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Xxvii   Listen
adjective
xxvii  adj.  The Roman number representing twenty-seven.
Synonyms: twenty-seven, 27.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Xxvii" Quotes from Famous Books



... that of Grettir's song on Hallmund, but which is stated to be by some cave-wight that lived in a deep and gloomy cavern somewhere in Deepfirth, on the north side of Broadfirth. In the so-called Bergbuaattr or cave-dweller's tale (Edited by G. Vigfusson in Nordiske Old-skrifter, xxvii., pp. 123-128, and 140-143, Copenhagen, 1860), this song is said to have been heard by two men, who, on their way to church, had lost their road, and were overtaken by the darkness of night, and, in order to escape ...
— The Story of Grettir The Strong • Translated by Eirikr Magnusson and William Morris

... XXVII. Sed adhibes artem advocatam etiam sensibus. Pictor videt quae nos non videmus et, simul inflavit tibicen, a perito carmen agnoscitur. Quid? hoc nonne videtur contra te valere, si sine magnis artificiis, ad quae pauci accedunt, nostri quidem generis admodum, nec videre nec audire possimus? ...
— Academica • Marcus Tullius Cicero

... / and endyng with kyng Iohan of Fraunce / taken prisoner at Poyters by prince Edwarde. [Woodcut.] [Colophon] Imprinted at London in flete strete by Richarde Pynson / printer vnto the kynges moste noble grace / & fynisshed the .xxi. day of Februarye / the yere of our lorde god .M .CCCCC .xxvii. ...
— Catalogue of the Books Presented by Edward Capell to the Library of Trinity College in Cambridge • W. W. Greg

... Passing over chapter xxvii., in which Mr Mill refutes Sir W. Hamilton's opinion that the study of mathematics is worthless, or nearly so, as an intellectual discipline—we shall now call attention to the concluding remarks which sum up the results of the volume. ...
— Review of the Work of Mr John Stuart Mill Entitled, 'Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy.' • George Grote

... beautiful, charitable, and ancient prayers of this day with the words, Let us pray, dearly beloved, for the holy church of God etc. The deacon then kneeling says (according to the ancient custom mentioned by S. Cesarius of Arles in his 36th homily, and by S. Basil in his book on the Holy Ghost c. XXVII) Let us bend our knees, and the subdeacon answers, Stand up, as it was customary to pray standing. This form is repeated before each prayer, except that which is offered for the Jews[85]: for their soldiers, bowing ...
— The Ceremonies of the Holy-Week at Rome • Charles Michael Baggs

... substitution of distichs for tetrastichs. Then comes the appendix containing other proverbial dicta (chap. xxiv. 23-34. chap. vi. 9-19, chap. xxv. 2-10), followed by the proverbs "of Solomon, which the men of Hezekiah copied out" (xxv. 11-xxvii. 22), and wound up with a little poem in praise of rural economy. Chaps. xxviii. and xxix. constitute another collection of proverbs of a more strictly religious character, and then come the sayings of Agur, written in strophes of six lines, the rules ...
— The Sceptics of the Old Testament: Job - Koheleth - Agur • Emile Joseph Dillon

... invisible particles or gemmules and that these gemmules increase by division. Cytology began to develop on new lines some years after the publication in 1868 of Charles Darwin's "Provisional hypothesis of Pangenesis" ("Animals and Plants under Domestication", London, 1868, Chapter XXVII.), and when he died in 1882 it was still in its infancy. Darwin would have soon suggested the substitution of the nuclei for his gemmules. At least the great majority of present-day investigators in the domain of cytology have been led to the conclusion that the ...
— Darwin and Modern Science • A.C. Seward and Others

... XXVII. No landgrave or cassique shall be tried for any criminal cause in any but the chief justice's court, and that by a jury of ...
— An Historical Account Of The Rise And Progress Of The Colonies Of South Carolina And Georgia, Volume 1 • Alexander Hewatt

... Shehr: "They carry away much incense, which is produced at this place and in the interior; ... it is exported hence all over the world, and here it is used to pay ships with, for on the spot it is worth only 150 farthings the hundredweight." See note 2, ch. xxvii. supra; and next chapter, ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo, Volume 2 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... War more properly charged both. However, it had the effect of checking the military zeal which appeared to manifest itself in the American ranks at a distance from the theatre of hostile operations, and completely to extinguish the ardour of the American troops on the lines." (Thompson, Chap. xxvii., p. 215.)] ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 2 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Edgerton Ryerson

... Chapter 2.XXVII.—How Pantagruel set up one trophy in memorial of their valour, and Panurge another in remembrance of the hares. How Pantagruel likewise with his farts begat little men, and with his fisgs little women; and how Panurge broke a great staff ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... unwisely preferred by the translator) "that Lane has succeeded in preserving" "The measured and finished language Lane chose for his version is eminently fitted to represent the rhythmical tongue of the Arab" (Memoir, p. xxvii.). "The translation itself is distinguished by its singular accuracy and by the marvellous way in which the Oriental tone and colour are retained " (ibid.). The writer has taken scant trouble to read me when he asserts ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... presuppose such an acquaintance of Jesus with households in and near Jerusalem as is not easy to explain if he never visited Judea before his passion (Mark xi. 2, 3; xiv. 14; xv. 43 and parallels; compare especially Matt, xxvii. 57; John xix. 38). These all suggest that the narrative of Mark does not tell the whole story, a conclusion quite in accordance with the account of his work given by Papias. It has been assumed that Peter was a Galilean, a man of family living in Capernaum. It is not impossible that on some ...
— The Life of Jesus of Nazareth • Rush Rhees

... and command to Moses, in the choice of magistrates, supreme and subordinate; and discovers, that people are not left to their own will in this matter. It is God's direction, that the person advanced to rule, must be a man in whom is the spirit; Numb. xxvii, 18; which Deut. xxxiv, 9, interprets to be the spirit of wisdom, (i.e.) the spirit of government, fitting and capacitating a man to discharge the duties of the magistratical office, to the glory of God and the good of his people; without this, he ought not to be ...
— Act, Declaration, & Testimony for the Whole of our Covenanted Reformation, as Attained to, and Established in Britain and Ireland; Particularly Betwixt the Years 1638 and 1649, Inclusive • The Reformed Presbytery

... in his dwelling an oblation with great gladness; I will sing and speak praises unto the Lord. Ps. xxvii. 7. ...
— The Book of Common Prayer - and The Scottish Liturgy • Church of England

... England's intestine battles. Song xxiii. Northamptonshire. Song xxiv. Rutlandshire; and the British saints. Song xxv. Lincolnshire. Song xxvi. Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, Derbyshire; with the story of Robin Hood. Song xxvii. Lancashire and the Isle of Man. Song xxviii. Yorkshire. Song xxix. Northumberland. ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook, Vol. 3 • E. Cobham Brewer

... XXVII "Let not these blessings then sent from above Abused be, or split in profane wise, But let the issue correspondent prove To good beginnings of each enterprise; The gentle season might our courage move, Now every passage plain ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso

