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51

adjective
1.
Being one more than fifty.  Synonyms: fifty-one, li.



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"51" Quotes from Famous Books



... every where preaching the Word[50]." [Sidenote: Still confined to Jews, and Samaritans, or to proselytes.] Still it would seem that they confined their preaching to such as were either Hebrews, or Grecians, i.e. foreigners more or less professing Judaism[51]; or, as in the case of the Samaritans, to such as were of mixed Jewish descent, and clung to the Law of Moses, though with manifold corruptions; or, again, to proselytes like the Ethiopian eunuch. The Apostles, we read, continued at Jerusalem, doubtless ...
— A Key to the Knowledge of Church History (Ancient) • John Henry Blunt

... Camp 51. Mild night and morning. Our small stock of sheep got out of the fold in the night and half of them are missing this morning; I hope they may be got. Sky a good deal overcast. Wind east. I am glad that the missing sheep, after a little ...
— McKinlay's Journal of Exploration in the Interior of Australia • John McKinlay

... prepare for this a royal proclamation was set forth making obligatory the English /Order for Communion/. As the new rite regarded only the Communion of the laity, the Latin Mass was to remain in use as heretofore "without any varying of any rite or ceremony."[51] The clergy were commanded to announce the Sunday on which they proposed to distribute Communion to their flocks. After the priest had himself communicated, the communicants, who did not wish to go to confession, should make a general confession, and should receive Communion ...
— History of the Catholic Church from the Renaissance • Rev. James MacCaffrey

... third millions. The per cent of gain in membership, from 1890 to 1905, in the six American religious bodies that number a million each was as follows: Christians or disciples of Christ, 94 per cent.; Roman Catholics, 73 per cent.; Lutherans, 51 per cent.; Methodists, 40 per cent.; Baptists, 38 per cent., and Presbyterians, 35 per cent. Barring out the Catholics and Lutherans, who get most of their gain by immigration, the Christians or churches of Christ show more than double the gain of the ...
— To Infidelity and Back • Henry F. Lutz

... years. Retiring members shall be eligible for re- appointment. 4. The Court of First Instance shall establish its rules of procedure in agreement with the Court of Justice. Those rules shall require the unanimous approval of the Council." 51) Article 171 shall be replaced by the following: "ARTICLE 171 1. If the Court of Justice finds that a Member State has failed to fulfil an obligation under this Treaty, the State shall be required to take the necessary measures to comply with the judgment of the Court of Justice. 2. If the ...
— The Treaty of the European Union, Maastricht Treaty, 7th February, 1992 • European Union

... silver on the left, but the places of these also were changed after the temple was burnt down, and the golden bowl is now placed in the treasury of the people of Clazomenai, weighing eight and a half talents and twelve pounds over, 51 while the silver one is placed in the corner of the vestibule 52 and holds six hundred amphors 53 (being filled with wine by the Delphians on the feast of the Theophania): this the people of Delphi say is the work of Theodoros the Samian, 54 and, as I think, rightly, ...
— The History Of Herodotus - Volume 1(of 2) • Herodotus

... 51. But all wear slayne Cheviat within; the hade no strengthe to stand on hy; The chylde may rue that ys unborne, it ...
— Ballads of Scottish Tradition and Romance - Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - Third Series • Various

... Amen-hotep) IIIrd of the XVIIIth Dynasty, the Memnon of the Greeks,[51] (circa 1500-1466 B.C.,) had a number of large scarabs made, their object was not sepulchral nor were they to be used as talisman, but they apparently were made for the incising upon them, of purely historical ...
— Scarabs • Isaac Myer

... unmanly. I have Anne, my wife, and Charles to look after. I felt rather sneaking as I came home from the Parliament-house—felt as if I were liable monstrari digito in no very pleasant way. But this must be borne cum coeteris; and, thank God, however uncomfortable, I do not feel despondent."[51] On the following day, the 18th January, the day after the blow, he records a bad night, a wish that the next two days were over, but that "the worst is over," and on the same day he set about making notes for the magnum opus, as he called it—the complete edition of all the novels, with a new ...
— Sir Walter Scott - (English Men of Letters Series) • Richard H. Hutton

... expression of an experience, a philosophy, and an art. Like the lovers of his lyric, Mr. Browning has renounced the selfish serenities of wild-wood and dream-palace; he has fared up and down among men, listening to the music of humanity, [51] observing the acts of men, and he has sung what he has heard, and he has painted what he has seen. Will the work live? we ask; and we can answer only in his ...
— Essays from 'The Guardian' • Walter Horatio Pater

... seen by the holy woman at the sepulchre of the Saviour, who overthrew the large stone which closed the mouth of the tomb, and who was seated upon it, had a countenance which shone like lightning, and garments white as snow.[51] ...
— The Phantom World - or, The philosophy of spirits, apparitions, &c, &c. • Augustin Calmet

... Observations is dated Mar. 20th. The distribution of the book would be a few weeks later.—On May 7th I began my Lectures: 51 names: I finished on May 29th.—The mounting of the Equatoreal was finished some time before the Syndicate Visitation at the end of May, but Jones's charge appeared to be exorbitant: I believe it was paid at last, ...
— Autobiography of Sir George Biddell Airy • George Biddell Airy

... other authorized sending to the States commissioners empowered to "treat with Congress, with provincial assemblies, or with Washington; to order a truce; to suspend all laws; to grant pardons and rewards; to restore the form of constitution as it stood before the troubles."[51] The prime minister substantially acknowledged that England's course toward her colonies had been one prolonged blunder, and now she was willing to concede every demand save actual independence. The war might be continued, as it was; but such a confession could ...
— Benjamin Franklin • John Torrey Morse, Jr.

