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G   Listen
noun
G  n.  
1.
G is the seventh letter of the English alphabet, and a vocal consonant. It has two sounds; one simple, as in gave, go, gull; the other compound (like that of j), as in gem, gin, dingy. Note: The form of G is from the Latin, in the alphabet which it first appeared as a modified form of C. The name is also from the Latin, and probably comes to us through the French. Etymologically it is most closely related to a c hard, k y, and w; as in corn, grain, kernel; kin L. genus; E. garden, yard; drag, draw; also to ch and h; as in get, prehensile; guest, host (an army); gall, choler; gust, choose. See C.
2.
(Mus.) G is the name of the fifth tone of the natural or model scale; called also sol by the Italians and French. It was also originally used as the treble clef, and has gradually changed into the character represented in the margin. See Clef. G sharp is a tone intermediate between G and A.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"G" Quotes from Famous Books



... infected articles be small or large. In the accompanying drawing A is the boiler, which is filled by pouring water into the reservoir, B, until the same, entering the boiler at its lowest part through the tube, C, rises to the desired height in the water gauge, G. C acts also in the place of a safety valve. D is the fire space, E a movable grate, and F the coal hopper. The fuel consists of charcoal or coke. The boiler is emptied by the cock, H. I is a steam ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 611, September 17, 1887 • Various

... very clearly. It is the exception to find anyone among the peace talkers who really grasps how inseparably the necessity for free access for everyone to natural products, to coal and tropical products, e.g. free shipping at non-discriminating tariffs, and the recognition by a Tribunal of the principle of common welfare in trade matters, is bound up with the ideal of a permanent world peace. But any peace ...
— War and the Future • H. G. Wells

... The reader is referred to JOHN G. WHITTIER, of Philadelphia, or to the following gentlemen, who have heard the whole, or a part of his story, from his own lips: Emmor Kimber, of Kimberton, Pa., Lindley Coates, of Lancaster Co., do.; James Mott, of Philadelphia, Lewis Tappan, Elizur ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... genus Gentiana, having showy, variously colored flowers. The dried rhizome and roots of a yellow-flowered European gentian, G. lutea, used as ...
— Mother's Remedies - Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remedies from Mothers - of the United States and Canada • T. J. Ritter

... drew his harp still closer to his breast, Gazed at the jeweled coronets as this thought he expressed: 'Fair queens, I bid you wear them until your locks turn gray; Those crowns, alas! are fleeting, but song will live alway.'" NIENDORF (H.A.G.'s tr.). ...
— Legends of the Middle Ages - Narrated with Special Reference to Literature and Art • H.A. Guerber

... which Arthur's shelves were crowded, having all the while, however, the dispiriting conviction that Lady Dunstable had been dandled on the knees of every English Prime Minister since her birth, and had been the blood relation of all of them, except perhaps Mr. G., whose blood no doubt had not been blue enough to ...
— A Great Success • Mrs Humphry Ward

... powerful encouragement reached the young writer, 'Poems and Songs' was published in Sydney by Mr. J. R. Clarke. 'The Empire' published a favourable review. Further notice of his work appeared in the 'Athenaeum' during the next four years, and in 1866 it was generously praised by Mr. G. B. Barton in his 'Poets and Prose Writers of ...
— The Poems of Henry Kendall • Henry Kendall

... g. The use of ardent spirits should be prohibited by law, seeing that it causes misery and crime, which it is one of the chief ends of law to ...
— The Making of Arguments • J. H. Gardiner

... good. Then he sat down on the box, and began cutting letters out of a piece of newspaper. Finding that the snippings littered the floor, he picked them up and began scribbling on his blotting-paper. He tried the effect of different initials before the name Rose: G. Rose, E. Rose, L. Rose, Rose, L.L., L.L. Rose. When he had covered the sheet, he looked at it discontentedly a little while, then suddenly began to write ...
— The Story of an African Farm • (AKA Ralph Iron) Olive Schreiner

... all night, automobile trucks, operated under orders from William G. McAdoo, Governor of the Federal Reserve Bank, loaded with millions and millions of gold, passed unprotected and almost unheeded through the crowded section between Wall Street and the Grand Central Station. ...
— The Conquest of America - A Romance of Disaster and Victory • Cleveland Moffett

... work of "Memoires de Monsieur l'Abbe Lenglet du Fresnoy," although the dedication is signed G. P., is written by Michault, of Dijon, as a presentation copy to Count de Vienne in my possession proves. Michault is the writer of two volumes of agreeable "Melanges Historiques et Philologiques;" and the present is a very curious piece of literary ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli

... person desirous to get the key of the house is requested to apply to M.G., and in case of his absence, to ... signing his name, title, and country, in the same time tell the guide's and muleteer's name, just to drive away those have been so rough to spoil the moveables and destroy the stables ... are the ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 59, December 14, 1850 • Various

... yo' to act dat-a-way, Boomerang. Yo' all ain't got no call t' git contrary now, jest when I wants t' git home t' mah dinner. I should t'ink you'd want t' git t' de stable, too. But ef yo' all ain't mighty keerful I'll cut down yo' rations, dat's what I'se goin' to do. G'lang, now, dat's a good feller. Ho! Ho! I knowed dat'd fetch yo' all. When yo' all wiggles yo' ears dat-a-way, dat's a suah sign yo' all is gwine ...
— Tom Swift and his Electric Runabout - or, The Speediest Car on the Road • Victor Appleton

... not fluent with his pen. But still a word or two did come to her. "Dearest Mary, I am doing better and better, and I hope I shall see you in about a fortnight. Quite right in giving the money. Stick to the French. Your own F. G." But as he signed himself her own, his mind misgave ...
— Orley Farm • Anthony Trollope

... formerly, still there is a great field for brickwork. The late Mr. Brunel, who was fond of pushing size to extremes, tried how wide a span he could arch over with brickwork. And I believe the bridge which carries the G.W.R. over the Thames at Maidenhead has the widest arch he or any other engineer has successfully erected in brick. This arch has, it is stated, a span of 128 ft. It is segmental, the radius being 169 ft., and the rise from springing to crown 24 ft., and the depth of the arch 5 ft. 3 in. Nowadays, ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 601, July 9, 1887 • Various

... understood the natives to say these things because of his strong preconceptions as to what he would find in the islands off the coast of Asia based on his reading of the Book of Sir John Maundeville. Cf. ch. XVIII. of that work, e.g., "a great and fair isle called Nacumera.... And all the men and women have dogs' heads," and ch. XIX., e.g., "In one of these isles are people of great stature, like giants, hideous to look upon; and they have but one eye in the middle of ...
— The Northmen, Columbus and Cabot, 985-1503 • Various

