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D   Listen
noun
D  n.  
1.
The fourth letter of the English alphabet, and a vocal consonant. The English letter is from Latin, which is from Greek, which took it from Phoenician, the probable ultimate origin being Egyptian. It is related most nearly to t and th; as, Eng. deep, G. tief; Eng. daughter, G. tochter, Gr. qygathr, Skr. duhitr.
2.
(Mus.) The nominal of the second tone in the model major scale (that in C), or of the fourth tone in the relative minor scale of C (that in A minor), or of the key tone in the relative minor of F.
3.
As a numeral D stands for 500. in this use it is not the initial of any word, or even strictly a letter, but one half of the original Tuscan numeral for 1000.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"D" Quotes from Famous Books



... her finger and the tip of her tongue, and if you went nearer, why, of course, for dry goods like flour and spice, you went by handfuls and pinches, and for wet, there was a middle-sized jug—quite the best thing whether for much or little, because you might know how much a teacupful was if you'd got any use of your senses, and you might be sure it would take five middle-sized jugs to make a gallon. Knowledge of this kind is like Titian's colouring, difficult to communicate; and as Mrs. Palfrey, once ...
— Brother Jacob • George Eliot

... the Greek geographers to imagine that the source of the Nile was westward in the direction of Lake Chad. The first map on which the course of the Ghazal is indicated with anything like accuracy is that of the French cartographer d'Anville, published in 1772. The exploration of the river followed the ascent of the White Nile by the Egyptian expeditions of 1839-1842. For a considerable portion of the period between 1833 and 1865 John Petherick, a Welshman, originally a mining engineer, explored the Ghazal ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 2 - "Baconthorpe" to "Bankruptcy" • Various

... incendiary! shew here thy art Upon this carcass of a cold hard heart; Let all thy scatter'd shafts of light that play Among the leaves of thy large books of day, Combined against this breast at once break in And take away from me myself and sin; This gracious robbery shall thy bounty be, And thy best fortune ...
— Santa Teresa - an Appreciation: with some of the best passages of the Saint's Writings • Alexander Whyte

... say! And what business had you to think, coming trespassing here on my ground, and breaking the hedges! I'd have you up for that, if for nothing ...
— The Stokesley Secret • Charlotte M. Yonge

... Dupleix in his movement against Madras. When, too late, the Nabob heard of the fall of Madras, he sent an army to recapture the town, and called upon the French governor to surrender it. The governor was Duval D'Espremesnil, the father of that mad D'Espremesnil who fuliginates through a portion of the French Revolution. He refused to obey the Nabob, opened fire upon his forces, and repulsed them. The repulse ...
— A History of the Four Georges, Volume II (of 4) • Justin McCarthy

... not the Lord Jesus designed by these words to show what an overthrow will one day be made among professors, he needed not to have you'd it at this rate, as in the text, and afterwards, he has done; the sentence had run intelligible enough without it; I say, without his saying, "I say unto you." But the truth is, the professor is in danger; the preacher and ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... died, and I never answered them a word,—and at last they let me go." When Fanny inquired whether their father had been kind to her, she declared that he had been "main kind." "But, oh, Fanny! if he'd only say a word, it would warm ...
— The Vicar of Bullhampton • Anthony Trollope

... "if the pains come on very bad, to give her some drops. They're in a little green bottle by her bed. Five drops ... yes, miss, five drops in a little green bottle. Only if the pains is very bad. She's brave—wonderful. I'd 'ave sat up till morning willing, and so of course would Miss Elizabeth. But she seemed to ...
— The Captives • Hugh Walpole

... adamantine temper, the audacity of hope with which he still clung to the final accomplishment of his purposes, the contagion of his courage touched, nevertheless, the drooping spirits of his followers. [Footnote: "L'egalite d'humeur du Chef rassuroit tout le monde; et il trouvoit des resources a tout par son esprit qui relevoit les esperances les plus ...
— France and England in North America, a Series of Historical Narratives, Part Third • Francis Parkman

... place the effigy of justice rather than justice itself. The State is not satisfied with drawing all concerns to itself, but it acquires an ever-increasing power of deciding on them all without restriction and without appeal. *d ...
— Democracy In America, Volume 2 (of 2) • Alexis de Tocqueville

... seemed to me that the West was accumulating a little too much wiseness. I've been saving New York for dessert. I know it's a low-down trick to take things from these people. They only know this and that and pass to and fro and think ever and anon. I'd hate for my mother to know I was skinning these weak-minded ones. She raised ...
— Strictly Business • O. Henry

... Republic a constitution was drawn up in which the following clause was introduced: "Art. 75. All the agents of the government below the rank of ministers can only be prosecuted for offences relating to their several functions by virtue of a decree of the Conseil d'Etat; in which the case the prosecution takes place before the ordinary tribunals." This clause survived the "Constitution de l'An VIII," and it is still maintained in spite of the just complaints of the nation. I have always ...
— Democracy In America, Volume 1 (of 2) • Alexis de Tocqueville

... Vincent read in the local paper a highly colored account of the fray. After giving a large number of wholly fictitious details of the fray, it went on to say: "The victims were Cyrus D. Jenkins, a much-esteemed citizen and a prominent Unionist; the other two were guests at the hotel; one had registered as P. J. Moore of Vermont, the other James Harvey of Tennessee. Nothing is as yet known as to the persons whose ...
— With Lee in Virginia - A Story of the American Civil War • G. A. Henty

... at him and then at the two figures upon the floor, and then back at him again with eyes at once quizzical and cunning. Then his face broke into a grin that might hardly be called of drollery. "Accident!" quoth he. "By the blood! d'ye see 'tis a strange accident, indeed, that lays two men by the heels and lets the third go without a scratch!" Delivering himself thus, he came forward into the room, and, taking the last victim of Jonathan's adventure ...
— Howard Pyle's Book of Pirates • Howard I. Pyle

... gentlemen whose names we have learned were Messieurs d'Orville, Champdore, Beaumont, la Motte Bourioli, Fougeray or Foulgere de Vitre, Genestou, Sourin, and Boulay. The orthography of the names, as they are mentioned from ...
— Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, Vol. 1 • Samuel de Champlain

... minute of work they've done. There is nothing more I can do until they bring me more work. I might ride out and see how the fellows are coming along in the field, but I was out there yesterday, and I know all they're doing, and everyone of their problems. Besides, if I rode afield, I'd miss Mr. Newnham." ...
— The Young Engineers in Colorado • H. Irving Hancock

... surpassing beauty of this favorite spruce. Every tree-lover is sure to regard it with special admiration; apathetic mountaineers, even, seeking only game or gold, stop to gaze on first meeting it, and mutter to themselves: "That's a mighty pretty tree," some of them adding, "d——d pretty!" In autumn, when its cones are ripe, the little striped tamias, and the Douglas squirrel, and the Clark crow make a happy stir in its groves. The deer love to lie down beneath its spreading branches; bright streams from the snow ...
— The Mountains of California • John Muir

