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Foeman   Listen
Foeman

noun
(pl. foemen)
1.
An armed adversary (especially a member of an opposing military force).  Synonyms: enemy, foe, opposition.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Foeman" Quotes from Famous Books



... not your heart be troubled Nor fear your soul dismay, There is a wise Defender And He will be your stay. Where you have failed, He conquers, See, how the foeman flies! And all your tribulation Is turned to ...
— Heidi • Johanna Spyri

... Trusts to his feathers, shining golden-green, When the dark plumage with the crimson beak Has rustled shadowy from its splintered peak,— So trust thy friends, whose babbling tongues would charm The lifted sabre from thy foeman's arm, Thy torches ready for the answering peal From bellowing fort and ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... am not mistaken in you, sons of Dynevor. You have not willingly left your mountain eyry for these halls where the proud foeman holds his court and sits in judgment upon those who by rights are free as air. I have heard of you before, Llewelyn and Howel ap Res Vychan. You are not here, like your brethren, half won over to the cause of the foe; you would fight ...
— The Lord of Dynevor • Evelyn Everett-Green

... fair palaces, thy country's glory, Thy tuneful bards were banished or were slain, Some rest in glory on their deathbeds gory, And some have lived to feel a foeman's chain. ...
— The Purcell Papers - Volume I. (of III.) • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

... me thy sword, Julianus!" And her son Unsheathed the blade (that had not left his side Save when it sought a foeman's blood to shed), Awed by her regal ...
— Poems of Cheer • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... hand also, while the strange man still kept a hold of his short-sword; and presently, though he still struggled all he could, he saw the man draw back his hand to smite with the said sword; and at that nick of time the foeman's knee was on his breast, his left hand was doubled back behind him, and his right wrist was gripped hard in the stranger's left hand. Even therewith his ears, sharpened by the coming death, heard the sound of footsteps and fluttering raiment drawing ...
— The Roots of the Mountains • William Morris

... the enemy in his flight were some which excited a just indignation, and which indicated the shameless disregard of all the usages of honorable warfare. They were handcuffs, the fit appendage of a policeman, but not of a soldier who came to meet his foeman hilt to hilt. These were reported to have been found in large numbers; some of them were ...
— The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government • Jefferson Davis

... red-man chief scoured the broad prairies, a petty king in his tribe, a ruler of his wild domain. Bold, haughty, cautious, wily, unrelenting, revengeful, he led his impassioned warriors in the chase and to battle. Even to-day, the lurking Indian foeman is no mean adversary to be laughed and brushed out of the way, notwithstanding disease, war, assassination and necessary chastisement have united rapidly to decimate his race, thereby gradually lessening ...
— The Life and Adventures of Kit Carson, the Nestor of the Rocky Mountains, from Facts Narrated by Himself • De Witt C. Peters

... and Dick Elliott were face to face, and Chippy, who was very handy with his fists found, for the first time, a foeman to be reckoned with. They had a sharp rally; then they closed, and Dick, who was a capital wrestler, threw his man with ease. Down went Chippy, and saw ten thousand and one stars, for the back of his head was brought up hard against the flags of ...
— The Wolf Patrol - A Tale of Baden-Powell's Boy Scouts • John Finnemore

... speech is rhetorical: "Thou hast the sword Mimming, the work of Weland, that fails not them that wield it. Be of good courage, captain of Attila; never didst thou draw back to thy hold for all the strokes of the foeman; nay, my heart was afraid because of thy rashness. Thou shalt break the boast of Gunther; he came on without a cause, he refused the offered gifts; he shall return home empty-handed, if he return at all." That is ...
— Epic and Romance - Essays on Medieval Literature • W. P. Ker

... who is the foeman, and that is the proud man, the oppressor, who scorneth fellowship, and himself is a world to himself and needeth no helper nor helpeth any, but, heeding no law, layeth law on other men because he is rich; and surely every one that is rich is such an one, ...
— A Dream of John Ball, A King's Lesson • William Morris

... am the monarch of the Sea, The ruler of the Queen's Navee,— When at anchor here I ride, My bosom swells with pride, And I snap my fingers at a foeman's taunts. ...
— Aunt Jo's Scrap-Bag, Vol. 5 - Jimmy's Cruise in the Pinafore, Etc. • Louisa M. Alcott

... Kalbs-Braten. 'Does the hunter, when the wolf is in the pit, leap down to try conclusions with him. Fool! what care I for honour or thy boasted laws of chivalry? We of Wallachia are men of another mood. We smite our foeman where we find him, asleep or awake—at the wine-cup or in the battle—with the sword by his side, or arrayed in the silken garb of peace! Drag him from his steed, fellows! Let us see how lightly this adventurous English diver will leap the cataracts ...
— Blackwoods Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 366, April, 1846 • Various

... them, to plunderers, who stripped them bare. Their defeats were the result of His having thus ceased to regard them as His. But though He had 'sold' them, He had not done with them; for it was not only the foeman's hand that struck them, but God's 'hand was against them,' and its grip crushed them. His judgments were not occasional, but continuous, and went with them 'whithersoever they went out.' Everything ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... is, "A sail! a sail!" Brace high each nerve to dare the fight, And boldly steer to seek the foeman; One secret prayer to aid the right, And many a secret thought to woman Now spread the flutt'ring canvas wide, And dash the foaming sea aside; The cry's, "A ...
— The Red Rover • James Fenimore Cooper

... entitled to it, than that known as the battle of Mier. Though they there lost the day—a defeat due to the incapacity of an ill-chosen leader—they won glory eternal. Every man of them who fell had first killed his foeman—some half a score—while of those who survived there was not one so craven as to cry "Quarter!" The white flag went not up till they were overwhelmed and overpowered ...
— The Free Lances - A Romance of the Mexican Valley • Mayne Reid

... foeman kneels by his side, And raises his head to his knee— Oh, God! that brothers should part in youth, And thus ...
— Poems • Marietta Holley

