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Heel   /hil/   Listen
Heel

verb
(past & past part. heeled; pres. part. heeling)
1.
Tilt to one side.  Synonym: list.  "The wind made the vessel heel" , "The ship listed to starboard"
2.
Follow at the heels of a person.
3.
Perform with the heels.
4.
Strike with the heel of the club.
5.
Put a new heel on.  Synonym: reheel.



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"Heel" Quotes from Famous Books



... be so good as to remember what a hang-nail is like? or a grain of dust in your eye? or a blister on your heel? or a corn on your toe? and then reflect what the word "torture" implies, when it meant all that the most devilish cruelty could invent. Savonarola! good gracious me! I would have canted and recanted, and called black white, and white black, and confessed, and denied! Please don't think ...
— Records of Later Life • Frances Anne Kemble

... to him) that everything, as it came out, proved how true he had been to Italy—that, in fact, he had 'rather acted as an Italian than as a Frenchman.' And Mr. Russell, while liberal, is himself very English, and free from Buonaparte tendencies from hair to heel. ...
— The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Volume II • Elizabeth Barrett Browning

... their painful bites. Those who have been bitten confirmed this fact, and the judge Enciso who had been expelled, when asked by me concerning the danger of such bites, told me that one night, when he slept uncovered because of the heat, he had been bitten by one of these animals on the heel, but that the wound had not been more dangerous than one made by any other non-poisonous creature. Other people claim that the bite is mortal, but may be cured by being washed immediately with sea-water; Enciso also spoke of the efficacy of this remedy. Cauterisation is also used, as it ...
— De Orbe Novo, Volume 1 (of 2) - The Eight Decades of Peter Martyr D'Anghera • Trans. by Francis Augustus MacNutt

... me rise, and, Patrick, here, take away the candle.—At night. We are now here in high frost and snow, the largest fire can hardly keep us warm. It is very ugly walking, a baker's boy broke his thigh yesterday. I walk slow, make short steps, and never tread on my heel. It is a good proverb ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... a frontier town—a little drearier, a little shabbier and more down at the heel than when we saw it first. There have been few changes—the few that have occurred having arrived unheralded and hence have remained undiscovered. For instance, it is not generally known that Mrs. Pennycook has lost control of her husband. Yet, such is the fact. ...
— The Long Chance • Peter B. Kyne

... his heel and walked away. There was so much passion and hatred in the words that even the lightest-hearted amongst the boys were ...
— The Hero of Garside School • J. Harwood Panting

... with a vengeance. Sovereignty was a rattle for the States to amuse themselves with, until the royal infants, French and Spanish, should be grown old enough to take the sovereignty for good. Truly this was indeed keeping the republic under the king's heel to be crushed at his pleasure, as Aerssens, with just ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... stitches of coloured wool on a separate pin: 1 plain row, and 1 row of holes for ribbon to go through, 1 plain row, and then join it to the back part of the stocking, knit 2 seamed rows, 2 plain, 3 rows of bars, and 2 seamed rows. Divide for the heel 12 stitches on the middle pin, and 10 on each side, which you bind down. Continue 3 plain rows on the middle part where there are 12 stitches, and 3 rows of bars; no plain rows at the end; take up each side of the heel 10 stitches, and seam ...
— Exercises in Knitting • Cornelia Mee

... an inch of leather in a "drive," or a stiff blade of grass in a putt, and the interest is wound up to a really breathless pitch. Happy he is who does not in his excitement "top" his ball into the neighbouring brook, or "heel" it and send it devious down to the depths of ocean. Happy is he who can "hole out the last hole in four" beneath the eyes of the ladies. Striding victorious into the hospitable club, where beer awaits him, ...
— Lost Leaders • Andrew Lang

... happy family. She's been trying to make me marry an old goat of a prince and I finally told her to go roll her hoop—to get a divorce and marry the foul old beast herself. And to consolidate two empires, he's been wanting me to marry a multi-billionaire—who is also a louse and a crumb and a heel. Last week he insisted on it and I blew up like an atomic bomb. I told him if I got married a thousand times I'd pick every one of my husbands myself, without the least bit of help from either him or her. I'd keep on finding oil and stuff for him, I said, ...
— Subspace Survivors • E. E. Smith

... epizootic, it not unfrequently appears about one time or within a brief period, on most or all of the horses in a stable. It essentially consists in a stoppage of the normal secretions of the skin, which is beneficially provided for maintaining a soft condition of the skin of the heel, and preventing chapping and excoriation; and it usually develops itself in redness, dryness, and scurfiness of the skin; but in bad or prolonged cases, it is accompanied with deep cracks, an ichorous discharge, ...
— Prairie Farmer, Vol. 56: No. 3, January 19, 1884. - A Weekly Journal for the Farm, Orchard and Fireside • Various

... Girls take their chance. And you'd Conceit enough of Jim, at one time—proud As a pipit that's hatched a cuckoo: and if the gowk Were half as handsome as I—you ken, yourself, You needed no coaxing: I wasted little breath Whistling to heel: you came at ...
— Krindlesyke • Wilfrid Wilson Gibson

