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Xix   Listen
Xix

noun
1.
The cardinal number that is the sum of eighteen and one.  Synonyms: 19, nineteen.






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"Xix" Quotes from Famous Books



... in St. John's Gospel stands thus (John xix., 32-37)— "Then came the soldiers and brake the legs of the first and of the other which was crucified with Him. But when they came to Jesus and saw that He was dead already they brake not His legs: but ...
— The Fair Haven • Samuel Butler

... ministry two years, and until his success, at length, excited the apprehensions of those who were interested in the support of the national worship. Their clamour produced a tumult, in which he had nearly lost his life. (Acts xix. 1, 9, 10.) Undismayed, however, by the dangers to which he saw himself exposed, he was driven from Ephesus only to renew his labours in Greece. After passing over Macedonia, he thence proceeded to his former station at Corinth. (Acts ...
— Evidences of Christianity • William Paley

... Brienne the Younger," tom. ii. chap. xix., p. 178. "Le Marquis de Laigues qui certainement etoit mari de ...
— Political Women, Vol. 2 (of 2) • Sutherland Menzies

... only on this modest woman." Virgil (Reason called by Conscience) comes to the rescue of the entranced poet and reveals the Siren in all her foul ugliness. At that Dante awakes from his dream more than ever convinced of the evil of sin and its hideousness. (Purg., XIX, 9.) ...
— Dante: "The Central Man of All the World" • John T. Slattery

... xix. "For a certain man named Demetrius, a silversmith, which made silver shrines for Diana, brought no small gain unto ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... Geo. Herbert, Temple: "like summer friends, flies of estates and sunshine;" Quarles, Sion's Elegies, xix.: "Ah, summer friendship with the summer ends;" Massinger, Maid of Honour: "O summer friendship." See also Shakespeare, T. of ...
— Select Poems of Thomas Gray • Thomas Gray

... at the end of Chapter XIX, of the clerk in Old Shoreham church, whose loyalty was too much for his ritualism, may be capped by that of a South Down clerk in the east of the county, whose seat in church commanded a view of the neighbourhood. During an afternoon service one Sunday a violent gale was raging which ...
— Highways & Byways in Sussex • E.V. Lucas

... shall be no strongholds in future on the banks of this river, nor any men-of-war in the waters of the Principalities of Roumania, Servia, and Bulgaria, except the usual stationnaires and the small vessels intended for river police and custom-house purposes.' And Article XIX. gave to Russia that part of Turkey bordering on the Danube, known as the Dobrudscha, which Russia 'reserves the right of exchanging for the part of Bessarabia detached from her by the treaty of 1856,' ...
— Roumania Past and Present • James Samuelson

... already been impugned, an inner discipline had taken the place of outward worship, the saint had learned to forsake the world. This turn of religious thought produced all the phenomena of Buddhism before the period of Gautama. The sannyasin (vide sup., chapter xix.) of Brahmanism is also called bhikku, mendicant; the rules of the older ascetics are closely similar to those of the Buddhist monk; their very outfit, their cloak and alms-bowl, ...
— History of Religion - A Sketch of Primitive Religious Beliefs and Practices, and of the Origin and Character of the Great Systems • Allan Menzies

... Correspondent, "W.C." of Milton (who is anxious for our accuracy on all points), wishes us to correct an error or two in the account of Eclipse, at p. 362, vol. xix. of The Mirror. It is there stated that Mr. Wildman sold the moiety of Eclipse to Colonel O'Kelly, for 650 guineas; and that O'Kelly subsequently bought the other moiety for 1,100 guineas. But, our Correspondent, who was for many years intimate with both the above ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 578 - Vol. XX, No. 578. Saturday, December 1, 1832 • Various

... XIX. God, and all the attributes of God, are eternal. >>>>>Proof—God (by Def. vi.) is substance, which (by Prop. xi.) necessarily exists, that is (by Prop. vii.) existence appertains to its nature, or (what is the same thing) follows from its definition; therefore, ...
— Ethica Ordine Geometrico Demonstrata - Part I: Concerning God • Benedict de Spinoza

... poetry"; and we are half-surprised not to find him told, as he was by Blackwood, to "go back to the shop, Mr. John; back to the plasters, pills, and ointment-boxes". [Footnote: Quarterly Review, xix. 204. See Blackwood, vol. iii. 524; where the Reviewer sneers at "the calm, settled, imperturbable, ...
— English literary criticism • Various

... XIX. Any lord of a manor may alienate, sell, or dispose, to any other person and his heirs for ever, his manor, all entirely together, with all the privileges and leet-men thereunto belonging, so far forth as any colony lands; but no grant of any part thereof, either in fee, or for any longer term than ...
— An Historical Account Of The Rise And Progress Of The Colonies Of South Carolina And Georgia, Volume 1 • Alexander Hewatt

... XIX. Chief of the Great Company of the gods,* One only, who hath no second,* President of the Apts,* Ani, President of his Company of the gods,* living by Truth every day,* Khuti, Horus of the East.* He hath created the mountains, the gold* [and] the real lapis-lazuli by his will,* ...
— The Literature of the Ancient Egyptians • E. A. Wallis Budge

... appendages to a Dramatic Performance are not assigned to a friend, or an unknown hand, or a person of fashion, they are always supposed to be written by the author of the Play.' Murphy's Johnson, p. 154. He overlooks altogether the statement in the Gent. Mag. (xix. 85) that the Epilogue is 'by another hand.' Mr. Croker points out that the words 'as Johnson informed me' first appear in the second edition. The wonder is that Johnson accepted this Epilogue, which ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell

... A List of the Forces employed in the Expedition against Canada. See Smith, History of Canada, I. Appendix xix. Vaudreuil writes to Charles Langlade, on the ninth, that the three armies amount to twenty thousand, and raises the number to thirty-two thousand in a letter to the Minister on the next day. Berniers says twenty thousand; ...
— Montcalm and Wolfe • Francis Parkman

... were known malignants, and in heart disaffected to the work, and people of GOD, putting it in their power to destroy and pull down the LORD'S work at their pleasure; a practice manifestly inconsistent with their covenant engagements, and the word of GOD, Deut. xxiii, 9, 2 Chron. xix, 2. Those that were then called protestors (from their opposing and protesting against these resolutions), continued steadfastly to witness against the same, as the first remarkable step, to make way for that bloody catastrophe, that afterward befell the church. ...
— Act, Declaration, & Testimony for the Whole of our Covenanted Reformation, as Attained to, and Established in Britain and Ireland; Particularly Betwixt the Years 1638 and 1649, Inclusive • The Reformed Presbytery

... Floranes, "Vida literaria de Pedro Lopez de Ayala," in the Documentos ineditos para la historia de Espana, vols. xix. and xx.; F. W. Schirrmacher, "Ueber die Glaubwurdigkeit der Chronik Ayalas," in Geschichte von Spanien (Berlin, 1902), ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 1 - "Austria, Lower" to "Bacon" • Various

... which was identical with the life-principle was holy. The "Lord" of the Israelites was in the fire which descended on Mt. Sinai, Exodus xix., 18. "The bush burned with fire and the bush was not consumed," Exodus iii., 2. Whether the signification of "bush" is the same as "grove," I know not, but Josephus assures us that the bush was holy before the flame appeared in it. Because of its sacred character, it ...
— The God-Idea of the Ancients - or Sex in Religion • Eliza Burt Gamble

... more than me is not worthy of me." "And every one that hath forsaken houses, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my name's sake, shall receive an hundred fold, and shall inherit everlasting life." (Matt. x. 37, and xix. 29.) And again, yet more strongly: "If any man come to me and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple." (Luke xiv. 26.) That is exactly the same idea. When Jesus calls, husband and wife, father and ...
— Avataras • Annie Besant

... by the Scripture narrative—"And while he lingered, the men laid hold upon his hand, and upon the hand of his wife,... and they brought him forth, and set him without the city" (Genesis xix. 16). ...
— Milton • Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh

... Amphitryon chez qui l'on dine, no one knows better than Ouida the uses of a recherche dinner.—E. Yates, Celebrities, xix. ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1 - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook • The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D.

