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Xxi   Listen
adjective
xxi  adj.  The Roman number representing twenty-one.
Synonyms: twenty-one, 21.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Xxi" Quotes from Famous Books



... fallen into the hands of the rebels. Upon hearing this bad news he was seized with such a bad attack of the grippe that they wrapped him up in pillows and sent him home by sledge to St. Petersburg, where the four-handed card-party awaited him, and that very night he had the misfortune to lose his XXI. [Footnote: The card next to the highest in tarok.]; upon which the Czarina made the bon mot that Karr allowed himself twice to lose his XXI. (referring to twenty-one guns), which bon mot caused great ...
— Stories by Foreign Authors: Polish • Various

... Books (XVII-XXI) are devoted to revealing the Suitors as destroyers to Ulysses in person, though he be disguised. Three strands are interwoven into the texture, which we may separate for ...
— Homer's Odyssey - A Commentary • Denton J. Snider

... has here noticed what is so often emphasised by Greek writers, that tallness was a great beauty in women. See Aristotle, 'Ethics', iv., 3, and Homer, 'passim, Odyssey', viii., 416; xviii., 190 and 248; xxi., 6. So Xenophon in describing Panthea emphasises her tallness, ...
— The Early Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Tennyson

... seen on the hand by the little lines that leave the Line of Life and bend over towards the Mount of the Moon and also by the lines found on this Mount (2, Plate XXI.). ...
— Palmistry for All • Cheiro

... XXI. All things which follow from the absolute nature of any attribute of God must always exist and be infinite, or, in other words, are eternal and infinite through the ...
— Ethica Ordine Geometrico Demonstrata - Part I: Concerning God • Benedict de Spinoza

... XIV If thou must love me, let it be for nought XV Accuse me not, beseech thee, that I wear XVI And yet, because thou overcomest so XVII My poet thou canst touch on all the notes XVIII I never gave a lock of hair away XIX The soul's Rialto hath its merchandize XX Beloved, my beloved, when I think XXI Say over again, and yet once over again XXII When our two souls stand up erect and strong XXIII Is it indeed so? If I lay here dead XXIV Let the world's sharpness like a clasping knife XXV A heavy heart, ...
— Sonnets from the Portuguese • Browning, Elizabeth Barrett

... elders who commanded them,—"Go and lie in wait in the vineyards; and see, and behold, if the daughters of Shiloh come out to dance in dances, then come ye out of the vineyards, and catch you everyone his wife of the daughters of Shiloh, and go to the land of Benjamin," Judges, ch. xxi. The rape of the Sabine women, who were seized by the followers of Romulus on a day appointed for sacrifice and public games, also serves as a precedent for the action of those young Welshmen who captured Fairy wives whilst ...
— Welsh Folk-Lore - a Collection of the Folk-Tales and Legends of North Wales • Elias Owen

... [24:5] Matt. xxi. 19. Neander has shown that this was a typical action pointing to the rejection of the Jews. See his "Life ...
— The Ancient Church - Its History, Doctrine, Worship, and Constitution • W.D. [William Dool] Killen

... visited Antioch, and spent some time there, he prepared for a third journey into heathen countries, the account of which begins Acts xviii. 23. and ends chap. xxi. 17. At his first setting out he went over the whole country of Galatia and Phrygia in order, strengthening all the disciples; and passing through the upper coasts came to Ephesus. There for the space of three months, he boldly preached in the jewish synagogue, disputing, and persuading the things ...
— An Enquiry into the Obligations of Christians to Use Means for the Conversion of the Heathens • William Carey

... individual native as it affects his present relations with the whites and the probable future of the race, I shall have to speak in a later chapter (Chapter XXI), as also of the condition and prospects of the Christian missions which exist among them, and which form the main ...
— Impressions of South Africa • James Bryce

... against parents, were all equally made capital crimes. The law against the latter was in these words:—'If any child or children, above sixteen years of age, and of sufficient understanding, shall curse or smite their natural father or mother, he or they shall be put to death. Exodus xxi, 17; Lev. ...
— Travels in the United States of America • William Priest

... "It was the 2nd of September, 1666, that the anger of the Lord was kindled against London, and the fire began. It began in a baker's house in Pudding Lane, by Fish Street Hill; and now the Lord is making London like a fiery oven in the time of his anger (Psalm xxi. 9), and in his wrath doth devour and swallow up our habitations. It was in the depth and dead of the night, when most doors and senses were lockt up in the City, that the fire doth break forth and appear abroad, and like a mighty giant refresht with wine doth awake and arm itself, ...
— Old and New London - Volume I • Walter Thornbury

... knowing, and that any future researches being unpleasant to him would be equally disagreeable to me. M. de Sartines obeyed my request; and from that period till the death of the king I heard no more of this singular personage. CHAPTER XXI Extraordinary anecdote of Louis XIV and madame de Maintenon— The comtesse du Barry at Chantilly—Opinion of king and comte de la Marche respecting the "Iron Mask"—Madame du Barry visits madame de Lagarde My acquaintance with the singular being I was speaking of in the last ...
— "Written by Herself" • Baron Etienne Leon Lamothe-Langon

... proselytes. But the prophecy is not completely fulfilled even now, and it covers the entire development of the 'kingdom that cannot be moved' until the end of time. The writer of the Epistle to the Hebrews thus understands the prophecy (Hebrews xii. 26, 27), and there are echoes of it in Revelation xxi., which describes the final form of the Holy City, the New Jerusalem. So the chronology of prophecy is not altogether that of history; and while the events stand clear, their perspective is foreshortened. All the ages are but 'a little while' in the ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Ezekiel, Daniel, and the Minor Prophets. St Matthew Chapters I to VIII • Alexander Maclaren

... the fifth pit correspond in some degree with those of the third, except that in their case the traffic which is punished has to do with secular offices. Canto xxi. opens with the famous description of the work in the arsenal of Venice, which is introduced in order to afford an image of the boiling pitch in which sinners of this class are immersed. For some reason, which is not very ...
— Dante: His Times and His Work • Arthur John Butler

... period of their exile. And should they be condemned to the galleys or to other services, they shall fulfil the condemnation,—[Felipe III—Aranjuez, April 29, 1605. Felipe IV—Madrid, January 27, 1631. In Recopilacion de leyes, lib. vii, tit. viii, ley xxi.] ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVII, 1609-1616 • Various

... XXI. Olaus Bialterus. 1552 Abit patria. 1553 Cathderam adit. Hic primus sincerioris doctrin apud Holenses amorem in multorum animis, etiam adhuc prdecessoris sui collega, accendit: Deinde eandem doctrinam Episcopus apertius docuit et propugnauit. ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries - of the English Nation, v. 1, Northern Europe • Richard Hakluyt

... Hosts; the former for using enchantments, and the latter for employing Balaam in this wicked work. Woe to them that devise iniquity: Micah, ii. 1. Those who employ unhappy Gipsy women, should think on the portion of the liar; Rev. xxi. 8: for the person who tempts another to utter falsehood by offering rewards, is equally guilty before God. A companion of fools shall be destroyed: Prov. xiii. 20. Though hand join in hand, in sin, the ...
— The Gipsies' Advocate - or, Observations on the Origin, Character, Manners, and Habits of - The English Gipsies • James Crabb

