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WI

noun
1.
A midwestern state in north central United States.  Synonyms: Badger State, Wisconsin.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"WI" Quotes from Famous Books



... gang dry, my dear, And the rocks melt wi' the sun; I will luve thee still, my dear, While the ...
— The Captives • Hugh Walpole

... a' is gane, Baith freends and brandy bottle! An' noo the puir soul's left alane Wi' nocht ...
— The Cariboo Trail - A Chronicle of the Gold-fields of British Columbia • Agnes C. Laut

... the men behind him, the dark, determined toilers who sustained the immortal spirit of courage and humanity on thirty shillings a week and nine hours' work a day. "Who's for it, mates?" he asked, roughly. "Who's going wi' me?" ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... "He wi' kick you' brains out 'fore you git on um, an' broke you' neck 'fore you kin git from ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. XVII, No. 99, March, 1876 • Various

... once you 'member, Paul, but your crowd didn't want anything to do wi' me, so I cut it out," grumbled Jud, though he could not help looking pleased at being complimented on the woodcraft of their crowd by such an authority as ...
— The Banner Boy Scouts Snowbound - A Tour on Skates and Iceboats • George A. Warren

... who constituted herself one of Sylvia's sources of information in the crisis. Mrs. Sallie Ann Armistead was the mother of two boys with whom Sylvia, as a child, had insisted upon playing, in spite of the protests of the family. "Wha' fo' you go wi' dem Armistead chillun, Mi' Sylvia?" would cry Aunt Mandy, the cook. "Doan' you know they granddaddy done pick cottin in de fiel' 'long o' me?" But while her father was picking cotton, Sallie Ann had looked after her complexion and her figure, ...
— Sylvia's Marriage • Upton Sinclair

... Sandy, "but what between haverin' wi' thae Englishers an' drinkin' their whusky, my freen' Jerry an' me's ...
— The Settler and the Savage • R.M. Ballantyne

... Yo can do nowt wi' Jimmy. 'E'll goa 'is own road. 'Is feyther an' 'e they wuss always quar'ling, yo med say. Yet when t' owd gentleman was taaken bad, Jimmy, 'e couldn' do too mooch for 'im. 'E was set on pullin' 's feyther round. And when 'e found 'e couldn't ...
— The Three Sisters • May Sinclair

... sober member of the party, of another mon—a hartist—who, aboon thirty year sin', built a hut at Widdup, and hed a gurt big dog, and young Helliwell, ower at Jerusalem, wor then a lad, and used to bring him (the mon) milk, and in the end gat ta'en on as sarvant, and went wi' him to Scotland and all ower—you may imagine ...
— Philip Gilbert Hamerton • Philip Gilbert Hamerton et al

... faith of men that ha' brothered men, By more than easy breath; And the eyes o' men that ha' read wi' men, In the open ...
— Captain Desmond, V.C. • Maud Diver

... Ralston, except the man you sent wi the note to let him ha'e your spurs that were ...
— The Spoilers of the Valley • Robert Watson

... done, wi' serious face, They, round the ingle, form a circle wide; The sire turns o'er, wi' patriarchal grace, The big ha'-Bible, ance his father's pride: His bonnet rev'rently is laid aside, His lyart haffets wearing thin an' bare; Those strains that once did sweet in Zion glide, He wales ...
— The Principles of English Versification • Paull Franklin Baum

... Come row me o'er, Come boat me o'er to Charlie; I'll gi'e John Ross anither bawbee To boat me o'er to Charlie. We'll o'er the water an' o'er the sea, We'll o'er the water to Charlie, Come weal, come woe, we'll gather and go, And live and die wi' Charlie.'" ...
— Melody - The Story of a Child • Laura E. Richards

... he, 'there's neither truth nor honesty in the leein' buddies, Sir. But here's your Bradbury, an', at onny rate, we hae the eggs, Sir, for I paid for them wi' a label off yin o' they Japaneesy beer bottles. It seemed an awfu' waste to spend guid siller on folk that dinna ken when they ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, March 17, 1920 • Various

... There's no' a house in Edinburgh safe. The law is clean helpless, clean helpless! A week syne it was auld Andra Simpson's in the Lawn-market. Then, naething would set the catamarans but to forgather privily wi' the Provost's ain butler, and tak' unto themselves the Provost's ain plate. And the day, information was laid down before me offeecially that the limmers had made infraction, vi et clam, into Leddy ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume XV • Robert Louis Stevenson

