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54

adjective
1.
Being four more than fifty.  Synonyms: fifty-four, liv.



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"54" Quotes from Famous Books



... incidents it is reminiscent of other tales; and in its main outline, from the point where the hero sets out to seek adventures with the help of his magic ring, the narrative belongs to the "Bride Wager" group. In this group Von Hahn distinguishes at least two types (1 : 54, Nos. 23 and 24): in the one, the hero bets his head against the bride, and wins by performing difficult tasks; in the other, he wins by answering riddles. In our story there is no formal staking of his ...
— Filipino Popular Tales • Dean S. Fansler

... characteristic of the punctilious inaccuracy of Mr. Cottle (Recollections, ii. 54) that he should insist that the assumed name was "Cumberbatch, not Comberback," though Coleridge has himself fixed the real name by the jest, "My habits were so little equestrian, that my horse, I doubt not, was of that opinion." This circumstance, though trifling, ...
— English Men of Letters: Coleridge • H. D. Traill

... by the labour of their hands, and were poor. His father's name was Marius; his mother's name was Fulcinia. It was late before he saw Rome and became acquainted with the habits of the city, up to which time he lived at Cirrhaeato,[54] a village in the territory of Arpinum, where his mode of life was rude, when contrasted with the polite and artificial fashions of a city, but temperate and in accordance with the old Roman discipline. ...
— Plutarch's Lives, Volume II • Aubrey Stewart & George Long

... 54' N., lon. 113 17' W. The northeast trades had now left us, and we had the usual variable winds, the "doldrums,'' which prevail near the line, together with some rain. So long as we were in these latitudes, we had but little rest in our watch on deck at night; for, as ...
— Two Years Before the Mast • Richard Henry Dana

... 54. The true reading is Acharya in the dual number, meaning Drona and Kripa. Some texts read the word in the singular form. Nilakantha notices both these reading, but prefers the dual to ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... 3 days provision and this afternoon the Rest of our Rigiment came down and the teams that went up the day Before we received our pacet[54] of letters from home. ...
— The Military Journals of Two Private Soldiers, 1758-1775 - With Numerous Illustrative Notes • Abraham Tomlinson

... term of the Court of Common Pleas, he shall be tried, and if convicted of remaining as aforesaid, shall be whipped not exceeding ten lashes; and if he or she shall not then depart, such process shall be repeated, and punishment inflicted, toties quoties." Stat. 1788, Ch. 54. ...
— An Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans Called Africans • Lydia Maria Child

... French, and the grand combined army, under Wellington, stormed Ciudad Rodrigo and Badajos. This army also took Salamanca on the 16th of June. On the 1st of July it was ascertained that the number of prisoners of war in England was 54,517. Another battle was fought at Salamanca, on the 23d of July, when the French were again defeated by Wellington's army. On the 11th of August, Lord Wellington entered Madrid, and on the following day the ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 3 • Henry Hunt

... care of you,' which threw the Crown-Prince into such an ecstasy of joy as no pen can express;" and so the carriages rolled away,—towards the Knights-of-Malta business and Palace of the Head Knight of Malta, in the first place. [Forster, iii. 50-54.] ...
— History Of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. VIII. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... considerations are allowed, in the present governance of Europe, to prevail over the intense need of the Continent for the most sustained and efficient production to repair the destructions of war, and to satisfy the insistence of labor for a larger reward.[54] ...
— The Economic Consequences of the Peace • John Maynard Keynes

... sufficiently guaranteed by the interest they have as merchants, ship-owners, and as manufacturers, in preserving a union with the slave-holding states. On the other hand, what madness in the South to look for greater safety in disunion."(54) ...
— Slavery and Four Years of War, Vol. 1-2 • Joseph Warren Keifer

... and some lords replying, "the non-contents have it," his lordship said, "the non-contents must go below the bar:" which is the manner of dividing the house. Those who remained being told in their seats, and those who went out being told at coming in again, there were Content, 81; Not content, 54: so that the resolution moved for, passed without ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson, Vol. 10. - Parlimentary Debates I. • Samuel Johnson

... Montgomery with his victorious bands had borne everything before him like a tornado. The Canadian peasantry dreaded the very sight of warriors who must be ball-proof, as they were supposed, by a curious mistake, to be "incased in plate- iron," vetus de tole, instead de toile. [54] The red [54a] and black flag of successful rebellion floated over the suburbs of Quebec. Morgan's and Humphries' riflemen were thundering at the very gates of the city, those dear old walls—(loud applause)—which ...
— Picturesque Quebec • James MacPherson Le Moine

... churchwardens being headed by the old beadle, an imposing personage, who wore a cocked hat and an official coat trimmed with gold, and carried in majestic style a trident staff, a terror to evil-doers, at least to those of tender years.[54] At Beverley the stocks still preserved in the minster were used as late as 1853; Jim Brigham, guilty of Sunday tippling, and discovered by the churchwardens in their rounds, was the last victim. Some sympathizer placed ...
— Vanishing England • P. H. Ditchfield

... or ore in the old holes and pits in the said Forest, which have been worked out many years." Such a practice is well remembered by the aged miners, the chief part of the ore used in the above-named furnaces having been brought by sea from Whitehaven. {54} Thus Mr. Mushet represents, "at Tintern the furnace charge for forge pig iron was generally composed of a mixture of seven-eighths of Lancashire iron ore and one-eighth part of a lean calcareous sparry iron ore, ...
— Iron Making in the Olden Times - as instanced in the Ancient Mines, Forges, and Furnaces of The Forest of Dean • H. G. Nicholls

... architecture, are mere ventilators when introduced into the walls of temples, being intended to light the staircases, as in the second pylon of Horemheb at Karnak, or else to support decorative woodwork on festival days. The doorways project but slightly from the body of the buildings (fig. 54), except where the lintel is over-shadowed by a projecting cornice. Real windows occur only in the pavilion of Medinet Habu; but that building was constructed on the model of a fortress, and must rank as an ...
— Manual Of Egyptian Archaeology And Guide To The Study Of Antiquities In Egypt • Gaston Camille Charles Maspero