... the weaving, do not pull the added straws (Plate XIX, step 6, straw x-x) or holes will be made at the elbow. Instead, pull the longer straws that run through the center, thus ...
— Philippine Mats - Philippine Craftsman Reprint Series No. 1 • Hugo H. Miller

... passengers may enter or leave trains without using steps, as all cars which will enter the Pennsylvania Station, New York City, are to be provided with vestibules having trap-doors in the floor to give access to either high or low platforms. Details of the platforms are shown on Plates XVIII and XIX. ...
— Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol. LXVIII, Sept. 1910 • E. B. Temple

... of their inorganic constituents. An important paper on the state in which Nicotine exists in tobacco, and on the relative proportion of it furnished by different varieties of the plant, has been furnished by Schloessing ("Ann. Ch. et Ph." 3ieme Ser. XIX. 230). ...
— The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom • P. L. Simmonds

... fine linen, white and clean. And out of His mouth goeth a sharp sword, that He should smite the nations; and He shall rule them with a rod of iron; and He treadeth the winepress of the fierceness and of the wrath of almighty God" (Rev. xix. 11). ...
— True Words for Brave Men • Charles Kingsley

... LETTER XIX. From the same.—A characteristic dialogue with the pert Betty Barnes. Women have great advantage over men in all the powers that relate to the imagination. Makes a request to her uncle Harlowe, which is granted, on condition that she will admit of ...
— Clarissa, Volume 2 (of 9) • Samuel Richardson

... sufficient commentary upon the books and upon the man. The narrative has warmth and reserve, and is at once tender and clear-sighted. J'entrevois nettement, she says with truth, combien seront precieux pour les futurs historiens de la litterature du xix^e siecle, les memoires traces au contact immediat de l'artiste, exposes de ses faits et gestes particuliers, de ses origines, de la germination de ses croyances et de son talent; ses critiques a venir ...
— Figures of Several Centuries • Arthur Symons

... eternal life they must give to the poor all they possess, as was done in the primitive church, and as the Lord commanded the rich man to sell all that he had and give to the poor, and take up the cross and follow Him (Matt. xix. 21). (A.E., ...
— Spiritual Life and the Word of God • Emanuel Swedenborg

... next (XIX.) considers the Ideas of the pleasurable sensations, and of the causes of them. The Idea of a pain is not the same as the pain; it is a complex state, containing, no doubt, an element of pain; and the name for it is Aversion. So the name for an idea ...
— Moral Science; A Compendium of Ethics • Alexander Bain

... to see Jesus; and because he was little of stature he climbed up a tree. When Jesus came to the place He looked up and saw him, and said, "Zaccheus, make haste, and come down" (Luke xix. 5). His conversion must have taken place somewhere between the branch and the ground. We are told that he received Jesus joyfully, and said, "Behold, Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have taken anything from any ...
— The Way to God and How to Find It • Dwight Moody

... out the mercy of the covenant, because it contains such rare and glorious benefits, and therefore it is called a covenant of life and peace. "An everlasting covenant even the sure mercies of David." It is compared to the waters of Noah, Isa. liv. 6. Famous are those two texts; Exod. xix. 5, 6; Jer. xxxii. 40, 41—texts that hold forth strong consolation. By virtue of the covenant, heaven is not only made possible, but certain to all believers, and certain by way of oath. It is by virtue of the covenant ...
— The Covenants And The Covenanters - Covenants, Sermons, and Documents of the Covenanted Reformation • Various

... XIX. Each "pane" had three gates. Each gate adorned with a pearl. Such light gleamed in all the streets, that there was no need of the sun or moon. God was the light of those in the city. The high throne ...
— Early English Alliterative Poems - in the West-Midland Dialect of the Fourteenth Century • Various

... mentioned it is so done as to defy verification. Inartistic references are not, in this instance, a token of inadequate study. But a book designed only for readers who know at a glance where to lay their finger on S. Francis. Collat. Monasticae, Collat. 20, or Post constt. IV. XIX. Cod. I. v. will be slow ...
— The History of Freedom • John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton

... two stories of David's love for Bathsheba and of the revolt of Absalom, as found in the Second Book of Samuel (Chapters xi-xix). The succession of events is carefully observed, each least pleasant detail jealously retained, and in some places even the language closely imitated. Except in the old Bible plays, one does not often meet with such rigorous ...
— The Growth of English Drama • Arnold Wynne

... fully treated in Channing's History of the United States, I, chaps, VIII-XIV; and in Tyler's England in America, chaps. V-VII, IX-XIX. See also Fiske's Old Virginia and Her Neighbours, I, chaps. VII-XI, XIV; and Eggleston's Beginners of a Nation and The Transit of Civilization from England to America. The constitutional aspects of the colonial settlements are exhaustively treated in Osgood's ...
— Beginnings of the American People • Carl Lotus Becker

... XIX. Soul and Spirit being one, God and Soul are one, and this one never included in a limited mind or a 335:18 limited body. Spirit is eternal, divine. Noth- ing but Spirit, Soul, can evolve Life, for Spirit is more than all else. Because ...
— Science and Health With Key to the Scriptures • Mary Baker Eddy

... XIX The captains called forthwith from every tent, Unto the rendezvous he them invites; Letter on letter, post on post he sent, Entreatance fair with counsel he unites, All, what a noble courage could augment, The ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso

... XIX. But away, away goes Baldwin, no words can stop him now, Behind him lies the greenwood, he hath gained the mountain's brow, He reineth first his charger, within the churchyard green, Where, striding slow the elms below, the haughty ...
— Mediaeval Tales • Various

... XIX. These ten manuscripts, which were never before printed, would, if printed in small books, and bought single, cost almost the money that these twenty in folio comes for, ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... recent appearance of the Baudelaire letters (1841-66) all that we knew of Meryon's personality and art was to be found in the monograph by Philippe Burty and Beraldi's Les Graveurs du XIX Siecle. Hamerton had written of the French etcher in 1875 (Etching and Etchers), and various anecdotes about his eccentric behaviour were public property. Frederick Wedmore, in his Etching in England, did not hesitate to group Meryon's name with Rembrandt's and Jacquemart's ...
— Promenades of an Impressionist • James Huneker