... nine plus,[50] and has not yet paid him, together with a medal, which last was not returned to him until his arrival at Fond du Lac this spring. He also states that Mr. Warren took from him, while he was at La Pointe on his way out, a pack of thirty obiminicqua [51] (equal to thirty full-sized, seasonable beavers), and has not, as yet, offered ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... pictorem, Unquam es miratus, Immorare paululum memoriae TOBIAE SMOLLET, M.D. Viri virtutibus HISCE Quas in homine et cive Et laudes et imiteris. Haud mediocriter ornati: Qui in literis variis versatus. Postquam felicitate SIBI PROPRIA Sese posteris commendaverat, Morte acerba raptus Anno oetatis 51 Eheul quam procul a patria! Prope Liburni portum in Italia, Jacet sepultus. Tali tantoque viro, patrueli suo, Cui in decursu lampada Se pottus tradidisse decuit, Hanc Columnam, Amoris, eheul inane monumentum In ipsis Leviniae ripis, Quas VERSICULIS ...
— The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D. • James Boswell

... considerable thickness of incumbent soil, free from ice, is in favour of such an hypothesis, the partial failure of support necessarily giving rise to foldings in the overlying and previously horizontal layers, as in the case of creeps in coal mines.* (* See "Manual of Geology" by the author, page 51.) ...
— The Antiquity of Man • Charles Lyell

... vanity even as well-hardened as Cicero's to the quick; and his only important abstract work of this period, the De Legibus, seems to have been undertaken with little heart and carried out without either research or enthusiasm. His proconsulate in Cilicia in 51 and 50 B.C. was occupied with the tedious details of administration and petty warfare; six months after his return the Civil war broke out, and, until permitted to return to Rome by Caesar in the autumn ...
— Latin Literature • J. W. Mackail

... even rose to a considerable height along the southern slope of that chain of mountains. At that time the colossal glacier spread at its extremity like a fan, extending westward in the direction of Geneva and eastward towards Soleure.[51] The very minute and extensive investigations of Professor A. Guyot upon the erratic boulders of Switzerland have not only confirmed the statements of M. de Charpentier, but even shown that the northeastern boundary of the ancient ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 76, February, 1864 • Various

... to the land 'Athka; to the (those)[EN50] great mines of copper (or coppers)[EN51] which are in this place ('Athka); and their (i.e. the commissioners') ships[EN52] were loaded, carrying them (the metals); while other (commissioners were sent and) marched on their asses. No! one never (ter-tot) had heard, since the ...
— The Land of Midian, Vol. 1 • Richard Burton

... [51] Captain Burton started with two huge elephant-guns, one double rifle, one pea-rifle, one air-gun, two revolving pistols, and a cross-bow, all of which he used for display to amuse ...
— What Led To The Discovery of the Source Of The Nile • John Hanning Speke

... "In '51, on this same stretch, Miss West, the Flying Cloud, in twenty- four hours, logged three hundred and seventy-four miles under her topgallant-sails. That was sailing. She broke the record, that day, ...
— The Mutiny of the Elsinore • Jack London

... Ingle had him arrested upon two feigned actions to the value of 15,000 pounds sterling. Some friends succeeded in rescuing him from prison, and then Ingle sent the following petition to the House of Lords, which had the effect of stopping for the time proceedings against him.[51] Having done so he carried the prosecution no further. The petition is somewhat lengthy, but it should be read as it is eminently characteristic of ...
— Captain Richard Ingle - The Maryland • Edward Ingle

... food but only of how she could please her Beloved. And "she broke her alabaster box, and poured out upon her Saviour's Head the precious spikenard,[50] and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment."[51] ...
— The Story of a Soul (L'Histoire d'une Ame): The Autobiography of St. Therese of Lisieux • Therese Martin (of Lisieux)

... assumption, and is equally conformable with the universal superstitions of mankind (since similar attempts at divination are to be found among so many nations similarly barbarous) to believe that the oracle arose from the impressions of the Pelasgi [51] and the natural phenomena of the spot; though at a subsequent period the manner of the divination was very probably imitated from that adopted by the Theban oracle. And in examining the place it indeed seems as if Nature herself had been ...
— Athens: Its Rise and Fall, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... reason?' And Narada said, 'In course of my wanderings I arrived at the abode of Vasumanas. And at that time the Brahmanas were performing the ceremony of Swastivachana for the sake of a flowery car.[51] And I approached the king's presence. And after the Brahmanas had completed the ceremony, the flowery car became visible to them. And I praised that car, and thereupon the king told me, 'Holy one, ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... Pythagoras, Lycurgus, Hale, and Locke. The building contains various apartments for conducting the public business of the town: on the principal floor is a splendid room, 132 feet long, 43 ft. 8 in. wide, and 51-1/2 feet in height to the centre of the principal dome. The room is divided into three parts by two ranges of eight elegant Ionic pillars, so disposed that each may form a separate apartment; the central part being lighted by a superb dome, ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction. - Volume 20, No. 567, Saturday, September 22, 1832. • Various

... found many imitators among Spanish Jews. Solomon ibn Sakbel wrote Hebrew Makamat which may be regarded as an attempt at a satire in the form of a romance. The hero, Asher ben Yehuda, a veritable Don Juan, passes through most remarkable adventures.[51] The introductory Makama, describing life with his mistress in the solitude of a forest, is delicious. Tired of his monotonous life, he joins a company of convivial fellows, who pass their time in carousal. While with them, he receives an enigmatic love letter signed by an unknown ...
— Jewish Literature and Other Essays • Gustav Karpeles

... it occurs, partners simply alter positions so that the whole side forms a ring, or circle. It is sometimes used at the finish of a dance; and in "Bean-setting" it occurs at the beginning. (See diagrams, p. 51.) ...
— The Morris Book • Cecil J. Sharp

... was perceived on board the ship, and we were called upon to reembark speedily, or we should all be lost; for what we took for an island proved to be the back[51] of a sea monster. The nimblest got into the sloop, others betook themselves to swimming; but as for myself, I was still upon the island when it disappeared into the sea, and I had only time to catch hold of a piece of wood that we ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments • Anonymous

... 51. Constitution of 1792.—The new constitution, adopted by the Pennsylvania Synod in 1792, though granting a modified suffrage to lay delegates in all important questions, left the synod what it had been, a body governed by the clergy. Dr. Graebner says: "It has been pointed out how this ...
— American Lutheranism - Volume 1: Early History of American Lutheranism and The Tennessee Synod • Friedrich Bente

... the bounds of society, and without compact, only by putting a value on gold and silver, and tacitly agreeing in the use of money: for in governments, the laws regulate the right of property, and the possession of land is determined by positive constitutions. Sec. 51. And thus, I think, it is very easy to conceive, without any difficulty, how labour could at first begin a title of property in the common things of nature, and how the spending it upon our uses bounded it. So that there could then be no reason of quarrelling about title, nor any ...
— Two Treatises of Government • John Locke

... (ll. 51-64) Then answered the foul fiends, black and sinful, chained in torment: "Thou with thy lies didst teach us not to serve the Saviour! To thee alone it seemed that thou hadst power of all things in heaven and earth, that thou wert Holy God, even the Creator. ...
— Codex Junius 11 • Unknown

... led captive to Rome, A.D. 51, and, struck with the grandeur of that city, exclaimed, "Is it possible that a people so wealthy and luxurious can envy me a humble cottage in Britain?" Claudius the emperor was so charmed with his manly spirit and bearing that he released him ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1 - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook • The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D.