... thou seest me in this place, when I call upon thee, deliver me!' The Sultana, meanwhile, had commanded her handmaidens to let down Irene's tresses, and as she stood before her there covered by her own hair from head to heel, she bade them paint her face red because it was so pale, and her eyelashes brown. She commanded them also to salve her hair with fragrant unguents, and to hang chains of real pearls about her arms and neck. Irene knew not the meaning of these things. She ...
— Halil the Pedlar - A Tale of Old Stambul • Mr Jkai

... chimneys are shoe-straps, and the steps are the heel, and all those additions make the ...
— Mother Goose in Prose • L. Frank Baum

... both mean and sly, Soon after chanced this dove to spy; And, being arm'd with bow and arrow, The hungry codger doubted not The bird of Venus, in his pot, Would make a soup before the morrow. Just as his deadly bow he drew, Our ant just bit his heel. Roused by the villain's squeal, The dove took timely hint, and flew Far from the rascal's coop;— And with her flew ...
— The Fables of La Fontaine - A New Edition, With Notes • Jean de La Fontaine

... she had not the strength to speak, and he asked her again: "You will not?" "I cannot, master," she said, with a sigh, and he turned on his heel. ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume II (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... family physician, near which it happened. He was absent, and a doctor from Shelby county was called. He had a carpenter to make a box, reaching from my foot to my knee, and in this he put my leg. The box was straight on the bottom, and as the break was just in the hollow between the calf and the heel, anybody that had any sense should have known that the broken part would settle down level with the rest, and a bad job be the result. It was badly set, and gave me much ...
— Autobiography of Frank G. Allen, Minister of the Gospel - and Selections from his Writings • Frank G. Allen

... tight to the top of the mast. Cut a number of short pieces of heavy twine, and lace the sail, at intervals of a foot, to the boom and mast. Fasten a becket or loop of rope at a suitable position on the mast, to set the heel of the sprit into. Rig main-sheet over two sheaves, as shown; it brings less strain on the boom, and clears the skipper's head in tacking. Make a good, large wooden ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, January 1878, No. 3 • Various

... Southern-sympathizer though I was—that a man of such rare natural talent, such character and energy, should have his large nature dwarfed, be tethered for life to a cotton-stalk, and made to wear his soul out in a tread-mill, merely because his skin had a darker tinge and his shoe a longer heel than mine. ...
— Among the Pines - or, South in Secession Time • James R. Gilmore

... line running from the Mount of Cinderella to the heel is the clothes line and denotes love of dress. This line crossing it is the fish line and shows you are incapable of telling ...
— Ptomaine Street • Carolyn Wells

... yesterday one of my ancient race, Filled, with his Christian colleagues' heartiest will, The civic throne; and at this very hour A protest from all classes in the land From low and high, from peasant and from peer, Goes forth to plead with the despotic power That 'neath brute persecution's iron heel Would trample out my brethren's life. So, there, Which way I look I meet a greeting hand. So, not repeating here the vengeful plot Of the old Shylock of the play; without My pound of flesh or pound of ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 99., November 29, 1890 • Various

... and jolted the other under the chin with the heel of his left hand. The man arched backward, but Phillips caught a knee in the chest that sent him slithering across the deck. As he strove to twist to his hands and knees, he saw Brecken groping for ...
— This World Must Die! • Horace Brown Fyfe

... any fonder of being made to look like a fool than most men are," the farmer said, "but I'm fair." He turned on his heel and started to walk away. Over ...
— The Boy with the U. S. Weather Men • Francis William Rolt-Wheeler

... the cable, not being able to get the anchor in this sea, and then stepped the yard in the mast's place, and hoisted the peak of the sail corner-wise as best we might; and that was enough to heel us almost gunwale under as the cable was slipped and the ship headed about up the river mouth. We shipped one or two more heavy seas as she paid off before the wind, but we were on the watch for them, and no ...
— Havelok The Dane - A Legend of Old Grimsby and Lincoln • Charles Whistler

... now. At the last moment he side-stepped and his hand flashed down. It was a judo chop, the hand held stiff, the blow delivered with the side opposite the thumb. It was effective. The man dropped to the floor, shaking his head. Rick used the savate, the blow delivered with the heel. It landed against the side of the man's ...
— The Electronic Mind Reader • John Blaine

... dark of the great dyke stepped a figure cloaked from head to heel, and while Winsome wavered, tingling now with shame and fear, in an instant she was enclosed within two very strong arms, that received her as in a snare a bird ...
— The Lilac Sunbonnet • S.R. Crockett

... important trial concerning a certain vessel the defence was set up that this vessel had changed her character by so altering her "boltsprit" that it became fixed and could not be run inboard. It was found that all which her owners had done was to pass an iron bolt through the bits and heel of the bowsprit, clenching it. The defendant insisted that thus he had rendered it a complete standing "boltsprit," and not a running one: and that, therefore, by such alteration, his vessel became transformed from a cutter to a sloop. And, according to the definitions ...
— King's Cutters and Smugglers 1700-1855 • E. Keble Chatterton