... fear denied that Sarah was his wife, and Isaac does the same thing. The grief of Isaac and Rebekah over Esau, was not that he took two wives, but that they were Hittites. Chapter xxvii gives the details of the manner that Jacob and his mother betrayed Isaac into giving the blessing to Jacob intended for Esau. One must read the whole story in order to appreciate the blind confidence Isaac placed in Rebekah's ...
— The Woman's Bible. • Elizabeth Cady Stanton

... xxvi. and xxvii. may be found a description of those distinct varieties that are of chief value in this country. I find no good reason why I should fill pages with descriptions of varieties that are rarely cultivated, and which might well give place to better kinds. ...
— Success With Small Fruits • E. P. Roe

... am old, and I know not the day of my death (Gen. xxvii. 2.); no more doth any, though never so young. As soon (saith the proverb) goes the lamb's skin to the market as that of the old sheep; and the Hebrew saying is, There be as many young skulls in Golgotha as old; young men may die ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 207, October 15, 1853 • Various

... when they offer the sacrifices on the Sabbaths? or those to sin who are circumcised, or do circumcise, on the Sabbaths; since He commands that on the eighth day—even though it happen to be a Sabbath—those who are born shall be always circumcised?" (Dial. ch. xxvii.) ...
— The Lost Gospel and Its Contents - Or, The Author of "Supernatural Religion" Refuted by Himself • Michael F. Sadler

... they saw them sticking in the ground about them. No one was hit, but several had very narrow shaves. The compliment was returned, and as Alexander Jardine describes "'exeunt' warriors," who did not again molest them, although they were heard all around the camp throughout the night. (Camp XXVII.) Course W. Distance 9 miles. A ...
— The Overland Expedition of The Messrs. Jardine • Frank Jardine and Alexander Jardine

... harshly called our English vines, 'wicked weeds of Kent,' in Fors Clavigera, xxvii. 11. Much may be said for Ale, when we brew it ...
— Proserpina, Volume 1 - Studies Of Wayside Flowers • John Ruskin

... of the present edition of Erewhon. This view ultimately led me to the theory I put forward in Life and Habit, published in November, 1877. {41} I have put a bare outline of this theory (which I believe to be quite sound) into the mouth of an Erewhonian professor in Chapter XXVII ...
— The Note-Books of Samuel Butler • Samuel Butler

... casters of copper. The writer spent many hours watching I-o, the brass and copper worker of Cibolan, while he shaped bells, bracelets, and betel boxes at his forge on the outskirts of the village (Plate XXVII). Feathered plungers, which worked up and down in two bamboo cylinders, forced air through a small clay-tipped tube into a charcoal fire. This served as a bellows, while a small cup made of straw ashes formed an excellent crucible. The first day I watched I-o, he was making ...
— The Wild Tribes of Davao District, Mindanao - The R. F. Cummings Philippine Expedition • Fay-Cooper Cole

... belaboring a big drum, Thackeray playing on the flute, Leech the violin, and others extracting harmony from divers musical instruments. Again they appear at a later date, as a number of boys at play, in an illustration at the commencement of Vol. XXVII. ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... 'Inventarios de los bienes hallados a/ la expulsion de los Jesuitas', Introduction, xxvii, Francisco Javier Brabo. ** The rare and much-sought-after 'Manuale ad usum Patrum Societatis Jesu qui in Reductionibus Paraquariae versantur, ex Rituale Romano ad Toletano decerptum', was printed at the mission of Loreto. It contains prayers in Guarani as well as in Latin. Here also was printed ...
— A Vanished Arcadia, • R. B. Cunninghame Graham

... accipere, secundum bonitatem, et hujusmodi alia attributa, non accipiuntur aliae processiones, nisi Verbi et amoris, secundum quod Deus suam essentiam, veritatem et bonitatem intelligit et amat' (Q. xxvii. Art. 5). The source of the doctrine is to be found in St. Augustine, who habitually speaks of the Holy Spirit as Amor; but, when he refers to the 'Imago Trinitatia' in man the Spirit is represented sometimes by 'Amor,' sometimes by 'Voluntas' (de Trin., L. xiv. cap 7). The other two members of ...
— Philosophy and Religion - Six Lectures Delivered at Cambridge • Hastings Rashdall

... son Jacob is as varied and romantic as his own was uneventful. He begins by fraudulently winning a blessing from his father, and has in consequence to flee the promised land, xxvii.-xxviii. 9. On the threshold of his new experiences he was taught in a dream the nearness of heaven to earth, and received the assurance that the God who had visited him at Bethel would be with him in the strange ...
— Introduction to the Old Testament • John Edgar McFadyen

... the Greek ships that bore the wanderer, Ulysses, from Phaeacia to his home. Read "The Wanderings of Ulysses" in Gayley's Classic Myths, Chapter XXVII. ...
— Selections From American Poetry • Various

... odd little house on Seventh Street, Philadelphia, described in Chapter XXVII, actually existed until pulled down some years since to make room for a big manufacturing plant. I used to visit there every time I went to the Quaker City, and all the furnishings mentioned stand out vividly in my recollection to this day, even to the guitar off in one corner. I never played ...
— Two Boys and a Fortune • Matthew White, Jr.

... In a poem, a hitherto unpublished fragment entitled Il Diavolo Inamorato (vide post, vol. iii.), which is dated August 31, 1812, five stanzas and a half, viz. stanzas lxxiii. lines 5-9, lxxix., lxxx., lxxxi., lxxxii., xxvii. of the Second Canto of Childe Harold are imbedded; and these form part of the ten additional stanzas which were first published in the seventh edition. There is, too, the fragment entitled The Monk of Athos, which was first published (Life ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... question; and that is often so ambiguous that a sure inference is impossible. We may safely assert, however, that nowhere need "this law" mean the whole book. In fact, it invariably means very much less, and sometimes, as in xxvii. 3, 8, so little that it could all be engraved in large letters on a few plastered stones set ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 3 - "Destructors" to "Diameter" • Various

... true, whate'er befall; I feel it when I sorrow most; 'Tis better to have loved and lost Than never to have loved at all. XXVII, 4. ...
— The Principles of English Versification • Paull Franklin Baum

... his own people should be allowed to come and minister to him (xxiv. 23), and when the voyage is commenced it is said that Julius, who had charge of Paul, treated him courteously, and, gave him liberty to go to see his friends at Sidon (xxvii. 3). At Rome he was allowed to live by himself with a single soldier to guard him (xxviii. 16), and he continued for two years in his own hired house (xxviii. 28). These circumstances are totally different from those under which the Epistles of ...
— A Reply to Dr. Lightfoot's Essays • Walter R. Cassels

... insubordination in the administration of Lord Dalhousie was a contributory, if not the direct, cause of the events of 1857. See post, Introductory Note to Chapter XXVI, and Walpole's History of England from the Conclusion of the Great War in 1815, ch. xxvii., and ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Volume III (of 3), 1854-1861 • Queen of Great Britain Victoria

... Shobash: it is the Persian Shah-bash lit.be a King, equivalent to our bravo. Here, however, the allusion is to the buffoon's cry at an Egyptian feast, "Shohbash 'alayk, ya Sahib al-faraj,"a present is due from thee, O giver of the fete " Sec Lane M. E. xxvii. ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 7 • Richard F. Burton