... hence most of the cacao is brought down to the city of Bahia in canoes. Nevertheless, Bahia cacao is better fermented than the peculiar cacao of Para, another important cacao from Brazil, which is appreciated by manufacturers on account of its mild flavour. Bahia exported in 1919 about 51,000 tons of cacao. ...
— Cocoa and Chocolate - Their History from Plantation to Consumer • Arthur W. Knapp

... bakery at three rubles a month; "the hardest work I ever tried," he says; sawed wood, carried heavy burdens, peddled apples on the wharf, and tried to commit suicide out of sheer want and misery.[50] "Konovaloff" and "Men with Pasts"[51] would seem to represent some of the experiences of this period, "Konovaloff" being regarded as one of his best stories. Then he went to Tzaritzyn, where he obtained employment as watchman on a railway, was called back to Nizhni Novgorod ...
— A Survey of Russian Literature, with Selections • Isabel Florence Hapgood

... early morning, when he awoke, he heard many people talking around the house, and many roosters crowed. Then Dumalawi knew that he had companions, and upon going out he walked about where the people were warming themselves [51] by fires in their yards, and he ...
— Philippine Folk Tales • Mabel Cook Cole

... a pure solar spectrum, the other claiming prismatic affinity with Procyon. Their mutual circulation is performed in 104 days, and the radius of their orbit cannot be less, and may be a great deal more, than 51,000,000 miles. Hence the possibility is not excluded that the star—which has an authentic parallax of 0.08"—may be visually resolved. Indeed, signs of "elongation" were thought to be perceptible with the Greenwich 28-inch refractor,[1450] while only round images could be seen at Lick.[1451] ...
— A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century - Fourth Edition • Agnes M. (Agnes Mary) Clerke

... seems afterwards to have been called by his name, and is constantly mentioned by our early dramatists. In 1609 a tract was printed, entitled Pimlyco, or Runne Red Cap, 'tis a Mad World at Hogsdon. Isaac Reed (Dodsley's Old Plays, ed. Collier, vii. 51.) says,— ...
— Notes & Queries No. 29, Saturday, May 18, 1850 • Various

... chapel attached to a Parish Church where the daily offices are said, e. g., the chantry of Grace Church, New York. Anciently the chantry was an endowed chapel. {51} ...
— The American Church Dictionary and Cyclopedia • William James Miller

... 51. When the verb in a sentence precedes its subject, English often uses an introductory particle, such as "there," "it." In Esperanto ...
— A Complete Grammar of Esperanto • Ivy Kellerman

... people the most cowardly and the most cruel," and that he cannot know what real love of any kind is. The Abbe Dubois, who lived many years among the Hindoos, wearing their clothes and adopting their customs so far as they did not conflict with his Christian conscience, wrote (I., 51) that ...
— Primitive Love and Love-Stories • Henry Theophilus Finck

... vow. It was agreed between them that all things should remain as they were until their return; and Henry formally claimed of his suzerain the protection of his lands during his absence, and Philip accepted the duty.[51] A few days after taking the cross Henry held an assembly at Le Mans and ordered a tax in aid of his crusade. This was the famous Saladin tithe, which marks an important step in the history of modern taxation. It was modelled on an earlier tax for the same purpose which had been agreed upon between ...
— The History of England From the Norman Conquest - to the Death of John (1066-1216) • George Burton Adams

... out a glass.] Your worship's health.—[Drinks.] Ha! delicious, delicious! fancy it burgundy, only fancy it, and 'tis worth ten shillings a quart. {51} ...
— The Beaux-Stratagem • George Farquhar

... Soeldlinge. Es beruft die Arbeitlosen. Es stellt die Bernfenen an. Es beschaeftigt die Angestelleten. Es uebt die Beschaeftigten. Es belohnt die Geuebten. Es genuegt den Belohnten. Und Gnuege waehrt ewig; waechst ewig.—ii. 51. ...
— The Parables of Our Lord • William Arnot

... in his 'Principia Philosophiae,' i 51—'Et quidem substantia quae nulla plane re indigeat, unica tantum potest intelligi—nempe Deus. Alias vero omnes, non nisi ope concursus Dei existere posse perspicimus. Atque ideo nomen substantiae non convenit Deo et illis univoce, ut dici solet in scholis, hoc est, nulla ...
— Review of the Work of Mr John Stuart Mill Entitled, 'Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy.' • George Grote

... a secret joy In horror for itself alone, Thus Nature doth our souls alloy, Thus her perversity hath shown. Twelfth Night approaches. Merry eves!(51) When thoughtless youth whom nothing grieves, Before whose inexperienced sight Life lies extended, vast and bright, To peer into the future tries. Old age through spectacles too peers, Although the destined coffin nears, Having ...
— Eugene Oneguine [Onegin] - A Romance of Russian Life in Verse • Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin

... fighting power, was to a British frigate of the same class almost what an ironclad would be to a wooden ship. The Constitution, for example, was in size to the average British frigate as 15.3 to 10.9; in weight of metal as 76 to 51; and in crew as 46 to 25. Broke, however, had a well-founded belief in his ship and his men, and he proposed, in his sober fashion, to restore the tarnished honour of his flag by capturing single-handed the best American ...
— Deeds that Won the Empire - Historic Battle Scenes • W. H. Fitchett

... 51 Because, said he, the Son set his messengers over those whom the Father delivered unto him, to keep every one of them; but he himself laboured very much, and suffered much, that he might blot ...
— The Forbidden Gospels and Epistles, Complete • Archbishop Wake

... 51 The past and present wilt—I have fill'd them, emptied them. And proceed to fill my next fold ...
— Leaves of Grass • Walt Whitman