... Sec. XXI. This Christian art of the declining empire is divided into two great branches, western and eastern; one centred at Rome, the other at Byzantium, of which the one is the early Christian Romanesque, properly so called, and the other, carried to higher imaginative perfection ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume I (of 3) • John Ruskin

... XXI. The price of the first part will be an easier purchase than of the whole; and all in one volume would be somewhat too big in bulk ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... LETTER XX. XXI. From the same.—Another conference with her mother, who leaves her in anger.—She goes down to beg her favour. Solmes comes in. She offers to withdraw; but is forbid. What follows ...
— Clarissa, Volume 1 (of 9) • Samuel Richardson

... him thereto," says Machiavelli [treatise Du Prince, ch. xxi.], "a prince ought never to form alliance with one stronger than himself in order to attack others, for, the most powerful being victor, thou remainest, thyself, at his discretion, and princes ought to avoid, as much as ever they can, being at another's discretion. The ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume III. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... seem that the object of anger is evil. For Gregory of Nyssa says [*Nemesius, De Nat. Hom. xxi.] that anger is "the sword-bearer of desire," inasmuch, to wit, as it assails whatever obstacle stands in the way of desire. But an obstacle has the character of evil. Therefore anger regards evil ...
— Summa Theologica, Part I-II (Pars Prima Secundae) - From the Complete American Edition • Saint Thomas Aquinas

... story of Jephthah is contained in chaps, xi., xii. 1- 7, of the Book of Judges. The passage (xi. 12-29) is regarded by some, owing to its faint echo of certain portions of Numb, xx., xxi., to be an interpolation. Jephthah is said to have had Gilead for his father and a harlot for his mother. Various views have been put forward as to the account of his victories over the Midianites, some seeing ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 6 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... plural in original. Chapter XII et seq.: "St. Martinsville" corrected to "St. Martinville" Chapter XXI: "Brownville", Texas, corrected to "Brownsville". Chapter XXXIV: the Grant in temporary command of Getty's division is Brigadier-General Lewis Grant, not U. S. Grant as in ...
— History of the Nineteenth Army Corps • Richard Biddle Irwin

... if his accuracy be inquired into, he tells you that Carlisle, which he calls Cardoel en Gales, is on {605} the Tyne, and was garrisoned in vain with "grand plant de Galois," to prevent the Scotch from passing the Tyne under its walls (vol. i. ch. xviii. xix. xxi.). ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 216, December 17, 1853 • Various

... year, to give the class a text; generally some brief moral quotation from some of the ancient or modern poets, from which the students write a short essay, usually denominated a theme.—Works of R.T. Paine, p. xxi. ...
— A Collection of College Words and Customs • Benjamin Homer Hall

... LETTER XXI. From the same.— Admitted to the lady's presence. What passed on the occasion. Really believes that she still loves him. Has a reverence, and even a holy love for her. Astonished that Lovelace could hold his purposes against such an angel of a woman. Condemns him for ...
— Clarissa, Volume 7 • Samuel Richardson

... XXI. Any member may be expelled from the Society, or, having resigned his membership, may be deprived of his privileges, by a vote of two-thirds of the members present at any regular meeting, upon charges of the following description; provided the charge or charges against him have ...
— The Act Of Incorporation And The By-Laws Of The Massachusetts Homeopathic Medical Society • Massachusetts Homoeopathic Medical Society

... defence of a fort that is not in reason to be defended XV. Of the punishment of cowardice. XVI. A proceeding of some ambassadors. XVII. Of fear. XVIII. That men are not to judge of our happiness till after death. XIX. That to study philosophy is to learn to die. XX. Of the force of imagination. XXI. That the profit of one man is the ...
— The Essays of Montaigne, Complete • Michel de Montaigne

... Fredericksburg, while Sumner and Hooker attacked him in front. But by some alleged misunderstanding of orders Franklin's operations were limited to a mere reconnoissance, and the direct attacks of Sumner and Hooker were unsupported." "Rebellion Records," vol. xxi., ...
— War from the Inside • Frederick L. (Frederick Lyman) Hitchcock

... XXI. He overthroweth his enemies at dawn, when he is born each day.* Thoth exalteth his two eyes.* When he setteth in his splendour the gods rejoice in his beauties,* and the Apes (i.e. dawn spirits) exalt him.* Lord of the Sektet Boat and of the ...
— The Literature of the Ancient Egyptians • E. A. Wallis Budge

... head, of shaving the head, of clipping the beard, and of lacerating the body at death or in sign of mourning, appears very similar to the practices among the Israelites in the time of Moses. Vide Leviticus xix. 27, 28; Leviticus xxi. 5; Jeremiah xiviii. 30, 31, 32; Revelations ...
— Journals Of Expeditions Of Discovery Into Central • Edward John Eyre

... a voice from the God of the whole earth, saying unto him, "Thou profane and wicked prince, remove the diadem and take off the crown. I will overturn, overturn, overturn it, and it shall be no more" (Ezekiel xxi., 25-27). "Tho thou exalt thyself as the eagle, and tho thou set thy nest among the stars, thence will I bring thee down, saith the Lord" (Obadiah, 4). Neither the dignity of governor, nor the favor ...
— The world's great sermons, Volume 3 - Massillon to Mason • Grenville Kleiser

... that advice is, I must confess, nearly lost on those who are capable of indulging in them. If any youth, unhappily initiated in these odious and debasing vices, should happen to see what I am now writing, I beg him to read the command of God, to the Israelites, Deut. xxi. The father and mother are to take the bad son 'and bring him to the elders of the city; and they shall say to the elders, this our son will not obey our voice: he is a glutton and a drunkard. And all the men of the city shall stone him with stones, that he die.' This will give him some idea ...
— The Young Man's Guide • William A. Alcott

... power vested in the President by the Constitution, and by virtue of the seventeen hundred and fifty-third section of the Revised Statutes and of the civil-service act approved January 16, 1883, Rules IV, VI, XIX, XXI of the rules for the regulation and improvement of the executive civil service are hereby ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 3 (of 3) of Volume 8: Grover Cleveland, First Term. • Grover Cleveland

... XXI. Sciatica. Mr. G., aet. about 35, saddler, was sent by Dr. WAECHTER, March 6th, 1875. Had suffered from sciatica without discoverable cause for several years. For one year prior to his visit had been unable to work, and was confined to bed ...
— The Electric Bath • George M. Schweig

... frugum quidem fertilissima, sed ut prope sola iis carere possit, tanta est ciborum ex herbis abundantia. Plin. l. xxi. c. 15.—Trans. ...
— The Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, • Charles Rollin

... oratories in caves, where the idols were kept, and where aromatics were burned in small brasiers. Chirino found small temples in Taitay adjoining the principal houses. [See Vol. XII. of this series, chapter xxi.] It appears that temples were never dedicated to bathala maykapal, nor was sacrifice ever offered him. The temples dedicated to the anito were ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVI, 1609 • H.E. Blair