... April till the 24th September, by which time almost all our provisions were spent, so that many of our men died of hunger. Having passed through the straits into the South Sea, we found many violent currents, and were driven south into 54 degrees, where we found the weather excessively cold. Getting at last favourable winds, we prosecuted our intended voyage towards the coast of Peru; but in the end lost our whole fleet, being all separated ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. VIII. • Robert Kerr

... also found a degree of favor, but subordinate in its nature. For it {54} can not and will not pretend to solve the main problems. It only tries to explain how the individual variations, already in existence, might have been preserved and perhaps increased, and how new conditions of existence could have roused latent powers; but not ...
— The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality • Rudolf Schmid

... p. 54: The work done by Kato Shigeru and Niida Noboru on property and family has been used here. For the later period, work done by Makino Tatsumi has also been incorporated.—Literature on the plough and on iron for implements has been mentioned above. Concerning the fallow ...
— A history of China., [3d ed. rev. and enl.] • Wolfram Eberhard

... contended that the case should be left to the decision of courts of justice; arguing, that if the courts should decide the commissions given by Genet to be invalid, they would, as a matter of course, order restitution to be made.[54] ...
— Washington and the American Republic, Vol. 3. • Benson J. Lossing

... strengthen covetousness, to set up a false and spurious faith, to weaken parochial churches, to increase taverns and fornication, to squander money and labour to no purpose, and merely to lead the poor people about by the nose. (Niemeyer's Reprint, p. 54 ) ************************************* ...
— Prolegomena to the History of Israel • Julius Wellhausen

... 54. All permitting them to act just as they think proper, the ambassadors assure them that they would speedily return, having completed every matter. When they went and laid before the patricians the message of the commons, the other ...
— The History of Rome, Books 01 to 08 • Titus Livius

... astonishment, and of appointment-making, of laughing, and of recollecting, and in the spirit we found ourselves again in our learned Siberia, where refinement is carried to such an extent that the bears are tied up in the taverns, and the sables wish the hunter good evening.[54] ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VI. • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... support my eight children, and my wife, and myself, what have I in this world," cried he, striding suddenly with colossal firmness upon his sturdy legs, and raising to heaven arms which looked like fore-shortenings of the limbs of Hercules; "what have I in this wide world but these four bones?" [54] ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. IV • Maria Edgeworth

... augmented their little stock, with which they removed to Islington. This was the greatest benefaction that Paradise Lost ever procured the author's descendants; and to this he, who has now attempted to relate his life, had the honour of contributing a prologue[54]. ...
— Lives of the Poets, Vol. 1 • Samuel Johnson

... 54. It has been said that, for the remedy of past confusion and wrongs, which have resulted from people going from the said islands to China and other districts without order or permission, it would be advisable to ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, V7, 1588-1591 • Emma Helen Blair

... full, and clear, and refreshing all the year long. It may be always truly said of Jesus, the great Gospel Refuge, and of those who have fled to Him, what was said of old about Samaria, "There was great JOY in that CITY."[54] It was the object of all that Christ did and said on earth to give you this joy. "These things have I spoken unto you," says He, "that my JOY might remain in you, and that your JOY might be full."[55] Love Him now, and serve ...
— The Cities of Refuge: or, The Name of Jesus - A Sunday book for the young • John Ross Macduff

... Argentine Confederation, and Paraguay. Being a Narrative of the Exploration of the Tributaries of the River La Plata and Adjacent Countries during the Years 1853, '54, '55, '56, under the Orders of the United States Government. By Thomas J. Page, U.S.N., Commander of the Expedition. With Maps and Numerous Engravings. New York. Harper & Brothers. 8vo. ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 3, No. 18, April, 1859 - [Date last updated: August 7, 2005] • Various

... fight in vain. We know your strength—if one may call it by that name. We know that at the utmost you cannot bring against us above five and twenty thousand knights. Therefore, you have no chance—none whatever. Reflect: we are well equipped, well fortified, we number 54. Fifty-four what? Men? No, MINDS—the capablest in the world; a force against which mere animal might may no more hope to prevail than may the idle waves of the sea hope to prevail against the granite barriers of England. Be advised. We offer you your lives; for the sake of your families, ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... letters in Spanish. Genoa is fortunate in possessing a number of authentic letters, and these are preserved in a marble custodia, surmounted by a head of Columbus. In the pillar which forms the pedestal there is a bronze door, and the precious Columbus documents have been placed there. (See p. 54, ante.) ...
— Christopher Columbus and His Monument Columbia • Various

... exception of the first two pages, which exhibit only Saints Ambrose, Austin, Jerom and Gregory. At the bottom of the figure of St. Austin, second column, first page, it is thus written; "f.w. 1470." In the whole sixteen pages. The style of art is similar to that used in the Antichrist.[54] Of this tract, evidently xylographical, I never saw or heard ...
— A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume Three • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... more compact and crystalline basalt, form the main skeleton of the island. M. Bailly ("Voyage aux Terres Australes" tome 1 page 54.) states that they all "se developpent autour d'elle comme une ceinture d'immenses remparts, toutes affectant une pente plus ou moins enclinee vers le rivage de la mer; tandis, au contraire, que vers le centre de l'ile elles presentent une coupe abrupte, et souvent taillee a pic. Toutes ces montagnes ...
— Volcanic Islands • Charles Darwin

... this machine, but after it was finally perfected and a record of the operations made, we found that the men actually were operating at an average efficiency of 42 per cent, and our moisture test was running about 54 per cent. Our next step was to post a daily record of the relative standing of the men in the machine room, putting the men who had the best record at the top of the list, in the order of their weekly average efficiencies. (The efficiency of low ...
— Creative Impulse in Industry - A Proposition for Educators • Helen Marot

... the goyim (or non-Jewish races) to the hands of the angel Douma and sent down to Hell.[53] Indeed the goyim are even denied human attributes. Thus the Zohar again explains that the words of the Scripture "Jehovah Elohim made man" mean that He made Israel.[54] The seventeenth-century Rabbinical treatise Emek ha Melek observes: "Our Rabbis of blessed memory have said: 'Ye Jews are men because of the soul ye have from the Supreme Man (i.e. God). But the nations of the world are not styled men ...
— Secret Societies And Subversive Movements • Nesta H. Webster