... morning, Mr. Dix. Used the cure? I see you have, Mrs. Middlemist. Isn't it wonderful? If you'd only go about Monte Carlo with an inscription 'Try Sypher's Cure!' What an advertisement! I'd have you one done in diamonds! And how did you ...
— Septimus • William J. Locke

... middle of summer. Some days after this uncomfortable expedition, another was planned to the Terra del Fuego side, and succeeded better. On the 27th, the party intended for it, consisting among others of Bougainville himself, Messrs de Bournand, and d'Oraison, and the Prince of Nassau, well armed with swivel-guns and muskets, sailed in the Boudeuse's long-boat, and the Etoile's barge, across the straits, and landed at the mouth of a little river, on the banks of which ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 13 • Robert Kerr

... loved sport, and Villon above all, that he should strain his eyes a little and tilt his head slightly to see what manner of literature prevailed in these wilds. And the book gave him great cheer, for it was an old French folio of arms, "Les Arts de l'Homme d'Epee; ou, Le Dictionnaire du Gentilhomme," by one Sieur de Guille. Doom Castle was a curious place, but apparently Hugh Bethune was in the right when he described its master as "ane o' the auld gentry, wi' a tattie ...
— Doom Castle • Neil Munro

... your Tom would play fair, and let us have the hind-quarters of that deer, we might have it instead of the lizard. He'll only eat the neck, I daresay. Shall we try him? I don't think he'd show fight ...
— Rob Harlow's Adventures - A Story of the Grand Chaco • George Manville Fenn

... then he should prevail, and speed On his bad errand; man should be seduced, And flatter'd out of all, believing lies Against his Maker; no decree of mine Concurring to necessitate his fall, Or touch'd with slightest moment of impulse His free-will, to her own inclining left In ...
— A Theodicy, or, Vindication of the Divine Glory • Albert Taylor Bledsoe

... and started to say something, when his attention was drawn by a commotion on the driveway. A big Tucker limousine with an O.D. paint job and the single-starred flag of a brigadier general was approaching, horning impatiently. In the back seat MacLeod could see a heavy-shouldered figure with the face of a bad-tempered great Dane—General Daniel Nayland, the military commander of Tonto Basin. The inside guards ...
— The Mercenaries • Henry Beam Piper

... so polite, Ask'd Mister Whitbread if he'd be a 'Knight'. Unwilling in the list to be enroll'd, Whitbread contemplated the Knights of 'Peg', Then to his generous Sov'reign made a leg, And said, 'He was afraid he was ...
— The Works of Lord Byron: Letters and Journals, Volume 2. • Lord Byron

... unknown? Those words which first the bier's dread silence broke— Came they with revelation in each tone? Were the far cities of the nations gone, The solemn halls of consciousness or sleep, For man uncurtain'd by that spirit lone, Back from the portal summon'd o'er the deep? Be hush'd, my soul! the veil of darkness lay Still drawn; therefore thy Lord called back the voice departed, To spread His truth, ...
— Memories of Bethany • John Ross Macduff

... John came home from the city with a parcel. 'Mary,' he said hesitatingly, 'I've brought ye home a bit o' Lily! I thought I'd like to see ...
— Mushrooms on the Moor • Frank Boreham

... I may call the frenzied current of their eyes, as they read, to be stopped by even a moment of calm reflection or thought." [Footnote: Aspects of Modern Study, by Right Honorable G.J. Gorschen, D.C.L., M.P., p. 39.] Real assimilation of ideas has to be slow; and while some reading, owing to the simplicity of subject- matter, should be as rapid as the eye can travel, the rate at which ground is usually covered is too great ...
— How To Study and Teaching How To Study • F. M. McMurry

... produced much of our political excitement, and our Bristol business has been acted with great similarity of circumstance at Lyons, and is still going on. Talleyrand produced the 'Moniteur' last night with the account, lamented that the Duc d'Orleans had been sent with Marshal Soult to Lyons, which he said was unnecessary and absurd, that Soult was the best man for the purpose of putting it down. It was begun by the workpeople, who were very numerous, ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Vol. II • Charles C. F. Greville

... in relating this anecdote (Life of Augustus, chapter 5) says that the senate-meeting in question was called to consider the conspiracy of Catiline. Since, however, Augustus is on all hands admitted to have been born a. d. IX. Kal. Octobr. and mention of Catiline's conspiracy was first made in the senate a. d. XII. Kal. Nov. (Cicero, Against Catiline, I, 3, 7), the claim of coincidence is evidently based ...
— Dio's Rome, Vol. III • Cassius Dio

... answered to the description on the title- page quoted above. But in 1701 an accredited work of his appeared, namely, a translation into Welsh of Jeremy Taylor's Rules and Exercises of Holy Living, a 12mo. volume published in London. It was dedicated to the Rev. Humphrey Humphreys, D.D., Bishop of Bangor, who was a native of the same district of Merionethshire as Ellis Wynne, and, as is shown in the genealogical table hereto {0}, was connected by ...
— The Visions of the Sleeping Bard • Ellis Wynne

... blind women together by the ears, and the dashing of hot pudding, soup, or water in their faces, is another form of a Lox story, which occurs again in the Kalevala. But the entire spirit of the tricks is that of Lox, as those of Lox are like those of Loki. The Rev. D. Moncure Conway once said to me, as Miss E. Robins has also said in an article in the Atlantic Monthly, that it is only in the Norse mythology that the Evil One, or devil, is represented as growing up from or inspired solely by reckless wanton mischief,—the mischief of a ...
— The Algonquin Legends of New England • Charles Godfrey Leland

... good Scotsmen, leaders in the world of business—James Oliver, Philip D. Armour and Andrew Carnegie—were each the very antithesis of dogmatists and sectarians. They respected all religions, but had implicit faith in none. All were learners; all were men of peace; all had ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 11 (of 14) - Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Businessmen • Elbert Hubbard

... aunt would reply, "I hate talking to any one who agrees with me. It's like taking a walk to see one's own looking-glass. I'd rather talk to somebody who didn't, even if he were a fool," which for her ...
— Paul Kelver • Jerome Klapka, AKA Jerome K. Jerome

... Bertha protested. "It is most indiscreet. It is not in the part of the Countess d'Aurillac that she makes love ...
— The Lost Road • Richard Harding Davis

... place was an immense valley of considerable altitude called the Columbia Basin, surrounded by the Cascade Mountains on the west, the Coeur d'Alene and Bitter Root Mountains on the east, the Okanozan range to the north, and the Blue Mountains to the south. The valley floor was basalt, from the lava flow of volcanoes in ages past. The rainfall ...
— The Desert of Wheat • Zane Grey