... which meets one's eyes from the crest of a high ridge. The barren appearance of the sand is only intensified by the few sickly and shrunken gums that are dotted over it. In the troughs occasional clumps of shrubs, or scrubs, [e.g., Mulga (ACACIA ANAEURA), grevillea, hakea, ti-tree (MELALEUCA) and in the northern portion desert oaks (CASUARINA DESCAINEANA)] or small trees are met with, and everywhere are scattered tussocks of spinifex. ...
— Spinifex and Sand - Five Years' Pioneering and Exploration in Western Australia • David W Carnegie

... but died many years before the end of Queen Victoria's reign, and the work was taken in hand by Mr G.A. Henty, also a prolific writer of books for teenagers. There was some evidence in the book of two or more authors being at work, by reason of different spellings for the same person or item. For instance one of the authors spelt "Gatling guns" as "Catling ...
— Our Soldiers - Gallant Deeds of the British Army during Victoria's Reign • W.H.G. Kingston

... heard very fully, as a deep, dull, humming, far-resounding tone, with a strength proportionate to the mass of the falling water. It easily penetrates to a distance at which the other notes are inaudible. The notes C, E, G, F, belong to all rushing water, and in great falls are sometimes in different octaves. Small falls give the same notes one or two octaves higher. In the stronger falls, F is heard the most easily; in the weak ones, ...
— Music and Some Highly Musical People • James M. Trotter

... excellence, but also with regard to the way in which they are sustained—with the Revue des Deux Mondes or the Journal des Debats. Or compare our leading politicians with men like Gladstone, Disraeli, or Sir G. C. Lewis; or even with such men as Brougham or Thiers. Or compare the slovenly style of our newspaper articles, I will not say with the exquisite prose of the lamented Prevost-Paradol, but with the ordinary prose of the French or English newspaper. But a far better illustration—for it goes ...
— The Unseen World and Other Essays • John Fiske

... towards the table in question, when, as the applause ceased, the voice of the prefect of studies once more made itself clearly heard. It was only one word he said, but that word was "Forfeited." No more. I sat down again. Then he continued: "First prize in Latin, J. M. G." I must admit I didn't know what to do, but I stood up all right again. The audience didn't quite appear to understand what was going on, but the prefect of studies gave them no time to commence any further applause, for that one word, "Forfeited," came ...
— The Chronicles of a Gay Gordon • Jose Maria Gordon

... English translation of Philo's works in the Bohn Library (G. Bell & Sons) by C.D. Yonge (4 vols.), but it is neither accurate nor neat. The same may he said of the German translation of Jost, but an admirable German version edited by Dr. L. Cohn is now appearing, ...
— Philo-Judaeus of Alexandria • Norman Bentwich

... a long book, and one of G.M. Fenn's very best, for his hero gets into all sorts of tight corners, from which there appears no possible escape, just in the manner of most of Fenn's books, for he is the ...
— In the King's Name - The Cruise of the "Kestrel" • George Manville Fenn

... for the existence of certain sorts of objects, e.g. electrons, minimum quanta of time are requisite. Some such postulate is apparently indicated by the modern quantum theory and it is perfectly consistent with the doctrine of objects maintained ...
— The Concept of Nature - The Tarner Lectures Delivered in Trinity College, November 1919 • Alfred North Whitehead

... am much obliged to you for M. Guizot's letter, [Footnote: Apparently that of January 23rd, quoted in the previous letter to Lord Lansdowne.] which Miladi and I have read with interest, as one always does everything he writes. I showed it to G. Lewis and C. C. G., feeling sure you would have no objection. It is impossible not to agree in his gloomy view of things. It must be owned that the position the Emperor has made for himself is one of extreme difficulty. His idee dominante has been ...
— Memoirs of the Life and Correspondence of Henry Reeve, C.B., D.C.L. - In Two Volumes. VOL. II. • John Knox Laughton

... ask for my character before saying g. n. (good night). Haven't I been amiable to-day?" ...
— Wired Love - A Romance of Dots and Dashes • Ella Cheever Thayer

... wife asks you to take supper with us to- morrow night. Step across as early as you like. My cousin, Miss Serena Lovegrove, is paying us a visit. Yours faithfully, G. L.—N. B. Come as you are: ...
— The Far Horizon • Lucas Malet

... answered. "Very well. But I'll get forty next month or I'll leave this place! And I'm not one bit afraid to go straight to old 'J. G.' and tell him ...
— Saturday's Child • Kathleen Norris

... this document is earnestly requested to communicate its contents to Lloyds, the British Admiralty, the leading London newspapers, and Sir Ernest Trevor, K.C.M.G., Judge of Her Majesty's ...
— Dick Leslie's Luck - A Story of Shipwreck and Adventure • Harry Collingwood

... impressive inasmuch as Bergson cannot be said to be an easy author. The originality and sweep of his conceptions, the fine and delicate psychological analysis in which he is so adept and which is necessary for the development of his ideas—e.g., in his exposition of duree—make exacting demands upon those readers who wish to closely follow his thought. An interesting fact is that this is realized most of all by those who come to Bergson with a long process of philosophical discipline behind ...
— Bergson and His Philosophy • J. Alexander Gunn

... a soft rising inflection that made the "k" in "like" sound as "g." "I do not know what Americans mean by the word—'Lige.' You 'lige' so many people. A Chinese girl 'liges' only a few—her parents, her relatives; sometimes she 'liges' ...
— The Automobile Girls At Washington • Laura Dent Crane

... literature are such men as the celebrated preachers Adolf Jellinek, Salomon, Kley, Mannheimer; the able thinkers Steinheim, Hirsch, Krochmal; the illustrious scholars M. Lazarus, H. Steinthal; and the versatile journalists G. Riesser and L. Philipson. ...
— Jewish Literature and Other Essays • Gustav Karpeles

... SEMYON G. In the first place Pushkin's man deposed That yestermorn came to his house from Cracow A courier, who within an hour was ...
— Boris Godunov - A Drama in Verse • Alexander Pushkin

... our own. It is curious that all the old books of travels that I have read mention the natives of strange countries in a far more natural tone, and with far more attempt to discriminate character, than modern ones, e.g., Niebuhr's Travels here and in Arabia, Cook's Voyages, and many others. Have we grown so very civilized since a hundred years that outlandish people seem like mere puppets, and not like real human beings? Miss M.'s bigotry against ...
— Letters from Egypt • Lucie Duff Gordon

... good woman, a mite of butter on your bread.... You are mistaken; you ought to have said: a mite of butter on the rabbit. By G—d, your butter smells good! It is special butter, extra good butter, butter fit for a ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume IV (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... Miss G—— worked her way through New-England primary, grammar, and high schools to a Western college, which she entered with credit to herself, and from which she graduated, confessedly its first scholar, leading the male and female youth alike. All that need be told of her ...
— Sex in Education - or, A Fair Chance for Girls • Edward H. Clarke

... horse knew what they meant, for he came very near breaking from a limp into a trot several times, under the stimulus of all that clucking and "g'lang now." ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, July 1878, No. 9 • Various