... 54. VALUE OF GAS AS FUEL.—As a fuel for cooking purposes, gas, both artificial and natural, is very effective, and in localities where the piping of gas into homes is possible it is used extensively. Of the two kinds, artificial gas produces the ...
— Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 1 - Volume 1: Essentials of Cookery; Cereals; Bread; Hot Breads • Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences

... return to the subscribers. Ever watchful for her husband's honour, that admirable woman, as ardent a patriot as himself, refused the generous tender of the Catholics of Dublin. Although his several elections had cost Mr. Grattan above 54,000 pounds—more than the whole national grant of 1782—she would not, in this case, that any one else should bear the cost of his last triumph in the widowed capital of ...
— A Popular History of Ireland - From the earliest period to the emancipation of the Catholics • Thomas D'Arcy McGee

... in operation, and through it have been benefited with instruction,—1. In the Sunday-School, about 120 children. 2. In the Adult-School, about 40 Adults. 3. In the two Day-Schools for boys and, the two Day-Schools for girls, 209 children, of whom 54 have been entirely free; the others pay about one-third of the expense. There have been also circulated 482 Bibles, and 520 New Testaments. Lastly, 57l. has been spent to aid missionary exertions. The means which the Lord has ...
— A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Mueller - Written by Himself, First Part • George Mueller

... yet remains to be done upon the northern coasts of Australia. Beginning with the north-eastern coast, I have been enabled to lay down a very safe and convenient track for vessels bound through Torres Strait, and to delineate the coastline between Cape Hillsborough, in 20 degrees 54 minutes South, and Cape York, the north extremity of New South Wales; a distance of six hundred and ninety miles. As my instructions did not authorise my delaying to examine any part of this coast I could not penetrate into the many numerous and extensive openings that presented themselves in this ...
— Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia] [Volume 2 of 2] • Phillip Parker King

... Fritz & Ralston; Wells, Fargo & Co.; Drexel, Sather & Church, and Tallant & Wilde, were the principal bankers. Property continued almost unsalable, and prices were less than a half of what they had been in 1853-'54. William Blending, Esq., had rented my house on Harrison Street; so I occupied a room in the bank, No. 11, and boarded at the Meiggs House, corner of Broadway and Montgomery, which we owned. Having reduced expenses to a minimum, I proceeded, with all ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... shoulder, out of which spring, like so many stems of wheat, nearly a score of vaulting ribs for the roof that closes in the staircase. No. 38, the Maison Milsand has a fine Renaissance faade, also some sculpture in the court. On No. 52 and 54 of this same street is exhibited a reproduction of that kind of double arch seen in the Hotel de Ville. [Headnote: NOTRE DAME.] Close to the Rue des Forges is Notre Dame, consecrated in 1331, avery beautiful ...
— The South of France—East Half • Charles Bertram Black

... [54] I shall add a word about the healthfulness of these exercises, since it is partly my design in this sketch to give the fruits of my experience. It is true one cannot argue for everybody from his own case. Nevertheless, I am persuaded that this morning exercise and the inuring would ...
— Autobiography and Letters of Orville Dewey, D.D. - Edited by his Daughter • Orville Dewey

... 54. Until the expiration of two months from the date of this Scheme, or such further period as may be sanctioned in writing by the Board of Education, matters which under this Scheme are to be the subject ...
— A History of Giggleswick School - From its Foundation 1499 to 1912 • Edward Allen Bell

... vagrom and obscure cavalier had it not been for his children. Four sons there were whose qualities and opportunities were such as to have enabled them to play a somewhat large part in the world's affairs {54} in their day. How many unconsidered other progeny, male or female, there may have been, God alone knows—possibly, nay probably, a ...
— South American Fights and Fighters - And Other Tales of Adventure • Cyrus Townsend Brady

... divisions or seasons, there are the Holy Days dotting the Calendar—SAINTS' DAYS commemorating the grace given unto God's {54} faithful servants, and other Holy Days each having its special Scriptural teaching. (See FASTS, ...
— The American Church Dictionary and Cyclopedia • William James Miller

... Rodrigo, Dutchman, John Roads, late of Boston, Peter Grant, Scotchman, Richard Fowler and Randolph Judson, Englishmen, for piracy, and sentenced them to be hanged. All were however pardoned subsequently. Records of Massachusetts Bay, V. 40, 54, 66. Mitchell and Uring were whipped for complicity, of which there was evidence contradicting their testimony here presented. For the background of the whole story, see C.W. Tuttle, Captain Francis Champernowne, ...
— Privateering and Piracy in the Colonial Period - Illustrative Documents • Various

... number of inhabitants was a burden to the city where there was no employment for them, and further, was anxious that the frontiers of the empire should be more extensively occupied by sending colonists, he sent colonists to Signia[53] and Circeii,[54] to serve as defensive outposts hereafter to the city on land and sea. While he was thus employed a frightful prodigy appeared to him. A serpent gliding out of a wooden pillar, after causing dismay and flight in the palace, not so much struck the king's heart with sudden terror, as it filled him ...
— Roman History, Books I-III • Titus Livius

... 54. Composition. — N. composition, constitution, crasis[obs3]; combination &c. 48; inclusion, admission, comprehension, reception; embodiment; formation. V. be composed of, be made of, be formed of, be made up of; consist of, be resolved into. include &c. (in a class) 76; contain, hold, ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... [54] Yet the Government had had warning of this in a series of striking reports sent by one of Lord Elgin's spies during the Reign of Terror. "Jamais la France ne fut cultivee comme elle l'est. Il n'y a pas un arpent qui ne soit ensemence, sauf dans les lieux ou operent ...
— History of Modern Europe 1792-1878 • C. A. Fyffe

... being placed to my account. Had I so chosen, I could on either trial have saved myself at his expense, not from shame indeed, but from imprisonment.[54] Had I cared to show that the crown witnesses—the three most important—had been carefully coached by your father and his solicitors, not in reticences merely, but in assertions, in the absolute transference deliberate, plotted, and rehearsed, of the actions and doings of someone else on to me, ...
— Oscar Wilde, Volume 2 (of 2) - His Life and Confessions • Frank Harris

... because at first they felt the report might be a whitewash of executive policy, but that they became "enthusiastic" when they read his draft and quickly joined in the preparation of the final version.[21-54] ...
— Integration of the Armed Forces, 1940-1965 • Morris J. MacGregor Jr.

