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Caracole   Listen
verb
Caracole  v. i.  (past & past part. caracoled)  (Man.) To move in a caracole, or in caracoles; to wheel. "Prince John caracoled within the lists."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Caracole" Quotes from Famous Books



... land on the road to Montcourtois. The red-cheeked shy young man's female cousin exchanged a red-cheeked, shame-faced, rustic grin with him as he rode by, and the young man, in imitation of Monsieur Dorn, made his horse caracole, but being less versed in horsemanship than the old gendarme, had to hold on ignominiously by the mane in payment ...
— Schwartz: A History - From "Schwartz" by David Christie Murray • David Christie Murray

... rich brilliant dresses, caracole up to the carriages on fiery steeds, to display their horsemanship, and exchange compliments with their friends, and make pretty speeches, which are received by the bright-eyed damsels with little ogles, and flirts of their variegated ...
— Southern Literature From 1579-1895 • Louise Manly

... called a blush to her cheek and a smile on her lip, their attention called off now and then by some wild jest or courteous word from the young Lord Douglas, whose post seemed in every part of the royal train; now galloping to the front, to caracole by the side of the queen, to accustom her, he said, to the sight of good horsemanship, then lingering beside the Countess of Buchan, to give some unexpected rejoinder to the graver maxims of Lennox. The Princess Margory, her cousins, the Lady Isoline Campbell and Alice and Christina Seaton, escorted ...
— The Days of Bruce Vol 1 - A Story from Scottish History • Grace Aguilar

... gallery made his horse Caracole; then bowed his homage, bluntly saying, 'Fair damsels, each to him who worships each Sole Queen of Beauty and of love, behold This day my Queen of Beauty is not here.' And most of these were mute, some angered, one Murmuring, 'All courtesy is dead,' and one, 'The ...
— Idylls of the King • Alfred, Lord Tennyson



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