... long form: none conventional short form: Western Sahara Digraph: WI Type: legal status of territory and question of sovereignty unresolved; territory contested by Morocco and Polisario Front (Popular Front for the Liberation of the Saguia el Hamra and Rio de Oro), which ...
— The 1993 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... for a bit walk," Tommy sneered, "wi' the next jam fair to come ony time." He sat down resolutely. "No, thank ye ...
— A Daughter of the Snows • Jack London

... "Forrard wi' you all," continued Sampson between the sounds of impact; and soon the shuffling of feet indicated a retreat. Denman, who had opened his door, ready for a rush to Florrie's defense, now went aft to reassure ...
— The Wreck of the Titan - or, Futility • Morgan Robertson

... Glasgow body who said grudgingly, as he came out of Waverley Station, and gazed along its splendid length for the first time, "Weel, wi' a' their haverin', it's but half a street, onyway!"—which always reminded me of the Western farmer who came from his native plains to the beautiful Berkshire hills. "I've always heard o' this scenery," he said. "Blamed if ...
— Penelope's Progress - Being Such Extracts from the Commonplace Book of Penelope Hamilton As Relate to Her Experiences in Scotland • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... and composing aloud, we hear a great deal. 'Was Mr. Wordsworth a sociable man?' asked Mr. Rawnsley of a Rydal farmer. 'Wudsworth, for a' he had noa pride nor nowt,' was the answer, 'was a man who was quite one to hissel, ye kna. He was not a man as folks could crack wi', nor not a man as could crack wi' folks. But there was another thing as kep' folk off, he had a ter'ble girt deep voice, and ye might see his faace agaan for long enuff. I've knoan folks, village ...
— Reviews • Oscar Wilde

... most trivial subject, and gave a phrase of her conversation to each auditor in turn. "He come from Mellstock, down in South Wessex, about a year ago—worse luck for 'n, Belinda" (turning to the right) "where his father was living, and was took wi' the shakings for death, and died in two days, as you know, Caroline" (turning to the left). "It would ha' been a blessing if Goddy-mighty had took thee too, wi' thy mother and father, poor useless boy! But I've got him here to stay with me till I can see what's to be done with ...
— Jude the Obscure • Thomas Hardy

... the leather, youngun. Roun wi the nappy. Here, Jock braw Hielentman's your barleybree. Lang may your lum reek and your kailpot boil! My tipple. Merci. Here's to us. How's that? Leg before wicket. Don't stain my brandnew sitinems. Give's a shake of peppe, you there. Catch aholt. ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... Cauk and keel to win your bread, Wi' whigmaleeries for them wha need, Whilk is a gentle trade indeed ...
— Bride of Lammermoor • Sir Walter Scott

... of it, do you hear me? Go an' get your garments packed up, and out ye go into the street. Child o' my flesh, are ye? Out of my house, you drab, or maybe I'll be doing you a harm. I'll teach the like o' you to be stoppin' out o' nights an' then to come back wi'out a word of explainin'. I'll ...
— The Hound From The North • Ridgwell Cullum

... the door half-an-hour, Captain Stanchells," said he, addressing the principal jailer, who now showed himself. "How's this? how's this? Strangers in the jail after lock-up hours! I must see into this. But, first, I must hae a crack with an auld acquaintance here. Mr. Owen, Mr. Owen, how's a' wi' ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol VIII • Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.

... for the step he is taking, Woodley says, "We kin do nothin' till them greenhorns air gone. Old Dan Boone hisself kedn't take up trail, wi' sich a noisy clanjamfry aroun him. For myself I hain't hardly tried, seein' 'twar no use till they'd clar off out o' the way. And now the darned fools hev' made the thing more diffeequilt, trampin about, an' blottin' out every shadder o' sign, an everything as looks like a futmark. For all, ...
— The Death Shot - A Story Retold • Mayne Reid

... perceptible images with definite, poetry with indefinite sensations, to which end music is an essential, since the comprehension of sweet sound is our most indefinite conception. Music, when combined with a pleasurable idea, is poetry; music, without the idea, is simply music; the idea, wi thout the music, is ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 5 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... cuss or two, and said he'd no longer get his living by curing their twopenny souls o' such d—- nonsense as that (excusing my common way), and he took to farming straightway, and then 'a dropped down dead in a nor'-west thunderstorm; it being said—hee-hee!—that Master God was in tantrums wi'en for leaving his service,—hee-hee! I give the story as I heard it, my lady, but be dazed if I believe in such trumpery about folks in the sky, nor anything else that's said on 'em, good or bad. Well, Swithin, ...
— Two on a Tower • Thomas Hardy