... officer, moved first along the wadi bed, and then, while it was still only half light, ascended the left-hand spur and took up a position at A. The Lewis-gun team occupied the hill at C. The remaining section, which had been kept in reserve at the hills about D, now moved forward and occupied Ikba. All being reported clear, the senior officers moved forward, arriving at Ikba just as the daylight became strong enough for them to obtain the forward view of the enemy country which ...
— With the British Army in The Holy Land • Henry Osmond Lock

... d'esprit, I admit,' said he, and he waved his hand to signify that he could be equally witty every day in the week if he chose. His satisfaction, indeed, blinded him to the fact that his speech might be construed as uncommonly near to a proposal of marriage. He thought, with a cast back to ...
— The Philanderers • A.E.W. Mason

... Neuve Chapelle on March 10th, 1915, though not seriously—a flesh wound in the side. He had done most gallantly and was to get a D.S.O. He had been in hospital for two weeks and was almost well when Amaryllis came up to Brook Street, on the first of April. She had read his name in the list of wounded, and had telegraphed to his mother in great anxiety, but had been reassured, and now she throbbed with longing ...
— The Price of Things • Elinor Glyn

... his shipmates on both ships were not long in forming a strong liking to him, and a dislike to the treatment he was receiving. They felt there was something wrong, though all they could say about it was that "he was a d——d good fellow." ...
— The Tragedy of St. Helena • Walter Runciman

... "D.O.M. Hic seminatur Corpus Animale Spiritale resurrecturum THOMAE BLOUNT. De Orleton in agro Herefordiensi Armigeri, Ex interiori Templo Londini J Cti. Viri priscis Moribus avitae Fidei, Vitae integerrimae, Pietatis solidae, Fidelitatem, Dilectionem, Amorem, Charitatem, In Principem, ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 204, September 24, 1853 • Various

... recommencing. Suddenly many heavy blows struck with a handspike on the deck above boomed like discharges of small cannon through the forecastle. Then the boatswain's voice rose outside the door with an authoritative note in its drawl:—"D'ye hear, below there? Lay aft! Lay aft ...
— The Nigger Of The "Narcissus" - A Tale Of The Forecastle • Joseph Conrad

... ear of that conquering flirt, the volatile spouse of Captain Kahle. Having ascertained this, First Lieutenant Borgert rapidly strode toward the interesting pair, clinking his spurs and drawling forth an accented "G-o-o-d evening!" as he came up to them before they had had a chance to rise. Pommer looked indescribably much like an idiot in returning the salute; but the little woman, with the ready wit of her sex, assumed the ...
— A Little Garrison - A Realistic Novel of German Army Life of To-day • Fritz von der Kyrburg

... men, they were in nowise above the level of the inferior classes in England. *c No lofty conceptions, no intellectual system, directed the foundation of these new settlements. The colony was scarcely established when slavery was introduced, *d and this was the main circumstance which has exercised so prodigious an influence on the character, the laws, and all the future prospects of the South. Slavery, as we shall afterwards show, dishonors labor; it ...
— Democracy In America, Volume 1 (of 2) • Alexis de Tocqueville

... for't, Janice!" the elder said, as the started, the words being fairly jerked ouf of his mouth, "I dunno but I'd like to own one of these contraptions myself. You can git around lively in 'em—and that's ...
— How Janice Day Won • Helen Beecher Long

... "Well, I'd rather you should kill him than I," replied one of the others, "for he saved my life at Middleburgh, when every one made sure ...
— The Phantom Ship • Frederick Marryat

... there," said Andy; "don't tell me we're going to have a steak off that old cat? I can stand for a good deal, but I'd go hungry a long time before I'd eat ...
— The Aeroplane Boys on the Wing - Aeroplane Chums in the Tropics • John Luther Langworthy

... establishment of a state in which the Executive, the Legislative and the Judicial powers should be in separate hands and should work independently of each other. When Lebreton, the Parisian book-seller, announced that Messieurs Diderot, d'Alembert, Turgot and a score of other distinguished writers were going to publish an Encyclopaedia which was to contain "all the new ideas and the new science and the new knowledge," the response from the side of the ...
— The Story of Mankind • Hendrik van Loon

... kindly, common sense was a powerful tonic, morally and physically, to all invalids whom she nursed. She had no tolerance for any weakness which could be conquered. She had infinite tenderness for all weakness which was inevitable; and her discriminations between the two were always just. "I'd trust more to Mrs. Smailli's diagnosis of any case than I would to my own," said Dr. Macgowan to his fellow-physicians more than once. And, when they scoffed at the idea, he replied: "I do not mean ...
— Hetty's Strange History • Helen Jackson

... deal with splendid Royal Shows, and there is the precis of a dream of a Prince and an A.D.C., who correct the Abuses of the Privileges of ...
— From Edinburgh to India & Burmah • William G. Burn Murdoch

... something to my ancestors. My word to my father ought not to be an empty breath. Yet here I am, with all the interests of life pulling one way—wait till you've a boy five weeks old by a wife you'd be cut in little pieces for, and you'll know, sir,—and a dead father and a dead creed pulling the other. I knew what was coming, and I've talked about it and thought about it till my head's like a bee-hive. Now, ...
— The Yeoman Adventurer • George W. Gough

... world, doom'd to wander and roam, Bereft of my parents, bereft of a home, A stranger to something and what's his name joy, Behold little Edmund ...
— Our Mutual Friend • Charles Dickens

... town as he pleased: how should any man dare to stop him—the great calm magnanimous silent Strength! They say he licked a Life-Guardsman: I wonder whether it was Shaw, who killed all those Frenchmen? No, it could not be Shaw, for he was dead au champ d'honneur; but he WOULD have licked Shaw if he had been alive. A bargeman I know he licked, at Jack Randall's in Slaughter House Lane. Old Hawkins was too lazy to play at cricket; he sauntered all day in the sunshine about the green, accompanied by little Tippins, ...
— Men's Wives • William Makepeace Thackeray

... end of the world. Christianity, rightly understood, renders even the body of a good man sacred and precious, through the indwelling of the Infinite. "We have this treasure in earthen vessels," and the poor, dying tenement of flesh is hallowed as "A vase of earth, a trembling clod, Constrain'd to hold the breath ...
— The Destiny of the Soul - A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life • William Rounseville Alger

... Lorraine to France, a condition of the marriage. As the duke struggled against the surrender of his paternal domains, Cartenstein, the emperor's confidential minister, insultingly said to him, "Monseigneur, point de cession, point d'archiduchesse." My lord, no cession, no archduchess. Fortunately for Francis, in about a year after his marriage the Duke of Tuscany died, and Francis, with his bride, hastened to his new home in the palaces of Leghorn. Though the duke mourned bitterly over the loss of his ancestral domains, ...
— The Empire of Austria; Its Rise and Present Power • John S. C. Abbott