... Liberation of Guadeloupe or KLPG; General Federation of Guadeloupe Workers or CGT-G; General Union of Guadeloupe Workers or UGTG; Movement for Independent Guadeloupe or MPGI; ...
— The 2004 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... he boasted. "Tabernicle, he 'an' Mercantile both been to school an' they learnt me an' Wilkes Booth Lincoln. I knows crooked S, an' broken back K, an' curly tail Q, an' roun' O, an' I can spell c-a-t cat, an' d-o-g dog an' ...
— Miss Minerva and William Green Hill • Frances Boyd Calhoun

... I said to Mr. G.M., "Whether he was arrested that day, or knocked down by the cavalry and taken to a hospital, I don't know. I have not seen or heard of him till I ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1921 and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... destroyed all the Spanish ships and vessels which were upon the coast, the number as per margin.—I am, yours, etcetera, G. Walton." ...
— How Britannia Came to Rule the Waves - Updated to 1900 • W.H.G. Kingston

... C.M.G., 2d Class Osmanieh Hon. Fellow of Caius College, Cambridge, landowner and colliery proprietor, an enthusiastic Egyptologist, vice-President of Upper Egypt Exploration Society; has devoted immense sums of money and many years of his life to ...
— The Wheel O' Fortune • Louis Tracy

... comes from the pen of G.W. Cable, under the title of "The Negro Question," puts old truth in a new dress, and renders it more attractive and presentable. If any man has the right to write upon this "Negro Question," it is Mr. Cable. If I had to prepare a liturgy for the Congregational ...
— American Missionary, Volume 44, No. 6, June, 1890 • Various

... the Voyage of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, commanded by the late Captain Owen Stanley, during the years 1846-50, including Discoveries and Surveys in New Guinea, the Louisiade Archipelago, &c. &c. By John Macgillivray, F.R.G.S., Naturalist to the Expedition. London: ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 432 - Volume 17, New Series, April 10, 1852 • Various

... paid your debts, and such a management would have gained you the esteem of the reasonable part of mankind. I perceived this reflection, which he had never made himself, had a very great weight with him. He would have excused part of his follies, by saying Mr. G. had told him it became Mr. W.'s son to live handsomely. I made answer, that whether Mr. G. had said so or no, the good sense of the thing was noway altered by it; that the true figure of a man was the opinion the world ...
— Lady Mary Wortley Montague - Her Life and Letters (1689-1762) • Lewis Melville

... sportsman who cared nothing about Frank's worldly prospects, but had given the match his absolute approval from the moment that he realised that his future brother had played for the Surrey Second. 'What more can you want?' said he. 'You won't exactly be a Mrs. W. G., but you will be on the edge of first-class cricket.' And Maude, who rejoiced in his approval, without quite understanding the grounds for it, kissed him, and called him the best ...
— A Duet • A. Conan Doyle

... with Christianity from the East. The first instance was Theophilus, vicedominus of the Bishop of Adana, whose fall and conversion form the original of all the Faust Legends. See Grimm, D. M. 969, and 'Theophilus in Icelandic, Low German, and other tongues, by G. W. Dasent, Stockholm, 1845.' There a complete account of the literature of the legend may be found. In almost all these early cases the Fiend is outwitted by the help of the Virgin or some other saint, and in ...
— Popular Tales from the Norse • Sir George Webbe Dasent

... (g) If the swabbing solution or the standard metal-fouling solution is not available, the barrel should be scrubbed, as already described, with the soda solution, dried, and oiled with a light oil. At the end of 24 hours it ...
— Manual for Noncommissioned Officers and Privates of Infantry • War Department

... Into several remote regions of the world. Retold in words of one syllable for young people. By J.C.G. With 32 illustrations. ...
— Uncle Wiggily's Travels • Howard R. Garis

... constituting his body. Now this is a position which can belong to none else but the highest Person, who is all-knowing, and all whose purposes immediately realise themselves. That it is the highest Self only which rules over all and is the Self of all, other Upanishad-texts also declare; cp. e.g. 'Entered within, the ruler of creatures, the Self of all'; 'Having sent forth this he entered into it. Having entered it he became sat and tyat,' &c. (Taitt. Up. II, 6). Similarly the text from the Subala-Up., which begins, 'there was not anything ...
— The Vedanta-Sutras with the Commentary by Ramanuja - Sacred Books of the East, Volume 48 • Trans. George Thibaut

... come home at midnight singing "The Old Oaken Bucket," and act generally as if all the water in the world were in the well on the old homestead, and the mortgage on that had been foreclosed; or from 8 P.M. to 3 G.X. he'll sit in a small game with a large cigar, breathing a blend of light-blue cigarette smoke and dark-blue cuss-words, and next day, when his heart beats four and skips two, and he has that queer, hopping sensation in the knees, he'll complain bitterly to the other clerks that ...
— Old Gorgon Graham - More Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son • George Horace Lorimer

... with the cathedral enabled him to offer; and to Mr S.K. Greenslade for the loan of the drawings reproduced under his name; as well as to the Photochrom Co. Ltd., Messrs S.B. Bolas & Co., and Mr F.G.M. Beaumont for the use of their photographs. The views of the cathedral as it appeared in the early part of the nineteenth century are reproduced from Britton's "Norwich," and from a volume ...
— Bell's Cathedrals: The Cathedral Church of Norwich - A Description of Its Fabric and A Brief History of the Episcopal See • C. H. B. Quennell

... read the G'zette." Whereupon he advanced into the teeth of the enemy and bore off the newspaper, going before Margaret, as she went to the kitchen, and seating himself beside a flaring ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 8, No. 48, October, 1861 • Various

... a financial panic was on in Boston. Real estate was rapidly changing hands, most all owners making desperate efforts to realize. Banks which were thought to be solvent and solid went soaring skyward, and even collapsed occasionally, with a loud, ominous, R. G. Dun report. And so it happened that about this time Henry Thoreau strolled out of his cabin and looking up at the placid moon, murmured, "Moonshine, after all, is the only really permanent ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Vol. 13 - Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Lovers • Elbert Hubbard

... why, it does look some better." As the minister was about to pass on, Robert added, "Mr. G., I have not drank a drop of rum for one year, come next Monday. So you see the effect upon my house. I used to work hard before, and spent about all I earned for rum, to drink myself, or to give away. Many a time I have been at ...
— Select Temperance Tracts • American Tract Society

... variety. The grapes drop and crack badly and the pulp is tough and adheres too firmly to the seed for a dessert grape, so that the variety is worthless except for breeding purposes. Hercules was introduced by G. A. Ensenberger, Bloomington, Illinois, about 1890; ...
— Manual of American Grape-Growing • U. P. Hedrick

... mythology plays a more or less appropriate part. Here, as in painting and sculpture, art has often ennobled what is in itself purely conventional. The beginnings of parody are also to be found by lovers of that class of literature, e.g. in the Macaroneid— to which the comic Feast of the Gods, by Giovanni Bellini, ...
— The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy • Jacob Burckhardt