... asserts its title to Irish Estate. The victory at Dunbar. Act touching Elections in Common Hall. Removal of Royal Emblems. Matters in dispute between Court of Aldermen and Common Council. Charges against John Fowke, Mayor. The Scottish Army in England. The Battle of Worcester. CHAPTER XXVII. The War with Holland. Barebone's Parliament. The Lord Protector entertained at Grocer's Hall. Alderman Sir Christopher Pack and his Remonstrance. Cromwell's City Peers. The Restoration of the Rump. ...
— London and the Kingdom - Volume II • Reginald R. Sharpe

... [221] Liv. xxvii. 9 (209 B.C.) Fremitus enim inter Latinos sociosque in conciliis ortus:—Decimum annum dilectibus, stipendiis se exhaustos esse ... Duodecim (coloniae) ... negaverunt consulibus esse unde ...
— A History of Rome, Vol 1 - During the late Republic and early Principate • A H.J. Greenidge

... Apulia. xxv. Window in S. Teresia, Trani. xxvi. Window in S. Teresia, Trani. xxvii. Window in the Basilica, Altamura. xxviii. Windows in S. Gregorio, Bari. xxvix. Triforiurn Window in S. Gregorio, Ban. xxx. Window in Apse of the Cathedral, Bari. xxxi. Window in Bittonto. xxxii. Window in Apse of ...
— The Brochure Series of Architectural Illustration, Vol. 1, 1895 • Various

... [28] In Pisonem, xxvii. Even in Cicero's words as used here there is a touch of irony, though we cannot but imagine that at this time he was anxious to stand well with Pompey. "There are coming on the games, the most costly and the most ...
— The Life of Cicero - Volume II. • Anthony Trollope

... of a point of such consequence looks somewhat like previous concert." However much appearances might favour this opinion, another writer has shown most satisfactorily that no such previous concert existed. The reviewer of the "Memoires" in the Quarterly Review (xxvii. p. 191) proves, in the first place, that it was Sir Robert himself who determined the course of events, and, as he emphatically said, turned the key of the closet on Mr. Pulteney; so that, if he ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume 1 • Horace Walpole

... Syriac Kikupha (Bochart Hierozoicon, part ii. 347). The Spaniards call it Gallo de Marzo (March-Cock) from its returning in that month, and our old writers "lapwing" (Deut. xiv. 18). This foul-feeding bird derives her honours from chapt. xxvii. of the Koran (q.v.), the Hudhud was sharp-sighted and sagacious enough to discover water underground which the devils used to draw after she had marked the place ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... International bickering. XXII. Francesca entertains the green-eyed monster. XXIII. Ballad revels at Rowardennan. XXIV. Old songs and modern instances. XXV. A treaty between nations. XXVI. 'Scotland's burning! Look out!.' XXVII. Three magpies and ...
— Penelope's Experiences in Scotland • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... kitchyne too days ii^s. Item to Richard Leys for monye borowed of him to be dystributed at Horselye when S^r Thom Cawarden dyed for neesorryes iii^li. Item for the lone of black cottons xiii^s 1^d ob. Item for the waste of other cotten iii^s. Item for xxvii yards of black cotten that conveyed the wagon wherein the corse was carried to Blechinglie from ...
— Highways and Byways in Surrey • Eric Parker

... and Modern History, chapter xxv, "Characters and Episodes of the Great Rebellion"; chapter xxvi, "Oliver Cromwell"; chapter xxvii, "English Life and Manners under the Restoration"; chapter xxviii, "Louis ...
— EARLY EUROPEAN HISTORY • HUTTON WEBSTER

... overlooks the Advances of his Friends, and smarts severely for his Neglect XXV He bears his Fate like a Philosopher; and contracts acquaintance with a very remarkable Personage XXVI The History of the Noble Castilian XXVII A flagrant Instance of Fathom's Virtue, in the Manner of his Retreat to England XXVIII Some Account of his Fellow-Travellers XXIX Another providential Deliverance from the Effects of the Smuggler's ingenious Conjecture XXX The singular Manner of Fathom's Attack and Triumph over the ...
— The Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom, Complete • Tobias Smollett

... something of this kind that Isaac fell into when he sent Esau to hunt venison, and make him savory meat, such as his soul loved? Gen. xxvii. 4." ...
— Fanny, the Flower-Girl • Selina Bunbury

... (ver. 13).—The word praitorion occurs in e.g. Matt. xxvii. 27. Acts xxiii. 35, in the sense of the residence of a great official, regarded as praetor, or commander. The A.V. here evidently reasons from such passages, and takes the word to mean the residence ...
— Philippian Studies - Lessons in Faith and Love from St. Paul's Epistle to the Philippians • Handley C. G. Moule

... of the Lord, that will I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the Lord, and to enquire in His temple.—PS. xxvii. 4. ...
— Daily Strength for Daily Needs • Mary W. Tileston

... is dojicos, which is etymologically the same as the French dogiques. This latter term is defined in The Jesuit Relations (Cleveland, 1896-1901), xxvii, p. 311, note 1, as a name given, in foreign missions, to those natives who instruct their countrymen. They officiated in ...
— History of the Philippine Islands Vols 1 and 2 • Antonio de Morga

... fort; but we had neither time nor inclination to go further north. We hoped against hope that the steamer might get up, but on Saturday gave it up as useless, and settled to drive towards Gophir Ferry, trying to find a friend who, when out at C—— Farm, told us he was living on section xxvii by 13, and near two creeks. For the first five miles our road lay along the Beaver Creek, which was pretty; but afterwards the scenery much resembled Winnipeg, flat and uninteresting, not a tree, and without even the beautiful vegetation and flowers we had had on our previous ...
— A Lady's Life on a Farm in Manitoba • Mrs. Cecil Hall

... the Cabinet was appointed to deal with affairs on the West Coast of Africa, and this Committee 'by its delays and hesitations lost us the Cameroons,' where two native Kings had asked to be taken under British protection. [Footnote: See Chapter XXVII., p. 431.] On the East Coast there was a more serious result of ...
— The Life of the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles W. Dilke V1 • Stephen Gwynn

... words of his father, he cried with a great and exceeding bitter cry, and said unto his father, Bless me, even me also, O my father. Genesis xxvii. 34. (Compare Hebrew xii. 17. He found no place of repentance, though he sought it ...
— The Christian Year • Rev. John Keble

... New Zealand (Statenland), islands of the Tonga- and Fiji-groups, etc. by the ships Heemskerk and de Zeehaen, under the command of Abel Janszoon Tasman, Frans Jacobszoon Visscher, Yde Tjerkszoon Holman or Holleman and Gerrit Jansz(oon) (1642-1643) XXVII. Further discovery of the Gulf of Carpentaria, the North and North-West coasts of Australia by the Ships Limmen, Zeemeeuw and de Bracq, under the command of Tasman, Visscher, Dirk Corneliszoon Haen and Jasper Janszoon Koos (1644) XXVIII. Exploratory voyage to the West-coast of Australia round by ...
— The Part Borne by the Dutch in the Discovery of Australia 1606-1765 • J. E. Heeres