... XXI "And some had sworn an oath that she Should be to public justice brought; And for the little infant's bones With spades they would have sought. 225 But instantly the hill of moss [26] Before their eyes began to stir! And, for full ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth - Volume 1 of 8 • Edited by William Knight

... law; and they have been informed concerning thee, that thou teachest all the Jews which are among the Gentiles to forsake Moses, telling them not to circumcise their children, neither to walk after the customs. (Acts xxi. ...
— Lectures and Essays • Thomas Henry Huxley

... have further kept the Greek idea in the English form of "wind-flower." The name is explained by Pliny: "The flower hath the propertie to open but when the wind doth blow, wherefore it took the name Anemone in Greeke" ("Nat. Hist." xxi. 11, Holland's translation). This, however, is not the character of the Anemone as grown in English gardens; and so it is probable that the name has been transferred to a different plant than the classical one, and I think no suggestion ...
— The plant-lore & garden-craft of Shakespeare • Henry Nicholson Ellacombe

... I. Book vii. Chap. xxi. gives the following account of the battle in which Valdivia was defeated by ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 5 • Robert Kerr

... to the law found in Recop. leyes Indias (ed. 1841), lib. viii, tit. xx, ley i, which enumerates the offices that may be sold in the Indias. Cf. ley i, tit. xxi, which relates to the renunciation of such ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, V7, 1588-1591 • Emma Helen Blair

... morals,—the Praefectus Morum: It would therefore seem that this was the post held by Salustius, when Ammianus Marcellinus informs us in his History that the Emperor Julian "promoted him to be Prefect and sent him into Gaul:"—"Salustium Praefectum promotum in Galliam missus est" (Lib. XXI. c. 8): Otherwise it is not clear why Theodoretus should write thus in his Ecelesiastical History:—"At this time Sallustius who was Prefect, ALTHOUGH he was a slave to impiety:—[Greek: Salloustios de hyparchos on taenikauta, KAITOI ...
— Tacitus and Bracciolini - The Annals Forged in the XVth Century • John Wilson Ross

... omit pro Murena, chs. vii. and xxi., for want of space. Sulpicius was opposing Cicero in this case, and the latter's allusions to him are useful specimens of the good ...
— Social life at Rome in the Age of Cicero • W. Warde Fowler

... says (De Civ. Dei xxi, 11), "Tully writes that the laws recognize eight forms of punishment, indemnity, prison, stripes, retaliation, public disgrace, exile, death, slavery." Now some of these were prescribed by the Law. "Indemnity," as when a thief was condemned to make ...
— Summa Theologica, Part I-II (Pars Prima Secundae) - From the Complete American Edition • Saint Thomas Aquinas

... the mountains in Barbary, more particularly in Morocco and Algeria; but also in this country. Our Saviour, besides, gives the same advice to his disciples: "Let them which are in Judea flee to the mountains." (Luke xxi. 21.) It has always been difficult to apprehend fugitives in the mountains, especially in ancient times, when a good police did not exist. The conqueror has always had great difficulty, and exposed his conquests ...
— Travels in the Great Desert of Sahara, in the Years of 1845 and 1846 • James Richardson

... upon the rock, from the beginning of harvest until the water dropped upon them out of heaven, and suffered neither the birds of the air to rest upon them by day, nor the beasts of the field by night. 2 SAMUEL, xxi. 10. ...
— Poetical Works of William Cullen Bryant - Household Edition • William Cullen Bryant

... This clumsy fiction seems more at home in the grotesque and lawless mythology of the Turks, or in the Persian poet Sadi, who is said by Marmontel to have adopted it from the Turk. If Milton's intention were to reproduce Jacob's ladder, he should, like Dante (Parad, xxi. 25), have made it the means of ...
— Milton • Mark Pattison

... e.g. his article: "Ueber Gegenstande hoherer Ordnung und deren Verhaltniss zur inneren Wahrnehmung," "Zeitschrift fur Psychologie and Physiologie der Sinnesorgane," vol. xxi, pp. 182-272 (1899), especially ...
— The Analysis of Mind • Bertrand Russell

... idea of all individual rights of liberty being the product of state concession has been recently advocated by Tezner, Gruenhuts Zeitschrift fuer Privat-und oeffentliches Recht, XXI, pp. 136 et seq., who seeks to banish the opposing conception to the realm of natural right. The decision of such important questions can only be accomplished by careful historical analysis, which will show different results for different epochs,—that, for example, the legal nature of liberty ...
— The Declaration of the Rights of Man and of Citizens • Georg Jellinek

... was not till some years after he was 'touched' by Queen Anne that the Pretender dwelt there. The Hanoverian kings never 'touched.' The service for the ceremony was printed in the Book of Common Prayer as late as 1719. (Penny Cyclo. xxi. 113.) 'It appears by the newspapers of the time,' says Mr. Wright, quoted by Croker, 'that on March 30, 1712, two hundred persons were touched by Queen Anne.' Macaulay says that 'Charles the Second, in the course of his reign, touched ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... things begin to pass, then look up, and lift up your heads; for your redemption draweth night. St. Luke xxi. 28. ...
— The Christian Year • Rev. John Keble

... series, Botany, vol. i. pp. 317-398, with plate. Mr. H.O. Forbes has shown that the same thing occurs among tropical orchids, in his paper "On the Contrivances for insuring Self-Fertilisation in some Tropical Orchids," Journ. Linn. Soc., xxi. ...
— Darwinism (1889) • Alfred Russel Wallace

... me quite proud. I have not heard of anything in the scientific line which would interest you. Sir H. De la Beche (27/5. The Presidential Address delivered by De la Beche before the Geological Society in 1848 ("Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc." Volume IV., "Proceedings," page xxi, 1848).) gave a very long and rather dull address; the most interesting part was from Sir J. Ross. Mr. Beete Jukes figured in it very prominently: it really is a very nice quality in Sir Henry, the manner in which ...
— More Letters of Charles Darwin - Volume I (of II) • Charles Darwin

... resources—the rebellious spirits, punished their disobedience by incarcerating them in various kinds of prisons, for longer or shorter periods of time, in proportion to their demerits. For the belief of the followers of Mohammed in the magic excellence of Solomon, see Sale's Koran, xxi. and xxvii. According to the prophet, the devil taught men magic and sorcery. The magic of the Moslems, or, at least, of the Egyptians, is of two kinds—high and low—which are termed respectively rahmanee (divine) and sheytanee (Satanic). By a perfect knowledge of the ...
— The Superstitions of Witchcraft • Howard Williams

... The Arthurian Legend, 7. Squire, in his recent Mythology of the British Islands, states the case for "the mythological coming of Arthur" in cap. xxi. of his book. ...
— Folklore as an Historical Science • George Laurence Gomme

... of consecrations [i.e., the Sacramentary and the Pontifical Rituale] so also had the greatest part in the arrangement of the liturgical chants, following the order which is observed to this day as the most fitting: as is commemorated at the head of the Antiphoner." (Op. cit. c. xxi., Patr. ...
— St. Gregory and the Gregorian Music • E. G. P. Wyatt

... In Chapter XXI, a missing quotation mark has been added preceding "Her fortune amounts to one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, does it not?"; a missing period has been inserted after "muttered ...
— Ben's Nugget - A Boy's Search For Fortune • Horatio, Jr. Alger