... him, Because I said unto thee, I saw thee under the fig tree, believest thou? thou shalt see greater things than these. 51. And He saith unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Hereafter ye shall see heaven open, and the angels of God ascending and descending upon the Son ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - St. John Chapters I to XIV • Alexander Maclaren

... made to a particular type of small rotary motors which are being constructed by MM. Riedinger & Co., and which is stated have given very excellent results. These engines were specially used for working sewing machines and developed on the brake an efficiency of 34.07 and 51.63 foot pounds per second. Trials were made with a half horse power variable ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 803, May 23, 1891 • Various

... acroteria on the Stoa Basileios on the agora of Athens. Pliny[50] says that such works existed down to his day, and speaks of their great antiquity. Fortunately a notable example has been preserved in the acroterium of the gable of the Heraion at Olympia,[51] a great disk of clay over seven feet in diameter. It forms a part, says Dr. Drpfeld, of the oldest artistic roof construction that has remained to us from Greek antiquity. That is, the original ...
— The American Journal of Archaeology, 1893-1 • Various

... 51. An intercollegiate committee of graduates should be formed with power to absolve college athletes from technical and minor breaches ...
— The Making of Arguments • J. H. Gardiner

... of was based on an article entitled "Fortified Lime Juice" which appeared in The Chemist and Druggist, 13th May 1911 (page 51). On again referring to this article we find that the Government regulation applies only ...
— The Healthy Life, Vol. V, Nos. 24-28 - The Independent Health Magazine • Various

... unconscious than a definitely critical one. And though the exquisite felicity of his touch in detail is established once for all by comparing his prose narratives of the Passing of Arthur and the parting of Lancelot and the queen with the verse[51] from which he almost beyond question directly took both, he must sometimes have been bewildered by the mass of material from which he had to select, and may not always have included or excluded ...
— The Flourishing of Romance and the Rise of Allegory - (Periods of European Literature, vol. II) • George Saintsbury

... during floods. At 12, having remained behind the party with Jemmy, I got the following observation on a plain horizon of about a mile in length, namely, meridian altitude of the sun 78 degrees; latitude 19 degrees 51 minutes 7 seconds. Started again at 7.43 and came east-south-east four miles on the tracks of our party along an unwooded plain with plenty of old grass on it, now green from the recent wet weather; and along a low sandy ridge, ...
— Journal of Landsborough's Expedition from Carpentaria - In search of Burke and Wills • William Landsborough

... old. In this respect, we may perhaps liken them to the mendicant orders in the Middle Ages, with their florid, romantic theology, beyond the bounds of orthodox tradition, giving so much new matter to art and poetry. They are a picturesque addition, also, to the exterior of Greek life, with [51] their white dresses, their dirges, their fastings and ecstasies, their outward asceticism and material purifications. And the central object of their worship comes before us as a tortured, persecuted, slain god—the suffering ...
— Greek Studies: A Series of Essays • Walter Horatio Pater

... an institute for lengthening the life of dying States.... Those half-States which owe their existence only to the aid of foreign weapons, money or knowledge, are hopelessly at the mercy of the modern States.—Leipziger Tageblatt, 24th January, 1913. NIPPOLD, D.C., p. 51. ...
— Gems (?) of German Thought • Various

... situation was quite simple. Unless, by God's providence, some miracle happened, the Kansas was a doomed ship. The pin stuck where the Admiralty chart recorded soundings of one hundred fathoms with a fine sand bed. The longitude was 75-50 west of Greenwich and latitude 51-35 south. Staring at them from the otherwise blank space which showed the wide expanse of the Pacific was an ominous note by the compilers ...
— The Captain of the Kansas • Louis Tracy

... Book, adding the Acts of Parliament against the Mass, &c., passed in 1560. It formerly belonged to the Rev. Dr. Jamieson, and was purchased at his sale in 1839. The press-marks on the fly leaf may probably identify the collection to which it formerly belonged, "2 H. 16.—Hist. 51," and "a. 66." Notwithstanding a MS. note by Dr. Jamieson, it is a transcript of no value, corresponding in ...
— The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6) • John Knox

... eminent writers, clearly ascertained. In a cellar, the body of a person of short stature, without a head, not many years since, was found, and supposed to be the reliques of poor Anne, but soon after it was reinterred in the same place and covered with earth."[51] ...
— Strange Pages from Family Papers • T. F. Thiselton Dyer

... reaches his true home in heaven: Jesus gives him His arm to lean upon; and he "goes on his way rejoicing." He has many fiery trials to try him: Jesus tells him not to think these "strange," but rather to "rejoice," inasmuch as He is "partaker with him in his sufferings."[51] He has, at last, to walk through the dark Valley: Jesus meets him there, and supports him there. He sees "the King in His beauty," and the land that is yet "afar off;" and, believing, "he rejoices with joy unspeakable and full of glory."[52] ...
— The Cities of Refuge: or, The Name of Jesus - A Sunday book for the young • John Ross Macduff

... pounds; and she asks if ever Queen of England had spent so little in robes! "It evidently appears," says her Grace, "that, by my economy in the nine years I served her Majesty, I saved her near ninety thousand pounds[51] in clothes alone. Notwithstanding this," continues the Duchess, "my Lord-Treasurer (Harley) has thought fit to order the Examiner (Swift) to represent me in print as a pick-pocket all over England; and for that honest service, and some others, her Majesty has lately ...
— Political Women, Vol. 2 (of 2) • Sutherland Menzies

... Page 15: Christman replaced with Christmas | | Page 29: "we we called the tank" replaced with | | "as we called the tank" | | Page 29: terriffc replaced with terrific | | Page 44: "until they they had" replaced with | | "until they had" | | Page 47: yeards replaced with yards | | Page 51: areoplanes replaced with aeroplanes | | Page 52: Battallion replaced with Battalion | | Page 53: Zxischen replaced with Zwischen | | Page 54: simultanously replaced with simultaneously | | Page 57: quitely replaced with ...
— Over the top with the 25th - Chronicle of events at Vimy Ridge and Courcellette • R. Lewis

... 51. In which Mr. Pickwick encounters an old Acquaintance—To which fortunate Circumstance the Reader is mainly indebted for Matter of thrilling Interest herein set down, concerning two great Public Men of ...
— The Pickwick Papers • Charles Dickens