... here quoted by our Lord is to be found in the words of God to Moses, (Leviticus xix. 18:) "Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the Lord" Our Lord never thought of being original. The older the saying the better, if it utters ...
— Unspoken Sermons - Series I., II., and II. • George MacDonald

... being the xix daye of this monthe of August —— Downing wyfe to —— Downinge gravemaker of this paryshe she was sett on a new cukking stolle made of a grett hythe and so browght a bowte the markett place to Temes brydge and ther had iij Duckinges over hed and eres becowse she was a common ...
— Highways and Byways in Surrey • Eric Parker

... XIX. That the castle aforesaid being surrendered upon terms of safety, and on express condition of not attempting to search their persons, the woman of rank aforesaid, her female relations and female dependants, to the number of three hundred, besides children, evacuated the said castle; ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VIII. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... past the ship, voices talking naturally and easily, heard through the roof above his head, an occasional footstep, and once or twice a bell as the steersman communicated some message to one of his subordinates. Here he sat—John Masterman, Domestic Prelate to His Holiness Gregory XIX, Secretary to His Eminence Gabriel Cardinal Bellairs, and priest of the Holy Roman Church, trying to assimilate the fact that he was on an air-ship, bound to the court of the Catholic French King, and that practically the whole civilized world believed and acted on the belief ...
— Dawn of All • Robert Hugh Benson

... with the young man from which this parable remotely springs, an analogous expression is employed to indicate a chosen or choice disciple; "Jesus said unto him, If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast," &c. (xix. 21.) The term "perfect" in that text seems to be entirely parallel with "chosen." The meaning of both is determined by the main drift of the parable; and the meaning thus given accords with the ...
— The Parables of Our Lord • William Arnot

... Diurnal, No. 324. See the three declarations: that of the parliament on the marching of the army; of the army itself, addressed "to all that are saints and partakers of the faith of God's elect in Scotland;" and, the third, from Cromwell, dated at Berwick, in the Parliamentary History, xix. 276, ...
— The History of England from the First Invasion by the Romans - to the Accession of King George the Fifth - Volume 8 • John Lingard and Hilaire Belloc

... This temple ranked among the Seven Wonders of the world. It was held so sacred that it was used as a "safe-deposit" for treasures, which were secure here against robbery or war. See the interesting reference to it in Acts xix. 24-41. ...
— The Two Great Retreats of History • George Grote

... Archaeological Tour in Mexico, Boston, 1885, pp. 160-164. Torquemada's words, cited by Bandelier, are "Quando entraron los Espanoles, dicen que tenia mas de quarenta mil vecinos esta ciudad." Monarquia Indiana, lib. iii. cap. xix. p. 281. A prolific source of error is the ambiguity in the word vecinos, which may mean either "inhabitants" or "householders." Where Torquemada meant 40,000 inhabitants, uncritical writers fond of the marvellous have understood him to mean 40,000 houses, and multiplying ...
— The Discovery of America Vol. 1 (of 2) - with some account of Ancient America and the Spanish Conquest • John Fiske

... wanted to ask him was where Osmund the jarl had gone. He had ridden to Taunton from Aller, that he might be present at Thora's christening, and that their chrism loosing {xix} might be held at the same time; and I had looked to find both here, but they were gone. Nor had they left any word for me, and I was troubled about that. So I was about to tell the king what was in my mind concerning Thora first of all, and my heart began to beat strangely. But he waited ...
— King Alfred's Viking - A Story of the First English Fleet • Charles W. Whistler

... Gray's poem associated it for many years almost exclusively with elegiac poetry. Shenstone's collected poems were not published till 1764, though some of them had been printed in Dodsley's "Miscellanies." Only a few of his elegies are dated in the collected editions (Elegy VIII, 1745; XIX, 1743; XXI, 1746), but Graves says that they were all written before Gray's. The following lines will recall to every reader ...
— A History of English Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century • Henry A. Beers

... he be ready to fulfil them: as is evidenced by the precept of Our Lord (Matt. 5:39): "If one strike thee on one [Vulg.: 'thy right'] cheek, turn to him also the other"; and by others of the same kind, according to Augustine's exposition (De Serm. Dom. in Monte xix). Therefore neither is man bound to believe anything explicitly, and it is enough if he be ready to believe whatever God proposes ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... "Prayers were not read in the parish churches of Scotland" at that time. As Episcopacy was restored when Charles II. returned "upon the unanimous petition of the Scottish Parliament" (Scott's Collected Works, vol. xix. p. 78) it is not unnatural for the general reader to suppose that prayers would be read by the curates. Dr. McCrie maintains that "at the Restoration neither the one nor the other" (neither the Scotch nor English Prayer Books) "was ...
— Old Mortality, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... worthy of them? And how many are there, who might have done exceeding well in the world, had not their characters and spirits been totally depressed and Nicodemus'd into nothing?"—"Tristram Shandy," vol. i. chap. xix. ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. XXII (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... a Message xiii. The Drift of the Letaba xiv. I Carry the Collar of Prester John xv. Morning in the Berg xvi. Inanda's Kraal xvii. A Deal and Its Consequences xviii. How a Man May Sometimes Put His Trust in a Horse xix. Arcoll's Shepherding xx. My Last Sight of the Reverend John Laputa xxi. I Climb the Crags a Second Time xxii. A Great Peril and a Great Salvation xxiii. My Uncle's ...
— Prester John • John Buchan

... vigour, is the likeliest means, with God's blessing, to procure a safe and honourable peace for us and all our allies, whose support and interest I have truly at heart" ("Journals of House of Lords," xix, 166).] ...
— The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, D. D., Volume IX; • Jonathan Swift

... law was, "The stranger that sojourneth with you shall be unto you as the home-born among you" (Levit. xix. 34). ...
— Folkways - A Study of the Sociological Importance of Usages, Manners, Customs, Mores, and Morals • William Graham Sumner

... us with the earliest extant allusion to Death as a personage, designate him as an angel or messenger of God,—as, for instance, in the record of the destruction of the Assyrian host in the Second Book of Kings (xix. 35). The ancient Egyptians, too, in whose strange system of symbolism may be found the germ, at least, of most of the types used in the religion and the arts of more modern nations, had no representation of Death as an individual agent. They expressed the extinction ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 3, Issue 17, March, 1859 • Various

... Romat de. T. et de yseut qui fut fait lan mille. iijc. iiijxx. et xix. la veille ...
— A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume Two • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... at 'Femininism' is deftly turned aside by Miss Volz, by the simple device of substituting for it the word Pessimism. And Dr Tille, the translator of his best-known work, 'Thus spake Zarathustra' (1896, p. xix), has been bemused in an even more wonderful manner. He enumerates "the best known representatives" of Anarchic tendencies in political thought as "Humboldt, Dunoyer, Stirner, Bakounine, and Auberon ...
— Recent Tendencies in Ethics • William Ritchie Sorley

... times in the Koran from the Talmud (Sanhedrim 29). He caused Adam and Eve to lose Paradise (ii. 34); he still betrays mankind (xxv. 31), and at the end of time he, with the other devils, will be "gathered together on their knees round Hell" (xix. 69). He has evidently had the worst of the game, and we wonder, with Origen, Tillotson, Burns and many others, that he does not ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... XIX. At this crisis there arrived at Syracuse Gongylus, a Corinthian, in one trireme. All crowded round him, to hear what news he brought. He informed them that Gylippus would soon come to their aid by land, and that other triremes ...
— Plutarch's Lives Volume III. • Plutarch