... eyes of woman Will fill with the falling tear, Yet, facing old Death, our foeman, We shout our reviving cheer. Though high beat the hearts we cherish, The dead we most highly prize: Hurrah for the first to perish! Three cheers for the next ...
— Soldier Songs and Love Songs • A.H. Laidlaw

... of mail, reaching the body itself with his blade. The Cossack's shirt was dyed purple: but Schilo heeded it not. He brandished his brawny hand, heavy indeed was that mighty fist, and brought the pommel of his sword down unexpectedly upon his foeman's head. The brazen helmet flew into pieces and the Lyakh staggered and fell; but Schilo went on hacking and cutting gashes in the body of the stunned man. Kill not utterly thine enemy, Cossack: look back rather! The Cossack did not turn, and one of the dead man's ...
— Taras Bulba and Other Tales • Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol

... bovine, their outlook crude and raw. They abandon vital matters to be tickled with a straw, But the straw that they were tickled with—the chaff that they were fed with— They convert into a weaver's beam to break their foeman's head with. ...
— Songs from Books • Rudyard Kipling

... the Prussian kultur Now threatened her with death; She met the screaming vulture In simple, quiet faith, "I am an English woman, I love my country well, But must not hate a foeman," ...
— War Rhymes • Abner Cosens

... thousand miles we sailed, Till reached was Afric's strand; At Cape Town for some weeks we stayed, Not yet on foeman's land. ...
— A Yeoman's Letters - Third Edition • P. T. Ross

... came, his fierce lions aloft Told the instinct that burned in his cohorts of mail— But our eagles swooped down, and the battle-field oft, Was the grave of the foeman,—stern, ghastly and pale. The cloud of the strife rolled darkly away— And the carnage-fed wolves slunk back to their den— While Peace shone around like the god of the day, And shed her blest light on the children of men. Bright Star of ...
— Poems • Sam G. Goodrich

... plunges his hand into the pocket, where he deposited both letter and photograph—after holding the latter before the eyes of his dying foeman, and witnessing the fatal effect. With all his diabolical hardihood, he had been awed by this—so as to thrust the papers into his ...
— The Death Shot - A Story Retold • Mayne Reid

... feint and parry, seeking each to unmask his man and discover where he is weak and where strong. The unknowing ones and Gosse murmur, and cry on their man to let out. And he, irresolute a moment, yields, and standing drives at his foeman's head. Up goes the right of Basil the son of Richard, and behold while all cry "a parry!" in goes his left, quick as a flash, and grazes the ...
— Follow My leader - The Boys of Templeton • Talbot Baines Reed

... bugle, though loudly it blows; It calls but the warders that guard thy repose; Their bows would be bended, their blades would be red, Ere the step of a foeman draws near ...
— The Elson Readers, Book 5 • William H. Elson and Christine M. Keck

... doughty foeman, Scorns and blasphemes him strong. Tho' he again should smite her She would not slack her song. Nay, she would shriek and rally— 'Frisco would ten times rise! Not till her last tower crumbles, Not till ...
— General William Booth enters into Heaven and other Poems • Vachel Lindsay

... with me, saying, "Love is a tyrant, I trow." Indeed, ye were right, and the case has proved what ye said to be true. Alack! They've forgotten outright a passion-distraught one, whose faith Time 'minisheth not, though the fires in his entrails rage ever anew. If my foeman in love be my judge, to whom shall I make my complaint? To whom of injustice complain, to whom for redress shall I sue? Were it not for my needing of love and the ardour that burns in my breast, I had not ...
— The Book Of The Thousand Nights And One Night, Volume III • Anonymous

... faith which in Spain we revere, Thou scourge of each foeman who dares to draw near; Whom the Son of that God who the elements tames, Called child of the thunder, immortal ...
— The Bible in Spain • George Borrow

... them, they would surely have shot or stabbed me. And are not his Majesty's fellow-subjects shooting and stabbing one another at this instant moment[A] in the American plantations? No; I always fought fair, and never refused Quarter when mine enemy threw up his point; nor, unless a foeman's death were required for Lawful Reprisals, did I ever deny ...
— The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 1 of 3 • George Augustus Sala

... a ruddy flash! another! another! the muffled bang of fire-arms, and the vengeful yell and whoops of savage foeman float down to the breathless listeners at the station on the Chug. The Sioux are here in full force, and a score of them have swept down on that brave, hapless, helpless fellow riding through ...
— Starlight Ranch - and Other Stories of Army Life on the Frontier • Charles King

... lean hand resting on the table and watched. He knew that some reply was expected, but in face of that knowledge he chose to remain silent. It was a case of Greek meeting Greek. The inscrutable Provincial had met a foeman worthy of his steel at last. His strange magnetic influence threw itself vainly against a will as firm as his own, and he felt that his incidental effects, dramatic and conversational, fell flat. Instantly he became interested in ...
— The Slave Of The Lamp • Henry Seton Merriman

... from hour to hour, until the sun became so hot that it was enough to melt his brains, if he had possessed any. All that day he continued his journey without meeting with any adventure, which vexed him sorely, for he was eager to encounter some foeman worthy of his steel. Evening came on, and both he and his horse were ready to drop with hunger and fatigue, when, looking about him in search of some castle—or some hovel—where he might find shelter and refreshment, he saw not far from the roadside a small inn, and, setting ...
— Children's Literature - A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes • Charles Madison Curry

... hear the booming of Johnson's cannon, the rattle of Dieskan's guns, and that wild war-whoop, more terrible than all. Again old Monro watches from his fortress-walls the steadily approaching foe, and looks in vain for help, save to his own brave heart. I see the light of conquest shining in his foeman's eye, darkened by the shadow of the fate that waits his coming on a bleak Northern hill but, generous in the hour of victory, he shall not be less noble in defeat,—for to generous hearts all generous hearts are friendly, ...
— Gala-days • Gail Hamilton