... 5. D'Indy's "Fantasia on French Folk Themes," given by the Longy Club at Chickering ...
— Annals of Music in America - A Chronological Record of Significant Musical Events • Henry Charles Lahee

... of Castile had ordered four ships to go in search of new lands, and I was selected by his highness to go in that fleet, in order to assist in the discoveries. We sailed from the port of Cadiz on the 10th of May, A.D. 1497, and steering our course through the great Western Ocean, spent eighteen months in our expedition, discovering much land and a great number of islands, the largest part of which were inhabited. As these are not ...
— Amerigo Vespucci • Frederick A. Ober

... the room and out into the eery shadows of the Way. Karl was done with his old life. He'd go to the upper levels and claim his rights. Some day, too, he'd punish the man who'd stolen them away. God! Born to the purple! To think he'd missed it all! Probably was kidnaped by the old rascal he'd been calling uncle. But he'd find out. Rudolph didn't have to explain. Fingerprint ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, December 1930 • Various

... work on the Curiosities of Literature Mr. D'Israeli attempts to trace the origin of the custom of uttering a blessing on people who sneeze. The custom seems, however, to be very ancient and widespread. It exists to this day in India, among the Hindus at any rate, as it existed in ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... Transparency of Industry powerless to cure the deeper Industrial Maladies. 4. Beginnings of Public Control of Machine-production. 5. Passage of Industries into a public Non-competitive Condition. 6. The raison d'etre of Progressive Collectivism. 7. Collectivism follows the line of Monopoly. 8. Cases of "Arrested Development:" the Sweating Trades. 9. Retardation of rate of Progress in Collective Industries. 10. Will Official Machine-work absorb an Increasing Proportion ...
— The Evolution of Modern Capitalism - A Study of Machine Production • John Atkinson Hobson

... days pass on;—sweet Spring returns, And whispers comfort to the heart that mourns: But not to mine, whose dear and cherish'd grief Asks for indulgence, but ne'er hopes relief. For, ah, can changing seasons e'er restore The lov'd companion I must still deplore? Shall all the wisdom of the world combin'd Erase thy image, Mary, from ...
— Memoirs of the Life of Rt. Hon. Richard Brinsley Sheridan Vol 2 • Thomas Moore

... to the girl who ought to have flowers more than any girl I know. I'd like to give them ...
— Missy • Dana Gatlin

... nodded and hobbled hurriedly to the wood fire, bending over as he poked it to hide the look of anxiety in his face. "Laws-a-massy, Massa Fairfax," he grumbled in good-natured evasion, "yoh'd mos' freeze to deaf, I reckons, 'thout sendin' foh me"—he coughed, and amended hastily: "'thout sendin' foh one ob de servants to ...
— Uncle Noah's Christmas Inspiration • Leona Dalrymple

... the minutes of the city council embodying these conditions, which I found in Withof's 'Vertheidigung' and communicated to Dr Hume Brown, was printed by him in the Appendix to his 'John Knox,' and is also reprinted here in Appendix D. ...
— The Scottish Reformation - Its Epochs, Episodes, Leaders, and Distinctive Characteristics • Alexander F. Mitchell

... "I'd better dive for Tania again," said Madge quietly, without intimating to her chums that she was feeling a little tired and less sure of herself in the water than usual. She knew they would not ...
— Madge Morton's Victory • Amy D.V. Chalmers

... procession from the Capitol," continued Cornelius, "on, I think, the second day; from the Capitol to the Circus, all down the Via Sacra. Hosts of strangers there, and provincials from the four corners of the earth, but not in the procession. There you saw, all in one coup-d'oeil, the real good blood of Rome, the young blood of the new generation, and promise of the future; the sons of patrician and consular families, of imperators, orators, conquerors, statesmen. They rode at the head of the procession, fine young fellows, six abreast; and still more of them ...
— Callista • John Henry Cardinal Newman

... bystander, and the answer was, "The Brigade! They're cleaning up the city before the convention!" And Comrade Abell clasped his hands to his forehead, and wailed in despair, "It's because they've been selling the 'Liberator'! Erman told me last week he'd been warned to stop ...
— They Call Me Carpenter • Upton Sinclair

... of British South Africa Company stock, the DeBeers which Rhodes formed received a monopoly on the diamond output and with it the assurance of a rigid enforcement of the so-called Illicit Diamond Buying Act. This law, more commonly known as "I. D. B." and which has figured in many South African novels, provided drastic punishment for dishonest dealing in the stones. More than one South African millionaire owed the beginnings of his fortune to ...
— An African Adventure • Isaac F. Marcosson

... sweet, when I do look on thee, In whom all joys so well agree, Heart and soul do sing in me. This you hear is not my tongue, Which once said what I conceived, For it was of use bereaved, With a cruel answer stung. No, though tongue to roof be cleaved, Fearing lest he chastis'd be, Heart and soul do ...
— St. George and St. Michael • George MacDonald

... mysteriously clean print-dress, and tortoise-shell spectacles she would gladly have kept on while charing, only they always come off in the pail. But he did, and when reproached by her for his needlessly defiant attitude, took up a more conciliatory tone. "Carn't recollect, or p'r'aps I'd ...
— When Ghost Meets Ghost • William Frend De Morgan

... leave?" said the inspector, collaring him. "Ah," he added, as the captive burst into tears, "I told you you'd have to deal with me. Now hold your noise, and remember where you are and who you're speakin' to; and perhaps I mayn't lock you up this time. Tell me what you saw when you were trespassin' ...
— An Unsocial Socialist • George Bernard Shaw

... royal manifesto on the table; there was no doubting that. The venture must be made now or never. If only d'Avoncourt were free! How well he would know what to ...
— The Nameless Castle • Maurus Jokai

... The Duchessa d'Astrardente stood still, and quietly looked about her. A minister, two secretaries, and three or four princes sprang towards her, each with a chair in hand; but she declined each offer, nodding to one, thanking another by name, and exchanging ...
— Saracinesca • F. Marion Crawford

... be to ask them to commit an absurdity. The thing would have to grow as it developed, and we can only ask them to show us a main outline. This has been done in many publications, among which I have studied, with as much care as these distracting times allow, "Self-Government in Industry," by G.D.H. Cole, "National Guilds," by A.R. Orage (so described on the back of the book, but the title-page says that it is by S.G. Hobson, edited by A.R. Orage), and "The Meaning of National Guilds," by ...
— War-Time Financial Problems • Hartley Withers

... harmonies, O skill'd to sing of Time or Eternity, God-gifted organ-voice of England, Milton, a ...
— Essays • Ralph Waldo Emerson