... shake hands over a dhrink wid him, for he can do me no hurrt anny more!' No, sorr! L'ave him lie, an' l'ave the years av ver life count him out; fur the day you die, he dies, an' not wan shake o' the mixer sooner! G'wan, now, fur the rub-down. Ye've faught yer lasht round, if ye ...
— The Fighting Chance • Robert W. Chambers

... The Group of Eight (G-8) along with other multilateral and regional bodies also have been instrumental in developing landmark counterterrorism standards and best practices that have been adopted by international standard-setting organizations. But our obligations are not static. We will collaborate with our partners ...
— National Strategy for Combating Terrorism - September 2006 • United States

... the Rikshas, the Pitris, the Planets, the spouses of the deities, the celestial maidens, the celestial mothers, the great cycles, kine, Chandramas, Savitri, Agni, Savitri, the knowledge of the Vedas, the seasons, the year, small and big divisions of time, e.g., the Kshanas, the Labas, the Muhurtas, the Nimeshas, and the Yugas in succession, protect thee, O Yadava, and keep thee in happiness, wherever thou mayst stay. Let no danger overtake thee on thy way, and let no heedlessness be thine, O sinless one.—Thus blessed by ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... appreciated the genius of Mr Stevenson. Among old Edinburgh friends of long standing were his many Balfour and Stevenson cousins and his old comrades of early days, and among the latter Mr Charles Baxter and the late Sir Walter G. Simpson held a principal place in his regard. Mr Sydney Colvin he had first met in 1873, Mr Henley he first knew in Edinburgh about the end of 1874, and Mr Edmund Gosse was another much valued friend of long standing. Mr Colvin ...
— Robert Louis Stevenson • Margaret Moyes Black

... bedroom or boudoir. It has been done by ignorant people at a watering-place, but it never looks well. It is really an undress, although lace and satin may be used in its composition. A plain, high, and tight-fitting g,arment is much the more elegant dress for the afternoon teas ...
— Manners and Social Usages • Mrs. John M. E. W. Sherwood

... open, for instance, such a book on comparative psychology, as der Thierische Wille of G. H. Schneider, you will find, sandwiched in among the admirable dealings of the author with his proper subject, and popping out upon us in unexpected places, the most delightfully naif German onslaughts ...
— The Will to Believe - and Other Essays in Popular Philosophy • William James

... Curtin, some three miles out of town, and in the afternoon countermarched to town and thence across the Susquehanna to the Heights of Bridgeport—the latter being accomplished through a rain storm. As we enter the fort the Eighth and Seventy-First, N.Y.S.N.G., which had got a few hours' start of us, move out, taking the cars for Shippensburg ...
— Our campaign around Gettysburg • John Lockwood

... time printed, according | to the true Copie. | Written by Francis Beaumont & John Fletcher Gent. | The Stationer to | Dramatophilus. | A Play and no Play, who this Booke shall read, | Will judge, and weepe, as if 'twere done indeed. London, | Printed by E. G. for William Leake, and are to be sold | at his shop in Chancery-lane, neere unto ...
— A King, and No King • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... of one of my offices with all the requisites for carrying out quantitative analyses of surface soils, I requested Professor Lobley, F.G.S., etc., to analyse the four samples of soils which I brought ...
— A start in life • C. F. Dowsett

... suitable vehicle for a long narrative poem. Suggestions for its construction were taken from three Italian metres—the Ottava Rima, the Terza Rima, the Sonnet—and the Ballade stanza. There are eight lines in the iambic pentameter measure (five accents); e.g.— ...
— Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I • Edmund Spenser

... make use of all sorts of appeals to sympathy and prejudice. In one case in New York in which James W. Osborne appeared as prosecutor the defendant wore a G.A.R. button. His lawyer managed to get a veteran on the jury. Mr. Osborne is a native of North Carolina. The defendant's counsel, to use his own words, "worked the war for all it was worth," and the defendant lived, bled ...
— Courts and Criminals • Arthur Train

... pictured in Diderot's Mmoires, and there was a brother-in-law, "Messire Marius-Jean-Baptiste-Nicholas d'Aine, chevalier, conseiller du roi en ses conseils, Matre des requtes honoraire de son htel, intendant de justice, police, et finances de la gnralit de Tours," who lived in rue Saint Dominique, paroisse Saint-Sulpice. There was in Holbach's household for a long time an old Scotch surgeon, a homeless, misanthropic old fellow by the name of Hope, of whom Diderot gives a ...
— Baron d'Holbach - A Study of Eighteenth Century Radicalism in France • Max Pearson Cushing

... purchase of Louisiana, Mr. Jefferson has thus been eulogized by James G. Blaine, in his "Twenty Years ...
— Thomas Jefferson • Edward S. Ellis et. al.

... Joseph. G'lang, Dobbin!" and the deacon started his old horse, who had completed his quarter century, ...
— Joe's Luck - Always Wide Awake • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... the annexation of Texas was one of the most hotly discussed questions. The Whigs opposed annexation, but their ground was not radical enough to suit the growing body of Abolitionists in the country, who nominated a third candidate, James G. Birney. Lincoln was obliged to meet the arguments of the Abolitionists frequently in his campaigning. In 1845, while working for Congress, he found the abolition sentiment stronger than ever. Prominent ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol. VI., No. 6, May, 1896 • Various

... which marks the distinction between the genuine and the sham in behavior. A later age had it thus: "Handsome is as handsome does," and in this larger sense we have agreed to accept the motto of William of Wykeham, which declares that "Manners maketh Man." OLIVER H. G. LEIGH ...
— The PG Edition of Chesterfield's Letters to His Son • The Earl of Chesterfield

... "Yo' g'way, chile! Who ebber heerd ob sich nonsens? 'Tain't no witches ob no kine; hits somefin' to eat, I tell yo'. I kin smell hit," said an old aunty, who sniffed the ...
— Wakulla - A Story of Adventure in Florida • Kirk Munroe

... 27th.—Bright and lightly clouded by spells. No rain. Northwest River panned out only a little stream. N.G. Guess we must portage. Desperate. Late in season and no way to Michikamau. One more try for inlet, and then a long nasty portage for the big lake. See little hope now of getting out before winter. Must live off country and take big chances. Camping near ...
— A Woman's Way Through Unknown Labrador • Mina Benson Hubbard (Mrs. Leonidas Hubbard, Junior)

... glorious effects! She has only now got the full use of her voice. My G——! what could she not do if she had the full run of Moss's Theatre! She might choose whatever operas would suit her best; and she would have me to guide her judgment! I do know my profession, Mr. O'Mahony. A lady in her line should always ...
— The Landleaguers • Anthony Trollope

... called by fishermen, very abundant in the wooden troughs constructed by the late Dr. Sibthorp, for aquatic plants, in the botanic garden at Oxford, to the cases of which many small shells of the G. Planorbis Limnea and Cyclas were affixed, precisely in the same manner as in the fossil tubes of Auvergne; an incrusting spring, therefore, may, perhaps, be all that is wanting to reproduce, on the banks of the Isis or the Charwell, a rock similar in structure to ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, - Issue 284, November 24, 1827 • Various