... friend's face when a foeman you spy, For his hatred you'll turn into friendship thereby. Deal gentle words round you when threats are outpoured, For not against silk do we use the sharp sword. By means of caresses and promises fair, The elephant fierce you may ...
— Tord of Hafsborough - and Other Ballads • Anonymous

... I will follow on all the day Where the bonnie Prince has led, Till we drive the Winter foeman away And throne my Prince instead: And sing willaloo! With the birds, willaloo! For ...
— Ballads of Peace in War • Michael Earls

... struggle. A third time he approached in the same manner, when the Christian knight, desirous to terminate this illusory warfare, in which he might at length have been worn out by the activity of his foeman, suddenly seized the mace which hung at his saddle-bow, and, with a strong hand and unerring aim, hurled it against the head of the Emir, for such and not less his enemy appeared. The Saracen was just aware of the formidable missile in time to ...
— The Ontario Readers: Fourth Book • Various

... Since then we never spoke, Unless to utter reproach, And bandy bitter words; We meet as two hungry eagles meet, When a badger lies dead at their feet— Each would use a spear on his foe, Each an arrow would put to his bow, And bid its goal be his foeman's breast, But the warriors interpose, And delay the vengeance I owe. Thou hear'st my ...
— Traditions of the North American Indians, Vol. 3 (of 3) • James Athearn Jones

... wounded from their helplessness, And bearing life draughts to the sinking soul! O Mother Earth! thine arms will fondle her When ingrate man hath drain'd her spirit dry, Fashioned in weakness, yet in weakness strong Where honour were the foeman, what is she Before the onslaught of satanic serfs?— The mirror of her purity obscured, Polluted by lust's pestilential breath— Pluck'd like a flower to while an hour away, Then cast to wither on the barren ...
— Eidolon - The Course of a Soul and Other Poems • Walter R. Cassels

... the roofs went thundering down! Oh, the prayers, the prayers and curses, that together winged their flight From the maddened hearts of many, through that long and woful night!— Till the fires began to dwindle, and the shots grew faint and few, And we heard the foeman's challenge only in a far halloo: Till the silence once more settled o'er the gorges of the glen, Broken only by the Cona plunging through its naked den. Slowly from the mountain summit was the drifting veil withdrawn, And the ...
— The American Union Speaker • John D. Philbrick

... the blind anger faded from the eyes of Riley. By the weight of that first blow he knew that he had encountered a worthy foeman, and by the position of Cartwright he could tell that he had met a confident one. The big fellow was perfectly poised, with his weight well back on his right foot, his left foot feeling his way over the rough ground as he advanced, always ...
— The Rangeland Avenger • Max Brand

... and that little craft steamed boldly out from behind the "Minnesota," and sent two huge iron balls, weighing one hundred and seventy pounds each, against the side of the "Merrimac." The shot produced no effect beyond showing the men of the "Merrimac" that they had met a foeman worthy of their steel. The "Merrimac" slowed up her engines, as though to survey the strange antagonist thus braving her power. The "Monitor" soon came up, and a cautious fight began; each vessel sailing round the other, advancing, ...
— The Naval History of the United States - Volume 2 (of 2) • Willis J. Abbot

... entered the Cambridgeshire halls, 'Mid the squires, and the parsons, the farmers, and thralls! Said DUNCAN, the foeman, "My friends, on my word, Of a stranger proceeding I never have heard. I don't wish to be rude, but I can't understand What you mean by this singing, oh young ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 101, July 25, 1891 • Various

... crew of the Fairburn collier brig lying helpless on his back and at the mercy of a fellow who was showing him no favour, but was pounding away at the upturned face with one of his fists, whilst with the other hand he held a firm grip of his prostrate foeman. ...
— With Marlborough to Malplaquet • Herbert Strang and Richard Stead

... captain, laughing. "If any others wish to follow his example, let them go at once, for we may have warm work ere long. To my mind, though I am a plain man, a person should so live as not to fear the lightning's flash, nor the foeman's shot, nor the raging ocean either; and then, whether in tempest or battle, he will be able to do his duty like a man, knowing that there is One above who will look after him, and, if He thinks fit, carry him through ...
— A True Hero - A Story of the Days of William Penn • W.H.G. Kingston

... sped ship Gudruda, Left her lord in foeman's ring; Brighteyes back to back with Baresark Held his head 'gainst mighty odds. Down amidst the ballast tumbling, Ospakar's shield-carles were rolled. Holy peace at length they handselled, Eric must in bonds ...
— Eric Brighteyes • H. Rider Haggard

... who venture to justify these cowardly murders—these informations—these lettres de cachet—these seizures of papers—these confiscations of presses. The red flag floats for a week from the balcony of the Hotel-de-Ville, like as in times of old, the banners torn from the grasp of the dying foeman floated from the arched roof of our temples." In another part he says, "Marat's presses have been seized—the name of the author should have sufficed to protect the typographer. The press is sacred, as sacred as the cradle of the first-born, ...
— History of the Girondists, Volume I - Personal Memoirs of the Patriots of the French Revolution • Alphonse de Lamartine

... to perish, falling on the foeman's ground, When the ranks are rolled in vapor, and the ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3 - Sorrow and Consolation • Various

... never cursed, Nor spoke a foeman's word Against a man in Ireland nursed, Howe'er we thought he erred; So start not, Irish-born man, If you're to Ireland true, We heed not race, nor creed, nor clan, We've hearts and ...
— Thomas Davis, Selections from his Prose and Poetry • Thomas Davis

... longer now she spurned at mean revenge, Or stayed her hand for conquered foeman's moan; As when, the fates of aged Rome to change, By Caesar's side she crossed the Rubicon. Nor joyed she to bestow the spoils she won, As when the banded powers of Greece were tasked To war beneath the Youth of Macedon: No seemly veil her modern minion ...
— Some Poems by Sir Walter Scott • Sir Walter Scott