... early in the morning to the place where he stood before the Lord and he looked toward Sodom and Gomorrah, and toward all the land of the plain, and beheld, and lo, the smoke of the country went up as the smoke of a furnace.—Genesis xix, 15-28. ...
— The Dore Gallery of Bible Illustrations, Complete • Anonymous

... mostly confined to the north central parts, in the highlands of the Warsingali and Dulbahanta tribes. The rest of my information is derived from conversations with the natives, or what I have read in some very interesting pages in vol. xix. of the 'Transactions of the Royal Geographical Society,' ...
— What Led To The Discovery of the Source Of The Nile • John Hanning Speke

... Iliad xix., the combat of the Gods, the description of Neptune, Iliad xi., and the Prayer of Ajax, ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... persons with the chaste lives, the abstinence from liquor, and the continual fasts of the "White Doves." For the purpose of convincing novices of the Scriptural foundation of their rites and belief they are referred to Matthew xix., 12: "and there be eunuchs which have made themselves for the kingdom of Heaven's sake," etc.; and Mark ix., 43-47; Luke xxiii., 29: "blessed are the barren," etc., and others of this nature. As to the operation itself, pain is represented as voluntary martyrdom, and persecution as the struggle ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... XIX. The mistress of the house should always be certain that the coffee be excellent; the master that his liquors be of ...
— The Physiology of Taste • Brillat Savarin

... to be diminished or thwarted. Let Hezekiah spread every letter of Rab-shakeh before the Lord and pray (2 Kings xix, 14). The answer will be, "I have heard" (v. 20). Let the answer to every slander that Gashmu repeateth among the heathen be, "O Lord, strengthen my hands" (Neh. vi, 9); "My God, think thou upon Tobiah ...
— Among the Forces • Henry White Warren

... They are carefully summarised in a series of papers in the Gentleman's Magazine for 1750, vols. xix and xx. It is clear from the correspondence on the subject how much interest they aroused.—See also Nichols' Lit. An., ...
— The English Church in the Eighteenth Century • Charles J. Abbey and John H. Overton

... be observed that in this Veda first occurs the implication of the story of the flood (xix. 39. 8), and the saving of Father Manu, who, however, is known by this title in the Rik. The supposition that the story of the flood is derived from Babylon, seems, therefore, to be an unnecessary (although a permissible) hypothesis, as the tale is old enough ...
— The Religions of India - Handbooks On The History Of Religions, Volume 1, Edited By Morris Jastrow • Edward Washburn Hopkins

... XIX. Moved by Thomas Wilkinson, Esq.; seconded by Thomas Maltby, Esq.—That copies of the resolutions entered into this day be transmitted to the Admiralty, to the Trinity House, and to Lloyd's; and that copies of the resolutions be published in several ...
— An Appeal to the British Nation on the Humanity and Policy of Forming a National Institution for the Preservation of Lives and Property from Shipwreck (1825) • William Hillary

... XIX The Little House on Duke of Gloucester Street; and the Beginning of Various Feelings, Sensibilities, and Attitudes between ...
— Queed • Henry Sydnor Harrison

... still in the possession of Mr. Daft, who would doubtless be glad to show it to any one wishing to see it.—N.B.—the term “celt” is not connected with the name Celtic or Keltic, but is frem a Latin word celtis, or celtes; meaning a chisel, and used in the Vulgate, Job xix., 24, ...
— Records of Woodhall Spa and Neighbourhood - Historical, Anecdotal, Physiographical, and Archaeological, with Other Matter • J. Conway Walter

... to Aberdeen one cannot tell, though the resemblance is close enough to suggest a direct "lifting" from some English version of Grimm's Goblins. At the same time it must be remembered that Jack the Giant Killer (see Notes on No. xix.) contains some of the incidents of ...
— More English Fairy Tales • Various

... characteristics of— Absolutism detested by, xxxi, xxxiv admiration of, for George Eliot and for Gladstone, basis of, xxiii Catholicism of, xii-xiv, xix, xx, xxvii, xxviii; attitude of, to doctrine of Papal Infallibility, xxv, xxvi; reality of his faith, xviii et seq. ideals cherished by, document embodying, xxxviii-ix; need of directing ideals practised ...
— The History of Freedom • John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton

... from considering this man of the world, full of information and sparkling with vivacity, stretched on a sick bed, and apprehending all the tedious languor of helpless decrepitude and deserted solitude." Vol. xix. p. 129.-E. ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole Volume 3 • Horace Walpole

... and to eke out its slender emoluments he began to write. What were his earliest efforts we cannot certainly say, or whether any of them survive among the poems recognized as his. He tells us that his first literary model was Archilochus (Ep. I, xix, 24), a Greek poet of 700 B.C., believed to have been the inventor of personal satire, whose stinging pen is said to have sometimes driven its victims to suicide. For a time also he imitated a much more recent satirist, Lucilius, whom he rejected later, as disliking ...
— Horace • William Tuckwell

... from appropriate texts: Text of the first reverend gentleman was, And every one that hath forsaken houses, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my name's sake, shall receive an hundred-fold, and shall inherit everlasting life. [Matthew xix. 29.] Text of the second was, Now the Lord had said unto Abraham, Get thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from thy father's house, unto a land that I will show thee." [Genesis xii. 1.] Excellent texts; well handled, let us hope,—especially with brevity. After ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. IX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... Christ, appears from his own words: "They brought little children to Christ, and the disciples rebuked them. And Jesus said, Suffer little children to come unto me, and forbid them not; for of such is the kingdom of heaven."—Matt. xix. 13, 14. St. Luke expresses it still more strongly: "They brought unto him even infants, that he might touch them."—xviii. 15. These children were so little, that they were brought to him; yet he says, "Suffer them to come unto me:" so little, that he "took ...
— The Story of My Life - Being Reminiscences of Sixty Years' Public Service in Canada • Egerton Ryerson

... "Rule XIX. No higher stakes than guinea points shall ever be played for, nor shall any card or billiard playing be permitted in the club ...
— Prince Fortunatus • William Black

... lib. ii., xix. Having described to us the siege of Numantia, he goes on "Hactenus populus Romanus pulcher, egregius, pius, sanctus atque magnificus. Reliqua seculi, ut grandia aeque, ita vel magis ...
— Life of Cicero - Volume One • Anthony Trollope

... less security than on the sun;" so that he be rich (and liberal withal) he shall be honoured, admired, adored, reverenced, and highly [2210]magnified. "The rich is had in reputation because of his goods," Eccl. x. 31. He shall be befriended: "for riches gather many friends," Prov. xix. 4,—multos numerabit amicos, all [2211]happiness ebbs and flows with his money. He shall be accounted a gracious lord, a Mecaenas, a benefactor, a wise, discreet, a proper, a valiant, a fortunate man, of a generous spirit, ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... Of the Angel Victor appearing to Saint Patrick. XVI How St. Patrick was Redeemed from Slavery. XVII How he Relieved those who were Perishing of Hunger. XVIII Of his Fast continued for Twenty Days. XIX How he Overcame the Temptation of the Enemy. XX How he was again made Captive, and released by the Miracle of the Kettle. XXI Of Saint Patrick's Vision. XXII How he dwelt with the blessed Germanus, and how he received the Habit from Saint Martin. XXIII Of the Flesh-meat changed into Fishes. XXIV ...
— The Most Ancient Lives of Saint Patrick - Including the Life by Jocelin, Hitherto Unpublished in America, and His Extant Writings • Various