... and wolves and other Canidae is shown by savages taking the trouble to cross them. Buffon got four successive generations from the wolf and dog, and the mongrels were perfectly fertile together.[51] But more lately M. Flourens states positively as the result of his numerous experiments that hybrids from the wolf and dog, crossed inter se, become sterile at the third generation, and those from the jackal and dog at the fourth generation.[52] But these animals were closely confined; and many ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I. • Charles Darwin

... perfect. To understand the Constitution, it is necessary to read it in conjunction with the authoritative commentary of Marquis Ito, which was issued at the same time. Mr. Coleman very correctly summarizes the Constitution as follows[51]:— ...
— The Problem of China • Bertrand Russell

... the Strait of Gibraltar was made in the early morning hours, while a mist hung near the surface of the water and permitted no one at the fort to see the wake of the U-51's periscope. Once inside the Mediterranean he headed for the south of Greece, escaping attack from a French destroyer and proceeding through the AEgean Sea to the Dardanelles. The journey ended on the 25th of May, just ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume V (of 12) - Neuve Chapelle, Battle of Ypres, Przemysl, Mazurian Lakes • Francis J. Reynolds, Allen L. Churchill, and Francis Trevelyan

... However they are not so rude in their behavior, perhaps because they were softened by the evangelical law, which they once enjoyed. However, they abandoned that law because the ministers abandoned them. [51] That holy conquest was undertaken with great resolution by father Fray Juan de San Nicolas, one of the eight, who with a spirit apostolically bold planted the standard of the cross in the town nearest the seashore. He subdued its inhabitants by his gentleness, and attracted ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume XXI, 1624 • Various

... with the head projecting half-way above the sides. A notch was cut across the barrel, through this channel, at the trigger end, and a trigger made of heavy iron wire, bent to the shape shown in Fig. 51, was hinged to the gun by a bolt which passed clear through the stock and through both eyes of the trigger. By using two nuts on the bolt, and tightening one against the other, they were prevented from working loose and coming off. When we ...
— The Scientific American Boy - The Camp at Willow Clump Island • A. Russell Bond

... B.Suphan, Berlin, Weidman, 1877, I, 254. In the tenth fragment (second edition) he says the Germans have imitated other nations, "so dass Nachahmer beinahe zum Beiwort und zur zweiten Sylbe unseres Namens geworden." See II, p.51. Many years later Herder does not seem to view this period of imitation with such regret as the attitude of these earlier criticisms would forecast. In the "Ideen zur Geschichte und Kritik der Poesie und bildenden Knste," 1794-96, he states with a burst of ...
— Laurence Sterne in Germany • Harvey Waterman Thayer

... length of the floor of the inner cave, which lies north-east and south-west, is 51 feet; and of this floor a length of about 37 feet was more or less covered with ice, the greatest breadth of the ice being within an inch or two of 11 feet. Excepting in the part of the cave already mentioned as being less than 3 feet high, we found the floor not nearly so dry, nor so completely ...
— Ice-Caves of France and Switzerland • George Forrest Browne

... for the Guelph cut his orange horizontally, and the Ghibelline downwards. Children were taught these artifices of faction—their hatreds became traditional, and thus the Italians perpetuated the full benefits of their party-spirit from generation to generation.[51] ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli

... and among these words one may look with a good degree of certainty for the 1, 2, 3, etc., of the number scale. So fruitful has been this line of research, that the attempt has been made, even, to establish a common origin for all the races of mankind by means of a comparison of numeral words.[51] But in this instance, as in so many others that will readily occur to the mind, the result has been that the theory has finally taken possession of the author and reduced him to complete subjugation, instead of remaining his ...
— The Number Concept - Its Origin and Development • Levi Leonard Conant

... world. As a playful reminiscence of our hopes of the year 1852, I suggested to Uhlig that in our correspondence during that year we should ignore its existence and should date our letters December '51, in consequence of which this said month of December ...
— My Life, Volume II • Richard Wagner

... death—whether you be beheaded, or fall victim to pest or stroke, or in whatever manner God may call you home—in it all, look only upon me, whose Word promises that you shall not die, what seems death being but a sweet sleep, ay, the entrance into life eternal." Christ says (Jn 8, 51): "Verily, verily, I say unto you. If a man keep my Word, he shall ...
— Epistle Sermons, Vol. II - Epiphany, Easter and Pentecost • Martin Luther

... the nature of this country, and found quarries in it; and if there were any in the colony I ought to find them, as my condition and profession of architect should have procured me the knowledge of {51} them. After giving the situation of the capital, it is proper I describe the order in which ...
— History of Louisisana • Le Page Du Pratz

... not made himself prominent by previous exercises in play-writing. Further in H.T. prol. 51-2, he describes his ...
— The Student's Companion to Latin Authors • George Middleton

... ear 47 The IDEAS of sight more apt to be confounded with the IDEAS of touch than those of hearing are 48 How this comes to pass 49 Strictly speaking, we never see and feel the same thing 50 Objects of SIGHT twofold, mediate and immediate 51 These hard to separate in our thoughts 52 The received accounts of our perceiving magnitude by sight, false 53 Magnitude perceived as immediately as distance 54 Two kinds of sensible extension, neither of which is infinitely ...
— An Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision • George Berkeley

... 51. Semigraphy, or the Art of Short-Writing, as it hath been proved by many hundreds in the City of London, and other places, by them practised, and acknowledged to be the easiest, exactest, and swiftest method; the meanest capacity ...
— The Compleat Cook • Anonymous, given as "W. M."