... made a few private records of his own singing and gave this one to the natives," suggested Dave Tower. "They'd take it for something to eat, but, when they tried boiling it and had no success, they'd throw it away. That's probably what's happened and ...
— Panther Eye • Roy J. Snell

... a letter dated January 14, 1775, only a few months before he attested the sincerity of his patriotism, in his own blood, on Bunker Hill. His handwriting has many ungraceful flourishes. All the small d's spout upward in parabolic curves, and descend at a considerable distance. His pen seems to have had nothing but hair-lines in it; and the whole letter, though perfectly legible, has a look of thin and unpleasant ...
— A Book of Autographs - (From: "The Doliver Romance and Other Pieces: Tales and Sketches") • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... the woods or away from his own door to see and hear, is the hardy and ever- welcome meadowlark. What a twang there is about this bird, and what vigor! It smacks of the soil. It is the winged embodiment of the spirit of our spring meadows. What emphasis in its "z-d-t, z-d-t" and what character in its long, piercing note! Its straight, tapering, sharp beak is typical of its voice. Its note goes like a shaft from a crossbow; it is a little too sharp and piercing when ...
— Birds and Poets • John Burroughs

... his responsive Irish nature catching the sunshine in an instant. "Then, be Jove, we'll do them yet, for the garrison must have heard the firing. What d'ye think, Cochrane? They must be full cry upon our scent this four hours. Any minute we might see the white puggaree of a British officer coming ...
— A Desert Drama - Being The Tragedy Of The "Korosko" • A. Conan Doyle

... Madame D'Arblay gives two accounts of the last interview she ever had with Johnson,—on the 25th November, 1784. In the "Diary" ...
— Autobiography, Letters and Literary Remains of Mrs. Piozzi (Thrale) (2nd ed.) (2 vols.) • Mrs. Hester Lynch Piozzi

... came down to the wharf every time the ship was up, arter that. Sometimes she'd spend the evening aboard, and sometimes they'd go off and spend it somewhere else. She 'ad a fancy for the cabin, I think, and the cap'n told me that she 'ad said when they were married she was going to sail with ...
— Ship's Company, The Entire Collection • W.W. Jacobs

... Your honor, jist thry me." "Well, I will hire you by the day." "By the day, and sure I've no place to put my head at night." "Well then, my man, I can't hire you, for I have no place for you to sleep." "Sleep, is it? I'd never want a better place than with the horses—the stable, to be sure, on a bit of straw—there's no better place to my mind, sir." The poor fellow's destitution, his worn and tattered clothes, his tangled hair, with a face young and simple, but not vicious ...
— A Biographical Sketch of the Life and Character of Joseph Charless - In a Series of Letters to his Grandchildren • Charlotte Taylor Blow Charless

... envy Caesar's lot; To wander through Britannia's dales And be snowed up in Scythian vales Is Caesar's taste—I'd rather not?'" ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... school if the pupils could see that. There'd be little trouble in the world if the people could see it. It is the good on my side, the bad shoved off on yours. Who taught you such a sense of ...
— A Little Girl in Old Detroit • Amanda Minnie Douglas

... found my excellent friend R——d, who, together with his young bride, had accompanied his father-in-law, who was desirous of testing the salubrity of these springs. He described the surrounding country as beautiful, and the little place itself as agreeable enough for a ...
— Impressions of America - During the years 1833, 1834 and 1835. In Two Volumes, Volume I. • Tyrone Power

... D., in an address upon the reasons why physicians still prescribe alcoholics, says that the magnetism of public opinion has great ...
— Alcohol: A Dangerous and Unnecessary Medicine, How and Why - What Medical Writers Say • Martha M. Allen

... sowl, this thratemint is foul— To put your best frinds to the blush; An' wor you sinsare, in what you sed there We'd tie up your whistle, my thrush! But ULICK, machree, you can't desave me, By sayin' the word you don't mane; Or make her beleeve who stands at me sleeve, In FISH an' his Castles in Spane. Arrah what do you ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 2, April 9, 1870 • Various

... just then, but before long I told them I would go to jail before I'd put it up. I went to the manager, then to the inspector, and hung the bluff around. At last they decided to kick me out of the bank and let the guarantee company make good the loss. I hung around Toronto for a little while, with two five-hundred dollar bills tucked ...
— A Canadian Bankclerk • J. P. Buschlen

... John S. Popkin, D.D.," a Professor at Harvard College, Professor Felton observes: "He was a mortal enemy to translations, 'interliners,' and all such subsidiary helps in learning lessons; he classed them all under the opprobrious name of 'facilities,' and never scrupled to seize them as contraband ...
— A Collection of College Words and Customs • Benjamin Homer Hall

... between the two—neither over-sentimental nor over-comic, but altogether light in tone, and marked in the main by wit and humour. Now, to this last class of verse has been given, in general, the name of vers de societe or vers d'occasion—verse of society or for the moment. Mr. Frederick Locker, nearly twenty years ago, thus labelled his volume of 'Lyra Elegantiarum'—still, even at this distance of time, the best available collection of our lighter verse. But the label is not sufficiently distinguishing; it is too ...
— By-ways in Book-land - Short Essays on Literary Subjects • William Davenport Adams

... 'I'd better be going off by myself somewhere,' he remarked as gravely as he could manage, 'if you're going to start shooting a man up just ...
— The Desert Valley • Jackson Gregory

... and also of the duration of existance, without beginning or end, and so frame the idea of an eternal being. The degrees or extent wherein we ascribe existence, power, wisdom, and all other perfections (which we can have any ideas of) to that sovereign Being, which we call G-d, being all boundless and infinite, we frame the best idea of him our minds are capable of: all which is done, I say, by enlarging those simple ideas we have taken from the operations of our own minds, by reflection; or by our senses, from exterior things, to ...
— An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Volume I. - MDCXC, Based on the 2nd Edition, Books I. and II. (of 4) • John Locke

... "He hates you; he swears so a hundred times a day, and he is determined to break your proud spirit for you. We shall force you to knock under sooner or later; and I warn you it will be best for you to be sooner rather than later. What friends have you got anywhere to take your side? If you'd made friends with me, my fine lady, you'd have found it good for yourself; but you've chosen to make me your enemy, and I'll make him your enemy. You know, as well as I do, he can't hear the sight of ...
— The Doctor's Dilemma • Hesba Stretton

... right, then; no trouble to show the cattle. Yes, they run right around home here within twenty-five miles of the ranch. Show you a sample of the stock within an hour's ride. You can just bet that old Tom Green County has got the steers! Sugar, if I'd a-known that you was in a hurry, I could have shown you the cattle the next morning after you come. Captain, you ought to know me well enough by this time to speak your little piece without any prelude. ...
— Reed Anthony, Cowman • Andy Adams