... ower-come sooth For age and youth, And it brooks wi' nae denial, That the oldest friends Are the dearest friends, And the new ...
— Flint - His Faults, His Friendships and His Fortunes • Maud Wilder Goodwin

... send my oldest boy down and look at her. My oldest boy—but you know him? Aye, a grand lad. Both grand lads. Modelled off their mother, the pair of them. If I'd only a daughter like her ... the woman she was! A wife for a seafarin' man. "Watch and watch I've stood wi' ye," she said, goin'—"watch and watch, but I'm no good to see the lights nor to grip the wheel longer. The sight's gone and the strength, Matt. Watchmate, bunkmate, and shipmate I've been to ye, but ye're in smooth water now ... and no longer ye'll ...
— Wide Courses • James Brendan Connolly

... Sir Wag drew off the Sheath And showed there was no Pig beneath, His pent-up Wonder, Pleasure, Awe, Exploded in a long Guffaw: And, to his dying Day, he'd swear That Naught in Town the Bell could bear From "Jockey wi' the Yellow Coat That had a ...
— Collected Poems - In Two Volumes, Vol. II • Austin Dobson

... wha will shoe my bonny foot? And wha will glove my hand? And wha will lace my middle jimp Wi' ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 22, November, 1878 - of Popular Literature and Science • Various

... in London, All alone and alonie, She's gane wi' bairn to the clerk's son, Down by ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 207, October 15, 1853 • Various

... as he the bard has said 'Hech thrawfu' raltie rorkie! Wi' thecht ta' croonie clapperhead And fash' wi' unco pawkie!' He'll faint away when I appear, Upon his native heather; Or p'r'aps he'll only scream with fear, Or p'r'aps the ...
— Fifty Bab Ballads • William S. Gilbert

... read God's Word there and sang a sweet Psalm of praise to Jehovah, and offered a prayer to the Father of lights, the God of Israel, I thought of the prayer of Peden, the prophet, as he sat on Cameron's grave. Lifting up his eyes steadfastly to Heaven, he prayed: "Oh, to be wi' Ritchie!" ...
— Gathering Jewels - The Secret of a Beautiful Life: In Memoriam of Mr. & Mrs. James Knowles. Selected from Their Diaries. • James Knowles and Matilda Darroch Knowles

... eyes of blue that faded to grey at the marge, and said, 'Stop up your ears, laddie, like the adder, to any temptin' o' your uncle. Keep watch and ward, and, if need arise, run for me instantly, for, though I'm auld the noo, I'm aye ready for a warsil wi' auld Hornie.' ...
— Border Ghost Stories • Howard Pease

... ye'll pe makin' a fule o' Jamie wi' a glance like a sun-sparkle on the sea! Jamie's no fule wi' the right sort, an' the yacht is a shentleman, an' the shentleman's the yacht, for it's the shentleman ...
— The Life Everlasting: A Reality of Romance • Marie Corelli

... flowers in front of her a push. "I hata dem! I wanta see da rosa on da bush, I wanta see da leaves on da tree. I wanta put ma face in da grass lak when I young girl in Capri. I wanta look at da sky, I wanta smell da field. I wanta lie at night wi ma bambini and hear da rain. I no can wait one ...
— Drusilla with a Million • Elizabeth Cooper

... Rab? I asked for him next week of the new carrier who got the goodwill of James's business, and was now master of Jess and her cart. "How's Rab?" He put me off, and said rather rudely, "What's your business wi' the dowg?" I was not to be so put off. "Where's Rab?" He, getting confused and red, and intermeddling with his hair, said, "'Deed, sir, Rab's deid." "Dead! what did he die of?" "Weel, sir," said he, getting redder, ...
— Famous Stories Every Child Should Know • Various

... ye. Mairover the gardener's craft be a gentle one, and I see na reason why, if a white lily like yoursel must toil and spin, it should na be oot in God's sunshine, where the flowers bloom, instead o' pricking the bluid oot o' yer body, and the hope oot o' yer heart, wi' the needle's point, as I ha' seen sae mony o' my ain coontry lassies do. Gude-by, and may the roses in yer cheeks bloom a' the ...
— What Can She Do? • Edward Payson Roe

... the Hoggheimers, an' Schmidt Brothers, an' Fritz Schneckluk, an' a heap more buyers o' his that would rear up an' rip-snort an' refuse to do another cent's worth of dealing with a firm that was sellin' 'em autos wi' one hand an' shootin' holes in their brothers and cousins and Kaisers wi' the other. I soothed the old man down by pointing out I was to go working these lorries, and the British Army don't shoot Germans ...
— Action Front • Boyd Cable (Ernest Andrew Ewart)