... low, clear voice, begs their pardon if she has behaved ill. The students—all of us—wept like children; the surgeon wrapped her up carefully, and, resting on James and me, Ailie went to her room, and Rab followed. We put her to bed. James took off his heavy shoes, crammed with tackets, heel-capped and toe-capped, and put them carefully under the table, saying: "Maister John, I'm for nane o' yer strynge nurse bodies for Ailie. I'll be her nurse, and I'll gang aboot on my stockin' soles as canny as pussy." ...
— The Great English Short-Story Writers, Vol. 1 • Various

... in her wayward mood. On the heel of one perverse imp another often treads. While I remained at Oxford, which was but a few days after this event, the retailing of my wrongs was my chief employment; and in a coffee-room, to which I resorted for this purpose, the following advertisement in a London ...
— The Adventures of Hugh Trevor • Thomas Holcroft

... Leif had retired for the night. If the chief had overheard the dispute with Thorhall! He lingered, meditating a question; but a second glance at Valbrand's battered face dissuaded him. He turned sharply on his heel, and strode across to the storehouse that had ...
— The Thrall of Leif the Lucky • Ottilie A. Liljencrantz

... glistening border a dry spot flashes around each footstep, but grows moist again as we lift our feet. In some spots the sand receives a complete impression of the sole, square toe and all; elsewhere it is of such marble firmness that we must stamp heavily to leave a print even of the iron-shod heel. Along the whole of this extensive beach gambols the surf-wave. Now it makes a feint of dashing onward in a fury, yet dies away with a meek murmur and does but kiss the strand; now, after many such abortive efforts, ...
— Twice Told Tales • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... roll on, The generations pass, the ages grow, And bring us nearer to the final day When from the south shall march the fiery band And cross the bridge of heaven, with Lok for guide, And Fenris at his heel with broken chain; While from the east the giant Rymer steers His ship, and the great serpent makes to land; And all are marshall'd in one flaming square Against the Gods, upon the ...
— Myths of the Norsemen - From the Eddas and Sagas • H. A. Guerber

... Governor Keith. "I don't know such a person," says he; but, opening the letter, "O! this is from Riddlesden. I have lately found him to be a compleat rascal, and I will have nothing to do with him, nor receive any letters from him." So, putting the letter into my hand, he turn'd on his heel and left me to serve some customer. I was surprized to find these were not the governor's letters; and, after recollecting and comparing circumstances, I began to doubt his sincerity. I found my friend Denham, and opened ...
— The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin • Benjamin Franklin

... turned lightly on her heel like a weather-cock turned by the wind, pretending to go and look after the household affairs. You can imagine that D'Armagnac was greatly embarrassed with the head of poor Savoisy, and that for ...
— Droll Stories, Complete - Collected From The Abbeys Of Touraine • Honore de Balzac

... later, just one short score, the hills of Jena looked down upon the crushing, disgraceful defeat of this same Prussian army. The country was dismembered, and as a political force ceased to exist. The heel of the Corsican despot was on its neck. Even after the restoration of Prussia by the Vienna Congress in 1815, it required another half-century to give her back her lost prestige. Sadowa and Sedan reinstated Prussia, ...
— A Little Garrison - A Realistic Novel of German Army Life of To-day • Fritz von der Kyrburg

... the screw-together. He screws on the heel plate, the guard that protects the trigger, puts in the trigger plate, lets in the pipes to hold the ramrod, puts on the nozzle cap, and all ...
— Rides on Railways • Samuel Sidney

... the mutual want of attachment between his person and his buttons. These small but necessary friends continually desert him; and his shoes appear to walk a few inches faster than his feet, leaving him in a chronic state of down-at-heel. Collars will not assimilate with his neck; whether they are tied with strings, or fastened with buttons, the result is the same, and Georgi's exterior when all or three parts of his buttons have deserted him, exhibits a looseness ...
— Cyprus, as I Saw it in 1879 • Sir Samuel W. Baker

... Popinot, bewildered; "let us rather talk of the end of all your troubles." Anselme turned on his heel towards the window, and drummed with his fingers on the panes as he gazed into the court. "Well," he said to himself, "even if she did love du Tillet, is that any reason why I should not behave ...
— Rise and Fall of Cesar Birotteau • Honore de Balzac

... valor. And he took hostages of all the provincial chiefs bordering on his kingdom, and among others he held in his power the sons of Dichu, lest any of them should raise the head to defend themselves, or the heel to offend him. For he, being rooted in the errors of idolatry, strenuously favored the magicians and the soothsayers; and his neck was stiff and his head was stubborn against the true religion. But when he understood that Dichu, with all his ...
— The Most Ancient Lives of Saint Patrick - Including the Life by Jocelin, Hitherto Unpublished in America, and His Extant Writings • Various