... latyn Legenda Aurea, that is to say in englyshe the golden legende, For lyke as golde passeth all other metalles, so this boke excedeth all other bokes". "Finyshed the xxvii daye of August, the yere of our lord M. CCCCC. XXVII, the xix yere of the regne of our souverayne lord Kynge Henry the eyght. Imprynted at London in Flete Strete at the Sygne of the Sonne ...
— The Two Lovers of Heaven: Chrysanthus and Daria - A Drama of Early Christian Rome • Pedro Calderon de la Barca

... the translation of Dhunjeebhoy Jamsetjee Medhora, Zoroastrian and some other Ancient Systems, xxvii.] ...
— Death—and After? • Annie Besant

... XXVII. Funerum nulla ambitio; id solum observatur, ut corpora clarorum virorum certis lignis crementur. Struem rogi nec vestibus nec odoribus cumulant: sua cuique arma, quorundam igni et equus adjicitur. Sepulcrum caespes erigit; ...
— Germania and Agricola • Caius Cornelius Tacitus

... repentance, can profit the soul. "He cannot be absolved who doth not first repent, nor can he repent the sin and will it at the same time, for this were contradiction to which reason cannot assent" (Inf., XXVII, 118.) Prayer can help the soul struggling in life or in Purgatory proper, but the assistance derived from prayer can never do away with the necessity of personal penance. "Conquer thy panting with the soul ...
— Dante: "The Central Man of All the World" • John T. Slattery

... Notwithstanding the name of Taara, and the fact that Thursday is sacred to him, it is worth noting that Taara and Thor have no attributes in common; Thor corresponding to the Esthonian Aeike, i. xxvii., ...
— The Hero of Esthonia and Other Studies in the Romantic Literature of That Country • William Forsell Kirby

... most humbly beg Your Majesty not to speak of this to the Queen-Mother, as perhaps she would not approve of the step we are now taking." [OEuvres de Frederic, xxvii. i. 387.] ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XIV. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... considerations he coulde not consente that the same Order shulde be practised, till the lerned men off Strausbrough, Zurik, Emden, &c., were made privy" (Brief Discourse of the Troubles begun at Frankfort in the year 1554, Petheram's reprint, p. xxvii). We have the following additional entry: "After longe debatinge to and fro, it was concluded that Maister Knox, Maister Whittingham, Maister Gilby, Maister Fox and Maister T. Cole shulde drawe forthe some Order meete for their state and time: whiche thinge was by them accomplished and offred ...
— The Scottish Reformation - Its Epochs, Episodes, Leaders, and Distinctive Characteristics • Alexander F. Mitchell

... of a vow might be censured, yet it seems not forthwith to follow that the marriages of such persons must be dissolved. For Augustine denies that they ought to be dissolved (XXVII. Quaest. I, Cap. Nuptiarum), and his authority is not lightly to be esteemed, although other men afterwards ...
— The Confession of Faith • Various

... n^{th} convergent is not equal to the sum to n terms of the series. Expressions for [beta]0, [beta]1, [beta]2, ... by means of determinants have been given by T. Muir (Edinburgh Transactions, vol. xxvii.). ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 2 - "Constantine Pavlovich" to "Convention" • Various

... Read the description of Tyre in the Bible, Ezekiel xxvii. 3-25, and tell what is said there about the riches of the Tyrians. Find out ...
— Introductory American History • Henry Eldridge Bourne and Elbert Jay Benton

... XXVII. The colon is generally placed before a quotation, when notice of the quotation is given by some introductory words. In this case also the dash is ...
— "Stops" - Or How to Punctuate. A Practical Handbook for Writers and Students • Paul Allardyce

... two souls stand up erect and strong XXIII Is it indeed so? If I lay here dead XXIV Let the world's sharpness like a clasping knife XXV A heavy heart, Beloved, have I borne XXVI I lived with visions for my company XXVII My own Beloved, who hast lifted me XXVIII My letters! all dead paper, mute and white! XXIX I think of thee!—my thoughts do twine and bud XXX I see thine image through my tears to-night XXXI Thou comest! all is said without a word XXXII The first time that the sun rose on thine ...
— Sonnets from the Portuguese • Browning, Elizabeth Barrett

... signifies the primary root of vengeance, in so far as a man avenges the wrong done to God and his neighbor, because charity makes him regard them as his own. Now every act of virtue proceeds from charity as its root, since, according to Gregory (Hom. xxvii in Ev.), "there are no green leaves on the bough of good works, unless charity ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... revenue of some sort from the colonies?' Not one of the Ministry then in London (Pitt being absent and ill) had sufficient authority to advise his dismission, and nothing less could have stopped his measures." (History of the United States, Vol. VI., Chap. xxvii., ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 1 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Egerton Ryerson

... xxvi. (cp. xxi. 22-34, time of Abraham), notably a covenant with Abimelech at Beer-sheba (whence the name is explained "well of the oath''); (see ABRAHAM.) By a pure error, or perhaps through a confusion in the traditions, Achish the Philistine (of Gath, 1 Sam. xxi., xxvii.), to whom David fled, is called Abimelech in the superscription ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... He is advised to provide articles for trade and ransom, and to secure for the expedition the most experienced men whom he can find—it is especially desirable that the pilot should be such. The king has written to Ponce de Leon and other officials to furnish all the help necessary. (No. xxvii, ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803, Volume II, 1521-1569 • Emma Helen Blair

... He and his wife Pyrrha, with the advice of the oracle of Themis, repeopled the earth by throwing behind them the bones of their grand- mother,—i.e., stones of the earth.—See Ovid, Met. lib. i. fab. 7. 31. St. Augustine (De Civ. Dei, xvi. 7). 32. [Greek omitted] (St. Matt. xxvii. 5) means death by choking. Erasmus translates it, "abiens laqueo se suspendit." 33. Burnt by order of the Caliph Omar, A.D. 640. It contained 700,000 volumes, which served the city for fuel instead of wood ...
— Religio Medici, Hydriotaphia, and the Letter to a Friend • Sir Thomas Browne

... extraordinary courage, but deformed in his person. His brother Paolo, who unhappily possessed those graces which the husband of Francesca wanted, engaged her affections; and being taken in adultery, they were both put to death by the enraged Lanciotto. See Notes to Canto XXVII. v. 43 The whole of this passage is alluded to by Petrarch, in his Triumph of Love ...
— The Divine Comedy • Dante

... follows: the stones, the joints being vertical, are locked into one another by semicircular ridges fitting into corresponding indentations. Mr. Smirke, writing on aperture heads in "Archaeologia," vol. xxvii., said that he thought these excrescences, or in masons' language, "joggles," insufficient for security, and suggested that perhaps inside, out of sight, the joints radiate like those of a skeme arch. He also commented on the irregularity of the stones used ...
— Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of Rochester - A Description of its Fabric and a Brief History of the Episcopal See • G. H. Palmer

... of which he was quite capable, or make him for the time unfit for real leadership by suspending his self-command. [Footnote: See Crittenden's testimony in Buell Court of Inquiry, Official Records, vol. xvi. pt. i. p. 578. Cist's account of Chickamauga, Army of the Cumberland, p. 226, and chap, xxvii., post.] ...
— Military Reminiscences of the Civil War V1 • Jacob Dolson Cox