... doggies gang to heaven, Dad? Will oor auld Donald gang? For noo to tak' him, faither wi' us, Wad ...
— Beautiful Joe - An Autobiography of a Dog • by Marshall Saunders

... mun be somewhat set down o' tother side o' th' book," announced Charity sturdily. "Yo' mun mind you 'at yo' took me ba'at [without] a commendation, because nob'ry [nobody] 'd have me at after Mistress Watson charged me wi' stealing her lace fall, 'at she found at after amongst her kerchiefs; that's a hundred pound to th' good. And yo' nursed me through th' fever—that's another. And yo' held me back fro' wedding wi' yon wastrel [scoundrel] Nym Thistlethwaite, ...
— It Might Have Been - The Story of the Gunpowder Plot • Emily Sarah Holt

... Shropshire, the son of a grocer; devoted himself to the collection of old ballads, and published in 1765 "Reliques of Ancient English Poetry"; he published also ballads of his own, among them "The Hermit of Warkworth," and was the author of "O Nannie, wilt thou gang wi' me?" he associated with Johnson, Burke, and other notables of the period, and was a member of Dr. Johnson's Literary Club; became bishop of Dromore in 1782, where he was held in affectionate regard; was blind for some years before he ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... apparently, had her purpose to serve or point to settle; for as we met, she was the first to stand; and, sharply scanning my appearance and aspect at a glance, she abruptly addressed me. "Honest man," she said, "do you see yon house wi' the chimla?" "That house with the farm-steadings and stacks beside it?" I replied. "Yes." "Then I'd be obleeged if ye wald just stap in as ye'r gaing east the gate, and tell our folk that the stirk ...
— The Cruise of the Betsey • Hugh Miller

... his cradle in the glamourie They have stolen my wee brother, Housed a changeling in his swaddlings For to fret my own poor mother. Pules it in the candle light Wi' a cheek so lean and white, Chinkling up its eyne so wee Wailing shrill at her an' me. It we'll neither rock nor tend Till the Silent Silent send, Lapping in their awesome arms Him they stole with spells and charms, Till they take this changeling creature Back to its own fairy nature — Cry! Cry! ...
— Peacock Pie, A Book of Rhymes • Walter de la Mare

... that's all mighty fine, And I like the old saying's suggestion; But—wi' a small crock such as mine, The speed may be matter o' question. I've set my hand to 'un, o' course, And munna look back, there's no doubt o' it: Yet I wish I'd a handier horse For the job, or that I were well out ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 104, February 11, 1893 • Various

... of it was this: My uncle Caimbogie was aye up at the castle, for besides his knowledge of liquor, there was nae his match for deer-stalking, or spearing a salmon, in those parts. He was a great, rough carle, it's true; but ane ye'd rather crack wi' than fight wi'. ...
— Charles O'Malley, The Irish Dragoon, Volume 2 (of 2) • Charles Lever

... Castalia, who don't look on my brew as the brew: There are fools who can't think why the names of my heroines of title should always be Hebrew. 'Twas my comrade, Sir Alister Knox, said, "Noo, dinna ye fash wi' Apollo, mon; Gang to Jewry for wives and for concubines, lad—look at David and Solomon. And it gives an erotico-scriptural twang," said that high-born young man, "—tickles The lug" (he meant ear) ...
— The Heptalogia • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... Tosh," continued Leeby; "an' there's nae doot 'at he's makkin for the minister's, for he has on his black coat. He'll be to row the minister's luggage to the post-cart. Ay, an' that's Davit Lunnan's barrow. I ken it by the shaft's bein' spliced wi' yarn. Davit broke ...
— A Window in Thrums • J. M. Barrie

... bachelor; "but it must daunt a man to hear his name loudly coupled wi' a woman's before ...
— I Saw Three Ships and Other Winter Tales • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... Heaven wi' its jasper halls Is now the on'y town I care to be in.. Good Lord, if Nick should bomb the walls As ...
— Some Diversions of a Man of Letters • Edmund William Gosse

... flummery like that, Captain," said Turnbull; "for folk will be gabbin'. But 'twas his grandsire was talked o', not him; and 'twould play the hangment wi' me doun here, if 'twas thought there was stories like that passin' ...
— J. S. Le Fanu's Ghostly Tales, Volume 3 • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