... grassy Upland's gentle Swells Echo to the Bleat of Flocks; (Those grassy Hills, those glitt'ring Dells Proudly ramparted with rocks) And Ocean 'mid his uproar wild Speaks safely to his Island-child. Hence for many a fearless age Has social Quiet lov'd thy shore; Nor ever sworded Foeman's rage Or sack'd thy towers, or stain'd thy fields with gore. Disclaim'd of Heaven! mad Av'rice at thy side, At coward distance, yet with kindling pride— Safe 'mid thy herds and corn-fields thou hast stood, And join'd the yell of Famine and of Blood. ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Vol. 5 • Edited by E. V. Lucas

... any emergency either of discretion or valor. Right often had the two stood side by side in the press of skirmish and the rush of battle,—for they had ever sought the locality of strife—and there had come to be little choice for the foeman between the accomplished axe-play of the master and the sweeping blows of the sturdy squire. And as among the veteran soldiery of the French-Italian borders no name stood higher than De Lacy, so also was no wearer of the silver spurs more respected than he who bore the banner ...
— Beatrix of Clare • John Reed Scott

... throw off the lethargy irresistibly stealing over him; to shake the leaden movements from his limbs. He vainly endeavored to penetrate the mist falling before his eyes and to overcome the dizziness that made his foeman seem like a figure in a dream. Was it through loss of blood, or weariness, or both?—but he was cognizant his thrusts had lost force, his plunges vitality, and that even an element of chance prevailed in his parries. But he uttered no sound. When ...
— The Strollers • Frederic S. Isham

... 80 Such now he marcheth to this man forlorne, And left to losse: his stalking steps are stayde Upon a snaggy Oke, which he had torne Out of his mothers bowelles, and it made His mortall mace, wherewith his foeman ...
— Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I • Edmund Spenser

... certain death below. It was soon evident that Om-at, younger and with greater powers of endurance than Es-sat, was gaining an advantage. Now was the chief almost wholly on the defensive. Holding him by the cross belt with one mighty hand Om-at was forcing his foeman straight out from the cliff, and with the other hand and one foot was rapidly breaking first one of Es-sat's holds and then another, alternating his efforts, or rather punctuating them, with vicious blows to the pit of his adversary's ...
— Tarzan the Terrible • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... revolver: two of the enemy's skirmishers dropped to the shots, and the third wavered in his saddle; the rest closed round the fallen man with leveled lances. The stout sergeant looked back no more; but he set his teeth hard, and turned out of his way to encounter a stray Russian, and laid the foeman's face open from eyebrow to lip, with an awful blasphemy. The spot where Royston fell was so near to the British lines that those who slaughtered him dared not stay for plunder. Half an hour later, Davis and two more volunteers ...
— Sword and Gown - A Novel • George A. Lawrence

... in grand appeal. The now national "Dixie" tells not of fields to be won. It is a dark presage of the battle morrow. Behind grim redan and salient, the footsore troops rest from the day's indecisive righting. The foeman is not idle; all night long, rumbling trains and busy movements tell that "Uncle Billy Sherman" never sleeps. His blue octopus crawls and feels its way unceasingly. The ragged gray ranks, whose guns are their only pride, whose motto is "Move by day; fight ...
— The Little Lady of Lagunitas • Richard Henry Savage

... of him, too!" 'Twas so, The half-relenting ANGUS, low Spake in his snowy beard. "Bold can he speak, and fairly ride: I warrant him a warrior tried." A foeman to be feared, A leader to be trusted, seemed This dark, cold chief, and few had dreamed Of such strange severance. And any not ignoble eye In sorrow more than mockery Aside will gladly glance. 'Tis pity ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 99., December 6, 1890 • Various

... One morning there came to Mr. Fassit a letter imploring him to return: "Come back, o come agin and bore us some more wels. We wil protec you like a son. We dont make war on Ile." And I, being thus respected, went and came from the Foeman's Land, and joined in the dreadful rebel-ry and returned unharmed, leading a charmed if not particularly charming life all winter and the spring, to the great amazement and bewilderment of many, as will appear in ...
— Memoirs • Charles Godfrey Leland

... wait on thee each morn! * Thine enviers' noses in the dust be set! Ne'er cease thy days to be as white as snow; * Thy foeman's days to be as black ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 4 • Richard F. Burton

... under Sabhal's twin peaks, upon us drave the horsemen, troop upon troop, and the foeman pressed us sore— They said to us, "Two things lie before you; now must ye choose the points of the spears couched at ye; or if ye will not, chains!" We answered them, "Yea this thing may fall to you after the fight, when men shall be left on ground, and none shall arise again; ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 2 • Charles Dudley Warner

... and had even insulted him, he could not help admiring his shrewdness and courage. He—Lecoq—had prepared himself for a strenuous struggle with this man, and he hoped to conquer in the end. Nevertheless in his secret soul he felt for his adversary, admiring that sympathy which a "foeman worthy of one's steel" ...
— Monsieur Lecoq • Emile Gaboriau

... Congress just at the close of the great Civil War. It was a period of excitement throughout the entire country, and of intense foreboding to the section he represented. In the debates of that stormy period he bore no mean part. He was counted a foeman worthy the steel of the ablest who entered the lists. A thorough student from the beginning, of all that pertained to Magna Charta, the Bill of Rights, and the Federal Constitution, he was equipped as few men have been, for forensic contests ...
— Something of Men I Have Known - With Some Papers of a General Nature, Political, Historical, and Retrospective • Adlai E. Stevenson

... before or since had the soil of England been trodden by a hostile foot. Never had a British peer been forced to feel that his own castle was not safe from the invader. Jones, with his handful of American tars, had accomplished a feat which had never before been accomplished, and which no later foeman of England has dared to repeat. It is little wonder that the British papers described ...
— The Naval History of the United States - Volume 1 (of 2) • Willis J. Abbot