... catapult upon the Orange champion. A lively scramble followed, but the scene speedily resolved itself into its proper elements. The procession had passed, the car moved on its way, and the passengers through the rear door saw the simple lad grinding the ribbon in the dust with triumphant heel, while its late wearer flew toward the horizon pursued by an imaginary mob. Louis sat down and ...
— The Art of Disappearing • John Talbot Smith

... blanket and lay down. Dick lay at right angles to me, his feet nearly touching mine. He began snoring heavily almost immediately, and just when I was going to give him a kick, and tell him not to make such a row, I felt him give me a good sharp shove with the heel of his boot, by which I understood that he was awake, and meant to keep awake, as he did not ...
— The Recollections of Geoffrey Hamlyn • Henry Kingsley

... He no longer waited in the summer-house, but paced impatiently before the entrance to the labyrinth. Another five minutes. He was deceived, undoubtedly. She and her sisters were probably waiting for him and laughing at him on the lawn. He ground his heel into the clover, and threw his switch into the thicket. Yet he would give her one—only one ...
— Maruja • Bret Harte

... troublesome in our absence. The ives. Gibson's estimate of a straight heel. Christmas day, 1873. Attacked by natives. A wild caroo. Wild grapes from a sandal-wood tree. More earthquakes. The moon on the waters. Another journey northwards. Retreat to the depot. More rain at the depot. Jimmy's escape. A "canis familiaris". An innocent lamb. Sage-bush scrubs. ...
— Australia Twice Traversed, The Romance of Exploration • Ernest Giles

... a certain hot-tempered gentleman came to visit the Skratdjs. A tall, sandy, energetic young man, who carried his own bag from the railway. The bag had been crammed rather than packed, after the wont of bachelors; and you could see where the heel of a boot distended the leather, and where the ...
— Last Words - A Final Collection of Stories • Juliana Horatia Ewing

... commenced preaching away in grand style at some queer outlandish stuff, which fairly baffled my gumption. I must confess, however, both in fairness to Taffy and to James, that, as I had been up since five in the morning, (having pawned my word to send home Duncan Imrie, the heel-cutter's new duffle great-coat by breakfast time, as he had to go into the Edinburgh leather-market by eleven,) my een were gathering straws; and it was only at the fearsome parts that I could for half a moment keep them sundry. "Many men," however, "many minds," as the copy- line book says; ...
— The Life of Mansie Wauch - Tailor in Dalkeith, written by himself • David Macbeth Moir

... closed carriage, with Lushington sitting bolt upright beside her like a policeman in charge of his prisoner. It was not yet quite dark when the brougham stopped at the door of Margaret's hotel, and the porter who opened the carriage looked curiously at her riding boot and spurred heel as she got out under the covered way. She and Lushington had not exchanged a ...
— Fair Margaret - A Portrait • Francis Marion Crawford

... seemed to pass All over his handsome features. Then he kicked at a tuft o' grass, In a sort of a pet, then stammered, As he lifted his eyes from his shoes, "I'm sorry, my lad—very sorry, But to-morrow the mare must lose." He turned on his heel. I stood stroking My "Lady's" soft shining skin, Then I muttered, "I'm sorry, sir, very, But to-morrow the mare ...
— Successful Recitations • Various

... that the crown-sheet of the fire-box is bare, and that any moment it may give down and the end will come. Yet his gauntleted hand never falls from the throttle-bar to the air-cock, and his eyes never leave the bubble appearing and disappearing at longer intervals in the heel of the water-glass. ...
— The Grafters • Francis Lynde

... exchange, we want every year from six to ten millions of quarters;" and this latter answers, "We have more corn at home of our own growth than we can consume, I must have cash;" the American, preferring barter, will turn on his heel and trade with the Englishman; the unsuccessful applicant takes back his goods, or visits the market no more, and confines his future operations to the home supply of his own country, which in a short time, from competition and ...
— The Economist - Volume 1, No. 3 • Various

... found means to penetrate into the dungeon of the criminal, and offering him a cup of poison, implored him to save them from disgrace. The Count d'Horn turned away his head, and refused to take it. Montmorency pressed him once more, and losing all patience at his continued refusal, turned on his heel, and exclaiming, "Die, then, as thou wilt, mean-spirited wretch! thou art fit only to perish by the hands of the hangman!" left him ...
— Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions - Vol. I • Charles Mackay

... drama acted in other homes than the Tuileries, when men have found a woman's heart in their way to success, and trampled it down under an iron heel. Men like Napoleon must live out the law of their natures, I suppose,—on a ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 8, No. 50, December, 1861 • Various

... dark days individuals of our sex rose out of the general degradation and showed that they were fitted by nature for a higher position. But sin and ignorance kept the mass of them under the heel of their masters. As civilization advanced there came some mitigation of their lot, and where pure religion gained a foothold women began to receive recognition; but their state was deplorable indeed among all those peoples whose religion ...
— Daybreak: A Romance of an Old World • James Cowan