... a case from which he had withdrawn in transitu, so to speak, he refused to accept any portion of the fee. Such habits may not meet with the same measure of commendation from professional men[51] which they will command on the part of others; but those who are not members of this ingenious profession, contemning the fine logic which they fail to overcome, stubbornly insist upon admiring the lawyer who refuses to subordinate right to law. In this respect ...
— Abraham Lincoln, Vol. I. • John T. Morse

... mediums continue summoning spirits until late afternoon when the ceremony known as Gipas—the dividing—is held. [51] The chief medium, who is now possessed by a powerful spirit, covers her shoulder with a sacred blanket, [52] and in company with the oldest male relative of the expectant woman goes to the middle of the room, where a bound pig lies with ...
— The Tinguian - Social, Religious, and Economic Life of a Philippine Tribe • Fay-Cooper Cole

... 51. 31. "Ser Ciappelletto," the hero of the first story in Boccaccio's Decameron, forger, murderer, blasphemer, fornicator, drunkard and gambler, "he was probably the worst man who was ever born," to crown all, he so deceived the priest to whom he ...
— The Lives of the Painters, Sculptors & Architects, Volume 1 (of 8) • Giorgio Vasari

... substituted for those of Celtic deities. Certain primitive ritual, too, is still carried out in the vicinity of some megalithic structures in Celtic areas, as at Dungiven, in Ireland, where pilgrims wash before a great stone in the river Roe and then walk round it, and in many parts of Brittany.[51] ...
— Legends & Romances of Brittany • Lewis Spence

... Fiji: Fijian 51% (predominantly Melanesian with a Polynesian admixture), Indian 44%, European, other Pacific Islanders, overseas Chinese, and other ...
— The 2001 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... Diagram 51 shows a similar example, the only difference being that it is not the advance of the Black Knight's Pawn but that of the Rook's Pawn which gives White an opportunity of opening a file for his Rooks. He will accomplish this by advancing his Knight's Pawn to ...
— Chess and Checkers: The Way to Mastership • Edward Lasker

... wood, which are not used. The church is under the personal care and watchful management of the archbishop of Manila who is now governing. The houses of the ecclesiastical cabildo are contiguous to the church. [51] ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 (Vol 28 of 55) • Various

... are alive at a very early hour, and the excitement increases. The Reform Committee sits in perpetual session in the offices of the 'Gold Fields.' They are appointing sub-committees for the safeguard and comfort of the town; 51,000l. for the relief of the poor has already been raised. Messengers are sent out to call in all the women and children from the mines. Arrangements are being made for the housing and feeding of these. Nothing is forgotten, ...
— A Woman's Part in a Revolution • Natalie Harris Hammond

... are no instances more modern than this, of carrying these laws into practice; and the last, sanguinary act is itself now repealed. The severe statute of 5th Eliz. c. 20 is repealed by 23d Geo. III. c. 51—and Gypsies are now only punishable under the Vagrant Act, which declares, "that all persons pretending to be Gypsies, or wandering in the habit, and form of Egyptians, shall be deemed rogues, and vagabonds."—17th Geo. II. ...
— A Historical Survey of the Customs, Habits, & Present State of the Gypsies • John Hoyland

... the Reliance were landed, and, considering that they had experienced much bad weather on the passage, looked extremely well. The two Colonial ships had been employed eight months on this voyage to and from the Cape, and had added 51 cows, 3 bulls, a few horses, and about 90 sheep, to the stock of domestic cattle ...
— An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 2 • David Collins

... regarding the history and mechanical construction of platen printing presses, from the original hand press to the modern job press, to which is added a chapter on automatic presses of small size. 51 pp.; illustrated; 49 ...
— Division of Words • Frederick W. Hamilton

... he said, "little Miss Jeanne, and remember, No. 51, Grosvenor Square. If I am not there, I have a very nice old housekeeper who will look after you until I ...
— Jeanne of the Marshes • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... possible object of worship for us. How little the pantheist's God can mean to us will be understood when it is stated that, according to Spinoza, man "cannot strive to have God's love to him." [6] Indeed, how could the universe "love" one of {51} its mere passing phases? Is it a wonder that this cheerless creed has "increasingly repelled rather than attracted religious people" when once they have understood its inwardness? We ask for bread and receive—a nebula; ...
— Problems of Immanence - Studies Critical and Constructive • J. Warschauer

... a path, steep indeed, but easily passable, leads to the fortress of Virgantia.[51] The sepulchre of this petty prince whom we have spoken of as the maker of these roads is at Susa, close to the walls; and his remains are honoured with religious veneration for two reasons: first of all, because he governed his people with ...
— The Roman History of Ammianus Marcellinus • Ammianus Marcellinus

... 51. You recognize, Maximus, the theory of Plato, as far as I have been able to give it a lucid explanation in the time at my disposal. I put my trust in him when he says that the cause of epilepsy is the ...
— The Apologia and Florida of Apuleius of Madaura • Lucius Apuleius

... metropolis With glistering spires and pinnacles adorned, Which now the rising Sun gilds with his beams.—iii. 549-51. ...
— The Astronomy of Milton's 'Paradise Lost' • Thomas Orchard

... earl had taken his departure, walking to the door with the haughty air of a nobleman, then bowing to me with the affability of a business man, I left my flat, took a cab, and speedily found myself climbing the stair to the first floor of 51 Beaumont Street, Strand. As I paused at the door on which were painted the words, 'S. Brooks, Stenography, Typewriting, Translation', I heard the rapid click-click of a machine inside. Knocking at the door the writing ceased, and I was bidden to enter. ...
— The Triumphs of Eugene Valmont • Robert Barr

... associated with the lower Basidiomycetes are the large fungi of which Tremella (Fig. 51, A) is an example. They are jelly-like forms, horny and somewhat brittle when dry, but becoming soft when moistened. They are common, growing on dead twigs, logs, etc., and are usually brown or ...
— Elements of Structural and Systematic Botany - For High Schools and Elementary College Courses • Douglas Houghton Campbell

... carefully distilled, is at first colorless, but speedily becomes yellowish; its specific gravity is 0.87 at 72.5 deg. Fahr.; its boiling-point is 444 deg. Fahr.; it solidifies at 51.8 deg. to 60.8 deg. Fahr., or still higher; it is soluble in absolute alcohol, and in acetic acid. The most usual and reliable tests of the quality of an otto are (1) its odor, (2) its congealing point, (3) its crystallization. The odor can be judged only after long experience. ...
— Scientific American Supplement No. 275 • Various

... Theocritus or any of his Followers have brought it to it's utmost Perfection or not. Rapine takes it for granted that Theocritus and Virgil are infallible; and aim's at nothing beyond showing the Rules which he thinks they observ'd. Facetious Head! (Works, Oxford, 1933, pp. 51-52. The ...
— De Carmine Pastorali (1684) • Rene Rapin