... told me how his father thrashed him, and divers household matters. Whenever he saw a woman on our way he looked after her over my shoulder and then gave his judgment: "That's no her," adding sometimes, "She has a wean wi' her." Meantime I was telling him how I was going to take him to a gentleman who would find out his mother for him quicker than ever I could, and how he must not be afraid of him, but be brave, as he had been ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 23 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... born with a kind o' a twist in my back, even if nobody don't see it. No, I wasn't born in no castle. Well, I gotta do what I c'n do with my twist. All right. What d'you want? 'Tain't for the rats you're keepin' me. You wanta hush up somethin' wi' that whore! ...
— The Dramatic Works of Gerhart Hauptmann - Volume II • Gerhart Hauptmann

... him say—for he lived to be ninety, nevertheless—was poor compensation for the drifts, and the inflienza, and the broken chilblains; but now and again they'd get a fair skinful of liquor from a jolly squire, as 'd set 'em up like boggarts mended wi' new broomsticks." ...
— At a Winter's Fire • Bernard Edward J. Capes

... There is an ancient children's song which consists of a series of questions asked an elk, and its replies to the same. In one place, the questioner sings, "Elk, what is your bowl (or dish)?" and the elk answers, "Ok-wi-tok-so-ka," stone bowl. On this point, Wolf Calf, a very old man, states that in early days the Blackfeet sometimes boiled their meat in a stone bowl made out of a hard clayey rock.[1] Choosing a fragment of the right size and shape, they would pound it with another ...
— Blackfoot Lodge Tales • George Bird Grinnell

... by rail to Wi-ju, a small place on the left bank of the Yalu River, which forms the boundary between Korea and Manchuria. Opposite, on the right or north bank of the Yalu, stands An-tung, a town with 5000 Japanese and 40,000 Chinese inhabitants. The river had just begun to freeze over, and ...
— From Pole to Pole - A Book for Young People • Sven Anders Hedin

... unexplained),[1420] or the earth is represented as the mother of all things (California). Elaborate cosmogonies are found in New Zealand (the Maoris), in North America (the Pawnees, the Lenape, and so forth), in Australia, and elsewhere. An interesting example is the Californian Achom[a]wi cosmogony. In the beginning, according to this scheme, were only the sea and the sky, and from the sky came down the Creator; or a cloud, at first tiny, grew large, condensed, and became the Silver-Gray Fox, the Creator, and out of a fog, which in like manner was condensed, ...
— Introduction to the History of Religions - Handbooks on the History of Religions, Volume IV • Crawford Howell Toy

... the matter wi' ye?" asked the other. "I didna hear that ye were sick or hurt. How comes it ye are here? Can it be that ye ha' been to the war, man, and we not hearing of ...
— A Minstrel In France • Harry Lauder

... And set my bright sword at my head, Mine arrows at my feet, And lay my yew-bow by my side, My met-yard wi . ...
— Ballads of Robin Hood and other Outlaws - Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - Fourth Series • Frank Sidgwick

... his head, "that's the lads. They're good lads when you let em alone. But what it'll be now they maids get meddling again us can't foretell. It were bad enough afore, wi' their quarrelsomeness and their shilly-shally. It sends all things to ...
— Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard • Eleanor Farjeon

... thank God; we be Newton choir. Though a man is just buried here, that's true; and we've raised a carrel over the poor mortal's natomy. What—do my eyes see before me young Luke Holway, that went wi' his regiment to the East Indies, or do I see his spirit straight from the battlefield? Be you the ...
— A Changed Man and Other Tales • Thomas Hardy

... Colin coming to the honours of the family, and regarded this new marriage as a crossing of Providence. She vainly endeavoured to stir up Master Colin to remonstrate on his brother's "makin' siccan a fule's bargain wi' yon glaikit lass. My certie, but he'll hae the warst o't, honest man; rinnin' after her, wi' a' her whigmaleries an' cantrips. He'll rue the day that e'er he bowed his noble head to the ...
— The Clever Woman of the Family • Charlotte M. Yonge

... before I kist, That love had been sae ill to win, I had lockt my heart in a case of gowd And pinn'd it wi' a siller pin. And O! if my young babe were born, And set upon the nurse's knee, And I mysell were dead and gane, And the ...
— The Golden Treasury - Of the Best Songs and Lyrical Poems in the English Language • Various

... ye for? T' maister's down i' t' fowld. There's nobbut t' missis. I'll hae no hend wi't," muttered the ...
— The Worlds Greatest Books - Vol. II: Fiction • Arthur Mee, J. A. Hammerton, Eds.