... Mount Rainier, he saw nine gleaming disks outlined against the snow, each one about the size of a C-54. ...
— The Flying Saucers are Real • Donald Keyhoe

... injuries were sustained by ——, aged 54, while assisting in discharging cargo. Shortly before one o'clock, it is stated, a cheese struck him and knocked ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, April 14, 1920 • Various

... inhabitants of Africa, and would thus carry back to the country of their origin, the seeds of civilization which might render their sojournment and sufferings here a blessing in the end to that country.[54] ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 3, 1918 • Various

... writer, and Bethany beyond Jordan (i. 28); he knows the exact distance from Jerusalem to the better-known Bethany (xi. 18); the "deep" well of Jacob at Sychar (iv. 11); the city of Ephraim near the wilderness (xi. 54); Aenon near to Salim, where John baptized (iii. 23). This word Aenon is an Aramaic word signifying "springs," and even Renan ridicules the notion of such a name having been invented by Greek-speaking sectaries at Ephesus. The place was too obscure to be known to ordinary travellers, ...
— The Books of the New Testament • Leighton Pullan

... Monmouth's army at Sedgemoor she entertained and concealed him in her house at Moyles Court. To convict her it was necessary to prove that Hicks had been in Monmouth's army, that she knew it, and that she entertained and concealed him. The prosecution was conducted by Pollexfen,[54] Mundy, and Corriton, as far at least as it was not conducted by Jeffreys. Lady Lisle, according to the custom of the time, was not allowed counsel, though no doubt she had opportunities for receiving legal advice during the ...
— State Trials, Political and Social - Volume 1 (of 2) • Various

... forms belonging to Bellerophon and Maclurea. In the former (fig. 53) there is a symmetrical convoluted shell, like that of the Pearly Nautilus in shape, but without any internal partitions, and having the aperture often expanded and notched behind. The species of Maclurea (fig. 54) are found both in North America and in Scotland, and are exclusively confined to the Lower Silurian period, so far as known. They have the shell coiled into a flat spiral, the mouth being furnished ...
— The Ancient Life History of the Earth • Henry Alleyne Nicholson

... Balim{54} Forsake their temples dim, With that twise batter'd god{55} of Palestine; And mooned Ashtaroth, Heav'ns queen and mother both, Now sits not girt with tapers holy shine; The Lybic Hammon shrinks his horn; In vain the Tyrian maids their ...
— Six Centuries of English Poetry - Tennyson to Chaucer • James Baldwin

... a group (54) showing this great diversity in complexion: one of the figures is painted almost pure white, and with light ...
— The Antediluvian World • Ignatius Donnelly

... done, Till, aided by Pallas, the battle he won. So sung the rapt Minstrel the blood-stirring tale, But the check of Odysseus waxed deadly and pale; While the song warbled on of the days that were past, His eyelids were wet with the tears falling fast.[54]" ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 379, May, 1847 • Various

... father, the great Cyrus; invaded and subdued Egypt, but afterwards suffered serious reverses, and in the end gave himself up to dissipation and vindictive acts of cruelty, from which not only his subjects suffered, but the members of his own family; d. 54 B.C. ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... favour your request. My niece shall not impute the cause to be In my default, her will should want effect: But in the king is all my doubt, lest he My suit for her new marriage should reject. Yet shall I prove him: and I heard it said, He means this evening in the park to hunt.[54] Here will I ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition) • Various

... Worshipful Robert Marsh, Esqr; Mayor, The Worshipful The Sheriffs, Aldermen, and Common Council of the City of Norwich." The entries are limited to one line each, and there is a column showing the sizes. The catalogue consisting of 54 printed pages, and measuring 8.5 by 6.5 inches, is entitled "A New Catalogue of the Books in the Publick Library of the City of Norwich, in the year 1732, to which is added, An Account of the Orders prescribed by the Court and Common Council for the regulation of the same, ...
— Three Centuries of a City Library • George A. Stephen

... Chapter 54. Types of Animal Sacrament 1. The Egyptian and the Aino Types of Sacrament 2. Processions with ...
— The Golden Bough - A study of magic and religion • Sir James George Frazer

... system—the Orinoco, Amazon, and La Plata, draining three immense plains—the llanos of Venezuela, the sylvas of Brazil, and the pampas of the Argentine Republic. The continuity and extent of these vast depressions are more remarkable even than the height and length of the mountain chains.[54] ...
— The Andes and the Amazon - Across the Continent of South America • James Orton

... twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed. 53 For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality. 54 But when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall come to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. 55 O death, where is thy victory? O ...
— Epistle Sermons, Vol. II - Epiphany, Easter and Pentecost • Martin Luther

... indeed, for the Lord's honour, but zealous with the same zeal as animated those two disciples who would fain have commanded fire to come down from heaven on the inhospitable Samaritan village" (Luke ix. 54). I think the learned author is mistaken here, and that the preponderance of evidence lies on the other side. The subject is interesting, and will ...
— The Parables of Our Lord • William Arnot

... (54 B.C.), a little earlier in the season, Caesar made a second invasion with a much larger force, and penetrated the country a short distance north of the Thames. Before the September gales set in, he reembarked for the ...
— The Leading Facts of English History • D.H. Montgomery

... being bound to the staik in the myddest of some coallis, some tymmer, and other mater appointed for the fyre, a trane of powder was maid and sett a fyre, quhilk gave to the blessed martyre of God a glaise, skrimpled[54] his left hand, and that syd of his face, but nether kendilled the wood, nor yett the coallis.[55] And so remaned the appointed to death in torment, till that men rane to the Castell agane for moir poulder, and for wood more able to tack fyre; which at last being kendilled, ...
— The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6) • John Knox