... wage war against another nation, were wont to determine which city should be attacked first by casting lots in a peculiar manner. The names of the cities were written on arrows. These were shaken in a bag, and the one drawn decided the matter (see Ezekiel xxi. 21-22). A like method of divination, called belomany, was current among the Arabians before Mahomet's rise, though it was afterwards prohibited by the Koran. By imitation of their elders, to which children are constantly prone—in the making of "housies," in nursing of dolls, ...
— Children's Rhymes, Children's Games, Children's Songs, Children's Stories - A Book for Bairns and Big Folk • Robert Ford

... to the prevalence of this illusion in Germany, see section "The Chosen People and its Mission," p. 28; also Introduction, p. xxi. ...
— Gems (?) of German Thought • Various

... which carried all along exultingly to welcome Him on His last visit to the Holy City; when the crowds spread branches of the palm-trees, and cried, "Hosanna to the Son of David: blessed is He that cometh in the name of the Lord" (S. Matt. xxi. 9). "Blessed be the King that cometh in the name of the Lord: peace in Heaven, and glory in the highest" (S. Luke ...
— The Kingdom of Heaven; What is it? • Edward Burbidge

... Davis, "The Shays Rebellion a Political Aftermath" (Proceedings American Antiquarian Society, xxi, pp. 58, ...
— The Frontier in American History • Frederick Jackson Turner

... jeunes generations et celle de la vieillesse ou de l'age mur, les peuples modernes n'auraient donc fait que reproduire dans leur ordre social un changement de rapports qui s'etait deja accompli dans la nature intime des choses.—BOUTMY, Revue Nationale, xxi. 393. Il y a dans l'homme individuel des principes de progres viager; il y a, en toute societe, des causes constantes qui transforment ce progres viager en progres hereditaire. Une societe quelconque tend a progresser tant que les circonstances ne ...
— Lectures on Modern history • Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton

... shape, and composition of forces that will fight in all elements will assuredly change in the future. Early work done in advanced warfighting experiments out of TRADOC's Battle Labs beginning in 1992 and growing into the current Force XXI and other promising capabilities as well as by the USMC at MCCDC at Quantico are the precursors of how change may be discovered and implemented. The challenge is to ensure that all components of our fighting power are properly balanced and combined into the most effective and lethal mixes ...
— Shock and Awe - Achieving Rapid Dominance • Harlan K. Ullman and James P. Wade

... XXI. Anent Mariage without proclamation of bans, which being in use these years by-gone hath produced many dangerous effects: The Assembly would discharge the same, conforme to the former acts, except the Presbyterie in some ...
— The Acts Of The General Assemblies of the Church of Scotland

... at Adam and Eue / and endyng with kyng Iohan of Fraunce / taken prisoner at Poyters by prince Edwarde. [Woodcut.] [Colophon] Imprinted at London in flete strete by Richarde Pynson / printer vnto the kynges moste noble grace / & fynisshed the .xxi. day of Februarye / the yere of our lorde ...
— Catalogue of the Books Presented by Edward Capell to the Library of Trinity College in Cambridge • W. W. Greg

... "owneth." This sense is very common in Shakespeare. In the original edition of the authorized version of the Bible we read: "So shall the Jews at Jerusalem bind the man that oweth this girdle" (Acts xxi. I i) ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... doctrine of parallelism, in its original form, to Spinoza. It was elaborated by W. K. Clifford, and to him the modern interest in the subject is largely due. The whole subject is discussed at length in my "System of Metaphysics," Chapters XIX-XXI. The titles are: "The Automaton Theory: Parallelism," "What is Parallelism?" and "The Man and the Candlestick." Clifford's doctrine is presented in a new form in Professor Strong's recent brilliant work, "Why the Mind ...
— An Introduction to Philosophy • George Stuart Fullerton

... XXI. The Ego is deathless and limitless, for limits 336:1 would imply and impose ignorance. Mind is the I AM, or infinity. Mind never enters the finite. Intelligence 336:3 never passes into non-intelligence, or matter. Good never enters into evil ...
— Science and Health With Key to the Scriptures • Mary Baker Eddy

... Abiathar the High Priest, and did eat of the shew-bread, &c." See the same also in Matthew, ch. xii. 3. Luke vi. 3. Now here is a great blunder; for this thing happened in the time of Achimelech, not in the time of Abiathar; for so it is written, 1 Sam. xxi. "And David came to Nob, to Achimelech the Priest, &c." And in the 22d chapter it is said ...
— The Grounds of Christianity Examined by Comparing The New Testament with the Old • George Bethune English

... approximate to the derivatives of cellulose rather than to those of ligno-cellulose, the more oxidisable, non-cellulose, or lignone constituents having been decomposed. In fact, he regards his product as cellulose penta-nitrate (C{12}H{16}O{5}(ONO{2}){5}). The Chemiker Zeitung, xxi., p. 163, contains a further paper by Muehlhaeusen on the explosive nitro-jute. After purifying the jute-fibre by boiling it with a 1 per cent. solution of sodium carbonate, and washing with water, he treated 1 part of ...
— Nitro-Explosives: A Practical Treatise • P. Gerald Sanford

... the LORD stood by the threshing-floor of Ornan the Jebusite. And David lifted up his eyes, and saw the Angel of the LORD stand between the Earth and the Heaven, having a drawn sword in his hand stretched out over Jerusalem."—1 Chron. xxi. 15, 16. ...
— Inspiration and Interpretation - Seven Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford • John Burgon

... JOSHUA). The mount or hill-country in b appears to be that which the Israelites unsuccessfully attempted to take (Num. xiv. 41-45), but according to another old fragment Hormah was the scene of a victory (Num. xxi. 1-3), and it seems probable that Caleb, at least, was supposed to have pushed his way northward to Hebron. ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 - "Bulgaria" to "Calgary" • Various

... act of worship or as an amusement;" fifth, that any who perverted the dance from a sacred use to purposes of amusement were called infamous. The only records in Scripture of dancing as a social amusement were those of the ungodly families described by Job xxi, 11-13, who spent their time in luxury and gayety, and who came to a sudden destruction; and the dancing of Herodias, Matt. Xiv, 6, which led to the rash vow of King Herod and to the murder of John the Baptist. So much for ...
— Questionable Amusements and Worthy Substitutes • J. M. Judy

... Book XXI of the "History of Rome." Translated by D. Spillan and Cyrus Edmonds. The identity of the pass through which Hannibal crossed has been the subject of much controversy. A writer in Smith's "Dictionary" says the account in Polybius "will be found, on ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to prose. Volume II (of X) - Rome • Various

... XXI. Item, That all stayrs in the house, and other rooms that neede shall require, bee made cleane on Fryday after dinner, on paine of forfeyture of euery on whome ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, - Issue 268, August 11, 1827 • Various

... XXI After these events, the Goths had already returned 110 home when they were summoned at the request of the Emperor Maximian to aid the Romans against the Parthians. They fought for him faithfully, serving as auxiliaries. ...
— The Origin and Deeds of the Goths • Jordanes