... Perhaps there was a little of both those feelings you accuse me of—perhaps I did want to triumph over both you and Shepler—and the other people who said you'd never marry for anything but money—but do you think I'd have had either one of those desires if I hadn't loved you? Do you think I'd have cared how many Sheplers you married if I hadn't loved you so, night and day?—always turning ...
— The Spenders - A Tale of the Third Generation • Harry Leon Wilson

... strict, 'bout den, wid cullud folks, an' white people, too. De Kloo Kluxes was out nights. I hear'd tell 'bout 'em whuppin' people. But dey never ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves - Mississippi Narratives • Works Projects Administration

... emphatic opinion that the author was a Miss Frances D——, who many years ago was living in a remote village in the North of England, and who had been paid L5 for the line, I appealed to the Post Office for help to trace the lady out; and through the kindly assistance of the officials at St. ...
— The History of "Punch" • M. H. Spielmann

... would soon be exiled from society, and a conversation assembly room would become tremendous as a court of justice." This is a hit at Boswell, who (as regards Johnson himself) had full licence to take notes the best way he could. Madame D'Arblay's are much fuller, and bear a suspicious resemblance to the ...
— Autobiography, Letters and Literary Remains of Mrs. Piozzi (Thrale) (2nd ed.) (2 vols.) • Mrs. Hester Lynch Piozzi

... go in herself and see if they wanted anything. So Sarah goes and tells John to go and take some wood in. But John he wa'nt going to go, till I told him that if he didn't go I would, and if I went to carrying in wood, I'd dirty all my clothes, and then somebody would want to know the reason. So John he carried in some wood. Then I watched Sarah, but she didn't go in. So I told her about it. And then she promised, but didn't go. I told her again, and she promised, but didn't go. ...
— The Lights and Shadows of Real Life • T.S. Arthur

... we'd whip them," shouted the Prince, wriggling gleefully in John Tullis's straining embrace half an hour after the latter had ridden through the gate. Tears streamed down the big man's face. One arm held the boy, the other encircled the sister he had all but lost. In the Monastery of St. ...
— Truxton King - A Story of Graustark • George Barr McCutcheon

... the Lilybelle proudly, 'I cared nothing for him. He called on me once And would have come often, no doubt, if I'd asked him. But though he was handsome, I thought ...
— The Englishman and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... Mr. John D. Waite, of Lewistown, Mont., recently appointed by President Roosevelt as a member of the Commission to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mr. Carter, appeared and took his place ...
— Final Report of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission • Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission

... Plain! Oh, isn't it beautiful! I had no idea how lovely it was!" cried Betty, as with her eyes still fixed on the distant panorama of woods and water she went down the steps, Tom at her heels—he bet she'd get sick of it all soon enough, ...
— The Prodigal Judge • Vaughan Kester

... indeed, left nothing to be desired on the score of plainness or conciseness of style. Count Del Ferice had married Maria Consuelo d'Aranjuez d'Aragona. ...
— Don Orsino • F. Marion Crawford

... was not only Abbot of Arbroath and Bishop of Mirepoix in France, but also coadjutor to his aged uncle in the Archbishopric of St Andrews, and cardinal, with the title of St Stephen on the Coelian Mount. "Paul III.," says D'Aubigne, "alarmed at seeing the separation of England from Rome, and fearing lest Scotland—as she had a nephew of Henry VIII. for her king—should follow her example, was anxious to have in that country one man who should be absolutely devoted to him. David Betoun ...
— The Scottish Reformation - Its Epochs, Episodes, Leaders, and Distinctive Characteristics • Alexander F. Mitchell

... paled. "You'd better go on, if you have to be at your claim," she said, aware that she could offer no argument, no alternative plan to his wish for an onward march. "I'm—not used to riding—much. I ...
— The Furnace of Gold • Philip Verrill Mighels

... what I wish, my child. Your Duc d'Herouville has immense estates in Normandy, and I want to be his steward, under the name of Thoul. I have the capacity, and I am honest. A man may borrow of the Government, and yet not steal from ...
— Poor Relations • Honore de Balzac

... diplomatic pathos, lifted her eyes upon me again, opened her lips slightly, said nothing, and finally advanced a somewhat tremulous hand, which I hastened to receive within my own. She availed herself at once of this point d'appui to get on her feet, and bounded lightly to the floor. A few minutes later, we were both on horseback and leaving the ...
— Led Astray and The Sphinx - Two Novellas In One Volume • Octave Feuillet

... eventually married a Mademoiselle Hervae d'Almenara, the daughter of a Spanish banker, who was later Minister of Joseph, and was created Marquis of Abruenara. The lady was neither handsome nor amiable, but she possessed a vast fortune, and Bonaparte himself solicited her hand for his aide de camp. After the death of Duroc his widow ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... weary boy had toiled all day With heavy spade and hoe; His mistress met him on the way, And bade him quickly go And bring her home some sticks of wood, For she would bake and brew; When he returned, she'd give him food; For she had much to do. And then she charged him not to stay, Nor loiter long ...
— Sanders' Union Fourth Reader • Charles W. Sanders

... un lieu sur la terre ou les joies pures sont inconnues; d'ou la politesse est exilee et fait place a l'egoisme, a la contradiction, aux injures a demivoilees; le remords et l'inquietude, furies infatigables, y tourmentent les habitans. Ce lieu est la maison de deux epoux qui ne peuvent ni ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. 6 • Maria Edgeworth

... "It really is very lonesome here for Viola—if it weren't for her church work and her music I don't know what she'd do. There are so few young people, and then her years at the seminary spoiled her for ...
— The Tyranny of the Dark • Hamlin Garland

... for the arrival of the Portuguese General, Tristan d'Acunha, to whom she pledged her faith long ago, when a cruel fate separated her from him. She knows that the Portuguese are at this moment besieging Goa, which formerly belonged to them. Jessonda is accompanied by her women ...
— The Standard Operaglass - Detailed Plots of One Hundred and Fifty-one Celebrated Operas • Charles Annesley

... 1822, on a fine morning in the month of February, I was traversing the boulevards of Paris, from the quiet circles of the Marais to the fashionable quarters of the Chaussee-d'Antin, and I observed for the first time, not without a certain philosophic joy, the diversity of physiognomy and the varieties of costume which, from the Rue du Pas-de-la-Mule even to the Madeleine, made each ...
— The Physiology of Marriage, Part II. • Honore de Balzac

... Oration on Webster by Rufus Choate at Dartmouth College; J. Barnard's Life and Character of Daniel Webster; E.P. Whipple's Essay on Webster; Eulogies on the Death of Webster, especially those by G.S. Hillard, L. Woods, A. Taft, R.D. Hitchcock, and Theodore Parker, also Addresses and Orations on the One Hundredth Anniversary of Webster's Birth, too numerous to mention,—-especially the address of Senator Bayard at Dartmouth College. The complete and exhaustive Life of Webster is yet to be written, although the ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume XII • John Lord