... of the black knight smote full upon the linden shield of his foeman, the staggering weight of the mighty black charger hurtled upon the gray, who went down with his rider into the dust of the highway. The momentum of the black carried him fifty paces beyond the fallen horseman before his rider could rein ...
— The Outlaw of Torn • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... beginning her second cup of tea when the door opened and her father's foeman in the arena of Science came in. He was the very antithesis of Professor Marmion; a trifle below middle height, square-shouldered and strongly built, with thick, iron-grey hair, and somewhat heavy features which would have been almost commonplace but for the broad, ...
— The Mummy and Miss Nitocris - A Phantasy of the Fourth Dimension • George Griffith

... actful of unrehearsed effects; that's why I think twice before taking on old Shylock again. I admire him, Bunny, as a steely foeman. I look forward to another game with him on his own ground. But I must find out the pace of the wicket before I put ...
— Mr. Justice Raffles • E. W. Hornung

... gather, Foeman and friend in love and peace! Waves sleep together When the blasts that called them to battle, cease. For fangless Power grown tame and mild 5 Is at play with Freedom's fearless child— The dove ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... declared his willingness to bury himself in the obscurity of private life, if he were permitted to return unmolested to England. The appeal failed to extract a satisfactory reply. The Ministers would make no terms with their ruined foeman. Wilkes then resolved to show that he was not so helpless as his enemies appeared to think him. He published in 1767, in London, a pamphlet, in which he stated his case with indignation, but not without dignity. When the pamphlet had obtained a wide circulation, ...
— A History of the Four Georges and of William IV, Volume III (of 4) • Justin McCarthy and Justin Huntly McCarthy

... in despair). Mother! sweet mother, Far in the Eastland, Soon must thy daughter Pass from earth's day! Ne'er shall a boy-babe Suck from her bosom Valor to strangle Wolves in the lair! Never shall husband From the red war-fields Bring her the foeman's spoils! ...
— Nirvana Days • Cale Young Rice

... of themselves. There is one grand thing even about the devilry of war—the transcendent self-abnegation with which, however poor and unworthy may be the cause, a man casts himself away, 'what time the foeman's line is broke.' The poorest, vulgarest, most animal natures rise for a moment into something like nobility, as the surge of the strong emotion lifts them to that height of heroism. Life is then most glorious when it is given ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... was drowned in a noise like that of a swearing cat, which emanated from the sack. Instantly that formidable sheep was upon its feet and had taken in the military situation at a glance. In a few moments it had approached, stamping, to within fifty yards of the swinging foeman, who, now retreating and anon advancing, seemed to invite the fray. Suddenly I saw the beast's head drop earthward as if depressed by the weight of its enormous horns; then a dim, white, wavy streak of ...
— The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, Volume 8 - Epigrams, On With the Dance, Negligible Tales • Ambrose Bierce

... quarter started the play was fast and furious. The teams had sized each other up and got a line on their respective line of play. Each side realized that the battle was for blood, and that it had in the other a worthy foeman. There would be no ...
— Bert Wilson on the Gridiron • J. W. Duffield

... thowt's o' war, He long'd for battles clatter. He grieved to think noa foeman dar To cross a sup o' watter; He owned one spot,—an' nobbut one, Within his heart wor tender, An' as his darlin had it fun, He'd be ...
— Yorkshire Ditties, Second Series - To which is added The Cream of Wit and Humour - from his Popular Writings • John Hartley

... the organ moan her sorrow to the roof — I have told the naked stars the Grief of Man! Let the trumpets snare the foeman to the proof — I have known Defeat, and mocked it as we ran! My bray ye may not alter nor mistake When I stand to jeer the fatted Soul of Things, But the Song of Lost Endeavour that I make, Is it ...
— Verses 1889-1896 • Rudyard Kipling

... Halfdan! of mingled blood, Lives near indeed, though distant be his abode; But to thy foeman's dwelling the way is weary,— Though standing by thy ...
— Fridthjof's Saga • Esaias Tegner

... the Gaul, like some awkward Polyphemus, rushed upon him, flinging at him barbarous curses in his own tongue, and snorting and raging like a bull. Thrice the Greek sprang back before the monster; thrice the giant swung his mighty sword to cleave his foeman down, and cut the empty air; but at the fourth onset the Hellene smote the ex-lanista once across the neck, and the great eyes rolled, and the panting stopped, and the mighty Gaul lay silent in a ...
— A Friend of Caesar - A Tale of the Fall of the Roman Republic. Time, 50-47 B.C. • William Stearns Davis

... hath rescued thee from this wicked uncle, who sent thee to a place whence none ever came off safe and sound, purposing not in this but thy destruction; and indeed thou fellest upon death from which Allah delivered thee. How, then, wilt thou return and cast thyself again into thine foeman's hand? By Allah, save thyself and return not to him this second time. Haply thou shalt abide upon the face of the earth till it please Almighty Allah to receive thee; but, an thou fall again into his hand, he will not suffer thee to live a single hour." The ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... cried John, "let the young cock crow; he means no more than that it's hard to be hungry and see your brother feed a foeman. Indeed I could be wishing myself that his reverence was the Good Samaritan on ...
— John Splendid - The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn • Neil Munro

... Baker, now a Senator from Oregon, left the halls of Congress for a Union command. At the head of the California volunteer regiment he charged the enemy at Ball's Bluff and fell, his body pierced by half a dozen bullets. Curiously different was the record of Broderick's old foeman, William Gwin. In October, 1861, he started East via the Isthmus of Panama, accompanied by Calhoun Benham, one of Terry's seconds in the fateful duel. On the same steamer was General Sumner, relieved of his ...
— Port O' Gold • Louis John Stellman

... the engine, or the pilot. Failing to secure the position he most coveted, this daring German would surrender it with apparent unconcern to the enemy who usually fell into the trap. For just as the foeman's machine came up to the tail of Immelman's craft the latter would suddenly turn his nose straight to earth, drop like a stone, execute a backward loop, and come up behind his surprised adversary who thus found the ...
— Aircraft and Submarines - The Story of the Invention, Development, and Present-Day - Uses of War's Newest Weapons • Willis J. Abbot

... stood upon the castle wall, Oriana: She watch'd my crest among them all, Oriana: She saw me fight, she heard me call, When forth there stept a foeman tall, Oriana, Atween me and ...
— The Early Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Tennyson