... inquiries after you when the guard finds your compartment empty an' the door open. May be the train'll put back; more likely they'll send a search-party; but anyways you're all wet through, an' the best thing for health is to off wi' your clothes an' ...
— News from the Duchy • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... cried. "Lemme git out." . . . And she was out, with the bound of a deer. "You g'long," she said; "a'm sorry a rode this far wi' you. You'll larf 'bout muh bar foots, an' this hyuh rag o' mine, wi' them po' white trash an' niggers. Whar you fum, anyhow? You hain't a Fuginia feller. A kin tell by yo' talk. You called roots 'ruts' jess now, an' yuh said we'd 'sun' be whar them other fellers be. ...
— Southern Literature From 1579-1895 • Louise Manly

... aboard ship. But I can offer ye something better than the berth of ship's boy; we have but one carpenter among us, and I will gladly take you on with the rating of carpenter's mate, if that will suit ye. Iss, fegs, that I will! Now, what say ye? Shall us call it a bargain, and have done wi' it?" ...
— Two Gallant Sons of Devon - A Tale of the Days of Queen Bess • Harry Collingwood

... The second day she did the same, and saw nocht. The third day she looked again, and on coming back said to the auld wife she saw nocht but a muckle Black Bull coming roaring alang the road. "Aweel," quo' the auld wife, "yon's for you." On hearing this she was next to distracted wi' grief and terror; but she was lifted up and set on his ...
— The Blue Fairy Book • Various

... the yard; eats up all that he can catch; and never a one would have been left to tell the tale, if the great giantical hostler (him as blacked your shoes) hadn't ha' cudgelled him off. And after all this, there are you hopping away at the ball wi' some painted doll—looking babies in her eyes—quite forgetting me that has to sit up for you at home pining and grieving: and all isn't enough, but at last you must trot off ...
— The Uncollected Writings of Thomas de Quincey, Vol. 2 - With a Preface and Annotations by James Hogg • Thomas de Quincey

... ye in the wont of drawing up wi' a' the gangrel bodies that ye find cowering in a ...
— The Romance of Names • Ernest Weekley

... "Go wan wi' yer wurruk, ye idlers!" he suddenly commanded the others. And then he explained to me that Mr. Cardigan was not in, neither was Mr. Jackson. In fact, Mr. Cardigan had not been in for a hundred years—being dead. But if I wanted to look at goods I ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Vol. 2 of 14 - Little Journeys To the Homes of Famous Women • Elbert Hubbard

... hear that, Missy Rosy. I begun to think 't want no use to cook nice tidbits for ye, if ye jist turned 'em over wi' yer fork, and ate one or two mouthfuls, without knowing what ...
— A Romance of the Republic • Lydia Maria Francis Child

... go with you, with all my heart," said the other; "only then you mustn't think, mayster, as it's all on your own account as says so; it wouldn't be honest to let you think so. Truth is, I've been having a talk wi' a good minister as came a-preaching where we were on the Sabbath up at the diggings; and he's opened my eyes a bit; or, rather, the Lord's opened 'em through him. So you see, I've been asking him what's my duty about ...
— Frank Oldfield - Lost and Found • T.P. Wilson

... as we'n heerd. Theer wur a chap as towd some on us last neet as yo'd getten th' sack fro' th' managers—or leastways as yo'd turned th' tables on 'em an' gi'en them th' sack yo'rsen. An' we'n heerd as it begun wi' yo're standin' up fur us chaps—axin' fur things as wur wanted i' th' pit to save us fro' runnin' more risk than we need. An' we heerd as yo' spoke up bold, an' argied for us an' stood to what yo' thowt war th' reet thing, an' we set our moinds on tellin' yo' as we'd heerd it an' ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 7 • Various

... 'Be quiet, wi' the', Sylvia? Thou'st splashing me all ower, and my feyther'll noane be so keen o' giving me a new cloak ...
— Sylvia's Lovers, Vol. I • Elizabeth Gaskell

... deevils ye ever saw. He was gayan big for a monkey, and was hairy a' ower, except his face and his bit hurdies, which had a degree of bareness about them, and were nearly as saft as a lady's loof. Weel, what think ye that I did wi' the beastie? Odds, man, I dressed him up like a Heelandman, and put a kilt upon him, and a lang-tailed red coat, and a blue bannet, which for security's sake I tied, woman-like, below his chin wi' twa bits of yellow ribbon. I not only did this, but I learnt him to walk ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, - Issue 275, September 29, 1827 • Various

... you there," said Mr. Callender quietly; "and I'm observing in ye of late a tendency to combine business wi' compleement. But it was kind of ye to call; and I'll be sending ye ...
— The Bell-Ringer of Angel's and Other Stories • Bret Harte