... He told me that this verse came to his mind as he laid the poor beast down under a tree; Circumdederunt me vituli multi: tauri pingues obsederunt me, ["Many calves have surrounded me: fat bulls have besieged me" (Ps. xxi. 13)] and there is no wonder in that, for it is from a psalm of the passion, and it was what befell him afterwards, as ...
— The History of Richard Raynal, Solitary • Robert Hugh Benson

... rendering of a hymn to Christ The Word, taken from a collection of hymns to The Three One God, by Bishop Nektarios, Metropolitan of Pentapolis (vide Introduction, page xxi). The hymn, which is in anapaests, is at page 10 of the author's collection, where it bears the title, {Ode eis ton kyrion hemon Iesoun Christon.} The volume was published at Athens, 1909, and is one of many similar collections ...
— Hymns from the Morningland - Being Translations, Centos and Suggestions from the Service - Books of the Holy Eastern Church • Various

... observations experimentales sur l'influence de l'insomnie absolue" (Arch. ital. de biologie, t. xxi., 1894, pp. 322 ff.). Recently, analogous observations have been made on a man who died of inanition after a fast of thirty-five days. See, on this subject, in the Annee biologique of 1898, p. 338, the resume of an article (in ...
— Creative Evolution • Henri Bergson

... J. Jacobson, Die Auffindung des Apriori, 1876; the same, Ueber die Beziehungen zwischen Kategorien und Urtheilsformen, 1877; Wilhelm Koppelmann, Kants Lehre vom analytischen Urtheil, Philosoph. Monatshefte, vol. xxi, 1885; the same, Lotzes Stellung zu Kants Kritizismus, Zeitschrift fuer Philosophie, vol. lxxxviii, 1886; the same, Kants Lehre vom kategorischen Imperativ, 1888; the same, Kant und die Grundlagen der Christlichen ...
— History Of Modern Philosophy - From Nicolas of Cusa to the Present Time • Richard Falckenberg

... Contributions to Natural Selection, chap. ix., in 1870; and further extended and developed by me in connection with the theory of man's origin first suggested in my lectures at Harvard in 1871, and worked out in Cosmic Philosophy, part ii., chapters xvi., xxi., xxii.] ...
— The Discovery of America Vol. 1 (of 2) - with some account of Ancient America and the Spanish Conquest • John Fiske

... soundest and most illuminating discussion of the values and proper use of myths in education see Edward Howard Griggs, Moral Education, chap, xxi, "The Ethical Value of Mythology and Folk-Lore." For some good suggestions and lists consult Ezra Allen, "The Pedagogy of Myth in the Grades," Pedagogical Seminary, Vol. VIII, p. 258. A very interesting plan for the use of myths may be found in two articles by O. O. Norris, ...
— Children's Literature - A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes • Charles Madison Curry

... yo{u} holde yo{u} to the printe (for the 22 daye after Marche, which is the 22 daye of Aprill in which the sonne is aboute xi degrees in Taurus;) or to the written copye of thirtye two dayes, (w{hi}che is the seconde of maye at what tyme the sonne ys also aboute some xxi degrees in Taurus;) the signe is not misreckoned or misnamed, as yo{u} suppose. nether canne these woordes, since Marche beganne, helpe you to recken them from the begynnynge of Marche, (asyou seme to doo;) because they muste answere ...
— Animaduersions uppon the annotacions and corrections of some imperfections of impressiones of Chaucer's workes - 1865 edition • Francis Thynne

... feature in the Biographies of both. The world talked much of it, and still talks; and has now at last got it all collected, and elucidated into a dimly legible form for studious readers. [Preuss, OEuvres de Frederic, (xxi. xxii. xxiii., Berlin, 1853); who supersedes the lazy French Editors in this matter.] It is by no means the diabolically wicked Correspondence it was thought to be; the reverse, indeed, on both sides;—but it has unfortunately become a very dull one, to the actual generation of mankind. Not without ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. X. (of XXI.) - Frederick The Great—At Reinsberg—1736-1740 • Thomas Carlyle

... Canto XXI, Kandu is mentioned by Rama as an example of filial obedience. At the command of his father he is said ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... Gosson Entred for his copie vnder thande of } the Wardenes, a Ballad } called Kemps J[xxi:1] newe Jygge } vi^d." betwixt a souldior and a Miser } ...
— Kemps Nine Daies Wonder - Performed in a Daunce from London to Norwich • William Kemp

... are reminded of it, Lutheranism will be reformed back into heathenism, and Christianity out of the world. IX. In matters of faith, reason; and as regards the life, conscience, may be called the Popes of our age. XI. Conscience cannot pardon sins. XXI. In the sixteenth century the pardon of sins cost money, after all; in the nineteenth it may be had without money, for people help themselves to it. XXIV. In an old hymn-book it was said, 'Two places, ...
— History of Rationalism Embracing a Survey of the Present State of Protestant Theology • John F. Hurst

... [Footnote 19: Exodus xxi. 25. "In all criminall offences, where the law hath prescribed no certaine penaltie, the judges have power to inflict penalties, according to the rule of God's word."—Declaration of the General Court: Hutch. Coll. Papers, p. 207. And see the first article of the Colonial "Liberties," ...
— The Trial and Execution, for Petit Treason, of Mark and Phillis, Slaves of Capt. John Codman • Abner Cheney Goodell, Jr.

... says (De Civ. Dei xxi, 6): "It was not possible to learn, for the first time, except from their" (i.e. the demons') "teaching, what each of them desired or disliked, and by what name to invite or compel him: so as to give birth to the magic arts and ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... AND CAXTON. Two or three days. Study above, pages 77-81, and read in Le Morte Darthur as much as time permits. Among the best books are: VII, XXI, I, Xlll-XVII. Subjects for discussion: 1. Narrative qualities. 2. Characterization, including variety of characters. 3. Amount and quality of description. 4. How far is the book purely romantic, how far does reality enter into it? Consider how much notice is ...
— A History of English Literature • Robert Huntington Fletcher

... CASE XXI.-April 5th: Several children and adults were inoculated from the arm of William Pead. The greater part of them sickened on the sixth day, and were well on the seventh, but in three of the number a secondary indisposition arose in consequence ...
— The Harvard Classics Volume 38 - Scientific Papers (Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology) • Various

... prohibits further quotation in this number; but when we return to the subject, we shall notice chapter xxi., "Problem of Religious Contradictions," and also "The Law of Nature; or Principles of Morality." Few men wrote more on various topics than Volney; and few have been more respected while living, and esteemed when dead, by those whose respect ...
— Ancient and Modern Celebrated Freethinkers - Reprinted From an English Work, Entitled "Half-Hours With - The Freethinkers." • Charles Bradlaugh, A. Collins, and J. Watts

... passed away very rapidly and completely in France; and long before his death, the author of the Sopha, and Les Egaremens du Coeur et de l'Esprit, had the mortification to be utterly forgotten by the public." Vol. xxi. ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume 2 • Horace Walpole

