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Pip   /pɪp/   Listen
Pip

noun
1.
A disease of poultry.
2.
A minor nonspecific ailment.
3.
A small hard seed found in some fruits.
4.
A mark on a die or on a playing card (shape depending on the suit).  Synonym: spot.
5.
A radar echo displayed so as to show the position of a reflecting surface.  Synonyms: blip, radar target.



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"Pip" Quotes from Famous Books



... consumption, warts, heart-disease, softening of the brain, and the bloody pip! And what ...
— The Clarion • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... that's keeping the others back. He does it on purpose, firstly, and then, too, he can't finish plucking himself in the morning, poor lad. He wants ten hours for his flea-hunt, he's so finicking; and if he can't get 'em, monsieur has the pip all day." ...
— Under Fire - The Story of a Squad • Henri Barbusse

... and second of these articles I retain for my own use. Of the third I send you half-a-dozen bottles by way of sample: a judicious imbibition of the contents will be found to be a sovereign remedy for the Pip and other kindred disorders that owe their origin to a melancholy frame of mind. The fourth article on my list I send you bodily. It has been lent to me by a friend of mine who states that he found it in his muniment chest ...
— The Argosy - Vol. 51, No. 3, March, 1891 • Various

... catching cold or getting fits, or cramp, or the pip—can you do this?" And as she spoke, Snowdrop waddled down the steepest part of ...
— Dick and His Cat and Other Tales • Various

... the old Inns and squares. Traddles lived in Gray's Inn: Traddles who was in love with "the dearest girl in the world"; Tom Pinch and his sister used to meet near the fountain in the Middle Temple; Sir John Chester had rooms in Paper Buildings; Pip lived in Garden Court at the time of the collapse of Great Expectations; Mortimer Lightwood and Eugene Wrayburn had their queer domestic partnership in the Temple. The scene of the murderous plot in "Hunted Down" is also laid in the Temple, "at the top of ...
— The Law and Lawyers of Pickwick - A Lecture • Frank Lockwood

... Crookshanks, Heaviside, Sidebottom, Ramsbottom, Winterbottom; or a long name, as Blanchenhagen or Blanchhausen; or a short name as Crib, Crisp, Crips, Tag, Trot, Tub, Phips, Padge, Papps, or Prig, or Wig, or Pip, or Trip; Trip had been ...
— History of English Humour, Vol. 2 (of 2) • Alfred Guy Kingan L'Estrange

... him, and keep him in countenance for talking common sense. To-day I saw a short interlude at White's of this nature, which I took notes of, and put together as well as I could in a public place. The persons of the drama are, Pip, the last gentleman that has been made so at cards; Trimmer, a person half undone at them, and is now between a cheat and a gentleman; Acorn, an honest Englishman, of good plain sense and meaning; and Mr. Friendly, a reasonable man of ...
— The Tatler, Volume 1, 1899 • George A. Aitken

... knowledge of them. Gioviano Pontano, the author of the great astrological work already mentioned above, enumerates with pity in his 'Charon' a long string of Neapolitan superstitions—the grief of the women when a fowl or goose caught the pip; the deep anxiety of the nobility if a hunting falcon did not come home, or if a horse sprained its foot; the magical formulae of the Apulian peasants, recited on three Saturday evenings, when mad dogs were at large. The animal kingdom, as in antiquity, was ...
— The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy • Jacob Burckhardt

... world 'as got me snouted jist a treat; Crool Forchin's dirty left 'as smote me soul; An' all them joys o' life I 'eld so sweet Is up the pole. Fer, as the poit sez, me 'eart 'as got The pip wiv ...
— The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke • C. J. Dennis

... le Systme de la Nature. C'est la ligne o finit la tristesse de la morne et sche vrit, au-del commence la gaiet du roman. Il n'y a rien de mieux que de se persuader que les ds sont pips: cette ide en enfante milles autres, et un nouveau monde se rgnre. Le M. Mirabaud est un vrai abb Terray de la mtaphysique. Il fait des rductions, des suspensions, et cause la banqueroute du savoir, du plaisir et de l'esprit ...
— Baron d'Holbach - A Study of Eighteenth Century Radicalism in France • Max Pearson Cushing

... offspring of a citron; and he said to himself, "Are you asleep or awake, Ciommetiello? Are your eyes bewitched, or are you blind? What fair white creature is this come forth from a yellow rind? What sweet fruit, from the sour juice of a citron? What lovely maiden sprung from a citron-pip?" ...
— Stories from Pentamerone • Giambattista Basile