... their own evidence that Owyn was born before Sept. 3, 1359, and that his brother Tudor (who was slain in the battle of Grosmont, or Mynydd Pwl Melin) was three years younger. The record of this controversy assigns to Owyn himself this honourable title "Oweyn Sire [Lord] de Glendore del age XXVII ans et pluis."] ...
— Henry of Monmouth, Volume 1 - Memoirs of Henry the Fifth • J. Endell Tyler

... connected with 54, it will positively contradict your assertion, for it proves that they did keep the next day as the Sabbath, according to the commandment, and the seventh-day Sabbath was and is, the only Sabbath commandment in the whole bible. You pass this over and cite us to Matt xxvii: 62, 64, and base your whole proof on inference. It is this, that the Jews were so strict and pious in the observance of the Sabbath that they would not have gone to Pilate on that day to have asked him to set a watch over the body of Jesus, if it had been the Sabbath, because ...
— A Vindication of the Seventh-Day Sabbath • Joseph Bates

... the Castle Serponow, situate in the mountaines of Lucomoria, beyond the riuer Obi. [Sidenote: Men that yeerely die and reuiue.] They say that to the men of Lucomoria chauncheth a marueilous thing and incredible: For they affirme, that they die yeerely at the xxvii. day of Nouember, being the feast of S. George among the Moscouites: and that the next spring about the xxiii. day of Aprill, they ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation v. 4 • Richard Hakluyt

... In view of Goethe's own words, then, the caution of a recent critic (Felix Melchior in Litt. Forsch. XXVII Heft, Berlin, 1903) against applying the term Weltschmerz to "Werther," would seem to miss the mark entirely. Werther is a type, just as truly as is Faust, though in a smaller way, and the malady which he typifies has its ultimate origin in the development of public ...
— Types of Weltschmerz in German Poetry • Wilhelm Alfred Braun

... is the Helbon of the Bible (Ezek. xxvii. 18), now Helbon, north of Damascus, and five miles north of the middle of the pass. It must have been an important city because of the term "King." It was noted for wine, not only in Ezekiel's time, but, as Strabo mentions, the kings of ...
— Egyptian Literature

... the introductory essay by John Owen in his edition (London, 1885), of the Scepsis Scientifica, xxvii, xxix. See also Sadducismus Triumphatus (citations are all from the edition of ...
— A History of Witchcraft in England from 1558 to 1718 • Wallace Notestein

... SECTION XXVII. The changes effected by the Lombard are more curious still, for they are in the anatomy of the building, more than its decoration. The Lombard architecture represents, as I said, the whole of that of the northern barbaric nations. And this I believe was, at first, an imitation ...
— Stones of Venice [introductions] • John Ruskin

... appearance, and actions of Corceca, and explain the allegory. 6. Note the use of the stars to indicate time. 7. Under what circumstances does Una meet Archimago? 8. Explain the allegory in ix. 9. Note the Euphuistic balance in xxvii. 10. What figure do you find in xxxi? Note the Homeric style. 11. Describe the fight between Archimago and Sansloy, and explain the double allegory. 12. What is the ...
— Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I • Edmund Spenser

... Silverius and some senators from Rome, V. xxv. 13, 14; precautions against corruption of the guards, V. xxv. 15, 16; against surprise at night, V. xxv. 17; unable to defend Portus, V. xxvi. 18; encouraged by the arrival of Martinus and Valerian, V. xxvii. 2; outwits the Goths in three attacks, V. xxvii. 4-14; and likewise when they try his tactics, V. xxvii. 18-23; publicly praised by the Romans, V. xxvii. 25; explains his confidence in the superiority ...
— Procopius - History of the Wars, Books V. and VI. • Procopius

... Moses in His description of the priestly garments of Aaron. The Bible leaves them without description;* and the following verses contain all that is said of them: Exodus xxviii. 30; Leviticus viii. 8; Numbers xxvii. 21; Deuteronomy xxxiii. 8; Samuel xxviii. 6; Ezra ii. 63; Nehemiah vii. 65. Only a pretence of using spectacles in the work of translating was kept up, later descriptions of the process by Joe's associates referring constantly to the ...
— The Story of the Mormons: • William Alexander Linn

... CHAPTER XXVII. How King Arthur went to the tournament with his knights, and how the lady received him worshipfully, and how the ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... abnormal sexual pleasure in flagellation began to be recorded. The earliest distinct reference to a masochistic flagellant seems to have been made by Pico della Mirandola, toward the end of the fifteenth century, in his Disputationes Adversus Astrologiam Divinatricem, bk. iii, ch. xxvii. Coelius Rhodiginus in 1516, again, narrated the case of a man he knew who liked to be severely whipped, and found this a stimulant to coitus. Otto Brunfels, in his Onomasticon (1534), art. "Coitus," refers to another case of a man who ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 3 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... undertook, no matter how humble it might be, and the training of his childhood was not outgrown. He accordingly took the Bible lying on his desk and opened it at random one evening. There, truly enough, was an answer clear and unmistakable in the very first verse his eye lighted upon—Acts xxvii. 31: "Paul said to the centurion and to the soldiers, Except these abide in the ship, ye cannot be saved." It immediately decided him to remain in China, and he suffered no more from ...
— Sir Robert Hart - The Romance of a Great Career, 2nd Edition • Juliet Bredon

... so minute in its enactments against witches, was not repealed till the 9 Geo. II, c. 5. In Scotland, so late as the year 1722, when the local jurisdictions were still hereditary [see post, Sept. 11], the sheriff of Sutherlandshire condemned a witch to death.' Penny Cyclo. xxvii. 490. In the Bishopric of Wurtzburg, so late as 1750, a nun was burnt for witchcraft: 'Cette malheureuse fille soutint opiniatrement qu'elle etait sorciere.... Elle etait folle, ses juges furent imbecilles et barbares.' Voltaire's Works, ed. ...
— Life Of Johnson, Volume 5 • Boswell

... with cables, "undergirded" like St. Paul's ship, Acts xxvii. 27. [Transcriber's Note: ...
— Privateering and Piracy in the Colonial Period - Illustrative Documents • Various

... proves, according to Vallancey, that the Phoenicians traded here for tin before the Trojan war. Homer frequently mentions this metal; and even in Scripture we have allusions to this land under the name of Tarshish (Ezekiel, c. xxvii., v. 12-25), being the place whence the Tyrians procured various metals, and among the rest, the English metal tin. It appears that the primitive Greeks had a clearer knowledge of these shores than those in after years; and although Homer, in his shield of Achilles, describes ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 12, Issue 337, October 25, 1828. • Various

... the direction, and the strength of that Mediterranean wind to him who has come up to church under the plague of his own heart and under the heavy hand of God? You may be sure that Boanerges did not lecture that Fast-day forenoon in Mansoul on Acts xxvii. 14. We would know that, even if we were not told what his text that forenoon was. His text that never-to-be-forgotten Fast-day forenoon was in Luke xiii. 7—'Cut it down; why cumbereth it the ground?' And a very smart ...
— Bunyan Characters - Third Series - The Holy War • Alexander Whyte