... more severe strain could have been put upon the apparatus. There would come a great gust of the tornado, and the ship would begin to heel over. But the marvelous power of the gyroscope would force ...
— Dick Hamilton's Airship - or, A Young Millionaire in the Clouds • Howard R. Garis

... side, and contentedly puffed at his cigar until, at length, she turned upon him, and struck petulantly at the hand that had just removed it from his lips. The weed fell from his fingers to the ground, and Cora set her slippered heel upon it, as if it were an ...
— Madeline Payne, the Detective's Daughter • Lawrence L. Lynch

... ulna). A tarsus (tarsalia) equals the carpus.* Two of the proximal tarsalia may be noted: one working like a pulley under the tibia, is the astragalus (as.); one forming the bony support of the heel, is the calcaneum (ca.). There is a series of metatarsals, and then come four digits of three ...
— Text Book of Biology, Part 1: Vertebrata • H. G. Wells

... of life I cannot feel, The skin is dried and brown. Now look!" a bulb beneath my heel I crushed ...
— All That Matters • Edgar A. Guest

... long time he sat there, thinking, dreaming, smoking, till the last shred of tobacco was burned out in the heel of his briar; till the last ember had winked and died under the old ...
— The Air Trust • George Allan England

... made no reply, but sat down and drew off his heavy boots. The heel of the right one was worn down on the inside. It was, moreover, noticed that the prisoner wore no socks, and that his feet were ...
— Monsieur Lecoq • Emile Gaboriau

... several windows, and he lingered a moment wondering which might be Chatty's. Then with a stamp of his foot, and a laugh of utter self-ridicule, which astounded the passing cabmen (for in any circumstances he was not surely such a confounded sentimental ass as that), he turned on his heel and went straight home without lingering anywhere. It was hard upon him that he should be such a fool; that he should not be able to restrain himself from making idiotic advances, which he could never follow out, and for a mere ...
— A Country Gentleman and his Family • Mrs. (Margaret) Oliphant

... thirty-five points in a few days. Infringing companies sprang up like gourds in the night. And all went merrily with the promoters until the Overland Company was thrown out of court, as having no evidence, except "the refuse and dregs of former cases—the heel-taps found in the glasses at the end of ...
— The History of the Telephone • Herbert N. Casson

... that Edwin had ever heard Big James talk of his private politics. The fact was that Big James was no more anxious than Jos Curtenty and Osmond Orgreave to put himself under the iron heel of his ...
— Clayhanger • Arnold Bennett

... Weaver turned on his heel, and swung slowly to the saddle. His arm was paining him a great deal, but he gave no sign of it. He expected his men to game it out when they ran into bad luck, and he was stoic enough to set them an example without ...
— Mavericks • William MacLeod Raine

... dared to threaten you, and was actually going to throw you from the roof! Why did you not tell me, Dexie, and I would have horsewhipped him if it had cost me my life!" And he dug his heel into the gravel, as if he had ...
— Miss Dexie - A Romance of the Provinces • Stanford Eveleth

... virgin mother, that his reign will extend over all the earth, and that, by bruising the serpent's head, he will conquer Sin and Death. This promise fills Adam's heart with joy, because it partly explains the mysterious prophecy, but, when he inquires how the serpent can wound such a victor's heel, Michael rejoins that, in order to overcome Satan, the Messiah will incur the penalty of death, revealing how, after living hated and blasphemed, he will prove by his death and resurrection that Sin and Death have no lasting power over those who believe in his name. Full of joy at the promise ...
— The Book of the Epic • Helene A. Guerber

... brownish black, scarcely paler beneath; cheeks nearly black; underside of wings, and interfemoral membrane with lines of hairs; heel bone elongated, slender; ears moderate rounded; tragus oblong blunt; fore-arm bone, 1 10-12; shin bone, ...
— Journals Of Two Expeditions Of Discovery In North-West And Western Australia, Vol. 2 (of 2) • George Grey

... repeat around, knit once around, narrow every stitch, draw yarn through, and darn the end neatly and securely. It is an excellent plan to "run" the tip of a mitten on the wrong side, as you do the heel of a stocking, since it makes it wear longer, especially if intended for rough usage. The narrowing of a child's mitten may begin with every 4th stitch. Also, if the hand is long and slender, an additional row may be knitted between the ...
— Handbook of Wool Knitting and Crochet • Anonymous

... or three minutes to reason this out to himself, but at last he understood the drift of what his companion said. As the line through one toe and heel passed along the centre of the other, the foot must each time have been put down in a straight line, while if the footprints had been made by a person who turned out his toes they would never point ...
— In The Heart Of The Rockies • G. A. Henty

... for those two," said he, "that I forgot God and my mother. I still feel my friend's heel upon my forehead, and even to the bottom of my heart the shock of the stones thrown at me by ...
— In the Yule-Log Glow, Book II - Christmas Tales from 'Round the World • Various

... a fishing schooner the men ought to be over the side fishing, and she would be at anchor. Instead, feeling the long, steady heel to leeward and half-recover to windward, he knew she was flying ...
— The Harbor of Doubt • Frank Williams