... continued Colonel Gay bitterly, "I'm driven almost frantic by this conspiracy. Whenever a regiment arrives or leaves, whenever a train stirs—yes, by Heaven, every time a locomotive toots or a mule brays or a chicken has the pip—somebody informs the Johnnies, and every detail is known to ...
— Special Messenger • Robert W. Chambers

... smile in her smile; Twelve groomsmen supported the eminent groom To scowl in his scowl and to gloom in his gloom. The rites were performed by the hand and the lip Of his Grace the Diocesan, Billingham Pip, Assisted by three able-bodied divines. He prayed and they grunted, he read, they made signs. Such fashion, such beauty, such dressing, such grace Were ne'er before seen in that heavenly place! That night, full of gin, and all blazing ...
— Shapes of Clay • Ambrose Bierce

... said, soothingly; "play pretty and don't kick and scream. Burleson was going with us to see the old year out at the Cafe Gigolette, but he's got laryngitis or some similar species of pip—" ...
— The Common Law • Robert W. Chambers

... across the moor went the company speedily, for they feared a rescue. And as they went the stragglers joined them. Here a man got up feebly out of the ditch and rubbed his pate and fell in like a chicken with the pip going for its dinner. Yonder came hobbling a man with a lame ankle, or another with his shins torn by the briars or another with his jacket all muddy from the marsh. So in truth it was a tatterdemalion crew that limped ...
— Robin Hood • J. Walker McSpadden

... be my wife," he would entreat: "it is not knowing where I am that gives me the pip. If you consented, I should be as right as rain—your word is better to me than any Management's contract. I trust you—it is only myself that I doubt; every time you look at a man I wonder, 'Am I up to that chap's mark? is my turn as clever as his? isn't ...
— A Chair on The Boulevard • Leonard Merrick

... the common way. Poultry in general should be fed in coops, and kept very clean. Their common food is barley meal mixed with water: this should not be put in troughs, but laid upon a board, which should be washed clean every time fresh food is put upon it. The common complaint of fowls, called the pip, is chiefly occasioned by foul and heated water being given them. No water should be allowed, more than is mixed up with their food; but they should often be provided with some clean gravel in their coop.—The method of fattening poultry for the London market, is liable ...
— The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches, • Mary Eaton

... You are an extraordinary person, Matthew! You have mounted this misanthropic hobby of yours, and you ride it through thick and thin like a lunatic You are a man like any other, and yet, from the way you talk one would imagine that you had the pip, or a cold ...
— Ivanoff - A Play • Anton Checkov

... the pip move into his sightscreen. It settled less than a degree off dead center. He made the final corrections in course, set the air pressure control to eight pounds, ...
— Slingshot • Irving W. Lande

... Cetywall, The hony-suckle, the Harlocke, The Lilly and the Lady-smocke, to decke her summer hall. Thus as she wandred here and there, Ypicking of the bloomed Breere, she chanced to espie A shepheard sitting on a bancke, 40 Like Chanteclere he crowed crancke, and pip'd with merrie glee: He leard his sheepe as he him list, When he would whistle in his fist, to feede about him round: Whilst he full many a caroll sung, Vntill the fields and medowes rung, and that the woods did sound: In fauour this same shepheards swayne, ...
— Minor Poems of Michael Drayton • Michael Drayton

... honored guest were not perhaps as small as some other bantams, but that the colossal size of his shanghais was beyond parallel. Another may have hinted, for the purpose of superiorly praising his masterly treatment of the pip, that the diet of his hens was not such as to impart to their eggs the last exquisite flavor demanded by the pampered palate of the epicure. Another yet may have admitted that the honored guest had not successfully grappled ...
— Imaginary Interviews • W. D. Howells

... nightfall. In one niche was a dead sparrow my cousin Burwell had shot by mistake and thrown away. In a second was a frog on which a horse or cow had trod, crippling it so badly that Uncle Carter mercifully killed it with a blow of his stick. The poultry-yard and an epidemic of pip supplied me with two more silent tenants. A mouse-trap strangled a fifth, the gardener's mole-trap yielded up a sixth. Nos. 7 and 8 were land-terrapins ("tar'pens," in negro dialect), which I knew must be dead when I found them, although I could discern no sign ...
— When Grandmamma Was New - The Story of a Virginia Childhood • Marion Harland

... egg-shell after another burst open. "Pip! pip!" each cried, and in all the eggs there were little things that ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 2 • Charles Dudley Warner