... and rescue, the State and local unions are very active, especially in the larger towns and cities. In the smaller towns, religious temperance meetings are held weekly, and in the larger cities, daily, and sometimes twice a day. Chicago has as many as eighteen meetings every week. In Chapters XIX. and XX. of the first part of this volume, we have described at length, and from personal observation, the way in which these temperance prayer-meetings are generally conducted, and the means used for lifting up ...
— Grappling with the Monster • T. S. Arthur

... April 8th, 1738. The friends who had met to read and pass opinion on this "History" decided that in any printed form of this work it would be advisable not to call in question the courage of Marlborough. See Sir W. Scott's edition, vol. xix., ...
— The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, Vol. X. • Jonathan Swift

... and thy False Prophet have deceived, who have received thy brand on them, and who have worshipped thine image.—These all, you, your prophet, and your dupes, shall be cast into a lake of fire burning with brimstone". Rev. xiii. 2, 3. Rev. xix. 20. ...
— The Mark of the Beast • Sidney Watson

... XIX. Journalism. Writing. Advertising. Art. Handicrafts. Designing. Photography. Architecture. Landscape Gardening. House Decorating and Furnishing. Music. Acting. ...
— The Canadian Girl at Work - A Book of Vocational Guidance • Marjory MacMurchy

... own unassisted strength. To Franklin he wrote in the same strain; and La Fayette addressed a like memorial of ripe wisdom to Vergennes" (the French Minister for Foreign Affairs). (Bancroft's History of the United States, Vol. X., Chap., xix., pp. ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 2 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Edgerton Ryerson

... of Arnold on the value of Masonry to the young as a restraint, a refinement, and a conservator of virtue, throwing about youth the mantle of a great friendship and the consecration of a great ideal (History and Philosophy of Masonry, chap. xix). ...
— The Builders - A Story and Study of Masonry • Joseph Fort Newton

... Scotlond and the crowne to kyng Edward at Rokesburgh. Also in this yere the town of Berewyk was yolden up to kyng Edward. And in this same yere, that is to seye the yere of oure lord a m^{l} ccclvj^{to}, the xix day of Septembre, kyng John of Fraunce was taken at the bataill of Peyters be the doughty prynce Edward the firste sone of kyng Edward. Also Sire Philip his sone was taken with hym; and the erle of Pountys, the erle of Ewe, the erle of Longeville, the erle of Tankervyle, with othere ...
— A Chronicle of London from 1089 to 1483 • Anonymous

... group of sciences includes logic, psychology, ethics and aesthetics, metaphysics, and the history of philosophy. I have not included epistemology or the "theory of knowledge" as a separate discipline, for reasons which will appear later (Chapter XIX); and I have included the history of philosophy, because, whether we care to call this a special science or not, it constitutes a very important part of the work of the teacher of ...
— An Introduction to Philosophy • George Stuart Fullerton

... the modes in which paternal power is extinguished XIII. Of guardianships XIV. Who can be appointed guardians by will XV. Of the statutory guardianship of agnates XVI. Of loss of status XVII. Of the statutory guardianship of patrons XVIII. Of the statutory guardianship of parents XIX. Of fiduciary guardianship XX. Of Atilian guardians, and those appointed under the lex Iulia et Titia XXI. Of the authority of guardians XXII. Of the modes in which guardianship is terminated XXIII. Of curators XXIV. Of the security to be given by guardians and curators XXV. Of guardians' ...
— The Institutes of Justinian • Caesar Flavius Justinian

... Chapter XIX—On Coming Forth by Day. This is the second Egyptian chapter. It has its direct relation to the Hieroglyphic chapter, page 171. I note that I say here it costs a dime to go to the show. Well, now it costs around thirty cents to go to a good show in a respectable suburb, ...
— The Art Of The Moving Picture • Vachel Lindsay

... the Union Government Chapter XV The Kimberley Congress / The Kimberley Conference Chapter XVI The Appeal for Imperial Protection Chapter XVII The London Press and the Natives' Land Act Chapter XVIII The P.S.A. and Brotherhoods Chapter XIX Armed Natives in the South African War Chapter XX The South African Races and the European War Chapter XXI Coloured People's Help Rejected / The Offer of Assistance by the South African Coloured Races Rejected ...
— Native Life in South Africa, Before and Since • Solomon Tshekisho Plaatje

... friend of the family of Assynt, in 1738, for Norman Macleod, XIX. of Macleod, who, in that year, in virtue of a disposition of all his estates made by Neil Macleod of Assynt to John Breac Macleod, XVI. of Macleod, dated the 24th of November, 1681, commenced a process against Mackenzie, gives a most interesting account of the proceedings, ...
— History Of The Mackenzies • Alexander Mackenzie

... the Romans themselves, (or at least by Constantius in his jealousy of Julian,)—with "presents and promises,—the hopes of spoil, and a perpetual grant of all the territories they were able to subdue." Gibbon, chap. xix. (3, 208.) By any other historian than Gibbon, who has really no fixed opinion on any character, or question, but, safe in the general truism that the worst men sometimes do right, and the best often do wrong, praises when he wants to round ...
— Our Fathers Have Told Us - Part I. The Bible of Amiens • John Ruskin

... possibly the root of the Latin cornu: and its primary signification is to put forth horns; its secondary, to shoot forth rays, to shine. The participle is used in its primary sense in Psalms, xix. 31.; but the Greek Septuagint, and all translators from the Hebrew into modern European languages, have assigned to the verb its secondary meaning in Exod. xxxiv. In that chapter the nominative to coran is, in both verses, undeniably ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 26. Saturday, April 27, 1850 • Various

... des choses plvs remarqvables qve Sammvel Champlain de Brovage a reconneues aux Indes Occidentalles au voiage qu'il en a faict en icelles en l'annee mil v[c] iiij.[xx].xix. & en l'annee mil ...
— Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, Vol. 1 • Samuel de Champlain

... pt. iii. pp. 500, 540. For general military law on the subject, see Birkhimer's "Military Government and Martial Law," chap. viii. For the practice of the Confederates, see the treatment of the Hon. George Summers, chap. xix. post.] Only two days later he issued an order against pillaging or molestation of persons and dwellings, as stringent as any one could wish. [Footnote: Official Records, vol. xii. ...
— Military Reminiscences of the Civil War V1 • Jacob Dolson Cox

... less admixture of argillaceous and calcareous earths. The different proportions of which in each kind of stone may be seen in Mr. Kirwan's valuable Elements of Mineralogy. See additional notes, No. XIX.] ...
— The Botanic Garden - A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: The Economy of Vegetation • Erasmus Darwin