... human life "one woe doth tread upon the other's heel!" How continually, while one of those small private tragedies that I have spoken of is being enacted within, the actors are called upon to meet some other tragedy from without, so that external energy counteracts inward emotion, and holy sympathy with another's sufferings stifles all personal ...
— Mistress and Maid • Dinah Craik (aka: Miss Mulock)

... Writing to a friend at Richmond he said: "Though I have been relieved from command in the Valley, and may never again be assigned to that important trust, yet I feel deeply when I see the patriotic people of that region under the heel of a hateful military despotism. There are all the hopes of those who have been with me from the commencement of the war in Virginia, who have repeatedly left their homes and families in the hands of the enemy, to brave the dangers of ...
— Stonewall Jackson And The American Civil War • G. F. R. Henderson

... you'd like to know who does it, would you? I can tell you, anyway, who is the biggest cattle duffer round here, if you'd like to know!" Gleeson touched one flank of his horse with his heel, and rode close up to Burridge with the gun in his right hand. "His name is Burridge, and that's yourself. Everybody knows you, you old Scotch hound. You have as many cattle on the run with your brand on them as your master has. There is not a bigger cattle thief than old Burridge within a hundred ...
— The Book of the Bush • George Dunderdale

... over. For a while others were afraid to go near the well. But, as Aunt Lindie reminded, "There are other ways. In the springtime the first dove you hear cooing to its mate, sit down, slip off your shoe, and there you will find in the heel a hair. It will be the color of ...
— Blue Ridge Country • Jean Thomas

... no reply, but she knew now that the piercing, beastly cry from the negro reaching for her was brought forth because the heel of her shoe had entered the socket of ...
— The Story of the Soil • Cyril G. Hopkins

... setting their feet just on this place, so as to tread the very spot, where the martyr wrought the miracle. The mark is longer than any mortal foot, as if caused by sliding along the stone, rather than sinking into it; and it might be supposed to have been made by a pointed shoe, being blunt at the heel, and decreasing towards the toe. The blood-stained version of the story is more consistent with the appearance of the mark than the imprint would be; for if the martyr's blood oozed out through his ...
— Passages From the English Notebooks, Complete • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... stand listening intently, without comment, to violent arguments for and against a project, turning toward each speaker the frank dark eyes that illumined his pale countenance. When it came to his decision he had a way of planting his right heel forward, and compressing his lips, which he then opened with a slight smack of determination, giving quiet utterance to his judgment. It was usually quite impossible to move him from a decision thus made, and those who misinterpreted ...
— The Story of Cooperstown • Ralph Birdsall

... forward and the artist scratched his ears, to be rewarded by a grateful tongue. Again a command from Heinrich brought the dog to heel, but the voice was not so gruff this time. Together ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, November, 1930 • Various

... no! I will not have it. All was in thorough good order. I was never so much as a cable's length behind, though the devil, some years ago, split my heel ...
— Mary Anerley • R. D. Blackmore

... his heel, with no obeisance such as a slave should make, and strode out of the room. Marius ...
— Nicanor - Teller of Tales - A Story of Roman Britain • C. Bryson Taylor

... human weaknesses as one of the suits of armour hanging in the Tower of London; and during my extended and rather intimate acquaintance with her, I have never discovered but one foible incident to the flesh, love of her morning nap! You have adroitly struck Achilles in the heel. Sound the timbrel and sing like Miriam over your victory; for it were better to propitiate one of the house of Palma, than to strangle Pharaoh. You should apply for a position in some foreign legation, where your talents can be fitly ...
— Infelice • Augusta Jane Evans Wilson

... skipper answered, and turning on his heel, he went to the poop. Thither Colin followed him and told him all the story of the whale. The captain, who was an old friend of Colin's father when they both lived in a lumbering town in northern Michigan, was greatly taken aback when he found how dangerous the boat-trip had been, but he ...
— The Boy With the U. S. Fisheries • Francis Rolt-Wheeler

... slowly concentrated her gaze on the other luminous figure. Though swathed from neck to heel in what Blanche told herself, with a peculiar feeling of horror, were old-fashioned grave-clothes, the second woman yet looked more real, more alive, than the other. Her face, if deadly pale, was less mask-like, ...
— From Out the Vasty Deep • Mrs. Belloc Lowndes

... of all. [Turns aside.] Now, had I Guido of Ravenna's head Under this heel, I'd grind it into dust! False villain, to betray his simple child! And thou, Paolo—not a whit behind— Helping his craft with inconsiderate love!— Lady Francesca, when my brother left, I charged him, as he loved me, to conceal Nothing from you that bore on me: and now That you have seen ...
— Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911: Francesca da Rimini • George Henry Boker