... chewed a straw from the stable-yard; He owned a chestnut, The Dispatch, With one white sock and one white patch; And had bred a mare called Comic Cuts; He was a man with fearful guts. So too was Rother, the first whip, Nothing could give this man the pip; He rode The Mirror, a raking horse, A piebald full of points and force. All that was best in English life, All that appealed to man or wife, Sweet peas or standard bread or sales These two men ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 159, December 22, 1920 • Various

... the stolen property on him, or he on it, the high-handed private, (who, barring his propensity to ride in preference to walking, was a very clever sort of fellow, and rather popular with the Adjutant,) nabbed him as a hawk would a pip-chicken. ...
— The Humors of Falconbridge - A Collection of Humorous and Every Day Scenes • Jonathan F. Kelley

... names preserved memories of his books. To Rochester the Pickwickians had driven on their first search for knowledge; to Cobham Mr. Winkle had fled, and at the 'Leather Bottle' his friends had found him; in the marshlands Joe Gargery and Pip had watched for the escaped convict; in the old gateway by the cathedral Jasper had entertained Edwin Drood on the eve of his disappearance; along that very high-road over which Dickens's windows looked the child David Copperfield had tramped ...
— Victorian Worthies - Sixteen Biographies • George Henry Blore

... both her eyes, hard. Pip put her two fat little fists into her eyes, and listened. Tom laid his head down sideways on the table, and curled his arms round it. Bob declared that he wouldn't shut his eyes; he was going to see that the Professor ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, V. 5, April 1878 - Scribner's Illustrated • Various

... very careful of them. One was The Pilgrim's Progress, and I liked most of it exceedingly, especially the fight in the king's highway which Christian had with Apollyon. Another book was a story, very entertaining, by Charles Dickens, about little Pip and the convict who came back from Australia; I felt very sorry for Pip when he had to go out on the wet marshes so early, he being so little and ...
— Track's End • Hayden Carruth

... voice is changed; puling, and as if the throat were swelled, it corresponds with the cough; the cough is succeeded by a sonorous inspiration, not unlike the kink in hooping-cough—a crowing noise, not so shrill, but similar to the sound emitted by a chicken in the pip (which in some parts of Scotland is called the roup, hence probably the word croup); the breathing, hitherto inaudible and natural, now becomes audible, and a little slower than common, as if the breath were forced through a narrow tube; and this is more remarkable ...
— The Maternal Management of Children, in Health and Disease. • Thomas Bull, M.D.

... sure all you that take care not to die of the pip, be sure, I say, you take my advice, and stock yourselves with good store of such books as soon as you meet with them at the booksellers; and do not only shell those beans, but e'en swallow them down ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... just as solemnly and entirely contemplative of a lemon pip and a cheese paring, as an Italian of the Virgin in Glory. An English squire has pictures, purely contemplative, of his favorite horse—and a Parisian lady, pictures, purely contemplative, of the back and front ...
— Mornings in Florence • John Ruskin

... drink ten drops Of Holland's schnapps," Spoke out the King of Beasts. "That must taste fine," Said the Porcupine, "Did you see him smack his lip?" "I'd smack mine, too," Cried the Kangaroo, "If I didn't have the pip." ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume I. (of X.) • Various

... War is over and we've done the Belgians proud, I'm going to keep a chrysalis and read to it aloud; When the War is over and we've finished up the show, I'm going to plant a lemon-pip and ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 152, May 2, 1917 • Various

... There was a simple grandeur, a polite urbanity, a high-bred grace about her ladyship, which he had never witnessed in any woman. Her symptoms did not seem alarming; he had prescribed—Spir:Ammon:Aromat: with a little Spir:Menth:Pip: and orange-flower, which would be all ...
— The History of Pendennis, Vol. 2 - His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy • William Makepeace Thackeray

... the pomegranate, but of a darker colour, but the inside of the rind of a fine red. The fruit lies within the rind, commonly in four or five cloves, of a fine white, very soft and juicy, within each clove having a small black stone or pip. The pulp is very delicious, but the stone is very bitter, and is therefore thrown away, after sucking the fruit The rumbostan is about the size of a walnut after the green outside peel is off, and is nearly of the shape ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume X • Robert Kerr

... Harry, as if he feared his brother had suddenly become infected with some strange complaint—"rabies or the pip?" ...
— The Boy Aviators in Africa • Captain Wilbur Lawton



Words linked to "Pip" :   flight, blast, pick off, animal disease, injure, trounce, shell, marking, gun down, crush, wound, grass, mark, pip-squeak, worst, strike, ailment, rack up, mop up, beat out, playing card, kill, kneecap, ill, marker, pip out, hit, shoot, beat, whip, complaint, radar target, radar echo, seed, vanquish



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