... over," she whispered blithely to the wife, who sat in a dull abstraction, oblivious of the hospital flurry. "And it's going to be all right, I just know. Dr. Sommers is so clever, he'd save a dead man. You had better go now. No use to see him to-night, for he won't come out of the opiate until near morning. You can come tomorrow morning, and p'r'aps Dr. Sommers will get you a pass in. Visitors only Thursdays and ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... What a way to reason! A man is in desperate need of his money, and she won't pay it because, you see, she is not disposed to attend to money matters!... That's real silly feminine logic. That's why I never did like, and don't like now, to have to talk to women. I'd rather sit on a barrel of gunpowder than talk to a woman. Brr!... I feel quite chilly—and it's all on account of that little bit of fluff! I can't even see one of these poetic creatures from a distance without breaking out into ...
— Plays by Chekhov, Second Series • Anton Chekhov

... lives of American multi-millionaires you find a curious repetition of history. Men like John D. Rockefeller, Henry H. Rogers, Thomas F. Ryan, and Russell Sage began as grocery clerks in small towns. Something in the atmosphere created by spice and sugar must have developed the money-making germ. With the plutocrats of Belgium it was different. Practically all of them, ...
— An African Adventure • Isaac F. Marcosson

... to be ashamed of in that, old chap. I'm in love with her myself, if you come to that," said the Master, with a smile. "If you'd said you meant nothing and were not in love with her, I—well, I should be taking a rather different tone, perhaps. But you ...
— Jan - A Dog and a Romance • A. J. Dawson

... as juror to-day, the 28th of April, and that, therefore, you cannot accompany us and Kolosoff to the art exhibition, as you promised yesterday in your customary forgetfulness; a moins que vous ne soyez dispose a payer a la cour d'assises les 300 rubles d'amende que vous vous refusez pour votre cheval, for your failure to appear in time. I remembered it yesterday, when you had left. So keep it ...
— The Awakening - The Resurrection • Leo Nikoleyevich Tolstoy

... every one I know has morals, though I wouldn't like to ask. I know I have. But I'd rather teach them than practice them any day. "Give them to others"—that's my motto. Then you never have any use for them when you're left without. Now, speaking of the caprices of memory in general, and of mine ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... called him, but I guess he must have been a Kamtchadale or a Koriak. Anyway, he brought this strip of willow, and he had Tom Lewson's watch. Dunton traded him something for it. They couldn't make much of what he said except that he'd got the message from three white men somewhere along the beach. They couldn't ...
— Masters of the Wheat-Lands • Harold Bindloss

... through an atmosphere of intrigue, crime, and bloodshed. In his gondola on the canals and lagunes, and in the ships which he rises to command, he is successful in extricating his friends and himself from imminent dangers, and contributes largely to the victories of the Venetians at Porto d'Anzo and Chioggia. He is honoured by the state and finally wins the hand of the daughter of one of ...
— Captain Bayley's Heir: - A Tale of the Gold Fields of California • G. A. Henty

... that the scoundrel had been exposed that they set up siccan a roar of laughter, and thumped away at siccan a rate with their feet that down fell the place they called the gallery, all the folk in't being hurl'd topsy-turvy among the sawdust on the ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol VI. • Various

... book—this holy book, on every line Mark'd with the seal of high divinity, On every leaf bedew'd with drops of love Divine, and with the eternal heraldry And signature of God Almighty stampt From first to last—this ray of sacred light, This lamp, from off the everlasting throne, Mercy took down, and, in the night of time Stood, ...
— Trail Tales • James David Gillilan

... teacher at Detroit, Michigan, is another example of the professional Negro equipped for service in the Northwest before the Rebellion.[6] From other communities of that section came such useful men as Rev. J.W. Malone, an influential minister of Iowa; Rev. D.R. Roberts, a very successful pastor of Chicago; Bishop C.T. Shaffer of the African Methodist Episcopal Church; Rev. John G. Mitchell, for many years the Dean of the Theological Department of Wilberforce ...
— The Education Of The Negro Prior To 1861 • Carter Godwin Woodson

... I wish he'd shut up. There he is barking away, and it is probably only the moon, or some harmless tramp, or a footstep a mile away down the road, for the brute's power of hearing is phenomenal. Yet if he goes on like that I must pay some attention, or else there'll be an awful ...
— The Adventure of Living • John St. Loe Strachey

... the soul's sincere desire, Utter'd or unexpress'd; The motion of a hidden fire That trembles in ...
— Home Pastimes; or Tableaux Vivants • James H. Head

... his own people that he could hope for little help from them, he cringed with the craven fear so usually found in cruel men, and made the most abject submission. In the interval between the proclamation of the interdict and the fulmination of the sentence of excommunication (A.D. 1210), John visited Ireland. It may be supposed his arrival could not excite much pleasure in the hearts of his Irish subjects, though, no doubt, he thought it a mark of disloyalty that he should not be welcomed with acclamations. A quarter of a century had elapsed since he first set his ...
— An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800 • Mary Frances Cusack

... folding his arms on the table again, "I won't have a rag of you, I won't have a bone of you, left on earth. I'll put your body in the kiln,—I'd carry two such to it, on my Shoulders,—and, let people suppose what they may of you, they ...
— Great Expectations • Charles Dickens

... things, because you never do so well as when you are humbled and frightened, and, if you could be alarmed into the semblance of modesty, you would charm everybody; but remember my joke against you about the moon: 'D—n the solar system! bad light—planets too distant—pestered with comets—feeble contrivance; could make a better with ...
— The Great Speeches and Orations of Daniel Webster • Daniel Webster

... do another year at Osborne—— I say, Betty, one of them is coming here! How jolly exciting! He's coming up the avenue now. He's got red hair. . . . I believe—yes, it's—what was the name of that Lieutenant at Jack's wedding, d'you remember? The funny man. He made ...
— A Tall Ship - On Other Naval Occasions • Sir Lewis Anselm da Costa Ritchie

... Halting at Sutah and Yancoomassie Assin, the head-quarters arrived at Prahsu on the 27th, and on the morning of the 28th, the 200 men required crossed the Prah and marched to Essiaman. During this march the men had been obliged to carry their tentes d'abri, blankets and waterproof sheets, and seventy rounds of ball ammunition, in addition to their field kits and arms and accoutrements. On arriving at Essiaman, E Company, which, under Captain J.A. Smith, had crossed the Prah a day or two before, was found occupying ...
— The History of the First West India Regiment • A. B. Ellis