... verses are probably interpolated, but the interpolation was as early as Aristotle. The same views are placed by Herodotus in the mouth of the wife of Intarphernes (3. 119). See Donaldson, Woman, pp. 53, 54 and note. ...
— The Truth About Woman • C. Gasquoine Hartley

... 54. "If, therefore, having this before we were born, we were born possessing it, we knew, both before we were born and as soon as we were born, not only the equal and the greater and smaller, but all things of the kind; for our present discussion is not ...
— Apology, Crito, and Phaedo of Socrates • Plato

... those that we saw in these seas prove the contrary. Rock-weed is, however, a certain indication that, land is not far distant. The next day, it being calm, we hoisted out the boat to try whether there was a current, but found none. Our latitude was 37 deg. 10', longitude 172 deg. 54' W. On the 3d, being in latitude 36 deg. 56', longitude 173 deg.27', we took up more sea-weed, and another piece of wood covered with barnacles. The next day we saw two more seals, and a brown bird, about as big as a raven, with some ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 13 • Robert Kerr

... dismounted, who appears to be rubbing a hurt on his left leg. The two following slabs (52,3) are horses and men;—on the latter, a dismounted man in a flowing robe endeavouring to curb a rearing steed. On the next slab (54) are two horsemen mounted, the one to the right wearing a hat that has a modern appearance, and is similar to those worn by dignitaries of the Greek church at the present time. A fine horse and graceful horseman occur in the right corner of the slab 55,—the action of the horse ...
— How to See the British Museum in Four Visits • W. Blanchard Jerrold

... p 2.] 54 The man whose high and responsible lot is to steer the fortunes of a great State must be able to disregard the verdict of his contemporaries; but he must be all the clearer as to the motives of his own policy, and keep before his eyes, with the full weight of the categorical ...
— Germany and the Next War • Friedrich von Bernhardi

... her own pier. As she approached it the ports on the north side of pier 54 were closed that the Carpathia might land there, but through the two left open to accommodate the forward and after gangplanks of the big liner the watchers could see her looming larger and larger in the darkness till finally she was ...
— Sinking of the Titanic - and Great Sea Disasters • Various

... affectionate terms; and whenever I greet him he welcomes me most courteously and looks at me in a most friendly fashion, making it plain that his feelings for me are as friendly as his speeches. And he has often commissioned his Almoner[54] to find a benefice for me. The Queen sought to take me as her tutor. Everyone knows that, if I were prepared to live even a few months at Court, he would heap on me as many benefices as I cared for; but I ...
— Erasmus and the Age of Reformation • Johan Huizinga

... concubinage which are forbidden to them by the Christian faith. Then we have the dissolute class given over wholly to the lusts of the flesh. And lastly there are those who by this means obtain a more secure and easy livelihood.[54] ...
— Two Old Faiths - Essays on the Religions of the Hindus and the Mohammedans • J. Murray Mitchell and William Muir

... more invites a reader than an argument unlooked for, unthought of, and sells better than a scurrile pamphlet," tum maxime cum novitas excitat [53]palatum. "Many men," saith Gellius, "are very conceited in their inscriptions," "and able" (as [54]Pliny quotes out of Seneca) "to make him loiter by the way that went in haste to fetch a midwife for his daughter, now ready to lie down." For my part, I have honourable [55]precedents for this which I have done: I will cite one for all, Anthony Zara, Pap. Epis., his Anatomy of Wit, ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... 54. Again, observe its ease of outline. There is not a single straight line to be met with from foundation to roof; all is bending or broken. The form of every stone in its walls is a study; for, owing to the infinite delicacy of structure in all minerals, a piece of stone 3 in. in diameter, ...
— The Poetry of Architecture • John Ruskin

... Sec. 54. There is one peculiarity of poetry conducing much to its effect—the peculiarity which is indeed usually thought its characteristic one—still remaining to be considered: we mean its rhythmical structure. This, improbable though it ...
— The Philosophy of Style • Herbert Spencer

... Helene[54] and France is true and sad. I really wish you would caution Helene as to her language; she is much attached to you. I pity her very much; her position is very trying, and her religion ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Vol 2 (of 3), 1844-1853 • Queen Victoria

... shared the sinful beliefs of others, he would 54:1 have been less sensitive to those beliefs. Through the magnitude of his human life, he demonstrated the divine 54:3 Life. Out of the amplitude of his pure affection, he de- fined Love. With the affluence of Truth, he vanquished error. The world acknowledged not his righteousness, ...
— Science and Health With Key to the Scriptures • Mary Baker Eddy

... get a complete change of ideas and associations, although the subjects of conversation were painful enough, turning on the reports of mixed disaster and success in the Crimea that were making the close of '54 lurid and memorable for future history. Gwen glanced at Dr. Nash's letter, gave hurried directions to the servant to tell Tom Kettering to be in readiness to drive her at once to Chorlton, and made short work of breakfast and her ...
— When Ghost Meets Ghost • William Frend De Morgan

... [54] Proving another guilty would not have exculpated Oscar. Readers of my book will remember that I urged Oscar to tell the truth and how ...
— Oscar Wilde, Volume 2 (of 2) - His Life and Confessions • Frank Harris

... rather blue, but the lesson will be good for them. Catch me getting done like that again! I'm going to start now, 8 a.m., as I want to get ahead of the Cambridge idiots. Page 54 of the guide-book has all about the ...
— Parkhurst Boys - And Other Stories of School Life • Talbot Baines Reed

... story of his relations with his brother Perses have been treated with scepticism (see Murray, "Anc. Gk. Literature", pp. 53-54): Perses, it is urged, is clearly a mere dummy, set up to be the target for the poet's exhortations. On such a matter precise evidence is naturally not forthcoming; but all probability is against the sceptical view. For 1) if the ...
— Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica • Homer and Hesiod

... that whatever is due me as credit for my share in the matter is largely, if not wholly, due to James Lemen's advice and most righteous counsel. [18]His record in the new country has fully justified my course in inducing him {p.54} to settle there with the view of properly shaping events in the best interest of the people. If he comes to Virginia, see ...
— The Jefferson-Lemen Compact • Willard C. MacNaul