... 51 feet and provides seating capacity for 52 passengers. This length is about 4 feet more than those of the existing ...
— The New York Subway - Its Construction and Equipment • Anonymous

... in the complex answers to a single man may be seen in the work on Heaven and Hell, n. 51-86; and that the angels think according to the ...
— Spiritual Life and the Word of God • Emanuel Swedenborg

... been a great deal said about the Vigilance Committee in California in 1856, there has not been much said about it in '49, '50 and '51. That the reader may know what was going on up to that time, I must now draw largely from previously published accounts for my information, ...
— California 1849-1913 - or the Rambling Sketches and Experiences of Sixty-four - Years' Residence in that State. • L. H. Woolley

... man was good, and 1 woman. In logic 28 men were examined, and 1 woman: the woman came out fifth in rank, and she had only been at it a month. In moral philosophy 16 men were examined; and 1 woman: the woman came out third. In arithmetic, 51 men and 3 women: 2 men were optimi, and 1 woman optima; several men failed, and not one woman. In mechanics, 81 men and 1 woman: the woman passed with fair credit, as did 13 men; the rest failing. In French were examined ...
— The Woman-Hater • Charles Reade

... shell. The amazing force of expansion is also shown from the distance to which these iron plugs are thrown out of the fuse-hole. A plug of two pounds and a half weight was thrown no less than 415 feet from the shell; the fuse axis was at an angle of 45 deg.; the thermometer showed 51 deg. below the freezing point. Here you see ice and gunpowder performing the same operations. That similar effects should proceed from such dissimilar causes is very extraordinary."—Gray's ...
— The Conquest of Canada (Vol. 1 of 2) • George Warburton

... antiquity, and free from any appearance of imitating structures of timber, mark the sites of the oldest cities of Greece, Mycenae and Orchomenos for example, the most ancient being Pelasgic city walls of unwrought stone (Fig. 51). The so-called Treasury of Atreus at Mycenae, a circular underground chamber 48 ft. 6 in. in diameter, and with a pointed vault, is a well-known specimen of more regular yet archaic building. Its ...
— Architecture - Classic and Early Christian • Thomas Roger Smith

... but iffen I wants to cook for him and missy I gits $2.50 de month, so I cooks for him till I marries Armstead Barrett, and then us farm for de livin'. Us have big church weddin' and I has white loyal dress and black brogan shoes. Us been married 51 ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves - Texas Narratives, Part 1 • Works Projects Administration

... at Louisville, Kentucky, 50. Efforts to sell me, 50. Fortunate escape from the man-stealers in the public street, 51. I return to Bedford, Ky., 55. The rescue of my family again attempted, 55. I started alone expecting them to follow, 2. After waiting some months I resolve to go back ...
— Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, an American Slave, Written by Himself • Henry Bibb

... co-laborer in the work which brought the whole movement to a conclusion, Holbach's System of Nature. Two decades, however, before the latter work, the outcome of a long development of thought, appeared, the physician La Mettrie[1] (1709-51) had promulgated materialism, though rather in an anthropological form than as a world-system, and with cynical satisfaction in the violation of traditional beliefs—in his Natural History of the Soul, 1745, in a disguised form, and, undisguised, in his Man a Machine, 1748—and at the same time ...
— History Of Modern Philosophy - From Nicolas of Cusa to the Present Time • Richard Falckenberg

... one of the Nohant amusements. One of the joys of the family, and also one of the delights of dilettanti,(51) was the painting of the scenery, the manufacturing of costumes, the working out of scenarios, dressing dolls ...
— George Sand, Some Aspects of Her Life and Writings • Rene Doumic

... 51. In the meditation of the Great Calm the Buddha whose countenance is glorious, commendeth the most excellent wisdom of Ananda for that he asked the way of knowledge, desiring ...
— Buddhist Psalms • Shinran Shonin

... 17: He placed as many more.—Ver. 51. The temperate zones, lying between the torrid and the frigid, partake of the character of each in a modified degree, and are of a middle temperature between hot and cold. Here, too, the distinction of the seasons is ...
— The Metamorphoses of Ovid - Vol. I, Books I-VII • Publius Ovidius Naso

... young. Thin hives, their insufficiency. Brood combs, danger of exposure to low temperature, 49. Cocoons of drones and workers perfect. Cocoons of queens imperfect, the cause, 50. Number of eggs dependent on the weather, &c. Supernumerary eggs, how disposed of, 51. Queen bee, fertility diminishes after her third year. Dies in her fourth year, 52. Drones, description of. Their proper office. Destroyed by the bees. When first appear, 53. None in weak hives. Great number of them. Rapid increase ...
— Langstroth on the Hive and the Honey-Bee - A Bee Keeper's Manual • L. L. Langstroth

... have been already mentioned (pp. 50-51), mediate between the founders of skepticism and Bayle, its most gifted representative. The latter of these two wrote a Criticism of the Cartesian Philosophy, 1689, besides a Treatise on the Impotence of the Human Mind, which did ...
— History Of Modern Philosophy - From Nicolas of Cusa to the Present Time • Richard Falckenberg

... Paracelsus's mind, that boldly delivers a re- ceipt to make a man without conjunction; yet cannot but wonder at the multitude of heads that do deny traduction, having no other arguments to confirm their belief than that rhetorical sentence and antimetathesis<51> of Augustine, "creando infunditur, infundendo creatur." Either opinion will consist well enough with religion: yet I should rather incline to this, did not one objection haunt me, not wrung from speculations and subtleties, but from common sense and observation; ...
— Religio Medici, Hydriotaphia, and the Letter to a Friend • Sir Thomas Browne

... with the drays there next evening, to come on by moonlight, thus avoiding the intense heat, so oppressive under extreme thirst. The thermometer during the day, rose to 103 deg. in the shade. Latitude of the camp on Narran swamp, 29 deg. 45' 51" S. Thermometer at sunrise, 47 deg.; at noon, 97 deg.; at 4 P. M., 97 deg.; at 9, 69 deg.; ditto with wet bulb, 57 deg.. The height of this camp above the sea, the average of five ...
— Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia • Thomas Mitchell