... Burcau de l'imprimerie, rue du Theatre-Francais, No. 4," is said to be by "Thomas Paine, Citoyen et cultivateur de l'Amerique septentrionale, secretaire du Congres du departement des affaires etrangeres pendant la guerre d'Amerique, et auteur des ouvrages intitules: LA SENS COMMUN et LES DROITS ...
— The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete - With Index to Volumes I - IV • Thomas Paine

... as I beheld the scene, but I said nothing. I considered myself too fortunate to escape with life. When it was all over, the boatswain roared out, "That job's done! Now, Mr Barber, swab up all this here blood, and be d——d to you! and recollect that you are one of us." I obeyed in fear and silence, and then returned to my former station near ...
— The Pacha of Many Tales • Captain Frederick Marryat

... rooster don't never crow for 'vited comp'ny. Now if I had er wrang his neck he'd 'a' been in the pot, comp'ny or no, an' it 'ud cure him of any ...
— The Comings of Cousin Ann • Emma Speed Sampson

... skirts that come just below the knees," he whispered. "Some of them won't do it and he's wondering how to punish them. To-morrow there's going to be two public whippings. One of the victims is a man who said that if he was a woman he'd die before he put on knee skirts. After he's whipped he is going to be made to wear 'em. By Urim and ...
— The Courage of Captain Plum • James Oliver Curwood

... date of the Gospel, as we know it, is somewhat uncertain, but the best critical estimates are included between 70 and 90, A.D. Perhaps, with Harnack, we may adopt ...
— Weymouth New Testament in Modern Speech, Preface and Introductions - Third Edition 1913 • R F Weymouth

... American dominions. M. de Belluga, a Spanish gentleman and officer, of a liberal and philosophical turn of mind, and who was a member of the Royal Society of London, endeavoured to prevail upon the Count of Florida Blanca, and M. d'Almodaver, to grant an order of protection to the Resolution and Discovery; and he flattered himself, that the ministers of the King of Spain would be prevailed upon to prefer the cause of science to the partial views of interest: but the Spanish ...
— Narrative of the Voyages Round The World, • A. Kippis

... Francois. "After leaving here, I kept down the valley, and was just crossing an open piece of high ground, when I espied the white hawk, or falcon as you call it, hovering in the air as I'd often seen hawks do. Well, I stopped and hid behind a rock, thinking I might have a chance to put a few drops into him. All at once he appeared to stand still in the air, and, then closing his wings, shot down like an arrow. Just then I heard a loud 'whur-r-r,' and up started a whole covey ...
— Popular Adventure Tales • Mayne Reid

... in blue from head to foot, and with a bright blue ribbon encircling his slender throat, stood somewhat back of the seats. Senator Voorhees' form towered in the shadow of the cloak-room. Senator Conkling, who had not yet left the Senate, "Fier d'etre moi," sat in the middle aisle, dressed in a mixed brown business suit, with a bit of red handkerchief showing ...
— Perley's Reminiscences, Vol. 1-2 - of Sixty Years in the National Metropolis • Benjamin Perley Poore

... feet (English feet) above the level of the sea, and about five thousand above the valley we left in the morning. On one side, our view comprised the Jungfrau, with all her glaciers; then the Dent d'Argent, shining like truth; then the Little Giant (the Kleine Eigher); and the Great Giant (the Grosse Eigher), and last, not least, the Wetterhorn. The height of Jungfrau is 13,000 feet above the sea, 11,000 above the valley; she is the highest of this range. Heard the avalanches ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. III - With His Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... here and I'll read the affidavit to you. And say, if you don't want your dogs massacreed, you'd ...
— Viola Gwyn • George Barr McCutcheon

... shall be," declared Jane. "Mr. Dickinson, you come with me and show me where to get the paint. I'm off, girls. I think we'd better stay at the hotel to-night. Our palatial yacht won't be ready ...
— The Meadow-Brook Girls Afloat • Janet Aldridge

... destroyed the whole interior of the palace had done this wall no more harm than the bite of a fly to an elephant. "Troveremo che el danno che ha patito queste muraglie sara conforme alla beccatura d' una mosca fatta ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume II (of 3) • John Ruskin

... can get out With the hair of his head on—he'd better, no doubt. If you'll not take it hard, here's a bit of advice— It is dangerous for big pigs to dance on the ice; They sometimes slip up and they sometimes fall in, And the ice you are on is exceedingly thin. You're au fait, I'll admit, at a sharp game of chance, ...
— The Feast of the Virgins and Other Poems • H. L. Gordon

... club calmly, and went up to his room, where Francis was waiting impatiently for him with an important paper just arrived. It was a notification to the Sieur Louis-Marie-Agenor de Monpavon to appear the next day in the office of the Juge d'Instruction. Was it addressed to the censor of the Territorial Bank or to the former receiver-general? In any case, the bold formula of a judicial assignation in the first instance, instead of a private invitation, ...
— The Nabob • Alphonse Daudet

... route to the poles. And finally, the same element that signalized its entrance at the earth's more central regions AS HEAT, now signalizes its departure along earth's polar extremities AS COLD.[D] ...
— New and Original Theories of the Great Physical Forces • Henry Raymond Rogers

... the flat. It was a comfort to reflect that Ascham was so punctual—the suspense was beginning to make his host nervous. And the sound of the door-bell would be the beginning of the end—after that there'd be no going back, by ...
— Tales Of Men And Ghosts • Edith Wharton

... Lightning—(3) 'Conductor'—(3) OMNIBUS." Another pupil imagined it would be impossible to correlate the following letters of the alphabet to words beginning with the same letters, as "A" to "Anchor," "B" to "Bull," "C" to "Cab," "D" to "Doge,"—as well as "Cooley" to "The." There are, however, no words which my Pupils cannot soon learn to correlate together with the ...
— Assimilative Memory - or, How to Attend and Never Forget • Marcus Dwight Larrowe (AKA Prof. A. Loisette)



Words linked to "D" :   D'Oyly Carte, Cote d'Azur, Cote d'Ivoire, louis d'or, Duc d'Elchingen, Langue d'oc, Langue d'oc French, ergocalciferol, Jeanne d'Arc, Richard D'Oyly Carte, immunoglobulin D, alphabetic character, chef-d'oeuvre, five hundred, Systeme International d'Unites, cholecalciferol, Valle D'Aosta, D region, poitrine d'agneau, vitamin D, letter of the alphabet, Coeur d'Alene Lake, viola d'amore, D-day, Republic of Cote d'Ivoire, 500, large integer, Coeur d'Alene, viosterol, Donato d'Agnolo Bramante, charge d'affaires, Langue d'oil French, Langue d'oil, Francoise d'Aubigne, D and C, maitre d', ergosterol, Marie Anne Charlotte Corday d'Armont, Latin alphabet, calciferol, Nor-Q-D, hors d'oeuvre, raison d'etre, D-layer, objet d'art



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