... is growing darker; Ere one more day is flown, Bregenz, our foeman's stronghold, Bregenz ...
— The New McGuffey Fourth Reader • William H. McGuffey

... was again in the arena. A few "compliments" were jerked at the Kamfers Dam Laager; the Boers were made to feel that they had a foeman to deal with worthy of their lead. The success of the gun and the skill of him who made it were on every lip. The theme occasioned as much enthusiasm as could be expected from hearts saddened by disconsolation. And the man in the moon, too far distant to betray the ...
— The Siege of Kimberley • T. Phelan

... mail, wearing the hooded helmet that had often protected his head from the savage blows of his enemies, and clasping in his hand the handle of his great knife, Hrunting, whose hardened blade had carried death to many a strong foeman, Beowulf fronted ...
— Journeys Through Bookland V3 • Charles H. Sylvester

... although not all the truth. I said that I met Titus, and fought with him; that I wounded him somewhat; but that, by virtue of his armor, I did him no great harm, while he wounded me so seriously that I fell down as one dead; that he, feeling that I had fought like a brave foeman, had me carried to his tent, and tended and cared for until I was able to go forth; when he sent me ...
— For the Temple - A Tale of the Fall of Jerusalem • G. A. Henty

... welcome to her guest she made, And every courteous rite was paid, That hospitality could claim, Though all unasked his birth and name. 585 Such then the reverence to a guest, That fellest foe might join the feast, And from his deadliest foeman's door Unquestioned turn, the banquet o'er. At length his rank the stranger names, 590 "The Knight of Snowdoun, James Fitz-James; Lord of a barren heritage, Which his brave sires, from age to age, By their good swords had held with toil; His sire had fallen in such ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... prayer of Ajax was for light; Through all that dark and desperate fight, The blackness of that noonday night, He asked but the return of sight, To see his foeman's face. ...
— The World As I Have Found It - Sequel to Incidents in the Life of a Blind Girl • Mary L. Day Arms

... east to west, through both countries whose flags were raised over the field of battle, homes not to be numbered mourned in soul-wrecking grief, for husband, father, son or brother who sank beneath the foeman's steel or yielded life within the fever tent, or who, surviving shot and malady, carries back to his loved ones a maimed or weakened body. ...
— The Story of the Philippines and Our New Possessions, • Murat Halstead

... guard them, though the foeman stood Like sand-grains on our shore, And raise our angry battle-flood, And ...
— The Yankee Tea-party - Or, Boston in 1773 • Henry C. Watson

... man. No champion of a hundred shows, The prey of every draught that blows, Art thou; in fact thy charms present The earmarks of a mixed descent. And, though too proud to start a fight With every cur that looms in sight, None ever saw thee quail beneath A foeman worthy of thy teeth. Thou art, in brief, a model hound, Not so much beautiful as sound In heart and limb; not always strong When nose and eyes impel to wrong, Nor always doing just as bid, But sterling as the minted quid. ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Volume 152, Feb. 7, 1917 • Various

... grim, and shook the boundless earth, And sea, and ocean, and the heavens, when reeled The knees of Atlas neath the rush of Zeus. So crumbled down beneath Aeneas' bolts The Argive squadrons. All along the wall Wroth with the foeman rushed he: from his hands Whatso he lighted on in onslaught-haste Hurled he; for many a battle-staying bolt Lay on the walls of those staunch Dardan men. With such Aeneas stormed in giant might, With such drave back the thronging foes. All round The Trojans played the men. ...
— The Fall of Troy • Smyrnaeus Quintus

... lids may fall. Then on like birds, by their own speed upborne, They swept toward the plains of waving corn That lie beside Asopus' banks, and bring To Thebes the rich fruit of her harvesting. On Hysiae and Erythrae that lie nursed Amid Kithaeron's bowering rocks, they burst Destroying, as a foeman's army comes. They caught up little children from their homes, High on their shoulders, babes unheld, that swayed And laughed and fell not; all a wreck they made; Yea, bronze and iron did shatter, and in play Struck hither ...
— Hippolytus/The Bacchae • Euripides

... tale of the Blankshires bold, the famous charge they made; This is the tale of the deeds they did whose glory never will fade; They only numbered X hundred men and the German were thousands (Y), Yet on the battlefield of Z they made the foeman fly. ...
— Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, November 25, 1914 • Various

... On my soul, you have both the true ring. But as to your offer I must decline it. The thing is one of your wild impracticable Highland imaginings, a sheer impossibility. You seem to think I have a blood feud and that nothing less than a foeman's life will satisfy me. In that you err. I am a plain man of the world and cannot ...
— A Daughter of Raasay - A Tale of the '45 • William MacLeod Raine

... one with eyes that look below The battle-smoke to glimpse the foeman's charge, We through the dust of downward years may scan The onslaught that awaits this idiot world Where blood pays blood for nothing, and where life Pays life to madness, till at last the ports Of gilded helplessness be battered through By the still crash ...
— The Children of the Night • Edwin Arlington Robinson

... we will follow him to the death, Where the foeman's fiercest columns are! O, we will use our latest breath, Cheering for every sacred star! His to marshal us high and far; Ours to battle, as patriots can When a Hero leads the Holy War!— Abraham Lincoln, give ...
— The Every-day Life of Abraham Lincoln • Francis Fisher Browne

... minstrel fell, but the foeman's chain Could not bring that proud soul under! The harp he loved ne'er spoke again, For he ...
— Ladies-In-Waiting • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... to live as a freeman should — they were happier men than we, In the glorious days of wine and blood, when Liberty crossed the sea; 'Twas a comrade true or a foeman then, and a trusty sword well tried — They faced each other and fought like men in the days when the ...
— In the Days When the World Was Wide and Other Verses • Henry Lawson