... started the thing goin', what's become of those reformers? What's become of Charles Stewart Smith? Where's Bangs? Do you ever hear of Cornell, the iron man, in politics now? Could a search party find R. W. G. Welling? Have you seen the name of Fulton McMahon or McMahon Fulton—I ain't sure which—in the papers lately? Or Preble Tucker? Or—but it's no use to go through the list of the reformers who said they sounded in the death knell of Tammany in 1894. They're ...
— Plunkitt of Tammany Hall • George Washington Plunkitt

... surface. Section through, from top to bottom: Siliceous sandstone. Shale. 1. Main coal, 6 feet 6 inches, with creeps a, b, c, d. Shale eighteen yards thick. 2. Metal coal, 3 feet, with fractures e, f, g, h.) ...
— The Student's Elements of Geology • Sir Charles Lyell

... spent five years with the Author, from the time he was thirteen years and a half old [Footnote: This by farther recollection has since been discover'd and stated by Mr. G. and Mr. R. BLOOMFIELD not to be quite exact. See p. viii. C. L.] till he was turned of eighteen, the most interesting time of life (I mean the time that instruction is acquir'd, if acquir'd at all), I think I am able to give a better ...
— The Farmer's Boy - A Rural Poem • Robert Bloomfield

... Hallowell, an eccentric man, who a year later gave Nelson the coffin made from the mainmast of the Orient, that he patted his august superior on the back. "That's right, Sir John," said he, "and, by G——, we'll give ...
— Types of Naval Officers - Drawn from the History of the British Navy • A. T. Mahan

... this had been a day & night of much trouble & danger unto them, yet God gave them a morning of comforte & refreshing (as usually he doth to his children), for y^e next day was a faire sunshin[i]g day, and they found them sellvs to be on an iland secure from y^e Indeans, wher they might drie their stufe, fixe their peeces, & rest them selves, and gave God thanks for his mercies, in their manifould ...
— Bradford's History of 'Plimoth Plantation' • William Bradford

... purer breath. Joyous in the new unwonted lightness, Soared he upwards to celestial brightness, Earth's dark heavy burden lost in death. High Olympus gives harmonious greeting To the hall where reigns his sire adored; Youth's bright goddess, with a blush at meeting, Gives the nectar to her lord." S. G. Bulfinch ...
— TITLE • AUTHOR

... basket like that, and it belonged to her mother's friends, the Grant Girls, but Christina well knew they had not sent her the birthday gift. In a corner of the card was written in very small letters, "From G. G." ...
— In Orchard Glen • Marian Keith

... 2: See G. B. Adams, The Origin of the English Constitution (New Haven, 1912), Chap. 1. That the essentials of the English constitution of modern times, in respect to forms and machinery, are products of the feudalization of England which resulted from the Norman Conquest, and not survivals ...
— The Governments of Europe • Frederic Austin Ogg

... Ribblevale Company, and we can't afford to run any risk of their getting it. It's logically a part of the Boyne interests, as Scherer says, and Dickinson is ready with the money for the reorganization. If the Carlisle people and the Lake Shore get it, the product will be shipped out by the L and G, and the Railroad will ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... of his imitative stunts should be mistaken for the call of an early robin. Among these calls is a liquid gurgle, like hard cider coming out of the neck of a big brown jug. Another, and a common one, is two slurred eighth notes, repeated, "sol te, sol te"—upper G and B in ...
— Some Winter Days in Iowa • Frederick John Lazell

... From the south flew the maidens Myrkvi iggnum Athwart the gloom, Alvitr unga Alvit the young, Orlg drgja; To fix destinies; r savarstrnd They on the sea-strand Settusk at hvilask, Sat them to rest, Dr sir surnar These damsels of the south Drt ln ...
— The Book of Were-Wolves • Sabine Baring-Gould

... counterstroke of mine to her; but when I opened the other my heart began beating. The standard of Great Britain was painted in colours at the top; down each side, encricled in laurels, were kings and queens of England with their sceptres, and in the middle I read the initials, A. F-G. R. R., embedded in blue forget-me-hots. I could not doubt it was from my father. Riding out in the open air as I received it, I could fancy in my hot joy that it had dropped out ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... Buckingham—saw Lord Gower [3]—he is going to Holland; Sir J. and Lady Mackintosh and Horner, G. Lamb [4], with I know not how many (Richard Wellesley, one—a clever man), grouped about the room. Little Henry Fox, a very fine boy, and very promising in mind and manner,—he went away to bed, before I ...
— The Works of Lord Byron: Letters and Journals, Volume 2. • Lord Byron

... tonal attributes,—color, quality, pitch, and loudness. There is the subtle intimacy of violin tones compared with the clear arresting ring of the trumpet; the emotional differences between qualities like C and G, too delicate for expression in words; the piercing excitement of the high, bright tones, compared with the earnest depth of the low, dull tones; the almost terrifying effect of loud tones compared with the soothing influence of ...
— The Principles Of Aesthetics • Dewitt H. Parker

... nae mair about her culter, or, by G—! her will gar her eat her words, and twa handfuls o' cauld steel to drive them ower wi'!" And, with a most inauspicious and menacing look, the mountaineer laid his hand ...
— Rob Roy, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... G. Montgomery Chapple, bachelor, of Seymour's house, Wrykyn. Let us examine and ponder ...
— The Politeness of Princes - and Other School Stories • P. G. Wodehouse

... ministers, lay and clerical, and fifteen hundred members. Merle d'Aubigne has said of Dr. Cook that "the work which John Wesley did in Great Britain Charles Cook has done, though on a smaller scale, on the Continent." His death was lamented by all the leaders of French Protestantism. Professor G. De Felice, of Montauban, has affirmed that, of the instruments of the French awakening, "Dr. Charles Cook ...
— History of Rationalism Embracing a Survey of the Present State of Protestant Theology • John F. Hurst

... monks. One sea-captain, Brunet, was accused of having favored the escape of thirty-six young men, and condemned to return them within a year, or to furnish a legal certificate of their death, on pain of one thousand livres, with exemplary punishment.[G] It is imagined that these young voluntary Huguenot exiles emigrated to Massachusetts, from the fact that the same year when this strange cause was tried in France, Jean Touton, a French doctor, requested from the authorities of that colony the privilege of sojourning there. ...
— Continental Monthly - Volume 1 - Issue 3 • Various

... volume to which this title belongs is written, "This autograph of Genl. Washington's name is believed to be the earliest specimen of his writing, when he was probably not more than 8 or 9 years of age." This is a note by G.C. Washington, to whom Washington's library descended. Original in the possession ...
— The True George Washington [10th Ed.] • Paul Leicester Ford