... beasts of the wilderness,—they set up their watch-towers, they arouse her palaces, they bring them to ruin." The correct explanation of this verse has been given by Delitzsch in his Commentary on Habakkuk, S. xxi. Before the capture of Tyre could be assigned to the Chaldeans, it was necessary to point out that they should overthrow Asshur, the representative of the world's power in the time of the Prophet. The Chaldeans, a people which, up to that time, were not reckoned in the list of the kingdoms of the ...
— Christology of the Old Testament: And a Commentary on the Messianic Predictions. Vol. 2 • Ernst Hengstenberg

... skill or friendship could do was omitted. Garrick wrote both prologue and epilogue. The zealous friends of the Page xxi ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 1 • Madame D'Arblay

... thus emerge from the brain have been classed by physiologists among the phenomena of inverse vision, or cerebral sight. Elsewhere I have given a detailed investigation of their nature (Human Physiology, chap, xxi.), and, persuaded that they have played a far more important part in human affairs than is commonly supposed, have thus expressed myself: "Men in every part of the world, even among nations the most abject and barbarous, have an abiding faith not only in the existence ...
— History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, Volume I (of 2) - Revised Edition • John William Draper

... eldest daughter I give ten shillinges to be paied out of my sonnes stock Furthermore that goodes I have in Virginia as followeth To my wife Alice halfe my goodes. 2. to Joseph and Priscilla the other halfe equallie to be devided betweene them. Alsoe I have xxi dozen of shoes, and thirteene paire of bootes wch I give into the Companies handes for forty poundes at seaven years end if they like them at that rate. If it be thought to deare as my Overseers shall thinck good. And if they like them at that ...
— The Mayflower and Her Log, Complete • Azel Ames

... (afterwards Archdeacon) Coxe, which appeared in 1797. More valuable is the biographical sketch by Gay's nephew, the Rev. Joseph Baller, prefixed to "Gay's Chair" (1820); but the standard authorities on Gay's life are Mr. Austin Dobson ("Dictionary of National Biography," Vol. XXI., 1890) and Mr. John Underwood ("Introductory Memoir" to the "Poems of John Gay" in ...
— Life And Letters Of John Gay (1685-1732) • Lewis Melville

... xxxiv.10 ("There arose not a prophet since in Israel like unto Moses"). The Priestly Code, on the other hand, guards itself against all reference to later times and settled life in Canaan, which both in the Jehovistic Book of the Covenant (Exodus xxi.-xxiii.) and in Deuteronomy are the express basis of the legislation: it keeps itself carefully and strictly within the limits of the situation in the wilderness, for which in all seriousness it seeks to give the law. It has actually been successful, ...
— Prolegomena to the History of Israel • Julius Wellhausen

... XXI. Italic may be used with good effect for running titles, for table headings, and for sub-heads. It is not desirable for side notes. It has many kerned letters which are liable to break off at the ends of the lines ...
— The Uses of Italic - A Primer of Information Regarding the Origin and Uses of Italic Letters • Frederick W. Hamilton

... standard of Tongan life was less elevated than that indicated in the "Book of the Covenant" (Exod. xxi.-xxiii.) may be freely admitted. But then the evidence that this Book of the Covenant, and even the ten commandments as given in Exodus, were known to the Israelites of the time of Samuel and Saul, is (to say the least) by no means conclusive. ...
— The Evolution of Theology: An Anthropological Study - Essay #8 from "Science and Hebrew Tradition" • Thomas Henry Huxley

... "sin of man-stealing." For, in the laws adopted in 1641, among the "Capital Laws," at the latter part of article ninety-four is the following: "If any man stealeth a man, or mankind, he shall surely be put to death."[293] There is a marginal reference to Exod. xxi. 16. Dr. Moore does not refer to this in his elaborate discussion of statute on "bond slavery." And Winthrop says that the magistrates decided that the Negroes, "having been procured not honestly by purchase, but by the unlawful act of kidnaping," should be returned to their native ...
— History of the Negro Race in America From 1619 to 1880. Vol 1 - Negroes as Slaves, as Soldiers, and as Citizens • George W. Williams

... Boy. Prov. xxi. The King's Heart is in the Hand of the Lord; as the Rivers of Waters, he turneth it whither soever he will. Every Man is right in his own Eyes, but the Lord pondereth the Hearts. To do Justice and Judgment, is more acceptable to the ...
— Colloquies of Erasmus, Volume I. • Erasmus

... strove to attain. The keenness of this pursuit saved him from the blemish of egoism which aloofness from his surroundings would otherwise have forced upon him. For his character presented the anomaly, peculiar to the Renaissance, of a lofty idealism coupled in action with {xxi} irresponsibility of duty. He stood on a higher plane, his attitude toward life recognizing no claims on the part of his fellowmen. In his desire to surpass himself, fostered by this isolation of spirit and spurred on by the eager wish to attain universal knowledge, he has been ...
— Thoughts on Art and Life • Leonardo da Vinci

... second edition, 1808, p. xxi.) Scott says the ballad was taken down from an old woman's recitation at the Alston Moor lead-mines "by the agent there," and sent by him to Surtees. Consequently, when Surtees saw "Marmion" in print he had to ask ...
— Old Friends - Essays in Epistolary Parody • Andrew Lang

... immediately followed by this, "Thou shalt yet plant vines upon the mountains of Samaria." And again, at the yearly feast to the Lord in Shiloh, the dancing of the virgins was in the midst of the vineyards (Judges xxi. 21), the feast of the vintage being in the south, as our harvest home in the north, a peculiar occasion of joy and thanksgiving. I happened to pass the autumn of 1863 in one of the great vine districts of Switzerland, under the slopes ...
— Time and Tide by Weare and Tyne - Twenty-five Letters to a Working Man of Sunderland on the Laws of Work • John Ruskin

... the brilliant and aspiring artist of The Achievement (CHAPMAN AND HALL) who was in love with Diana Charteris, sloshed her husband, Lord Freddy, over the head with his own decanter (vide Chap. XXI.) he rather overdid it. For "the jagged thing fell with a sullen thud behind his (Lord Freddy's) ear," and that discourteous nobleman collapsed to rise no more. When the detective arrived the following noon he convinced himself that there was no necessity ...
— Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, October 7, 1914 • Various

... thread can be obtained. The fiber is tied in a continuous thread and is wound onto a reel. The warp threads are measured on sharpened sticks driven into a hemp or banana stalk, and are then transferred to a rectangular frame (Plate XXI). The operator, with the final pattern in mind, overties or wraps with waxed threads, such portions of the warp as she desires to remain white in the completed garment. So carefully does she wrap these sections, that, when the thread is removed from the frame and ...
— The Wild Tribes of Davao District, Mindanao - The R. F. Cummings Philippine Expedition • Fay-Cooper Cole

... but three times in the present work, in Rubs II, XXI and XXVI. Number II would lead us to believe that the poet used her figuratively as Sorrow or Remorse; but the text of XXI and XXVI point another conclusion. The latter Rubaiyat tell us forcefully that Gorgona was but too real and that her unloveliness was a sore trial ...
— The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam Jr. (The Rubiyt of Omar Khayym Jr.) • Wallace Irwin

... tenour of the letters and proclamations made thereupon, incurred therethrough the pains contained thereuntil, or any otherwise shall happen to pertain to us our Sovereign by reason foresaid with power, etc. At Saint Andrews the 23rd day of July, the year of God, 1547 years." [Reg. Sec. Sig., xxi. fol. 316.] ...
— History Of The Mackenzies • Alexander Mackenzie