... ye other gods, oh grant that this My child, like me, may grow the champion here As good in strength, and rule with might in Troy That men may say, "The boy is better far Than was his sire," when he returns from war, Bearing a gory harness, having slain A foeman, and his mothers heart rejoice. Thus saying, on the hands of his dear wife He laid the child; and she received him back In fragrant bosom, smiling through ...
— Hypatia - or, New Foes with an Old Face • Charles Kingsley

... came the habit of shaving. A beard offered too handy a grip to a foeman who had gotten to close quarters, therefore, warriors who had no true hardihood of soul preferred cutting off their beards to the honourable labour of defending their chins. Many ancient races effected a compromise in order to ...
— Here are Ladies • James Stephens

... Pleasure's beam; It may sparkle for a while, But 'tis transient as a dream, Faithless as a foeman's smile. ...
— Heart Utterances at Various Periods of a Chequered Life. • Eliza Paul Kirkbride Gurney

... marvellous they did not kill him outright. Doubtless they would have done so but for the face propped against the pillows, which caught their hungry eyes. Soldier and woman were alike forgotten at sight of this dying boy. Here was a foeman worthy their steel. They gathered about him, and with savage hands struck at him and the bed upon which ...
— What Answer? • Anna E. Dickinson

... the battle is deadly and gory, Where foeman 'gainst foeman is pressed, Where the path is before me to glory, Is pleasure for me, and the best. Let me live in proud chivalry's story, Or die with my lance in ...
— Atlantic Monthly Vol. 6, No. 33, July, 1860 • Various

... beautiful plain, oh rich green Bedawin pasture. We had left you, too often stained, with the blood of violent battle; Ah, dark disastrous day, when brother abandoned his brother, Though riding the fleetest of mares, and safe from pursuit of the foeman, He never once turned to inquire, though we tasted the cup of destruction. Oh fair and beautiful plain, we yesterday fought and regained thee! I praise and honor His name, who only the victory giveth! O, Feisal, we've meted to you your deserts in royal measure; With our spears ...
— The Women of the Arabs • Henry Harris Jessup

... adding, "Enter into this guarded stead and feel thou no fear from any foe, for thou hast wrought thy wish and hast attained thine aim and hast won thy will, O fair of face and o perfect of form, O thou whose countenance excelleth the new moon: here thou hast preserved thy life and art saved from foeman's strife." Thereupon she mounted the staircase and he behind her, while the slave-girls surrounded the twain, and she conversed with him and cheered him with fair words and welcomed him once more till they had entered the ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... England eyes her roses With pride she 'll ne'er forego, The rose has oft been trodden By foot of haughty foe; But the thistle in her bonnet blue, Still nods outow'r the fell, And dares the proudest foeman To tread the heather-bell. ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... five fought like a madman. His sword brake, and he took a great blow on his helmet that bore him down. Then the foeman thought to slay him outright; but Le Beau Disconus was minded suddenly of his axe that was at his hinder saddle-bow. He quitted himself like a true knight: three steeds he ...
— The Junior Classics, V4 • Willam Patten (Editor)

... Captain Towse, they were unstinted in their praises. "It was grand, it was terrible," they said, "to see that little handful of men rush on fearless of death, fearless of everything." It was bravery of the highest kind, and they admired it, as only brave men do admire courage in a foeman. The people of Britain who read extracts taken from Boer newspapers, extracts which ridicule British pluck and all things British, must not blame the Boers for those statements. In nearly every case the papers ...
— Campaign Pictures of the War in South Africa (1899-1900) - Letters from the Front • A. G. Hales

... kindly foemen, rather than with friends unkind; Friend and foeman are distinguished not ...
— Hindu Literature • Epiphanius Wilson

... good inch of his own height but in substance more than made up for the deficiency. He was a stalwart eight-year old, muscled like a Hercules, with plenty of bone to stand his weight; and his eyes, glittering through the tangle of forelock, gave him an air of savage cunning. Decidedly here was a foeman worthy of his steel, thought Alcatraz. He looked about him. There stood the mares and the horses ranged in a loose semi-circle, waiting and watching; only the colts, ignorant of what was to come, had begun to frolic together ...
— Alcatraz • Max Brand

... mail on his broad breast rang, As before the host he came; When there, through the foeman's first all sprang Like a lurid ...
— Golden Days for Boys and Girls, Vol. XIII, Nov. 28, 1891 • Various

... horrid, For ugly demons swarm upon its summit, And dragons nestle in its murky caverns: There did I fall, and with me fell my honour. There knelt I powerless, and my life accepted! Now am I calm, for I no more behold it; Nor yet behold the proud, the noble foeman, Nor yet my Nanna's cheek, o'erspread with blushes; Nor yet the burning, hated tears which rescued, Which purchased Hother from triumphant Balder! Ha! storm, thou sinkest! Howl and whoop around me! Peal, thunders, peal! and drown the cruel echo Of ...
— The Death of Balder • Johannes Ewald

... the foeman! well he held his ground! But here defeat at kindred hands he found! The shafts rained on him, in a righteous cause, Came from the ...
— A Wreath of Virginia Bay Leaves • James Barron Hope

... methinks will be more hard smiting than chance for good archery, wherefore I do pray let me bear thy standard in the fight—ne'er shall foeman touch it whiles that I do live—lord, ...
— Beltane The Smith • Jeffery Farnol

... there arose Dim in the darkness The face and form Of Heinrik the Hun With hand upheld Bearing a bomb. But fear filled the heart Of Sidni the Storeman, And with force of fear Raising the Rum Jar Drave he adrad At the face of the foeman. Down sank the Slayer Smitten asunder And over his face Unloosed ran the liquor. Then Heinrik the Hun Sang he this Swan Song: "Hero, I hail thee, Godlike who givest Fire and Sweetness Born of a blow. Loki art thou, Or Wotan the one-eyed Coming to call me Away to Walhall. ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Dec. 26, 1917 • Various