... not match the body of the text, irregularities in capitalization and hyphenation have not been corrected. Alternate spellings (e.g. Ogilvy vs. Ogilvie), possible errors in quoted passages (e.g. remembraance), and mathematical errors have not been changed ...
— Chapters in the History of the Insane in the British Isles • Daniel Hack Tuke

... Colonel A. G. Boone had made a treaty with these same Indians in 1860, and it was agreed that he should be their agent. It was done, and the entire savage nations were restful and kindly disposed toward the whites during his administration; any one ...
— The Old Santa Fe Trail - The Story of a Great Highway • Henry Inman

... Confidant (Paris, 1665), and Hattige ou Les Amours au Roy de Tamaran (Cologne, 1676), the first anonymous, the second written by a certain G. de Brimond, and dedicated to an Englishman of whom we are not specially proud—Harry Jermyn, Earl of St. Albans—are two very little books, of intrinsic importance and interest not disproportioned to their size. They have, however, a little of both for the student, in reference to ...
— A History of the French Novel, Vol. 2 - To the Close of the 19th Century • George Saintsbury

... L. G. Capers of Vicksburg, Miss., relates an incident during the late Civil War, as follows: A matron and her two daughters, aged fifteen and seventeen years, filled with the enthusiasm of patriotism, stood ready to minister to the wounds of their countrymen in their fine residence near the scene of the ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... to look upon the specific gravity (written shortly, sp. g.) as the weight of a substance divided by its volume. In the metric system, 1 c.c. of water at 4 C. weighs with sufficient exactness 1 gram; consequently, the sp. g., which states how many times heavier than water the substance is, also expresses the weight in grams ...
— A Textbook of Assaying: For the Use of Those Connected with Mines. • Cornelius Beringer and John Jacob Beringer

... goldmani and the others as Perognathus artus. These identifications were reasonable in the light of knowledge available in 1941, but in the light of information presently available from the now more abundant material it is clear that all 10 of the specimens are P. g. artus. Examination (by Hall) of the specimens reveals that the differences relied upon by Burt and Hooper to differentiate the two species are well within the range of individual variation. For example, the variation (5.3 to 5.6 mm.) in width of the supraoccipital ...
— Conspecificity of two pocket mice, Perognathus goldmani and P. artus • E. Raymond Hall

... mad.'"—"These are fine family portraits, Duke," said Madame. The Duc de Gontaut laughed, during the whole of this conversation, immoderately. Madame repeated it, one day, when she kept her bed. M. de G——- also began to talk of his sister, Madame du Roure. I think, at least, that is the name he mentioned. He was very gay, and had the art of creating gaiety. Somebody said, he is an excellent piece of furniture for a favourite. He makes her ...
— The Memoirs of Louis XV. and XVI., Volume 2 • Madame du Hausset, and of an Unknown English Girl and the Princess Lamballe

... to the mouth of the cave, a cry from one of the men called our attention again to the scene of the struggle. He held up in his hand a small, gleaming object which he had found trodden into the path. It was a silver match box covered with dents and mud and marked "R. F. G." I recognized it instantly; I had seen Radnor take it from his pocket a hundred times. As I looked at it now my hope seemed to vanish and that same sickening suspicion rushed over me again. The men eyed each other silently, and I did not have to ask what they were thinking of. We turned ...
— The Four Pools Mystery • Jean Webster

... there was a meeting of the Associacao Commercial do Amazonas, a most useful society in Manaos composed of the cleverest and soundest business men of that place. I was presented to the President, Mr. J. G. Araujo, and to Dr. Bertino Miranda, the honorary secretary—the latter a man of letters of great distinction, well known not only in his own country but in Latin countries all ...
— Across Unknown South America • Arnold Henry Savage Landor

... from the obscurity in which it had already lain some half a century, and which no subsequent research has been able fully to clear away. In the month of August of that year, the Rev. John Lumley, tutor to Lord G——, had the honor of discovering this curious relic under the ...
— The Lumley Autograph • Susan Fenimore Cooper

... the guest of Rev. G. R. Brackett, the well-loved pastor of one of Charleston's churches. It was with feelings of regret I turned my tiny craft towards untried waters, leaving behind me the beautiful city of Charleston, and the friends who had so kindly cared for ...
— Voyage of The Paper Canoe • N. H. Bishop

... only will a skilfull and warie Physician bee carefull to vse no cure but that which is fit for that sort of disease, but he wil also consider all other circumstances, and make the remedies suitable thereunto; as the temperature of the clime where the Patient is, the constitution of the Planets,[G] the time of the Moone, the season of the yere, the age and complexion of the Patient, and the present state of his body, in strength or weaknesse. For one cure must not euer be vsed for the self-same disease, ...
— A Counter-Blaste to Tobacco • King James I.

... in the most elegant and refined manner, but their paintings are hastening to decay with a rapidity which is grievous to behold. Fortunately, the Academy of Naples has published a volume of details, in which the greater part of the frescos of this villa are engraved. G. Passage, leading by the staircase B to the upper floor, and by the staircase H to the subterranean galleries. There is a similar staircase, H, on the other side ...
— Museum of Antiquity - A Description of Ancient Life • L. W. Yaggy

... devoured. The war about the forest violently forced upon the peasant the question as to whether or not the ancient privileges of the aristocracy could be justified before God and man. We possess a poem by G.A. Buerger which contrasts the naked rights of labor with the historic rights of rank in so sharp a fashion that, if it should be published today, it would undoubtedly be confiscated as communist literature. This ancient specimen of modern social-democratic poetry, ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VIII • Various

... courteously allowed me, in company with my friend, J.G. Whittier, to visit thy slave establishment in the city of Baltimore, some weeks since, I have often felt a desire to address a few lines to thee. I need not, perhaps, say that my feelings were painfully exercised ...
— A Visit To The United States In 1841 • Joseph Sturge

... than a ballot-box and a small show-case (the contents of the latter draped in newspapers at the present) and a neatly lettered sign above a blackboard, to one side. The sign simply demanded, "Vote Here!" The blackboard in less trim script announced that "For most popular business man" Mr. Timothy G. Finnerty had 305 votes, and three or four other candidates so few that there was no interest in deciphering the chalk figures; and that "For most popular young lady" Miss Norah Murray had 842 votes, and Miss Freda Berglund ...
— Life at High Tide - Harper's Novelettes • Various

... Capt. G. Persuade! What's all this! A goodly time for rhetoric forsooth! Who's this that's risking all our lives, waiting to be ...
— The Bride of Fort Edward • Delia Bacon

... The nearest in blood are the nephews, General Charles Russell Lowell, killed at Winchester, Lieutenant James Jackson Lowell, at Seven Pines, and Captain William Lowell Putnam, at Ball's Bluff. Another relative was the heroic Colonel Robert G. Shaw, who fell in the ...
— The Vision of Sir Launfal - And Other Poems • James Russell Lowell

... this Nikaya (e.g. the Suttanipata) are very ancient, the collection, as it stands, is late and probably known only to the southern Church. The contents of it are not quite the same in Ceylon, Burma and Siam, and only a small ...
— Hinduism and Buddhism, Vol I. (of 3) - An Historical Sketch • Charles Eliot