... Scott and Erasmus.—Has it yet been noticed that the picture of German manners in the middle ages given by Sir W. Scott, in his Anne of Geierstein (chap. xix.), is taken (in some parts almost verbally) from Erasmus' dialogue, Diversoria? Although Sir Walter mentions Erasmus at the beginning of the chapter, he is totally silent as to any hints he may have ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 32, June 8, 1850 • Various

... rained upon Sodom and upon Gomorrah brimstone and fire from the Lord out of heaven; and he overthrew those cities, and all the Plain' (Gen. xix. 24). ...
— Tacitus: The Histories, Volumes I and II • Caius Cornelius Tacitus

... [1] In Section XIX. of this journey, Wasilico, or Wasiley, is mentioned as duke of Russia; but who must only have been duke of some subordinate province. This submission of Russia, or of his particular dukedom, produced no fruit to the Romish see, as the Russian empire still remains ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 1 • Robert Kerr

... ignorant of the truth, viz., that the gospel was to be preached to all nations; and contrary hereunto, he erred in thinking it unlawful to preach amongst the Gentiles. I shall add two texts more, one in Acts xix., where we read that those disciples which had been discipled and baptized by John were yet ignorant of the Holy Ghost, and knew not (as the text tells us) whether there were any holy Ghost or no; though John did teach constantly, that he that should ...
— An Exhortation to Peace and Unity • Attributed (incorrectly) to John Bunyan

... found fault with Ivo of Chartres because simony was still prevalent in his diocese, the bishop retorted that those who practised it excused their action from the example of Rome, where not even a pen and paper were to be had free. Dante addresses the shade of Pope Nicholas III in the Inferno (xix.):— ...
— The Church and the Empire - Being an Outline of the History of the Church - from A.D. 1003 to A.D. 1304 • D. J. Medley

... considerable discussion among students of this subject as to the part of the hand on which the Line of Health (1-1, Plate XIX.) commences. ...
— Palmistry for All • Cheiro

... enters two or three great lakes of water, very large; after which a fresh water sea is reached, whereof there is no mention of having seen the end, as they have heard from those of the Saguenay; for they told us they had never been there themselves." Yet later, in chapter XIX., it is stated that old Donnaconna assured them he had been in the land of the Saguenay, where he related several impossible marvels, such as people of only one leg. It is to be noted that "the peoples in towns," who are apparently Huron-Iroquois, are here referred to as "good people," while the ...
— Hochelagans and Mohawks • W. D. Lighthall

... [Sidenote: Cap. XIX.] From that yle, in goynge be see, toward the southe, is another gret yle, that is clept Dondun. In that yle ben folk of dyverse kyndes; so that the fadre etethe the sone, the sone the fadre, the husbonde the wif, and the wif the husbonde. And zif it so befall, that the fadre or modre or ony ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries - of the English Nation. v. 8 - Asia, Part I. • Richard Hakluyt

... recommending his mother to his care, he complained of being thirsty, and that, as the sponge saturated with vinegar was applied to his mouth, he merely said: IT IS FINISHED! and he bowed his head and gave up the ghost. (St. John, chap. xix., v. 30.) ...
— Vestiges of the Mayas • Augustus Le Plongeon

... xii. 9; false kinds of, x. 4, xiii. 4; the foundation of the Christian life, xii. 5; worth more than all the science in the world, xv. 13; grows most in the state of perfect union, xix. 2; dangers of false, xix. 15-23; acquired in raptures, xx. 38; foundation of prayer must be laid in, xxii. 16; a false, the most crafty device of Satan, xxx. 12; asking for consolations not consistent with, ...
— The Life of St. Teresa of Jesus • Teresa of Avila

... Cor. ix. 25, Rev. iii. 11, and often. Stephanos is properly the victor's wreath, diadema the king's crown (Rev. xix. 12).—For a short essay on St Paul's use of athletic metaphors see this Epistle in ...
— Philippian Studies - Lessons in Faith and Love from St. Paul's Epistle to the Philippians • Handley C. G. Moule

... vers de soci'et'e we perpetually discover a laborious effort to introduce the lightness of the French badinage into a masculine and somewhat rough language."-Quart. Rev. vol. xix. p. 122. ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume 1 • Horace Walpole

... earliest written notices of the Vice in the mythical destruction of the Pentapolis (Gen. xix.), Sodom, Gomorrah ( 'Amirah, the cultivated country), Adama, Zeboim and Zoar or Bela. The legend has been amply embroidered by the Rabbis who make the Sodomites do everything a l'envers: e.g., if a man ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 10 • Richard F. Burton

... made himself the richer by wronging of others; the Lord at that time singled him out from all the rest of his brother publicans, and that in the face of many Pharisees, and proclaimed in the audience of them all, that that day salvation was come to his house; Luke xix. 1-8. ...
— The Jerusalem Sinner Saved • John Bunyan

... Instruction XIX.[16] The several commanders in the fleet are to take special care, upon pain of death, that they fire not over any ...
— Fighting Instructions, 1530-1816 - Publications Of The Navy Records Society Vol. XXIX. • Julian S. Corbett

... before he was called Augustus, did not bear and never could have borne, the name of Octavianus: the son of Octavius, he was himself Octavius, not Octavianus, as his sister was Octavia (so Pliny the Elder writes, "Marcellus Octavia" not Octaviana, "sorore Augusti genitus" N.H. XIX. 6, 1.) Shakespeare knew better than Bracciolini the name of Augustus, before he was Emperor, by making Antony say ...
— Tacitus and Bracciolini - The Annals Forged in the XVth Century • John Wilson Ross

... the beard was held in the highest esteem, especially in Asiatic countries, from the earliest period of which any records have been preserved. The Hebrew priests are commanded in the Book of Leviticus, ch. xix, not to shave off the corners of their beards; and the first High Priest, Aaron, probably wore a magnificent beard, since the amicable relations between brethren are compared, in the 133rd Psalm, to "the precious ointment upon the head, ...
— Flowers from a Persian Garden and Other Papers • W. A. Clouston

... and deepest sense of the term. The larger and more complex the organism, the more it held, in his opinion, of thought and sentient life. Thus the stars, in the language of Aristotle, are [Greek: thiotera aemon]. Compare Sonnets VIII., XIX. ...
— Sonnets • Michael Angelo Buonarroti & Tommaso Campanella

... are to be found, as far as I know them, in one short chapter (I. xix.) of Paulus Diaconus, and in Muratori's notes thereto; but however small the records, the deed decided the fate of Italy. Frederic, son of Fava, took refuge with the Ostrogoths, and demanded revenge in the name of his royal race; and it is easy to conceive ...
— The Roman and the Teuton - A Series of Lectures delivered before the University of Cambridge • Charles Kingsley

... CHAPTER XIX How Beaumains came to the lady, and when he came to the castle the gates were closed against him, and of the words that the ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... the third time, and they prophesied also. Then went Saul to Ramah, and he said, Where are Samuel and David? And one said, Behold they be at Naioth. And Saul went thither, and the Spirit of God came on him also and he prophesied. Wherefore man said: Is Saul also among the prophets?"—I. Samuel, xix, 20-21. ...
— The Investment of Influence - A Study of Social Sympathy and Service • Newell Dwight Hillis