... Kings xxiv.) and made Jehoiachin prisoner, and in 588 again captured the city, and carried Zedekiah, who had rebelled against him, captive to Babylon (2 Kings xxv.). Josephus gives an account of his expeditions against Tyre and Egypt, which are also mentioned with many details in Ezek. xxvii.-xxix. ...
— Babylonian and Assyrian Literature • Anonymous

... LETTER XXVII. Clarissa. In answer.—Is extremely alarmed at Lovelace's supposed baseness. Declares her abhorrence ...
— Clarissa, Volume 2 (of 9) • Samuel Richardson

... YE XXVII. With Aunt Joyce this morrow to visit old Nanny Crewdson, that is brother's widow to Isaac, and dwelleth in a cot up Thirlmere way. I would fain have avoided the same an' I might, for I never took no list in visiting poor folk, ...
— Joyce Morrell's Harvest - The Annals of Selwick Hall • Emily Sarah Holt

... XXVII Now in the place of Valens, his uncle, the 139 Emperor Gratian established Theodosius the Spaniard in the Eastern Empire. Military discipline was soon restored to a high level, and the Goth, perceiving that the cowardice and sloth of former princes was ended, ...
— The Origin and Deeds of the Goths • Jordanes

... Hebrew title would be Book of Events of the Times, and this again appears to have been a designation commonly applied to special histories in the more definite shape—Events of the Times of King David, or the like (1 Chron. xxvii. 24; Esth. x. 2, &c.). The Greek translators divided the long book into two, and adopted the title [Greek: Paraleipomena], Things omitted [scil. in the ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 3 - "Chitral" to "Cincinnati" • Various

... coming home to English children. Perhaps this may be partly due to the fact that a larger proportion of the tales are of native manufacture. If the researches contained in my Notes are to be trusted only i.-ix., xi., xvii., xxii., xxv., xxvi., xxvii., xliv., l., liv., lv., lviii., lxi., lxii., lxv., lxvii., lxxviii., lxxxiv., lxxxvii. were imported; nearly all the remaining sixty are home produce, and have their roots in the hearts of the English people ...
— More English Fairy Tales • Various

... [72] Ezekiel xxvii. 25, "The ships of Tarshish did sing of thee, and thou wast replenished, and made very glorious in the midst of ...
— The Poetical Works of William Lisle Bowles, Vol. 1 • William Lisle Bowles

... Conception, that the idea is said to have originated in England. I should also have added, that Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury, was its strenuous advocate.) Each of these personages holds a scroll. On that of David the reference is to the 4th and 5th verses of Psalm xxvii.—"In the secret of his tabernacle he shall hide me." On that of Solomon is the text from his Song, ch. iv. 7. On that of St. Augustine, a quotation, I presume, from his works, but difficult to make out; it seems to be, "In coelo qualis est Pater, talis ...
— Legends of the Madonna • Mrs. Jameson

... his hand over the sea, he shook the kingdoms." The fate of Babylon is pointed at by the Prophet, to show what Tyre had to expect from Assyria. Later, before the conquest by Nebuchadnezzar, Ezekiel thus speaks of Tyre (chap, xxvii.): "They have taken cedars from Lebanon to make masts for thee." "Of the oaks of Bashan have they made thine oars." "Tarshish was ...
— Outline of Universal History • George Park Fisher

... superior.' He read that Mr. Walter Poole was convinced that the three Synoptic Gospels were written towards the close of the first century; and one of the reasons he gave for this attribution was as in Matthew, chapter xxvii., verse 7, 'And they took counsel, and bought with them (the thirty pieces of silver) the potter's field, to bury strangers in. Wherefore that field was called, The field of blood, unto this day'—a passage which showed that the Gospel could not have been written till fifty or sixty years ...
— The Lake • George Moore

... 5. "Estimations" (Lev. xxvii. 2) treats of the way in which things devoted to the Lord are to be valued in order to be redeemed for ordinary use; also, how a priest is to value a field ...
— Hebrew Literature

... of green silk which carried him and all his host through the air is a Talmudic legend generally accepted in Al-Islam though not countenanced by the Koran. chaps xxvii. When the "gnat's wing" is mentioned, the reference is to Nimrod who, for boasting that he was lord of all, was tortured during four hundred years by a gnat sent by Allah ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... they were seen and felt) would settle the campaign. They would have all the credit of the victory, and of having dealt the final decisive blow, He appealed to the enthusiastic reception which they already met with on their line of march as a proof and an omen of their good fortune. [Livy. lib. xxvii. c. 45.] And, indeed, their whole path was amidst the vows and prayers and praises of their countrymen. The entire population of the districts through which they passed, flocked to the road-side to see and bless the deliverers of their country. Food, drink, ...
— The Fifteen Decisive Battles of The World From Marathon to Waterloo • Sir Edward Creasy, M.A.

... earth was confusion and chaos, God said: "Let there be light." This verse does not set forth the order of the creation. If it did, the word barishona (Bet Resh Alef Shin Nun He) would have been necessary, whereas the word reshit (Resh Alef Shin Yod Tav) is always in the construct, as in Jer. xxvii. 1, Gen. x. 10, Deut. xviii. 4;[67] likewise bara (Bet Resh Alef) must here be taken as an infinitive (Bet Resh Alef with shin dot); the same construction occurs in Hosea i. 2. Shall we assert that the verse intends to convey that such a thing was ...
— Rashi • Maurice Liber

... punished their disobedience by incarcerating them in various kinds of prisons, for longer or shorter periods of time, in proportion to their demerits. For the belief of the followers of Mohammed in the magic excellence of Solomon, see Sale's Koran, xxi. and xxvii. According to the prophet, the devil taught men magic and sorcery. The magic of the Moslems, or, at least, of the Egyptians, is of two kinds—high and low—which are termed respectively rahmanee (divine) and sheytanee (Satanic). By a perfect knowledge ...
— The Superstitions of Witchcraft • Howard Williams

... XXVII. Even if none of these adversities constrain us to call upon God's Name and to trust Him, yet were sin alone more than sufficient to train and to urge us on in this work. For sin has hemmed us in with three strong, mighty armies. The ...
— A Treatise on Good Works • Dr. Martin Luther

... ignorant.' Mr. Croker says that Captain Knight of the Belleisle lay for a couple of months in 1762 in Plymouth Sound. Croker's Boswell, p. 480. It seems unlikely that Johnson passed a whole week on ship-board. Loplolly, or Loblolly, is explained in Roderick Random, chap. xxvii. Roderick, when acting as the surgeon's assistant on a man of war, 'suffered,' he says, 'from the rude insults of the sailors and petty officers, among whom I was known by ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell

... superficial and rocky, precipitating themselves in low cascades over tabular masses of sand-stone. At Mamloo their beds are deeper, and full of brushwood, and a splendid valley and amphitheatre of red cliffs and cascades, rivalling those of Moosmai (chapter xxvii), bursts suddenly into view. Mamloo is a large village, on the top of a spur, to the westward: it is buried in a small forest, particularly rich in plants, and is defended by a stone wall behind: the only road is tunnelled ...
— Himalayan Journals (Complete) • J. D. Hooker