... more an article has been labored upon, the more is its value. But in trade, do two equal values cease to be equal, because one comes from the plough, and the other from the workshop?" (Sophism XXI.) ...
— Sophisms of the Protectionists • Frederic Bastiat

... work of Ivo Taille-Bois {xxi}, a Norman woodcutter, whom the duke has manufactured into a noble, and set to tyrannise over free-born Englishmen. Like a fiend he ever loves to do evil, and when there is neither man, woman, nor child to destroy, he will lame cattle, drive them into the water, ...
— The Rival Heirs being the Third and Last Chronicle of Aescendune • A. D. Crake

... XVII Containing Adventures of Chivalry equally new and surprising XVIII In which the Rays of Chivalry shine with renovated Lustre XIX Containing the Achievements of the Knights of the Griffin and Crescent XX In which our Hero descends into the Mansions of the Damned XXI Containing further Anecdotes relating to the Children of Wretchedness XXII In which Captain Crowe is sublimed into the Regions of Astrology XXIII In which the Clouds that cover the Catastrophe begin to disperse XXIV The Knot that puzzles human Wisdom, the Hand of Fortune ...
— The Adventures of Sir Launcelot Greaves • Tobias Smollett

... State prison in Paris, which was destroyed by the mob in 1789 (v. Coleridge's poem on this subject, and the stirring description in Dickens' Tale of Two Cities, II. xxi.). ...
— The Coverley Papers • Various

... In Chapter XXI, "When the Law falls to regulate sin" has been changed to "When the Law fails to regulate sin"; and "resorts which are in suc favor with the city government" has been changed to "resorts which are in such favor with the ...
— Fighting the Traffic in Young Girls - War on the White Slave Trade • Various

... sororem violare voluit, patrem occidit fere, et duas alias sorores ad mortem vulneravit, would have violated his sister, killed his father, &c. A true saying it was of him, Vino dari laetitiam et dolorem, drink causeth mirth, and drink causeth sorrow, drink causeth "poverty and want," (Prov. xxi.) shame and disgrace. Multi ignobiles evasere ob vini potum, et (Austin) amissis honoribus profugi aberrarunt: many men have made shipwreck of their fortunes, and go like rogues and beggars, having turned all their substance ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... spirit to draw the Spaniards on to destruction." "L'Espagne," says Montesquieu, "a fait comme ce roi insense, qui demanda que tout ce qu'il toucheroit se convertit en or, et qui fut oblige de revenir aux Dieux, pour les prier de finir sa misere."—Esprit des Loix, lib. xxi., ...
— The Conquest of Canada (Vol. 1 of 2) • George Warburton

... Manila in 1625, the remainder of his life was spent in Spain in various employments and in retirement. His death occurred between the years 1649-1652. Section vi of this chapter treats of the Recollect convent of San Juan de Bagumbaya (for whose early history given in summary here, see VOL. XXI). In 1642, the governor Sebastian Hurtado de Corcuera ordered all the buildings in the village of Bagumbaya to be torn down for fear of the Dutch, among them the convent. Despite the endeavor of the religious to save their convent, it was demolished and a new fort ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume XXXVI, 1649-1666 • Various

... on the premises of their employer, receive their "keep" as well as a fixed wage, while the knife-grinder and the tailor (VII, 33, 42) work in their own shops, and naturally have their meals at home. The silk-weaver (XX, 9) and the linen-weaver (XXI, 5) have their "keep" also, which seems to indicate that private houses had their own looms, which is quite in harmony with the practices of our fathers. The carpenter and joiner are paid by the day, the teacher by the month, the knife-grinder, the tailor, the barber (VII, 22) by the piece, ...
— The Common People of Ancient Rome - Studies of Roman Life and Literature • Frank Frost Abbott

... XXI. "That a man of intellect has doubts about his mistress is conceivable, but about his wife!—that would ...
— Analytical Studies • Honore de Balzac

... vieillesse ou de l'age mur, les peuples modernes n'auraient donc fait que reproduire dans leur ordre social un changement de rapports qui s'etait deja accompli dans la nature intime des choses.—BOUTMY, Revue Nationale, xxi. 393. Il y a dans l'homme individuel des principes de progres viager; il y a, en toute societe, des causes constantes qui transforment ce progres viager en progres hereditaire. Une societe quelconque tend a progresser tant que les circonstances ne touchent pas ...
— A Lecture on the Study of History • Lord Acton

... ancestors. Agriculture revived; golden corn covered the bloodstained scenes of warfare; men lived once more in peace under the shadow of their homes, none daring to make them afraid. Peace, with its hallowed associations, gladdened England for fifty long years {xxi}. ...
— Alfgar the Dane or the Second Chronicle of Aescendune • A. D. Crake

... of Saul, had no child unto the day of her death."—Second Samuel, vi, 23. "But the king took the five sons of Michal, whom she brought up for Adriel, the son of Barzillai, the Meholathite."—Second Samuel, xxi, 8. Dear friend, if you will notice the last quotation closely you will find that the words which I have italicised clearly indicate the true solution of the difficulty, which has no real historic existence. Those sons were not the natural sons of Michal, but adopted ...
— The Christian Foundation, Or, Scientific and Religious Journal, Volume I, No. 11, November, 1880 • Various

... (sometimes written Chilius), a Greek poet living at Rome. See Letters XVI and XXI. The Eumolpidae were a family of priests at Athens who had charge of the temple of Demeter at Eleusis. The [Greek: patria Eumolpidon] (the phrase used by Cicero here) may be either books of ritual or records such as priests usually kept: [Greek: patria] is an appropriate word ...
— The Letters of Cicero, Volume 1 - The Whole Extant Correspodence in Chronological Order • Marcus Tullius Cicero

... being well able to practise what Jesus commanded His disciples, "Take no thought how or what ye shall speak: for I will give you a mouth and wisdom, which all your adversaries shall not be able to gainsay nor resist" (Matt. x. 19; Luke xxi. 15). This is not given till after an experience of powerlessness; and the deeper that experience has been, the greater is the liberty. But it is useless to endeavour to force ourselves into this condition; for as God would not be the source, we should not realise the desired ...
— Spiritual Torrents • Jeanne Marie Bouvires de la Mot Guyon

... Lord of Light, dwelling in the mighty abode, in the bosom of the absolute darkness. I come to thee, a purified Soul; my two hands are around thee. (xxi. 1.) ...
— Death—and After? • Annie Besant

... LETTER XXI. Miss Howe to Clarissa.—Humourous account of her mother and Mr. Hickman in their little journey to visit her dying cousin. Rallies her on her present ...
— Clarissa, Volume 2 (of 9) • Samuel Richardson

... of his conduct when Achish's servants came to arrest him. He "twisted himself about in their hands" in the feigned contortions of possession; he drummed on the leaves of the gate,[H] and "let his spittle run down into his beard." (1 Sam. xxi. 13.) Israelitish quickness gets the better of Philistine stupidity, as it had been used to do from Sampson's time onwards, and the dull-witted king falls into the trap, and laughs away the suspicions with a clumsy joke at his servants' expense about more madmen being the ...
— The Life of David - As Reflected in His Psalms • Alexander Maclaren