... till we came to this place: For when we Careen'd at the Marias, the Worm had not touch'd us; nor at Guam, for there we scrubb'd; nor after we came to the Island Mindanao; for at the S.E. end of the Island we heel'd and scrubb'd also. The Mindanaians are so sensible of their destructive Insects, that whenever they come from Sea, they immediately hale their Ship into a dry Dock, and burn her bottom, and there let her lye ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898—Volume 39 of 55 • Various

... The directions for deep breathing should be carefully followed in the deep breaths taken after each motion. After the deep breathing, drag your leg up slowly, very slowly, trying to have no effort except in the hip joint, allowing the knee to bend, and dragging the heel heavily along the floor, until it is up so far that the sole of the foot touches without effort on your part. Stop occasionally in the motion and let the weight come into the heel, then drag the foot with less effort than before,—so will ...
— Power Through Repose • Annie Payson Call

... have disappeared completely from the outside of the horse's leg, although upon removing the skin it is easy to find the long splints, which are the remnants of toes, which have not yet quite disappeared. His heel has been lifted in the air until it is eighteen inches off the ground, and he is standing like an expert dancer upon the tip of his toe. The body of the horse thus being lifted far off the ground, a new development becomes necessary. All through the growth of the creature the neck and head have been ...
— The Meaning of Evolution • Samuel Christian Schmucker

... been bothering some of the women visitors?" cried the soldier and, wheeling about on his heel, he hurried into the dungeon, which Alice had just decided to leave. He met her coming out, and by her agitated manner must have guessed that something ...
— The Moving Picture Girls Under the Palms - Or Lost in the Wilds of Florida • Laura Lee Hope

... not like to see the yacht heel over and take in a couple of hogsheads of water, for she is loaded so heavily with coal that she ...
— Four Young Explorers - Sight-Seeing in the Tropics • Oliver Optic

... hid over-much of their bare bodies; for either the silk slipped from the shoulder of her, or danced away from her flank; and she whose feet were shod, spared not to show knee and some deal of thigh; and she whose gown reached unsheared from neck to heel, wore it of a web so thin and fine that it hid but ...
— The Water of the Wondrous Isles • William Morris

... not a long one. Before Mo, whose weak point was his speed, had covered half the intervening distance, a kick of the convict's heavy boot-heel, steel-shod, had found its bone, and broken it, just above the ankle. The shock was irresistible, and the check on the knife-hand perforce flagged for an instant—long enough to leave it free. Another blow followed, a strange one that M'riar could not localise, ...
— When Ghost Meets Ghost • William Frend De Morgan

... is a great man!—one of the greatest in Rome, or for that matter in the world! And he means to be yet greater!" And with that he turned on his heel and left the ...
— The Master-Christian • Marie Corelli

... won my wish—not all of it. They say there is a weak spot in every man's armour; there is always an Achilles' heel. I am no exception. Well, the gods ordained that I, James Sefton, a man who thought himself made wholly of steel, should fall in love with a piece of pink-and-white girlhood. What a ridiculous bit ...
— Before the Dawn - A Story of the Fall of Richmond • Joseph Alexander Altsheler

... lighted a cigarette and then remembered that the flare of the match could probably be seen from the station. He cursed himself for his carelessness. Throwing the cigarette on the earth floor he ground it under his heel. When at last Dick Spearsman had disappeared up the road that led to Bidwell and he came out of the old factory and got again into Turner's Pike, he felt that he was in no shape to talk of business but nevertheless ...
— Poor White • Sherwood Anderson

... "swung round on her heel, and, thumping violently, was carried by the tide (dragging her anchor) some two or three miles, grounding finally upon the shoal of Gull Island. At flood tide sail was made on her as soon as she floated, and we succeeded in getting her back into the channel. As the vessel grounded at every ...
— The Romance of the Colorado River • Frederick S. Dellenbaugh

... things, for a chance, had been cast loose, That still could keep afloat the struggling tars, For yet they strove, although of no great use: There was no light in heaven but a few stars, The boats put off o'ercrowded with their crews; She gave a heel, and then a lurch to port, And, going ...
— Don Juan • Lord Byron

... answer; he looked glumly at the floor, and kicked the cement with his heel. "What would you have them do with the money when they get it," ...
— A Certain Rich Man • William Allen White

... at his old Indian friend and saw, to his astonishment, that White Buffalo was ill at ease, if not actually nervous. Had he been alone, it is likely that he would have turned on his heel and hurried away. ...
— On the Trail of Pontiac • Edward Stratemeyer

... Harris's soul never dulled to the delight of driving the ploughshare through the virgin sod. There was something almost sacred in the bringing of his will to bear upon soil which had come down to him through all the ages fresh from the hand of the Creator. The blackbirds that followed at his heel in long, respectful rows, solemnly seeking the trophies of their chase, might have been incarnations from the unrecorded ages that had known these broad fields for chase and slaughter, but never for growth and production. ...
— The Homesteaders - A Novel of the Canadian West • Robert J. C. Stead