... a soight too cliver; he were that mean he slew nobbutt a wankling cauf as were bound to deny anny road; if he had nobbutt tekken his best cauf it wud hev worked reight enuff; 'tain't in reason that owd skrat 'ud be hanselled wi' wankling draffle."[795] ...
— Balder The Beautiful, Vol. I. • Sir James George Frazer

... forget, when I come back to town, An' wander the old ways again, an' tread them up and down. I never smell the clover bloom, nor see the swallows pass, Wi'out I mind how good ye were unto a little lass; I never hear the winter rain a-pelting all night through Wi'out I think and mind me of how cold it falls on you. An' if I come not often to your bed beneath the thyme, Mayhap 't is that I'd change wi' ye, and gie my bed for thine, ...
— The Little Book of Modern Verse • Jessie B. Rittenhouse

... encased in a brass scabbard, on which was inscribed the name of a kinsman upon whom the weapon had been bestowed by Sir William Wallace, from whose patriotism and bravery comes that heart-stirring air, "Scots wha hae wi' ...
— Retrospection and Introspection • Mary Baker Eddy

... imp o' death, how durst ye dwell Within this pure and hallow'd cell, Thy purposes I ken fu' well Are to destroy, And wi' a mortal breathing spell, To blast ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 388 - Vol. 14, No. 388, Saturday, September 5, 1829. • Various

... Mrs. Graham called on a poor woman with a present of a new gown. "I am obliged to you and her ladyship for your kindness," said the poor woman rich in faith, "but I maun gang to the right airth first; ye wad na hae come, gin ye had na been sent; the Lord hath left me lately wi' but ae goon for week-day and Sabbath, but now he has sent you wi' a Sabbath-day's goon." Meaning, in plain English, that her thankfulness was first due to the God of providence, who had put it into the hearts of his children to supply the wants ...
— The Power of Faith - Exemplified In The Life And Writings Of The Late Mrs. Isabella Graham. • Isabella Graham

... and the 'lobby-interest' at Albany; if we may judge from a quatrain before us, which hints at a verbal peculiarity of our excellent representative, Alderman VARIAN, whose v always takes the form of a w, especially in his rendering of a foreign tongue; as witness his being 'just on the qwi-wi-we for the capitol,' on one occasion, and the subjoined versification of another of his Latin sentences, with ...
— Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, March 1844 - Volume 23, Number 3 • Various

... you ha' the bra' time before you, you maun e'en try and be as geud as he. And if life last, ye wull too; for there never waur a bad ane of that stock. Wi' heads kindly stup'd to the least, and lifted manfu' oop to the heighest,—that ye all war' sin ye came from the Ark. Blessin's on the ould name! though little pelf goes with it, it sounds on the peur man's ear like a bit ...
— The Caxtons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... a hurt heart, who will sell me for this * A heart whole and free from all canker and smart? Nay, none will consent or to barter or buy * Such loss, ne'er from sorrow and sickness to part: I groan wi' the groaning of wine-wounded men * And pine for the pining ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 7 • Richard F. Burton

... young and the unwary here in this michty 'caravansy'! My leddy, there's not a decent lass in the place—only men to serve ye and make the beds. 'Thank ye kindly,' says I, 'but I, Aline Minto, shall make my ain.' So after I had let Eelen Young sleep with me one night, I packed her aff wi' the next coach and paid David Colvill, the guard, to look after her to Dumfries, where she has a sister ...
— Patsy • S. R. Crockett

... still more when I think of my allowing myself so long to keep my eyes shut to what I ought to have seen long ago. But the only apology I make to myself is, that one does not wish to think so ill of human nature. There is an old Scotch proverb, 'He has need o' a lang spoon that sups wi' the De'il,' and since we are engaged, let us try if we can partake of the broth without scalding ourselves. I still hope that we may; and however much my feelings revolt at having any connection in future with them, yet I shall endeavour ...
— A Publisher and His Friends • Samuel Smiles

... and wiser in time," he said; "and sure the Lord 'ud never be angered wi' two young creatures seeking after Him ...
— The Christmas Child • Hesba Stretton

... I never told you before, Kiddie, but that day when your outfit was attacked by the Injuns, I heard one of Nick's chums say ter him—time you was ridin' alone in advance of the wagons—that now was the chance if Nick had a mind ter put a bullet inter you an' vamoose wi' the boodle." ...
— Kiddie the Scout • Robert Leighton