... dwelling-place of the earliest men. But after a time when life was pure and spotless, Yima committed the sin which weighs on his descendants, and in consequence of that sin, lost his power, was cast out of Paradise, and given up to the dominion of the serpent, the evil spirit Angromainyus,[54] who finally brought about Yima's death by horrible torments.[55] It is an echo of the tradition about the loss of Paradise ensuing upon a transgression prompted by the Evil Spirit that we find in what is incontestably one of the oldest portions of the Sacred Scriptures of Zoroastrianism.[56] ...
— The Contemporary Review, Volume 36, September 1879 • Various

... 54. (Circular of the Minister, Gohier, July 6, 1793.) "It is to-day that, summoned to the alter of the country, those who desire the Republic will be known by name, and those who do not desire it, whether they speak or keep silent, will ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 4 (of 6) - The French Revolution, Volume 3 (of 3) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... defended to the last extremity." And Colonel Little, who had proved his fitness to command the post assigned him by his cool and soldierly conduct at Bunker Hill, quietly resolved that if the enemy assaulted Fort Greene it should never be surrendered while he was alive.[54] ...
— The Campaign of 1776 around New York and Brooklyn • Henry P. Johnston

... Several of these glossaries are about to be published. After Rashi's commentaries became a classic wherever there were Jews, the laazim were often translated into a foreign language, as into German or Italian. The Pseudo - Rashi on Alfasi,[54] following the manuscripts, sometimes presents a German translation now with, now without ...
— Rashi • Maurice Liber

... [-54-] So Decimus afterward died also. Antony and Lepidus left lieutenants in Gaul and themselves proceeded to join Caesar in Italy, taking with them the larger and the better part of their armies. They did not trust ...
— Dio's Rome, Vol. III • Cassius Dio

... said to him, "O Ja'afar, praise be to Allah who hath made us of those that observe external ordinances of Holy Law and hath averted from us the sin of disguising ourselves after the manner of hypocrites!"[FN54] But Ja'afar could not speak a word for excess of confusion; so the Caliph looked at him and said, "I wonder how they came hither, and who admitted them into my pavilion! But aught like the beauty of this youth and this damsel my eyes never yet ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... snow, terminates the range. Glaciers of greater or less extent descend between the pyramids of rock; and one, supplied from their largest recesses, even runs down the bank into the valley. Fig. 22[54] rudely represents the real contours of the mountains, including Mont Blanc itself, on its south side. The range of peaks, b, p, m, is that already spoken of, known as the "Aiguilles of Chamouni." They form but a very small portion of ...
— Modern Painters, Volume IV (of V) • John Ruskin

... pittancer shall provide five dumplings per monk per diem, and one plate of sausage meat, {53} and he shall also give to each of the servants on the said two days five dumplings for each several day; and the said pittancer on Christmas Day and on the day of St. John the Baptist shall make a relish, {54} or seasoning, and give to each monk one good glass thereof, that is to say, the fourth part of one {55} for each monk—to wit, on the first, second, and third day of the feast of the Nativity, the Circumcision, the Epiphany, and ...
— Alps and Sanctuaries of Piedmont and the Canton Ticino • Samuel Butler

... was the emperor of Rome, A. D. 54-68. He was a wicked tyrant among whose crimes are the death of his first wife, the death of his own mother, and the murder of a second wife. Two thirds of the city of Rome was burned, and the emperor has been accused of having had the fire set so he could enjoy ...
— Story Hour Readings: Seventh Year • E.C. Hartwell

... stationed at the city of Manila and the port of Cabite, one of which [53] came built from Yndia, and was bought in Pinacan for the service of your Majesty. The other six were built in the time of Don Juan de Silva, and Don Juan Ronquillo [54] took them all when he sailed in pursuit of the enemy at Playa Honda. These said galleys were in the greatest need of being repaired—one because it was very badly used up in the fight, and another because its ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVIII, 1617-1620 • Various

... be imagined. The Victory, the largest British ship present in the action, was only 186 feet long and 52 feet broad; yet in that little area 1000 men fought, 100 great guns thundered. A Spanish ship like the San Josef was 194 feet in length and 54 feet in breadth; but in that area 112 guns were mounted, while the three decks were thronged with some 1300 men. When floating batteries like these swept each other with the flame of swiftly repeated broadsides at a distance of a few score yards, ...
— Deeds that Won the Empire - Historic Battle Scenes • W. H. Fitchett

... "My wife and I could not agree; my neighbour was in the same case, so we exchanged wives and all four were content. What can be more reasonable than to render one another mutually happy, when it costs so little, and does nobody any harm."[54] It would seem that these maternal peoples have solved many difficulties of domestic and social life better than ...
— The Position of Woman in Primitive Society - A Study of the Matriarchy • C. Gasquoine Hartley

... us, that many of these unfortunate negroes learn cowardice and falsehood after they become slaves. When they first come from Africa, many of them show "a frank and fearless temper;"[54] but all distinction of character amongst the native Africans, is soon lost under the levelling influence of slavery. Oppression and terror necessarily produce meanness and deceit in all climates, and in all ages; and wherever fear is the governing motive ...
— Practical Education, Volume I • Maria Edgeworth

... the Chapel is Mr. Thomas Haworth. During the first 18 years of his ministry he received 20s. a week for his services; for three years afterwards he got 25s.; during the last two he has had 30s. per week; and his temporal consolation is involved in a sovereign and a half at present. Be is 54 years of age, has had very little education, believes in telling the truth as far as he knows it, and cares for nobody. He has a strongly intuitive mind; is full of human nature; is broad-faced, very fat and thoroughly English in look: has a chin which is neither of the nutmeg nor the cucumber order, ...
— Our Churches and Chapels • Atticus

... sight, I had time and liberty again to look into my Bible; which was my guide by day, and my pillow by night. Now that comfortable Scripture presented itself to me, "For a small moment have I forsaken thee, but with great mercies will I gather thee" (Isaiah 54.7). Thus the Lord carried me along from one time to another, and made good to me this precious promise, and many others. Then my son came to see me, and I asked his master to let him stay awhile with me, that I might comb his head, and look over him, for he was almost overcome ...
— Captivity and Restoration • Mrs. Mary Rowlandson