... soon discovered that the natives had been serving in the German outpost at G'henge, a position overrun and captured by a Sikh battalion about three months previously. They had, they declared, been very well treated ...
— Wilmshurst of the Frontier Force • Percy F. Westerman

... three representatives on the Commission; G.K. Gokhale died ere it made its Report, his end quickened by his sufferings during its work, by the humiliation of the way in which his countrymen were treated. Of Mr. Abdur Rahim I have already spoken. The Hon. Mr. M.B. Chaubal signed the Report, ...
— The Case For India • Annie Besant

... expectant of certain other notes; for instance, of the C in the octave immediately above, then the G immediately above that, then the E higher still; he will hear them all in time as clearly as the note originally struck; and, finally, a shrill little ghostly and quite importunate B flat in the treble will pulsate so loudly in his ear that he will never cease to ...
— Peter Ibbetson • George du Marier et al

... ARTHUR; Government majority runs up on division to 47; Ministerialists, fresh from meeting at Foreign Office, agree that, on whole, have spent a happy day. Debate spasmodically dull. Prince ARTHUR could not lift it out of the rut, nor GRANDOLPH either. Only Mr. G. shone with effulgent light through gloom of evening. Principal result of manoeuvre, beyond giving fillip to majority, is that a day will be filched from meagre holidays, and House ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 104, April 8, 1893 • Various

... of the Monumenta Germaniae Historica inde ab anno Christi 500 usque ad annum 1500 auspiciis societ, aperiendis fontibus serum German medii aevi edid, G. H. PERTZ, has just made its appearance. This work is regarded as a stupendous effort of erudition and historical acumen, even ...
— The International Monthly Magazine - Volume V - No II • Various

... efficit, et quandoque penitus interficit. G. Picolominens Idemque Zanch. cap. 10. lib. 4. si Deus permittat, corpora nostra movere possunt, alterare, quovis morborum et malorum genere afficere, imo et in ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... them to a fine pulp under the action of a continuous current of water led in by the pipe, d. The liquid pulp flows into the iron reservoir, B, from whence a pump, P, forces it through the pipe, w, to a sieve, g, which is suspended by four bars and has a backward and forward motion. By means of a rose, c, water is sprinkled over the entire surface of the sieve and separates the fecula from the fibrous matter. The water, charged ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 415, December 15, 1883 • Various

... upon his brute force and resolved to bring her to his feet, if need be by outrage. Even his accent deteriorated as he flung out his passionate words; he spoke like any London mechanic, with defect and excess of aspirates, with neglect of g's at the end of words, and so on. Adela could not bear it; she moved to the door. But he caught her and thrust her back; it was all but a blow. Her face half recalled him to ...
— Demos • George Gissing

... Legends found by George Smith had long been known to classical scholars, owing to the preservation of fragments of them in the works of later Greek writers, e.g., Eusebius, Syncellus, and others. The most important of these is derived from the History of Babylonia, which was written in Greek by BEROSUS, a priest of Bel-Marduk, i.e., the "Lord Marduk," at Babylon, about 250 B.C. In this work Berosus reproduced all the known historical facts ...
— The Babylonian Legends of the Creation • British Museum

... make me tired," Leach interfered. He was evidently, for all of his youth and inexperience, cock of the forecastle. "G'wan, you Kelly. You leave Oofty alone. How in hell did he know it ...
— The Sea-Wolf • Jack London

... was the most delightful we ever had at sea; even Vandy was well, and gained by the journey. We had very agreeable company on board, and were especially fortunate in our neighbors, Mr., Mrs., and Miss G., of Edinburgh, at table. The ship was crowded with officers and officers' wives and children returning from India to England, for children must be taken home out of the climate of India. Nothing can exceed the discipline and general management of the Peninsula and Oriental ships. Promotion ...
— Round the World • Andrew Carnegie

... Lens itself. Three Battalions would attack, ourselves on the right, our 4th Battalion in the centre, and the 5th S. Staffordshires on the left. Practice started at once over a flagged course, and our new Brigadier, General F.G.M. Rowley, C.M.G., of the Middlesex Regiment, came to watch us at work. Our formation differed slightly from that used in previous fights, for we gave great prominence to the "Moppers." Several times lately ...
— The Fifth Leicestershire - A Record Of The 1/5th Battalion The Leicestershire Regiment, - T.F., During The War, 1914-1919. • J.D. Hills

... which is earlier still, is modern also; Cuddie Headrigg is no more antique than Dandie Dinmont or the Ettrick Shepherd himself, and even his mother and her Covenanting friends are not far from the fashion of some enthusiasts of Scott's own time—e.g. Hogg's religious uncle who could not be brought to repeat his old ballads for thinking of 'covenants broken, burned and buried.' Guy Mannering and The Antiquary are both modern stories: it is not till Ivanhoe that Scott definitely starts on the regular ...
— Sir Walter Scott - A Lecture at the Sorbonne • William Paton Ker

... work,—"Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay" and "The Scottish History of James the Fourth." "Orlando Furioso," generally assigned to him, has no name on its title page; "Alphonsus, King of Aragon," is probably his, as it bears the initials "R. G."; "The Looking Glass for London and England" bears the joint names of Lodge and Greene; "The pleasant conceyted comedy of George-a-Green, the Pinner of Wakefield," sometimes assigned to him, is of ...
— The Critics Versus Shakspere - A Brief for the Defendant • Francis A. Smith

... by the genius of that sterling star of the shadowed world, Clifford Armytage—once known as Merton Gill in the little hamlet of Simsbury, Illinois, where for a time, ere yet he was called to screen triumphs, he served as a humble clerk in the so-called emporium of Amos G. Gashwiler—Everything For The ...
— Merton of the Movies • Harry Leon Wilson

... "G'an!" says Dennie. "Go back to school! read your program! Look," and Dennie pointed to the program which he still clasped in his hand; "read that! 'Two years elapses between the second and ...
— Continuous Vaudeville • Will M. Cressy

... that the Zanthe was a smuggler, and for some years had been engaged in the illegal game of defrauding the revenue of the Mexican republic. She was commanded by a Scotchman named Morris, and her first mate was a Yankee, answering to the hail of Pardon G. Simpkins, as gallant a fellow and as good a seaman as ever trod a plank. It was her custom to land contraband goods at different points upon the coast where lighters were kept concealed, and where the merchandise was taken charge of by the shore-gang, a numerous ...
— The Three Brides, Love in a Cottage, and Other Tales • Francis A. Durivage

... accounts are before me now, and I presume that every one who has been through the same experience has preserved some such record." (Naturally, if he began that way.) ("Liberty and a Living," by P. G. Hubert.) ...
— Three Acres and Liberty • Bolton Hall