... for him the horse of Ushkabus." "What! and unarmed?" inquired the Tartar chief; "No!" cried the champion, "Mark, my bow and arrow! Mark, too, with what effect they may be used!" So saying, Rustem drew the string, and straight The arrow flew, and faithful to its aim, Struck dead the foeman's horse. This done, he laughed, But Ushkabus was wroth, and showered upon His bold antagonist his quivered store— Then Rustem raised his bow, with eager eye Choosing a dart, and placed it on the string, A thong of elk-skin; to his ear he drew The feathered notch, and when the point had touched ...
— Persian Literature, Volume 1,Comprising The Shah Nameh, The - Rubaiyat, The Divan, and The Gulistan • Anonymous

... but a breath ago the mammoth browsed Upon my slopes, and in my caves I housed Your shaggy fathers in their nakedness, While on their foeman's offal ...
— Shapes of Clay • Ambrose Bierce

... my boy—merely a foeman. I am a West Pointer, and some of the dearest friends I have are upon the other side. But come, let us not be the ...
— Love Under Fire • Randall Parrish

... recovering from the shock, he pursued his course to the fort with the Indian close at his heels. Mr. Meigs was in the vigor of early manhood, and had, by frequent practice in the race, become a very swift runner. His foeman was also very fleet, and amongst the most active of their warriors, as none but such were sent into the settlements on marauding excursions. The race continued for sixty or eighty rods with little advantage on either ...
— Heroes and Hunters of the West • Anonymous

... to the "Pelican" alone or with a friend I go, I sigh for men of muscle who could fight a fight like BENDIGO. He didn't fight in feather-beds, or spend his days in chattering, But faced his man, and battered him, or took his foeman's battering. He didn't deal in gas, or waste his time in mere retort at all; But now the "pugs" are interviewed, and journalists report it all. A man may call it what he will, brutality or bravery, I'd rather have the prize-ring back than give a purse ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 100, 13 June 1891 • Various

... fortune, in being relieved from all further trouble with his implacable foeman, the sheik determined to have a day of rest, which to his slaves was very welcome, as was also the flesh of the dead camel, now given them ...
— The Boy Slaves • Mayne Reid

... the bushes on the bank of the stream. There! he raises his gun, and crying, God have mercy on your soul, fires, and his victim pitches headlong to the ground. They return his fire, but harm him not; and he again raises his gun, and, with the same prayer for mercy on the soul of the foeman he has singled out, fires, and another tory falls heavily to the earth. Mercy! they are now rushing forward to slay the old man! But now they are met by a party of the Americans, running forward ...
— The Rangers - [Subtitle: The Tory's Daughter] • D. P. Thompson

... the apartment, the Captain following him to the door, and raising his voice as he retreated, until he was fairly out of hearing.)—"The whilk stackets, or palisades, should be artificially framed with re-entering angles and loop-holes, or crenelles, for musketry, whereof it shall arise that the foeman—The Highland brute! the old Highland brute! They are as proud as peacocks, and as obstinate as tups—and here he has missed an opportunity of making his house as pretty an irregular fortification as an invading army ever broke their teeth upon.—But I see," he continued, looking own ...
— A Legend of Montrose • Sir Walter Scott

... calls this utensil, when she can bring herself to give the indescribable an imperfect vent in speech. But commonly the feeling is too deep for words. Her war with this foeman in her household, this coarse rebel in her realm of soft prettiness, is one of those silent ones, those grim struggles without outcry or threat or appeal for quarter that can never end in any compromise, ...
— Certain Personal Matters • H. G. Wells

... on his side. Sooner or later relief must come. Cosy in their tiny fortress, they could afford to wait for it. The Gentleman could not. Now for the first time the Parson learned that his anticipated ally was his foeman's. ...
— The Gentleman - A Romance of the Sea • Alfred Ollivant

... consulted me, spotted who I was in Regent Street, conjectured that I had got the number of the cab and would lay my hands on the driver, and so sent back this audacious message. I tell you, Watson, this time we have got a foeman who is worthy of our steel. I've been checkmated in London. I can only wish you better luck in Devonshire. But I'm not easy ...
— Hound of the Baskervilles • Authur Conan Doyle

... pretty much at their own discretion, were an uncouth, rough lot, with very little of the smartness of dress and bearing which we associate with the military character. Everywhere was a most portentous display of banners, as if the sacrilegious foot of a foeman could not be set on any spot rendered sacred by the dragon flag. The town presented a very neat and compact aspect, and struck me very favourably as compared with Tientsin, the only other Chinese town I had been in, and which seemed ...
— Under the Dragon Flag - My Experiences in the Chino-Japanese War • James Allan

... the Harris Ranch shack, just to show what I could do with it. And I realized when Dinky-Dunk and I drove over to it in the buckboard, on a rather nippy morning when it was a joy to go spanking along the prairie trail with the cold air etching rosettes on your cheek-bones, that it was a foeman well worthy of my steel. At a first inspection, indeed, it didn't look any too promising. It didn't exactly stand up on the prairie-floor and shout "Welcome" into your ears. There was an overturned windmill and a broken-down stable that needed a new roof, and a ...
— The Prairie Mother • Arthur Stringer

... sense art thou," answered Laeg, "for who but an idiot would think of sweet sleep and agreeable repose in a hostile territory, much more in full view of those who look out from a foeman's dun, and ...
— The Coming of Cuculain • Standish O'Grady

... The widow ne'er Her warrior's dying wish shall hear. The passing zephyr bears no sigh; No wounded warrior meets the eye; Death is his sleep by Erie's wave; Of Raisin's snow we heap his grave. How many hopes lie buried here— The mother's joy, the father's pride, The country's boast, the foeman's fear, In 'wildered havoc, side by side! Lend me, thou silent queen of night, Lend me a while thy waning light, That I may see each well-loved form That sank beneath ...
— Choice Specimens of American Literature, And Literary Reader - Being Selections from the Chief American Writers • Benj. N. Martin



Words linked to "Foeman" :   war machine, opponent, armed services, adversary, enemy, opposition, military machine, antagonist, resister, opposer, armed forces, foe, military, besieger



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