... to the indefatigable exertions of Mr. John Ward, one of the contractors, and Mr. James Marshall, the resident superintendent." Early the next month Colonel Yolland inspected the whole length from Welshpool to Newtown, pausing to express his special approbation of the Kilkewydd bridge {51} as "the best constructed on the line," and it was now open to the Company publicly to announce that from June 10th a through service of trains would run from Oswestry to ...
— The Story of the Cambrian - A Biography of a Railway • C. P. Gasquoine

... Stoic (about 135-51 B. C.) wrote on geography and astronomy under the titles On the Ocean and περι μετεωρων {peri meteôrôn}. He made a new but faulty calculation of the circumference of the earth (240,000 stades). Per contra, in a separate tract on the size of the sun (in refutation of the Epicurean view that ...
— The Legacy of Greece • Various

... at once, but by piece-meal; so that one half of the animal was oftentimes buried, while the other half[50] survived. He moreover assures us, that they could read and write; and whenever one of them was introduced into the sacred apartments for probation, the priest presented him with a [51]tablet, and with a pen and ink; and by his writing could immediately find out if he were of the true intelligent breed. These animals are said to have been of infinite use to the antient Egyptians in determining times and seasons; for it seems they were, in some particular ...
— A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume II. (of VI.) • Jacob Bryant

... to the tribes and subdividing each district among the tribesmen took as much time as the conquest of the land. (51) ...
— THE LEGENDS OF THE JEWS VOLUME IV BIBLE TIMES AND CHARACTERS - FROM THE EXODUS TO THE DEATH OF MOSES • BY LOUIS GINZBERG

... might be anxious about him. The need was probably the case of the old prince himself marching to Cicero's help. This he had promised to do, but the campaign was finished without him. This was in the year 51 B.C., and Marcus was nearly fourteen years old, his cousin being his senior by about two years. "They are very fond of each other," writes Cicero; "they learn, they amuse themselves together, but one wants the rein, the other the spur." (Doubtless the latter is ...
— Roman life in the days of Cicero • Alfred J[ohn] Church

... to the Falkland islands or Malouines, which consist of two principal islands, called West and East Islands, besides a number of islets, about 360 English miles from the continent of South America. The centre of the west, or principal island, is in lat. 51 deg. 25' S. and long. 60 deg. ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 11 • Robert Kerr

... which he had drawn from his pocket and thrown upon the table and re-read it as he had in the caf, by a glance of the eye, and again in the cab, on returning home, by the light of a gas jet: "George Lamil, 51 Moncey street." ...
— A Comedy of Marriage & Other Tales • Guy De Maupassant

... the eleventh century, whose prodigious exploits with the axle of his cart as an offensive weapon, and the wheel as a shield, are handed down in the chap-books of the last three centuries. See p. 63; also Bibliog. at the end of Romany Rye.—51. Elzigood: William E., of Heigham, Norwich, enlisted October, 1789, became Drum-major in the regiment, 22nd October, 1802; called facetiously or maliciously Else-than-gude on p. 54.—55. O'Hanlon: ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... account, if you will stay with me, keeping only a thousand heavy infantry, I will deliver to you the fortified places and everything I promised." The other answered: "On these terms I may not accept them, only let us go 51 free." "Nay, but I know," said Seuthes, "that it is safer for you to bide with me than to go away." Then Xenophon again: "For your forethought I thank you, but I may not stay. Somewhere I may rise ...
— Anabasis • Xenophon

... Hellenici: the Civil and Literary Chronology of Greece, from the earliest accounts to the death of Augustus. By Henry Fynes Clinton, M.A. Oxford, 1834-51. ...
— How to Form a Library, 2nd ed • H. B. Wheatley

... eateth my flesh and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day. For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed. He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him." John, 6:51-56. These words appeared to me to be undoubtedly the foundation of the Romish faith on this head. I even thought that the writer of them had the establishment of this doctrine especially in view. At that moment I was tempted ...
— The Village in the Mountains; Conversion of Peter Bayssiere; and History of a Bible • Anonymous

... keep the mean: He that sees all things oft sees not himself. The Thames is witness of thy tyranny, Whose waves thou dost exhaust for winter show'rs. The naked channel 'plains her of thy spite, That laid'st her entrails unto open sight.[51] Unprofitably borne to man and beast, Which like to Nilus yet doth hide his head, Some few years since[52] thou lett'st o'erflow these walks, And in the horse-race headlong ran at race, While in a cloud ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VIII (4th edition) • Various

... and all on board raised in unison a hymn of praise. Montmagny was with them, to deliver the island, in behalf of the Company of the Hundred Associates, to Maisonneuve, representative of the Associates of Montreal. [ Le Clerc, II. 50, 51. ] And here, too, was Father Vimont, Superior of the missions; for the Jesuits had been prudently invited to accept the spiritual charge of the young colony. On the following day, they glided along the green and solitary shores now thronged with ...
— The Jesuits in North America in the Seventeenth Century • Francis Parkman

... of the chief cities of the Netherlands, is situated on the river Scheldt, 22 miles north of Brussels, and 65 south of Amsterdam: longitude 4 deg. 23' East; latitude 51 deg. 13' North. It is called by Latin writers, Antverpia, or Andoverpum; by the Germans, Antorf; by the Spanish, Anveres; and by the French, Anvers.[2] The city is of great antiquity, and is supposed by some to have existed before the time of Caesar. It was much enlarged by ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 579 - Volume 20, No. 579, December 8, 1832 • Various

... people, it would appear, view with more or less antipathy the personal odors of those persons to whom they are not sexually attracted, while their attitude is neutral in this respect toward the individuals to whom they are sexually attracted.[51] The following statement by a correspondent seems to me to express the experience of the majority of men in this respect: "I do not notice that different people have different smells. Certain women I have known have been in the habit of using particular scents, but no associations could be ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 4 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... is as likely to stumble into a man from Bagdad as from Boston. One can stand in the middle of it and with his westerly ear catch the argot of Gotham and with his easterly all the dialects of Damascus. And if through some unexpected convulsion of Nature 51 Broadway should topple over, Mr. Zimmerman, the stockbroker, whose office is on the sixth story, might easily fall clear of the Greek restaurant in the corner of Greenwich Street, roll twenty-five yards more down Morris Street, and find himself on Washington Street reading a copy of Al-Hoda ...
— By Advice of Counsel • Arthur Train



Words linked to "51" :   cardinal, atomic number 51



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