... 86), killed his father, and drank Tvashta's soma, by which he obtained divine powers. In v. 12 of this hymn Indra excuses himself by saying that he was in great straits, and that then the soma was brought to him by an eagle. What these straits were is indicated in another hymn (IV. xxvii.), which tells us that he was imprisoned, and escaped on the back of the eagle, which he compelled to carry him; the watchman Krisanu shot an arrow at the bird, but it passed harmlessly through its feathers. Evidently in the story ...
— Hindu Gods And Heroes - Studies in the History of the Religion of India • Lionel D. Barnett

... solicitude for their own safety, and their faint hearts can furnish them with no other means of securing themselves, than in exterminating those who may hurt them. See his Essay entitled, Cowardice the Mother of Cruelty.—Vol. 2d, chap. xxvii. ...
— A Journal of a Young Man of Massachusetts, 2nd ed. • Benjamin Waterhouse

... chapters xxvi. and xxvii.; St. Mark, chapters xiv. and xv.; St. Luke, chapters xxii. and xxiii.; St. John, chapters ...
— Van Dyck - A Collection Of Fifteen Pictures And A Portrait Of The - Painter With Introduction And Interpretation • Estelle M. Hurll

... Brunswick on the throne of Great Britain ever to assume or exercise any power, be his claim what it might, not derived from the will of the people, expressed by their representatives, and their lordships in parliament assembled.' Parl. Hist. xxvii. 678. ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 3 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... whether she would confess freely, but she only shook her poor blinded head, and sighed with her dying Saviour, "Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani," and then in Greek, "The mou, the mou, hiva thi me hegkatlipes." [Footnote: "My God, My God, why hast Thou forsaken Me?"-Matt, xxvii. 46.] Whereat Dom. Consul started back, and made the sign of the cross (for inasmuch as he knew no Greek, he believed, as he afterwards said himself, that she was calling upon the devil to help her), and then called to the constable with ...
— Sidonia The Sorceress V2 • William Mienhold

... remission and reconciliation to this work: "By this shall the iniquity of Jacob be purged, and this is all the fruit to take away his sin; when he maketh all the stones of the altar as chalk-stones that are beaten asunder, the groves and images shall not stand up." Isa. xxvii. 9. ...
— The Works of Mr. George Gillespie (Vol. 1 of 2) • George Gillespie

... Cor. 10:13. They are also poor defenders of their cause when they admit that the violation of a vow is irreprehensible, and it must be declared that by law such marriages are censured and should be dissolved, C. Ut. Continentiae, xxvii. Q. 1, as also by the ancient statutes of emperors. But when they allege in their favor C. Nuptiarum, They accomplish nothing, for it speaks of a simple not of a religious vow, which the Church observes also to this day. The marriages of monks, nuns, or priests, have therefore ...
— The Confutatio Pontificia • Anonymous

... of mind. "Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace whose mind is staid on Thee, because he trusteth in Thee" (Isaiah xxvi, 3). "Let him take hold of my strength that he may make peace with me" (Isaiah xxvii, 5). St. Paul speaks of "The God of Peace" in many passages, e.g., Rom. xv, 33; 2 Cor. xiii, 11; 1 Thess. v, 23, and Hebr. xiii, 20; and Jesus, in his final discourse recorded in the fourteenth, fifteenth and sixteenth chapters of St. John's Gospel, ...
— The Law and the Word • Thomas Troward

... XXVII. Maternus reminds Messala of the true point in question; Messala proceeds to assign the causes which occasioned the decay of eloquence, such as the dissipation of the young men, the inattention of their parents, the ignorance of rhetorical professors, ...
— A Dialogue Concerning Oratory, Or The Causes Of Corrupt Eloquence • Cornelius Tacitus

... XXVII. This was the origin of the war with the Amazons; and it seems to have been carried on in no feeble or womanish spirit, for they never could have encamped in the city nor have fought a battle close to the ...
— Plutarch's Lives, Volume I (of 4) • Plutarch

... Thucydides is thought to have been more conservative in his religious opinions than I consider probable; see Classen, loc. cit.; Decharme, p. 83; Gertz in his preface to the Danish translation of Thucydides, p. xxvii.—Hippo: Vorsokr. 26, A 4, 6, 8, ...
— Atheism in Pagan Antiquity • A. B. Drachmann

... mats is easily done and the method is shown in Plate XXVI. Mats in over and under weave, of solid color (either natural or dyed), are used, and the embroidery is done with colored straws. Plate XXVII illustrates an embroidered color panel. Floral, geometrical, and conventionalized designs are discussed under the headings "Samar mats" and ...
— Philippine Mats - Philippine Craftsman Reprint Series No. 1 • Hugo H. Miller

... earthquake throughout vast creation that we have only to open our eyes and look at the rent rocks for a clear and perfect demonstration that this whole globe was shaken from centre to circumference, [35]and the graves of the dead were opened. Matt xxvii: 50, 53. You may answer me that Popery has honored that day by calling it good Friday, and the next first day following Easter Sunday, &c., but after all nothing short of bible argument will satisfy the earnest inquirer after truth.—The President had already shown that the Jewish ...
— The Seventh Day Sabbath, a Perpetual Sign - 1847 edition • Joseph Bates

... the sixteenth century. The English Battle of Otterburn is the more faithful to history, and refers (35.2) to 'the cronykle' as authority. The Hunting of the Cheviot was in the repertory of Richard Sheale (see First Series, Introduction, xxvii), who ends his version in the regular manner traditional amongst minstrels. Also, we have the broadside Chevy Chase, which well illustrates the degradation of a ballad in the hands of the hack-writers; this may be seen in many collections ...
— Ballads of Scottish Tradition and Romance - Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - Third Series • Various

... XXVII. The true idea of man, as the reflection of the 337:21 invisible God, is as incomprehensible to the limited senses as is man's infinite Principle. The visible uni- verse and material man are the poor counter- 337:24 feits of ...
— Science and Health With Key to the Scriptures • Mary Baker Eddy

... XXVII. When the Infante Don Sancho knew that the King his father had made this allotment it displeased him, for he was the eldest son; and he said to his father that he neither could nor ought to make this division; for the Gothic Kings had in old time made a constitution ...
— Chronicle Of The Cid • Various

... you; in its spiritual sense it will quicken you," he intends not that the body of Christ is in this sacrament merely according to mystical signification, but "spiritually," that is, invisibly, and by the power of the spirit. Hence (Tract. xxvii), expounding John 6:64: "the flesh profiteth nothing," he says: "Yea, but as they understood it, for they understood that the flesh was to be eaten as it is divided piecemeal in a dead body, or as sold in the shambles, not as it is quickened by the spirit . . . Let the spirit draw nigh ...
— Summa Theologica, Part III (Tertia Pars) - From the Complete American Edition • Thomas Aquinas

... bestow, your Lordship beyng learned and a louer of learning, my present a Book and my selfe a printer alwaies ready and desirous to be at your Honourable commaundement. And thus I humbly take my leave from the Black-friers, this xxvii of ...
— The Arte of English Poesie • George Puttenham