... of a half-filled book-shelf against the opposite wall, and had been suddenly smitten with an inspiration. On a leaf of his notebook he wrote: "Try her on the G's and H's," and found means to show it furtively to Blix. But Blix was puzzled, and at the earliest opportunity Condy himself said to the ...
— Blix • Frank Norris

... Newcastle, where he took shipping, and landed at Billinsgate. When he arrived, it was his immediate care to wait on [2]Mr. Mallet, who then lived in Hanover-Square in the character of tutor to his grace the duke of Montrose, and his late brother lord G. Graham. Before Mr. Thomson reached Hanover-Square, an accident happened to him, which, as it may divert some of our readers, we shall here insert. He had received letters of recommendation from a gentleman of rank in Scotland, to some persons of distinction in London, ...
— The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753),Vol. V. • Theophilus Cibber

... G. Blaine has given a masterly description and analysis of the comparative powers of the two illustrious debaters. Douglas, says Mr. Blaine, "was everywhere known as a debater of singular skill. His mind was fertile in resources. He was a master of logic. No man ...
— The Every-day Life of Abraham Lincoln • Francis Fisher Browne

... that there could be no reasonable doubt but that it was the same mule rode by Nat Turner, and that he was driven by the young mother in her flight with her infant to the Dismal Swamp, and if what G. P. R. James said in his Old Dominion be true, we must believe that Uncle Alek and Nat Turner rode the same mule. No other account was ever given that ever came to our knowledge, but it will make no difference as everybody knew that Uncle Alek had ...
— The Dismal Swamp and Lake Drummond, Early recollections - Vivid portrayal of Amusing Scenes • Robert Arnold

... occurred, which I must relate, though the joke was upon myself, or my friend, Mr. G——. Seeing a tall young squaw standing in front of her tent, I said, "Let us go and see what she is doing." She had made her morning toilet, and was very prettily dressed in gay colors, with a long red shawl on, coming down to her feet. I should say the entrance ...
— Three Years on the Plains - Observations of Indians, 1867-1870 • Edmund B. Tuttle

... the part of his companions, that Socrates shall answer his own questions, as well as other defects of style, which remind us of the Laws. The connection is often abrupt and inharmonious, and far from clear. Many points require further explanation; e.g. the reference of pleasure to the indefinite class, compared with the assertion which almost immediately follows, that pleasure and pain naturally have their seat in the third or mixed class: these two statements are unreconciled. In like manner, the table of goods does ...
— Philebus • Plato

... rent had to be paid; and the literary workers of to-day never forget that journalism is the only branch of literature that from the outset enables a man to live and pay his way. And yet when we remember Henry Clapp, Fitz James O'Brien, N. G. Shepherd, and Ned Wilkins, we feel that every working newspaper man is better to-day because they struggled and starved; because they lived in ...
— The Arena - Volume 4, No. 19, June, 1891 • Various

... Artillery at the Camp, visited the work during the morning and expressed his astonishment at the progress effected. Ordinarily it is a good day's work to throw a bridge of this class across a three-hundred foot stream. Col. G. F. Maunsell, Director General of Engineering Service in Canada, who is attached to headquarters at Ottawa, also paid close attention to the task and was vastly pleased with the result. Col. Morrison, ...
— A History of The Nations and Empires Involved and a Study - of the Events Culminating in The Great Conflict • Logan Marshall

... once given her consent to sexual intercourse by the act of marrying a man, she has given it forever, whatever new circumstances may arise, and he has no need to ask her consent to sexual intercourse, not even if he is knowingly suffering at the time from a venereal disease (see, e.g., an article on "Sex Bias," Westminster Review, ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 6 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... in my father's time, before I was a driver, that it happened. An aunt of mine—a youngish woman then—was travelling by the G. W. R. ('Great Way Round' they used to call us), when a young man entered the carriage, where she was sitting alone, and asked where the train stopped first. This was (say) at Paddington. My aunt said 'Reading' was the first station, ...
— Little Folks (July 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... in a room, and he was told to lie down on some straw to sleep, as it was now night. In the night the fleas troubled him so much that he was very restless. A sentinel had been placed to guard him, and when this wretch heard him moving in the dark he exclaimed, "Lie still, G—d—- you," and pricked him several times with his bayonet, so that the poor boy felt the fresh blood running down his body. He begged the sentinel to spare his life, declaring that it was hard he should be killed merely because the fleas had made him restless. ...
— American Prisoners of the Revolution • Danske Dandridge

... accepted belief. In my boyhood I used to hear Dr. John O. Fiske, a famous preacher in Maine. He told a friend of mine, in his old age, that he simply refused to read any book that would tend to disturb his beliefs. Professor William G. T. Shedd, one of the most distinguished theologians of this country, a leading Presbyterian divine, published so I am not slandering him by saying it a statement that he did not consider any book written since the seventeenth ...
— Our Unitarian Gospel • Minot Savage

... denunciation, he went on: "I have called you down, both of you, and you especially, Emily, to make a final settlement with you! I have told you before that you should marry Colonel John Boadley Bancker, and I need not tell you again, for by G—you shall! And now I tell you something more. If you ever permit that d—d low-lived, miserable, contemptible puppy, whom you call Frank Wallace, to cross the door-step of this house again, I will break every bone in his infernal carcase; and when he goes into the street, ...
— Shoulder-Straps - A Novel of New York and the Army, 1862 • Henry Morford

... tuned in fifths," he said. "The open strings are A, D, G, C. You can remember them, because they stand for 'Allowable Delights Grow Commonplace'; or, read the other way up: 'Courage ...
— The Upas Tree - A Christmas Story for all the Year • Florence L. Barclay

... "W. G." on his linen he understood that those were his initials, but he could not interpret them; they stood for nothing. He had no letters, memoranda in his pockets, bearing his name. And so he took the name of William Good. Perhaps the "William" came ...
— Garrison's Finish - A Romance of the Race-Course • W. B. M. Ferguson

... Prof. G.W. Lawrence, teacher of our school at Jellico, Tenn., a gentleman of quiet and unobtrusive manners, was brutally assaulted by a man of that place, and was shot in three places; one ball entered the wrist and followed up the arm, coming out near the shoulder, ...
— The American Missionary, Volume XLII. No. 7. July 1888 • Various



Words linked to "G" :   constant, chiliad, letter, tebibyte, immunoglobulin G, m, G-Jo, gramme, G clef, thou, base, nucleotide, purine, k, letter of the alphabet, DNA, G-man, G-string, terabyte, G suit, thousand, ribonucleic acid, gram, guanine, constant of gravitation, carat, deoxyguanosine monophosphate, alphabetic character, universal gravitational constant, gb, anti-G suit, mb, Roman alphabet, TiB, gravitational constant, gibibyte, 1000, tb, yard, desoxyribonucleic acid, Latin alphabet, penicillin G, physics, grand, millenary, one thousand, force unit, vitamin G, MiB, natural philosophy, g-force, gm, obolus, gee, computer memory unit, RNA, deoxyribonucleic acid, mebibyte



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