... clever men set to work and persevered until the strange letters were deciphered, and the palace-walls gave up their secrets. Here was King Sennacherib; here Tiglath-pileser (2 Kings xv. 29); here Esarhaddon (2 Kings xix. 37). Oh, how wonderful to look at the old-time portraits which had been drawn ...
— The Bible in its Making - The most Wonderful Book in the World • Mildred Duff

... directly contrary to the words which this Church itself believes to have been uttered by Jesus Christ: "Whosoever shall put away his wife, except it be for fornication, and shall marry another, committeth adultery" (Matt. xix. 9). ...
— Voltaire's Philosophical Dictionary • Voltaire

... half of the first year's income; a tax which was paid to the crown upon entering any office, pension, or grant. It was introduced into the Indias by a law of 1632. See Recopilacion leyes de Indias, lib. viii, tit. xix. ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume XXIV, 1630-34 • Various

... translates (Journal Asiatic Soc., xix. 124) part of the inscription on the black obelisk of Ashurakbal found in Nineveh and now in the ...
— Inquiries into Human Faculty and Its Development • Francis Galton

... Luke xix. 41, 42. And when Jesus was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over it, saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace! but now they ...
— Town and Country Sermons • Charles Kingsley

... that the Nine daies wonder was the "first Pamphlet that euer Will Kemp offred to the Presse,"[xix:1] there can be no doubt that this Dvtiful Invective was written by some other individual of the name; perhaps by the William Kempe who published in the following year a book entitled The Education of Children in learning, and who is supposed to have been a schoolmaster ...
— Kemps Nine Daies Wonder - Performed in a Daunce from London to Norwich • William Kemp

... reason a magistrate is called 'his worship'; and a guild or company is called 'worshipful.' In the Marriage Service the man says to his wife "I thee worship" because he sets her before all else. In Wyclif's Bible (S. Matth. xix. 19) we find "Worschipe thi fadir and thi moder." In old days any act of mind or body acknowledging the worthiness of another was an Act of Worship. In later days the word ...
— The Prayer Book Explained • Percival Jackson

... small doorway, especially by the side of a gate or portal, is called "the eye of the needle" and explains Matt. xix. 24, and Koran vii. 38. In the Rabbinic form of the proverb the camel becomes an elephant. Some have preferred to change the Koranic Jamal (camel) for Habl (cable) and much ingenuity has been wasted by Christian commentators on Mark x. 25, ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 9 • Richard F. Burton

... kind of mantle of a square form, called also rheno. Thus Caesar (Bell. Gall. vi. 21): "They use skins for clothing, or the short rhenones, and leave the greatest part of the body naked." Isidore (xix. 23) describes the rhenones as "garments covering the shoulders and breast, as low as the navel, so rough and shaggy that they are impenetrable to rain." Mela (iii. 3), speaking of the Germans, says, "The men are clothed only with ...
— The Germany and the Agricola of Tacitus • Tacitus

... nouveau rapprochement a etablir entre les Classes qui composent le Regne Animal. Ann. Mus., Vol. XIX. ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 09, No. 51, January, 1862 • Various

... rolling stone, sometimes soldier and sometimes engineer, visiting one European country after another. In 1771 he obtained a government appointment in Mauritius, a spot which was the subject of his first book (see TRAVEL AND ADVENTURE, Vol. XIX), and which was afterwards made the scene of "Paul and Virginia." In his "Nature Studies," 1783, he showed an enthusiasm for nature that contrasted vividly with the artificiality of most eighteenth-century writers; but his fame was not established ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol VII • Various

... Quixote could not have been written before 1591 is proved by the mention in chapter vi of a book published in that year. That it must have been written subsequently to 1596 is proved by the reference in chapter xix to an incident which was not ended till September, 1596 (see Navarrete). There are other hints and allusions in the story which, I think, show that it could scarcely have been begun while Philip II ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 1-20 • Various

... etc.: Mount Sinai was the mountain in Arabia on which Moses talked with God (Exodus xix, xx). God's miracles are taking place about us all the time, if only we can emancipate our souls sufficiently to see them. From out of our materialized daily lives we may rise at any moment, if we will, to ideal and spiritual things. In a letter to his nephew Lowell says: "This ...
— The Vision of Sir Launfal - And Other Poems • James Russell Lowell

... the Holy City; when the crowds spread branches of the palm-trees, and cried, "Hosanna to the Son of David: blessed is He that cometh in the name of the Lord" (S. Matt. xxi. 9). "Blessed be the King that cometh in the name of the Lord: peace in Heaven, and glory in the highest" (S. Luke xix. 38). ...
— The Kingdom of Heaven; What is it? • Edward Burbidge

... Exstirpation der Milz, in Beziehung zur haemolytischen Function der Milz. Ziegler's Beitraege zur path. Anat. vol. XIX. pt. 3. ...
— Histology of the Blood - Normal and Pathological • Paul Ehrlich

... XIX. But I wish'd it had been God's will that I, too, then could have died: I began to be tired a little, and fain had slept at his side. And that was ten years back, or more, if I don't forget: But as to the children, Annie, they're ...
— Enoch Arden, &c. • Alfred Tennyson

... xix. If a player neglect to score his hand, crib, or any point or points of the game, he cannot score them after the cards are packed ...
— Enquire Within Upon Everything - The Great Victorian Domestic Standby • Anonymous

... Tale); and in the "Retractation," at the end of the Parson's Tale, the "Book of the Twenty-five Ladies" is enumerated among the works of which the poet repents — but there "xxv" is supposed to have been by some copyist written for "xix." ...
— The Canterbury Tales and Other Poems • Geoffrey Chaucer

... made use of the roofs of edifices which were already there, spanning only the gaps of the streets with temporary wooden passages. This is clearly stated by Suetonius in chapters xxii. and xxxvii. and by Flavius Josephus, "Antiq. Jud." xix. 1, 11. From the palace at the northeast corner of the Palatine, he crossed the roof of the templum divi Augusti, then the fastigium basilicae Juliae, and lastly the Temple of Saturn close to the Capitolium. The Street of Victory which divided the emperor's ...
— Pagan and Christian Rome • Rodolfo Lanciani

... LETTER XIX. Miss Byron to Miss Selby.— Account of Sir Charles's return from Windsor: his joy on restoring the worthy family of the Mansfields from oppression: his interview with his friend Beauchamp, at Sir Harry's; and cheerful behaviour at ...
— The History of Sir Charles Grandison, Volume 4 (of 7) • Samuel Richardson

... manifest book-making—the mere outpouring of the professional preacher and story-teller. Of his historical and philosophical work I shall not speak at all. His shallow Cambridge Inaugural Lecture, given by him as Professor of History, was torn to pieces in the Westminster Review (vol. xix. p. 305, April 1861), it is said, by a brother Professor of History. Much less need we speak of his miserable duel with Cardinal Newman, wherein he was so shamefully worsted. For fifteen years he poured out lectures, sermons, tales, ...
— Studies in Early Victorian Literature • Frederic Harrison