... XXVII. I have not seen, I may not see, My hopes for man take form in fact, But God will give the victory In due time; in that faith I act. And lie who sees the future sure, The baffling present may endure, And bless, meanwhile, the unseen Hand that leads The heart's ...
— The Complete Works of Whittier - The Standard Library Edition with a linked Index • John Greenleaf Whittier

... built partly of timber, partly of steel, the compression members being generally of timber and the tension members of steel. On the Pacific coast, where excellent timber is obtainable and steel works are distant, combination bridges are still largely used (Ottewell, Trans. Am. Soc. C.E. xxvii. p. 467). The combination bridge at Roseburgh, Oregon, is a cantilever bridge, The shore arms are 147 ft. span, the river arms 105 ft., and the suspended girder 80 ft., the total distance between anchor piers being 584 ft. ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 3 - "Brescia" to "Bulgaria" • Various

... XXVII "Remember, pagan, when thine arm laid low The brother of Angelica. That knight Am I; — thy word was plighted then to throw After my other arms his helmet bright. If Fortune now compel thee to forego The prize, and do my will in thy despite, Grieve not at this, but rather grieve that thou Art ...
— Orlando Furioso • Lodovico Ariosto

... to Pharaoh, and Aaron thy brother shall be thy prophet; compared with JE iv. 10, 16. (Moses) I am slow of speech, and of a slow tongue; (Jehovah) Aaron shall be to thee instead of a mouth, and thou shalt be to him instead of God. Comp. Genesis xxvii. 46, with xxv: ...
— Prolegomena to the History of Israel • Julius Wellhausen

... XXVII. To escape from his lady, either by interposing another image of beauty between the thought of her and his heart, ...
— Sonnets • Michael Angelo Buonarroti & Tommaso Campanella

... The only approximation to it is furnished by the fact, that he was thirty at the beginning of his reign. (2 Sam. v. 4.) If we take into account that his exile must have lasted for a very considerable period (one portion of it, his second flight to the Philistines, was sixteen months, 1 Sam. xxvii. 7),—that the previous residence at the court of Saul must have been long enough to give time for his gradual rise to popularity, and thereafter for the gradual development of the king's insane hatred,—that further back still there was an indefinite period, between ...
— The Life of David - As Reflected in His Psalms • Alexander Maclaren

... LETTER XXVII. Miss Byron to Miss Selby.— Sir Charles departs unexpectedly, from the kindest motives. The concern and solicitude of his friends. Miss Byron's mind much agitated. The eldest of Mrs. Oldham's sons presented with a pair of ...
— The History of Sir Charles Grandison, Volume 4 (of 7) • Samuel Richardson

... show them sincerity; in regard to the young, to treat them tenderly.' CHAP. XXVI. The Master said, 'It is all over! I have not yet seen one who could perceive his faults, and inwardly accuse himself.' CHAP. XXVII. The Master said, 'In a hamlet of ten families, there may be found one honourable and sincere as I am, but not so ...
— The Chinese Classics—Volume 1: Confucian Analects • James Legge

... 22; cf. Job xxvii. 3; Wisd. ii. 2.—The words might be rendered "a spirit (spiritus) in her nostrils." The meaning is not clear. In the biblical passages in which the phrase occurs it indicates mortality. On the other hand, by the previous sentence St. Bernard suggests that, in contrast ...
— St. Bernard of Clairvaux's Life of St. Malachy of Armagh • H. J. Lawlor

... XXVII of "La Salle and the Discovery of the Great West." La Salle was assassinated by some of his own men, near a branch of the Trinity river in Texas. He had sailed from France in 1684 for the purpose of founding a colony at the mouth of the Mississippi, and had ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. X (of X) - America - II, Index • Various

... "Read Ezekiel xxvii. and you will find it. This place was known before the time of Christ, and was the centre of an extensive commerce with India, though it was also carried on by the Indus and the Oxus, the latter formerly flowing ...
— Asiatic Breezes - Students on The Wing • Oliver Optic

... See what we are told of king Asoka's grant of all the Jambudvipa to the monks in chapter xxvii. There are several other instances of ...
— Record of Buddhistic Kingdoms • Fa-Hien

... be omitted. In order to complete the course in one year in the New Testament lessons, the following might be omitted, if some must be. XVI The Mothers Prayer; XX The Good Shepherd; XXIII Jesus and the Children; XXVI, XXVII The Last Teachings. ...
— Hurlbut's Bible Lessons - For Boys and Girls • Rev. Jesse Lyman Hurlbut

... he told the wind where to set him down, and the carpet with all its contents rose into the air and alighted at the proper place. In hot weather the birds of the air, with outspread wings, formed a canopy over the whole party.—Sale, Koran, xxvii. (notes). ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1 - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook • The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D.

... Phil. Trans., vol. xxvii., p. 274. Umbrae (now called penumbrae) are spaces of half-shadow which usually encircle spots. Faculae ("little torches," so named by Scheiner) are bright streaks or patches ...
— A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century - Fourth Edition • Agnes M. (Agnes Mary) Clerke

... Salem (Plate XXVII) is the one of Rogers' hybrids of which the originator is said to have thought most, and to which he gave the name of his place of residence. The two chief faults, unproductiveness and susceptibility to mildew, are not found in all localities, and in these districts, ...
— Manual of American Grape-Growing • U. P. Hedrick

... began his reigne ouer the realme of England the second day of December, in the yere of our Lord 1135. in the eleuenth yeare of the emperour Lothair, the sixt of pope Innocentius the second, and about the xxvii. of Lewes the seuenth, surnamed Crassus king of France, Dauid the first of that name then reigning in Scotland, & entring into the twelfe of his regiment. [Sidenote: Matth. Paris. Wil. Mal. Simon Dun.] He was ...
— Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland (2 of 6): England (4 of 12) - Stephan Earle Of Bullongne • Raphael Holinshed

... XXVII. But you have recourse to art, which you call in to the aid of the senses. A painter sees what we do not see; and as soon as a flute-player plays a note the air is recognised by a musician. Well? Does not this argument seem to tell against ...
— The Academic Questions • M. T. Cicero

... winds, but He gives the shout from the air and instead of being gathered the church-saints are caught up in clouds, together with the risen saints to meet the Lord in the air. The elect people who are to be gathered when the Lord returns after the tribulation are the people Israel (see Isaiah xxvii:13). Their hour of deliverance has come. This is the same deliverance of which Daniel speaks in chapter xii:1. It is also significant that our Lord after He announced the gathering and restoration of Israel mentions at once the figtree, which ...
— Studies in Prophecy • Arno C. Gaebelein

... from the inside. They afford also the best account of religion in Russia as a living force, while those who wish to know more of the Orthodox Church as an institution may be referred to chaps. xxvi. and xxvii. of Mr. Baring's Russian People; chap. viii. of the same writer's Mainsprings of Russia; and chap. vi. of Sir C. Eliot's (Odysseus) Turkey in Europe (7s. 6d. net). The second of Mr. Graham's books deals with the threatening industrial changes in Russia. The third is a fine piece ...
— The War and Democracy • R.W. Seton-Watson, J. Dover Wilson, Alfred E. Zimmern,



Words linked to "Xxvii" :   27, large integer



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