... coming], he will lose Mantua and the Tyrol. God's righteous judgment it is: a War like this! Comes of flinging old principles overboard,—of meddling in business that was none of yours;" and more, of a plangent alarming nature. [Forster, ii. 144 (and DATE it from Militair-Lexikon, ii. 54).] ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. IX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... greater than the earth, and a ring. This ring does not touch the ball of the planet, being everywhere removed from it at a distance of 20,000 (English) miles. Observation indicates the breadth of the ring to be 54,000 miles. The thickness certainly does not exceed 250 miles. With the exception of a black streak which divides the ring throughout its whole contour into two parts of unequal breadth and of different brightness, this strange colossal bridge ...
— Biographies of Distinguished Scientific Men • Francois Arago

... c'est de fuir ... c'est un plaisir de les voir ainsi avec leur fumee d'opium dans la tete s'entre embrasser quand on est pret de combattre et se dire adieu les uns aux autres, comme gens qui sont resolus de mourir."—Vol. i. p. 54. Ramble-tamble egg, Scrambled eggs. Ram chikor, The great snow partridge (Tetragallus Himalayensis). Rampur. A small village in the Jhelum Valley, and a village on the way into the Lolab via Kunis. Rawal ...
— A Holiday in the Happy Valley with Pen and Pencil • T. R. Swinburne

... syllaba una brevior aut longior, exsibilatur, exploditur," says Cicero.[53] The actor dare not even have a cold, for on the slightest manifestation of hoarseness, he was hooted off, though favorites such as Roscius might be excused on the plea of indisposition.[54] The Scholiast Cruquius to Hor. Ser. I. 10.37 ff. notes: "Poemata ... in theatris exhibita ...
— The Dramatic Values in Plautus • Wilton Wallace Blancke

... prliminaire de l'Auteur of sixteen pages which Naigeon had printed separately in London. The Abrg du Code de la Nature, which ends the book was also published separately and is sometimes attributed to Diderot, 8vo, 16 pp. [54:1] ...
— Baron d'Holbach - A Study of Eighteenth Century Radicalism in France • Max Pearson Cushing

... unity of a dramatic poem, he placed at the beginning and at the end, like a prologue and an epilogue, two symbolic figures, in the last of which the seven branched candlestick serves as a support to the Old and New Testaments.[54] ...
— Fra Angelico • J. B. Supino

... east and north are the north Dene[52], or North Danes, both on the continent and on the islands. To the east are the Afdrede[53]. To the south is the mouth of the AElfe or Elbe, and some part of Old Seaxna[54] or Old Saxony. The North Dene have to the north that arm of the sea which is called the East sea, and to the east is the nation of the Osti[55], and the Afdrede, or Obotrites, to the south. The ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 1 • Robert Kerr

... forbidden by the Constitution or by the laws."[53] In his book, Our Chief Magistrate and his Powers, Ex-President Taft warmly protested against the notion that the President has any constitutional warrant to attempt the role of a "Universal Providence."[54] A decade earlier his destined successor, Woodrow Wilson, had avowed the opinion that "the President is at liberty, both in law and conscience, to be as big ...
— The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation • Edward Corwin

... her in her agony, ii. 18-22. The third poem, probably the latest in the book, represents the city, after a bitter lament, iii. 1-21, as being inspired, by the thought of the love of God, to submission and hope, iii. 22-36. A prayer of penitence and confession, iii. 37-54, is followed by a petition for vengeance upon the adversaries, iii. 55-66. The fourth poem, like the second, offers a very vivid picture of the sorrows and horrors of the siege: it laments, in detail, ...
— Introduction to the Old Testament • John Edgar McFadyen

... sold at auction. This condition tightened the money market, which in turn reacted on other branches of industry. Again, the great fires of '49-'53 resulted in the erection of too many fireproof buildings. Storage was needed, and rentals were high, so everybody plunged on storehouses. By '54 many hundreds of them stood vacant, representing loss. At that period the first abundance of the placers began to ...
— The Gray Dawn • Stewart Edward White

... 54 They which are drawn out of the deep and put into the building, and whose joints agree with the other stones which are already built, are those which are already fallen asleep, and have suffered for the sake ...
— The Forbidden Gospels and Epistles, Complete • Archbishop Wake

... the Senate the accompanying report[54] of the Secretary of State, in answer to their resolution of the ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 2 (of 2) of Volume 6: Andrew Johnson • James D. Richardson

... 54. What is stated in this passage is, shortly, this: the ear, etc, are the Hotris or sacrificing priests who are to pour libations on the sacrificial fire. The perceptions and functions of those organs constitute the Havi or libations that are to be poured. The points, ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... Forli, as far back as 1422, gives evidence upon this point, and insinuates that they carried the plague with them; as he observes that it raged with peculiar violence the year of their appearance at Forli. (54) ...
— The Zincali - An Account of the Gypsies of Spain • George Borrow

... Valentine; poverty and early difficulties, 53. His satire on the Church, 53. Excitement produced by it, 54. Service rendered by it, 54. Quotation from Andreae's Christianopolis, 61. Satire on the degenerate preaching ...
— History of Rationalism Embracing a Survey of the Present State of Protestant Theology • John F. Hurst

... according to the common rules in horse-racing, without any quibble or equivocation; and the following was the solution:—The first horse ran on the inside of the post; the second wanted weight; and the third fell and broke a fore-leg.(54) ...
— The Gaming Table: Its Votaries and Victims - Volume II (of II) • Andrew Steinmetz

... the envy late But now the pitie of the world! the Getes[54]? The men of Cholcos at thy sufferings grive; The shaggy dweller in the Scithian Rockes, The Mosch[55] condemned to perpetual snowes, That never wept at kindreds burials Suffers with thee and feeles ...
— Old English Plays, Vol. I - A Collection of Old English Plays • Various