... ouvrage que M. La Sage nous a fait connoitre sous le titre du Diable Boiteux; il l'a tourne, a sa maniere, mais avec des differences si grandes que Guevarra ne se reconnoitroit qu'a peine dans cette pretendue traduction. Par exemple, le chapitre xix de la seconde partie contient une aventure de D. Pablas, qui se trouve en original dans un livre imprime a Madrid en 1729, (sic.) L'auteur des lectures amusantes, qui ne s'est pas souvenu que M. Le Sage, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 55, No. 344, June, 1844 • Various

... the names, have been rendered worthy of them? And how many are there, who might have done exceeding well in the world, had not their characters and spirits been totally depressed and Nicodemus'd into nothing?'—Tristram Shandy, vol. I. chap xix. ...
— Lay Morals • Robert Louis Stevenson

... will persist as a name attached to a general custom long after the custom itself will have altered. For example, modern English marriage, as modified by divorce and by Married Women's Property Acts, differs more from early XIX century marriage than Byron's marriage did from Shakespear's. At the present moment marriage in England differs not only from marriage in France, but from marriage in Scotland. Marriage as modified by the divorce ...
— Revolutionist's Handbook and Pocket Companion • George Bernard Shaw

... partly by pneumatic tools. Hand tooling cost about twice as much as machine tooling, but its appearance was generally better. The average cost of tooling the several forms of blocks is shown by Table XIX. For 42,190 sq. ft. the average cost was 26 cts. per sq. ft. or $2.34 per sq. yd., or $4.73 per cu. yd. of block work. This tooling was done by stone cutters, and was unusually ...
— Concrete Construction - Methods and Costs • Halbert P. Gillette

... examples of reverence expressed towards mothers who are "the teachers of all virtue." In the moral law the command to fear the mother—that is to treat her with respect, is placed even before the duty of fearing the father (Lev. xix. 8). Enduring evidence remains of the spiritual status of mothers. When the Prophet of Exiles wishes to depict God as the Comforter of his people, he says "As one whom his mother comforteth, so will I comfort you" (Is. lxvi. 13). When the Psalmist describes his utter woe, ...
— Women's Wild Oats - Essays on the Re-fixing of Moral Standards • C. Gasquoine Hartley

... "Pan" (xix), to "Dionysus" (xxvi), to "Hestia and Hermes" (xxix), seem to have been designed for use at definite religious festivals, apart from recitations. With the exception perhaps of the "Hymn to Ares" (viii), no item in the collection can be regarded as either ...
— Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica • Homer and Hesiod

... XIX. (1) There remain two appendices touching the tradition of knowledge, the one critical, the other pedantical. For all knowledge is either delivered by teachers, or attained by men's proper endeavours: and therefore as the principal part of tradition of knowledge concerneth chiefly ...
— The Advancement of Learning • Francis Bacon

... convict or pauper in the state." Report of Board of Education of New Jersey, 1904, p. 323. In 1911 a committee of the Convention of American Instructors of the Deaf was appointed to collect information and statistics as to the occupations and wages of the deaf. Proceedings, xix., p. 217. ...
— The Deaf - Their Position in Society and the Provision for Their - Education in the United States • Harry Best

... l'Ordre des Pigeons,' par C. L. Bonaparte; Comptes Rendus, 1854-55. Mr. Blyth, in 'Annals of Nat. Hist.,' vol. xix., 1847, p. 41, mentions, as a very singular fact, "that of the two species of Ectopistes, which are nearly allied to each other, one should have fourteen tail-feathers, while the other, the passenger pigeon of North America, should possess but ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I. • Charles Darwin

... the prophets." Then it would be impossible for the Sabbath to be left out. A question was asked, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? Says Jesus, "If thou wilt enter into life keep the commandments"—xix. Here he quotes five from the tables of stone. It is still clearer in Luke x. 25, 28. "What is written in the law? how readest thou?" Here he gives the Savior's exposition in xxii. Matt. as above. Jesus says, "Thou hast ...
— The Seventh Day Sabbath, a Perpetual Sign - 1847 edition • Joseph Bates

... Benjamin was conspicuous for valour. But its turbulence and ferocity wrought its fall, in the great battles recorded in Judges xix. and xx. Saul was of this fierce tribe. It was finally ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 55, No. 340, February, 1844 • Various

... continued.) The tragic emotions of pity and fear should spring out of the Plot itself. XV The element of Character in Tragedy. XVI (Plot continued.) Recognition: its various kinds, with examples. XVII Practical rules for the Tragic Poet. XVIII Further rules for the Tragic Poet. XIX Thought, or the Intellectual element, and Diction in Tragedy. XX Diction, or Language in general. XXI Poetic Diction. XXII (Poetic Diction continued.) How Poetry combines elevation of language with perspicuity. XXIII Epic Poetry. XXIV (Epic Poetry continued.) Further ...
— Poetics • Aristotle

... African aristocracy, they hold agriculture beneath the dignity of man and fit only for their women and slaves; the "ladies" also refuse to work at the plantations, especially when young and pretty, leaving them to the bush-folk, male and female. M. du Chaillu repeatedly asserts (chap xix.) "there is no property in land," but this is a mistake often made in Africa. Labourers are hired at the rate of two to three dollars per mensem, and gangs would easily be collected if one of the chiefs ...
— Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... Magellan's voyage on the map and make a list of the lands or countries he passed. Look at the map of North America on this old map, and at the one in mentioned Chapter XIX. How do you account for the queer shape of North America ...
— Introductory American History • Henry Eldridge Bourne and Elbert Jay Benton

... to-day know better, having seen the Income Tax Amendment (No. XVI), the Election of Senators by Popular Vote Amendment (No. XVII), the Prohibition Amendment (No. XVIII), and the Woman Suffrage Amendment (No. XIX) go through within a period of seven years. For generations, however, the tradition of constitutional immobility held sway and the forces of change worked through channels that seemed easier ...
— Our Changing Constitution • Charles Pierson

... XIX "But what's the Thorn? and what the pond? 200 And what the hill of moss to her? And what the creeping breeze that comes [24] The little pond to stir?" "I cannot tell; but some will say She hanged her baby on the tree; 205 Some say she drowned it in the pond, Which is a little step beyond: But all ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth - Volume 1 of 8 • Edited by William Knight

... established there his permanent abode. In 1822 he suffered a stroke of apoplexy from which he never recovered: even the magnetic treatment given him by Justinus Kerner proved of no avail. He died at Dresden, April 3, 1825. See Allgemeine deutsche Biographie, XIX, 40-45. The article is by Professor Muncker. Wilhelm MUeller also wrote an article full of lavish praise of Loeben in Neuer Nekrolog der Deutschen, III, Jahrg. ...
— Graf von Loeben and the Legend of Lorelei • Allen Wilson Porterfield

... XIX. Venetian Art and the Provinces.—The Venetian provinces were held together not merely by force of rule. In language and feeling no less than in government, they formed a distinct unit within the Italian ...
— The Venetian Painters of the Renaissance - Third Edition • Bernhard Berenson

... pit (Canto xix.), we again find fire as the instrument with which the sinners are punished. Those who have made money by misuse of sacred offices are buried head downwards in holes with their feet projecting, and fire plays about their soles. Naturally ...
— Dante: His Times and His Work • Arthur John Butler



Words linked to "Xix" :   cardinal, large integer



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