... Money and Banking in the United States," also Summer, "History of American Currency." For working out of the same principles in England, depicted in a masterly way, see Macaulay, "History of England," chap. xxi; and for curious exhibition of the same causes producing same results in ancient Greece, see a curious quotation by ...
— Fiat Money Inflation in France - How It Came, What It Brought, and How It Ended • Andrew Dickson White

... built by one king alone, the third in succession from Devenipiatissa, B.C. 246 (Mahawanso, ch. xxi, p. 127). About the same period the petty chiefs of Rohuna and Mahagam were equally zealous in their devout labours, the one having erected sixty-four wiharas in the east of the island, and the other sixty-eight in the south.—Mahawanso, ch. ...
— Ceylon; an Account of the Island Physical, Historical, and • James Emerson Tennent

... general Def. of the Emotions). If, therefore, we form a clear and distinct idea of a given emotion, that idea will only be distinguished from the emotion, in so far as it is referred to the mind only, by reason (II:xxi.,&Note); therefore (III:iii.), the emotion will cease to ...
— Ethica Ordine Geometrico Demonstrata - Part I: Concerning God • Benedict de Spinoza

... they can be brought under the direction of the educator in the work of formal education. For that reason a more thorough study of instinctive forms of reaction, and of their relation to formal education, will be made in Chapter XXI. ...
— Ontario Normal School Manuals: Science of Education • Ontario Ministry of Education

... idea is the first element constituting the human mind. But not the idea of a non-existent thing, for then (II. viii. Cor.) the idea itself cannot be said to exist; it must therefore be the idea of something actually existing. But not of an infinite thing. For an infinite thing (I. xxi., xxii.), must always necessarily exist; this would (by II. Ax. i.) involve an absurdity. Therefore the first element, which constitutes the actual being of the human mind, is the idea of something actually ...
— Ethica Ordine Geometrico Demonstrata - Part I: Concerning God • Benedict de Spinoza

... expression of the theory that all natural instincts are corrupt. Finally, he enforces the only doctrine which can equal this in horror, namely, that the saints rejoice in the damnation of the wicked. In a sermon called 'Wicked Men useful in their Destruction only' (vol. viii., sermon xxi.), he declares that 'the view of the doleful condition of the damned will make them (the saints in heaven) more prize their own blessedness.' They will realise the wonderful grace of God, who has made so great ...
— Hours in a Library, Volume I. (of III.) • Leslie Stephen

... would tell it to the parson; for that notwithstanding the above-named was but a child, still it was written in Psalm viii., "Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength...."; and the Saviour himself appealed (Matt. xxi.) to the testimony ...
— The Amber Witch • Wilhelm Meinhold

... "My grandmother," remarks Chaumette, "used to say to me, Little boy, never waste a crumb of bread, you cannot make one." "Monsieur Chaumette," answers Louis, "your grandmother seems to have been a sensible woman." (Prudhomme's Newspaper in Hist. Parl. xxi. 314.) Poor innocent mortal: so quietly he waits the drawing of the lot;—fit to do this at least well; Passivity alone, without Activity, sufficing for it! He talks once of travelling over France by and by, to have a geographical and topographical view of it; being from of old ...
— The French Revolution • Thomas Carlyle

... boring the ear is very old, mention of it being made in Exodus xxi., 5 and 6, in which we find that if a Hebrew servant served for six years, his freedom was optional, but if he plainly said that he loved his master, and his wife and children, and did not desire to leave their house, the master should bring him before the judges; and according to the passage in ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... omnibus excelluit, Mathematicis, Philofophicis, Theologicis. Veritatis indagator ftudiofiffimus, Dei Trini-uniui cultor piiffimus, Sexagenarius, aut eo circiter, Mortalitati valedixit, Non vit, Anno Christi M.DC.XXI. Iulii 2. ...
— Thomas Hariot • Henry Stevens

... 264: Grote, Hist. p. 78, well observes that the "subsequent animosity of Neptune against Troy was greatly determined by the sentiment of the injustice of Laomedon." On the discrepancy between this passage and XXI. 442, see Mueller, ...
— The Iliad of Homer (1873) • Homer

... favour of virginity, have pretended that if Man had persevered in innocence he would not have entered into the carnal commerce of matrimony, and that the propagation of mankind would have been effected quite another way." (See St. Augustine, De Civitate Dei, xiv. cap. xxi.; Bayle's Dictionary, art. "Eve," 1735, ii. ...
— The Works of Lord Byron - Poetry, Volume V. • Lord Byron

... "Modern Egyptians," and of the benefits which, despite the proverbial difficulty of changing an old book into a new one, an edition, much enlarged and almost rewritten, would confer upon students, see Vol. III. Chap. XXI. Instead of a short abstract of all this celebrated story, we have only popular excerpts from the ...
— The Land of Midian, Vol. 2 • Richard Burton

... wine trade should not be free internally or for export; that breaking up wastes and enclosing commons should be prohibited; that the old arrangement of the militia should remain.—Arthur Young's France, ch. xxi. p. 607.] ...
— Diderot and the Encyclopaedists (Vol 1 of 2) • John Morley

... knoweth me, even so know I the Father: | and I lay down my life for the sheep. And other sheep I have, | which are not of this fold: them also I must bring, and they | shall hear my voice; and there shall be one fold, and one | shepherd. | | Or St John xxi. 15. | | Jesus saith to Simon Peter, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou | me more than these? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest | that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed my lambs. He saith | to him again the second time, Simon, son of Jonas, lovest thou | me? He saith unto him, ...
— The Book of Common Prayer - and The Scottish Liturgy • Church of England

... composition of the first two Gospels' ed. 6 (I. p. 433). The error is acknowledged in the preface to that edition (p. xxi).] ...
— Essays on "Supernatural Religion" • Joseph B. Lightfoot

... or connection between fungi and lichens, H. C. Sorby has some pertinent remarks in his communication to the Royal Society on "Comparative Vegetable Chromatology" (Proceedings Royal Society, vol. xxi. 1873, p. 479), as one result of his spectroscopic examinations. He says, "Such being the relations between the organs of reproduction and the foliage, it is to some extent possible to understand the connection between parasitic plants like fungi, which do not derive their ...
— Fungi: Their Nature and Uses • Mordecai Cubitt Cooke

... were Perishing of Hunger. XVIII Of his Fast continued for Twenty Days. XIX How he Overcame the Temptation of the Enemy. XX How he was again made Captive, and released by the Miracle of the Kettle. XXI Of Saint Patrick's Vision. XXII How he dwelt with the blessed Germanus, and how he received the Habit from Saint Martin. XXIII Of the Flesh-meat changed into Fishes. XXIV How in his Journey to Rome he Found the Staff of Jesus. XXV How he Journeyed ...
— The Most Ancient Lives of Saint Patrick - Including the Life by Jocelin, Hitherto Unpublished in America, and His Extant Writings • Various



Words linked to "Xxi" :   cardinal, twenty-one, large integer, 21



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