... exalted and solemn character to natural science. The possibility of separating generalities from specialties. Examples drawn from astronomy, recent optical discoveries, physical geognosy, and the geography of plants. Practicability of the study of physical cosmography — p. 33-54. Misunderstood popular knowledge, confounding cosmography with a mere encyclopedic enumeration of natural sciences. Necessity for a simultaneous regard for all branches of natural science. Influence of this study on national prosperity and the welfare of nations; its more ...
— COSMOS: A Sketch of the Physical Description of the Universe, Vol. 1 • Alexander von Humboldt

... every festival as if to some common refuge and harbor from the troubles of this harassed and anxious life, seeking to find there tranquillity and gain a new hope in life by its joyous festivities." These gatherings, at which, according to Josephus,[54] over two million people assembled, must, indeed, have been a striking symbol of the unity of the Jewish race, which was at once national and international; magnificent embassies from Babylon and Persia, from Egypt and Cyrene, from Rome and Greece, even ...
— Philo-Judaeus of Alexandria • Norman Bentwich

... him, and permitted him to advance; which he did with such rapidity that the infidels had not time to use fireworks (I.E. cannon), but cane to short weapons such as swords and daggers. At this time an elephant, named Sheer Shikar,[54] belonging to Khan Mahummud, refused the guidance of his driver, and rushed into the center of the enemy's line, where he was stopped by the elephants of Hoje Mul Roy, and his driver was killed. Khan Mahummud with five hundred horse followed, and the elephant becoming unruly, turned upon the enemy, ...
— A Forgotten Empire: Vijayanagar; A Contribution to the History of India • Robert Sewell

... Council for Ratification was organized in December with Everett Colby as chairman, Governor Edward I. Edwards and U. S. Senators Joseph S. Frelinghuysen and Walter E. Edge as honorary chairmen and 54 of the most prominent Democrats and Republicans in the State as vice-chairmen. This was not an active organization but the fact that the leaders of their parties allowed their names to be used had considerable ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume VI • Various

... [FN54] Arab. "Mustahall," "Mustahill' and vulg. "Muhallil" (one who renders lawful). It means a man hired for the purpose who marries pro forma and after wedding, and bedding with actual-consummation, at once divorces the woman. He is held ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 4 • Richard F. Burton

... on going to sleep. I cannot tell anything of the sense of hearing, as no sound reaches the ear to break the perfect stillness and silence of the regions between six and seven miles above the earth. My last observation was made at 1.54 p.m., above 29,000 feet. I suppose two or three minutes to have elapsed between my eyes becoming insensible to seeing fine divisions and 1.54 p.m., and then two or three minutes more to have passed till I was insensible, which I think, therefore, took place about 1.56 ...
— The Dominion of the Air • J. M. Bacon

... having secured in Texas a large addition to slave territory, was indifferent about the expansion of free territory. In fact, Henry Cabot Lodge, in his recent little book, "One Hundred Years of Peace," says: "The loss of the region between the forty-ninth parallel and the line of 54-40 was one of the most severe which ever befell the United States. Whether it could have been obtained without a war is probably doubtful, but it never ought to have been said, officially or otherwise, that we would ...
— From Isolation to Leadership, Revised - A Review of American Foreign Policy • John Holladay Latane

... and a very strong breath, brake his Pipe as often as he blow'd it. This is a great fault in one that writes Pastorals: for if his words are too sounding, or his sense too strong, he must be absurd, because indecently loud. And this is not the rule of an unskilful {54} impertinent Adviser, but rather of a very excellent Master in this Art; for Phoebus twitcht Virgil by the Ear, and warn'd him to forbear great Subjects: but if it ventures upon such, it may be allow'd to use ...
— De Carmine Pastorali (1684) • Rene Rapin

... long hours for operatives. In the cotton industry of Osoka, for example, most of the work is done by girls under fourteen, who work eleven hours a day and got, in 1916, an average daily wage of 5d.[53] Labour organization is in its infancy, and so is Socialism;[54] but both are certain to spread if the number of industrial workers increases without a very marked improvement in hours and wages. Of course the very rigidity of the Japanese policy, which has given it its strength, makes it incapable of adjusting itself to Socialism and Trade Unionism, ...
— The Problem of China • Bertrand Russell

... 1759, there is an admirable paper occasioned by that event, on Saturday, the 27th of the same month, No. 41. The reader, if he pleases, may compare it with another fine paper in the Rambler, No. 54, on the conviction that rushes on the mind at the ...
— Dr. Johnson's Works: Life, Poems, and Tales, Volume 1 - The Works Of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D., In Nine Volumes • Samuel Johnson

... founded in 1592, and later opened by Philip II in person." Ford, Handbook for Travellers in Spain. The monastery is one of the most picturesquely situated in all Christendom. It stands high up upon the jagged mountain Mons Serratus, or Montserrat, which gives to the monastery its name. See p. 54, note 2.] ...
— Legends, Tales and Poems • Gustavo Adolfo Becquer

... half-east; the sea was very high; from time to time a dense fog descended suddenly from the gray sky. Notwithstanding, at noon they were able to take an observation. The ship was found to be in latitude 65 degrees 20 minutes and longitude 54 degrees 22 minutes. They would have to go two degrees farther north before they ...
— The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Hatteras • Jules Verne

... %54. The Early French Possessions% on our continent may be arranged in three great areas: 1. Acadia, 2. New France, 3. Louisiana, or the basin ...
— A School History of the United States • John Bach McMaster

... In our high schools, 54% of the teachers are women; in public normal schools, 65%; and in institutions of higher learning 17.6% are women. Even in supervising positions, there are more women than men in the large centers of population. Certainly these figures justify us in saying that women have established ...
— Woman in Modern Society • Earl Barnes

... hands, and when he can be invited to come and deliver an oration on George Washington next year at the presentation of the old Washington homestead here, he may be "pushed over." You do the pushing. Mrs. Page has invited the young White House couple to visit us on their honeymoon[54]. Encourage that and that may encourage the larger plan later. Nothing else would give such a friendly turn to the whole world as the President's coming here. The old Earth would sit up and rub its eyes and take notice to whom ...
— The Life and Letters of Walter H. Page, Volume I • Burton J. Hendrick



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