... as I said, 60 The cock crew loud; as at that time of year The lusty bird takes every hour for dawn: Then Francis, muttering, like a man ill-used, 'There now—that's nothing!' drew a little back, And drove his heel into the smoulder'd log, 65 That sent a blast of sparkles up the flue: And so to bed; where yet in sleep I seem'd To sail with Arthur under looming shores, Point after point; till on to dawn, when dreams Begin to feel the truth and stir of day, 70 To me, methought, who ...
— Selections from Wordsworth and Tennyson • William Wordsworth and Alfred Lord Tennyson

... following hints will give an idea for the best footgear for the woods; let them be single soled, single backs and single fronts, except light, short foot-linings. Back of solid "country kip"; fronts of substantial French calf; heel one inch high, with steel nails; countered outside; straps narrow, of fine French calf put on "astraddle," and set down to the top of the back. The out-sole stout, Spanish oak and pegged rather than sewed, although either is good. They will weigh considerably ...
— Woodcraft • George W. Sears

... to reply to a taunt of Colonel Benton's, that he wanted to be President, the force of his speaking became painful. He made protestations which it seemed to strangers had better have been spared, 'that he would not turn on his heel to be President,' and that 'he had given up all for his own brave, magnanimous little State of South Carolina.' While thus protesting, his eyes flashed, his brow seemed charged with thunder, his voice became almost a bark, and his sentences were abrupt, ...
— Famous Americans of Recent Times • James Parton

... well founded. Canute's face was crimson with suppressed laughter; he was biting his lips frantically to hold back his mirth. The temper of the son of Lodbrok left him in one inarticulate snarl. Turning on his heel, with a whirlwind of flying cloak and a thunder of clashing weapons, he would have stalked away if the King had not made him the most peremptory ...
— The Ward of King Canute • Ottilie A. Liljencrantz

... master of Niss'rosh, the eagle's nest, was peering as the curtain rises on our story. He was half reclining in a big, Chinese bamboo chair, with an attitude of utter and disheartening boredom. His crossed legs were stretched out, one heel digging into the soft pile of the Tabreez rug. Muscular arms folded in an idleness that irked them with aching weariness, he ...
— The Flying Legion • George Allan England

... the North, bloody strikes from east to west, deep-seated unrest among the nation's laboring masses, and the steadily increasing cry of a multitude of suffering and helpless people writhing under the heel of the great iniquity? Couple the signs of the times, father, with an indisputable knowledge of corruption in politics, the inefficacy of the law because of the absolute power of rum and 'boodle' and the utter absence of any ...
— The Daughter of a Republican • Bernie Babcock

... his Majesty, who turned on his heel, and betook himself to his counting-house again. But he was not half-way towards it, when the voice ...
— Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know • Various

... forward to one of the drugged guards. In an impotent fury he shook the man, trying to waken him from his sleep; then, raging at his failure, he flung the helpless body against the wall and turned on his heel. ...
— Steve Yeager • William MacLeod Raine

... and easel against the corner of his house, knocked out his pipe on the heel of his boot and cautiously peered around the jamb of the door to find his unwelcome guest sitting on the edge of the bed smoking a cigarette. He straightened sheepishly, not knowing whether to grin or to scowl. Neither of them spoke for ...
— Madcap • George Gibbs

... clothes they can muster; and so they get along until they have become used to the sound. 'Tis just the same with horses. Those which are unused to these noises are so alarmed by them that they break away from their halters and heel-ropes, and many a man has lost his beasts in this way. So those who would avoid losing their horses take care to tie all four legs and peg the ropes down strongly, and to wrap the heads and eyes and ears of the animals closely, ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo, Volume 2 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... closely articulated program, almost as helpless as a package in a pneumatic tube—night expresses, racing military motors, snapshots at this and that, down a bewildering vista of long gray capes, heel clickings, stiff bows from the waist, and punctilious military salutes. You are under fire one minute, the next shooting through some captured palace or barracks or museum of antiques. At noon the guard is turned out in honor, at four you are watching distant shell fire from the Belgian dunes; ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume I (of 8) - Introductions; Special Articles; Causes of War; Diplomatic and State Papers • Various

... end of each year he would be rather worse off than before, descending a step annually. He must nibble like a frost-driven mouse to merely exist. So poor was the soil, that the clay came to the surface, and in wet weather a slip of the foot exposed it—the heel cut through the veneer of turf into the cold, dead, moist clay. Nothing grew but rushes. Every time a horse moved over the marshy land his hoof left deep holes which never again filled up, but remained the year ...
— The Life of the Fields • Richard Jefferies



Words linked to "Heel" :   boot, wedge, perisher, tip, tendon of Achilles, restore, golf, end, undersurface, pes, portion, dance, human foot, lean, spike, shoe, foot, terminal, travel along, bushel, fix, slant, furbish up, mend, doctor, terpsichore, tilt, villain, golf game, follow, lift, underside, loaf of bread, skeletal structure, trip the light fantastic toe, hit, touch on, loaf, clubhead, club-head, repair, part, saltation, Achilles tendon, golf-club head, bottom, scoundrel, club head, trip the light fantastic, angle, dancing



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