... plate was bought for three hundred and eighty pound, and kept close at White Works till 'twas known that Jonathan meant to go away and bide away some days. Then my mother drove across with it; and Thomas made the cases wi' old rotten boards, and they drove a slant hole under the cobbles, and got all vitty again long afore young Drake came ...
— Humorous Ghost Stories • Dorothy Scarborough

... Johnnie Cope!" and you may understand one side of Scottish character. The Border ballads, that go lilting along to the galloping of horses and jingling of spurs, are the interpretation of another side. The same active influence accompanies the Jacobite songs—"Up wi' the bonnets for bonnie Dundee!" filled many a legion for Prince Charles—and the blood kindles yet to their fife-like and drum-like movements. Again, the stately rhythm and march of some of the oldest airs make ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 26, August, 1880 - of Popular Literature and Science • Various

... her, and hold her dear, Heaven prosper thee and thine: And now my blessing wend wi' thee, My ...
— The Book of Brave Old Ballads • Unknown

... more on us what goes to Reuben Izod's at The Bell, we come in to 'ave our drink. And, mind you, pretty nigh all on us 'ad a-bin mouldin'-up taters all day, so's to get them finished afore the hay; so us could do wi' a drop. ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, August 1, 1917. • Various

... his hammock an' a thousand mile away, (Capten, art tha sleepin' there below?), Slung atween the round shot in Nombre Dios Bay, An' dreamin' arl the time o' Plymouth Hoe. Yarnder lumes the Island, yarnder lie the ships, Wi' sailor lads a dancin' heel-an'-toe, An' the shore-lights flashin', an' the night-tide dashin', He sees et arl so plainly as ...
— Poems: New and Old • Henry Newbolt

... here, and they're soopin' now. Postman's coom over fra' Drigg wi' a letter—will it be for wan of ye?' and she held out an eccentrically shaped and tinted envelope; 'there's a bonny ...
— The Giant's Robe • F. Anstey

... Lord Wellington: Ye daurna gang wi' me: For ye hae been ance in the land o' France, ...
— The Bon Gaultier Ballads • William Edmonstoune Aytoun

... By my troth, yes; I count it but time lost to hear such a foolish song. God be wi' you; and God mend ...
— Shakespeare and Music - With Illustrations from the Music of the 16th and 17th centuries • Edward W. Naylor

... hungry: I'm na that well off that I canna remember the time when I knew what it was to be on short commons, mysel'," he said; and the unconscious lapse into the mother idiom was a measure of his perturbation. "Take this, now, and be off wi' you, and we'll say no ...
— The Price • Francis Lynde

... my mistress, Bridget," said Mammy, "though it's often I'm forced to pray for patience wi' her." ...
— Lewie - Or, The Bended Twig • Cousin Cicely

... The liveryman knew the signs. This was not the first veteran to drift into Tubacca; he wouldn't be the last either. Seems like half of both them armies back east didn't want to go home an' sit down peaceful like now that they was through wi' shootin' at each other. No, siree, a right big herd o' 'em was trailin' out here. An' he thought he could put name to the color of coat this young'un had had on his back, too. Only askin' more than a man volunteered to tell, that warn't ...
— Rebel Spurs • Andre Norton

... you say, are of jasper cut, And the gates are gaudy wi' gold and gem; But there's times I could wish as the gates was shut— The ...
— Grass of Parnassus • Andrew Lang

... bonny Glenshee); Weary the marches made, sad the towns harried O, But in fancy the heather was aye at my knee: The hill-berry mellowing, stag o' ten bellowing, The song o' the fold and the tale by the hearth, Bairns at the crying and auld folks a-dying, The Hielan's sent wi' me to ...
— John Splendid - The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn • Neil Munro

... laughin' roses are my lips, Forget-me-nots my ee, It's many a lad they're drivin' mad; Shall they not so wi' ye? Heigho! the morning dew! Heigho! the rose and rue! Follow me, my bonny lad, For ...
— Flamsted quarries • Mary E. Waller

... to have a smock which was considerably too short to answer all the purposes of that piece of dress, our farmer was so tickled that he involuntarily burst out with a loud laugh: 'Weel luppen, Maggy wi' the short sark!' and recollecting himself, instantly spurred his horse to the top of his speed. I need not mention the universally known fact, that no diabolical power can pursue you beyond the middle of a running stream. Lucky it was for the poor farmer that the river Doon was ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... looks of her; and a passel of lubberin' furriners aboard, by the way she was worked. I seed her miss stays twice myself: so when Jonathan turns up wi' this tale, I says to myself, 'tis the very same. Though 'tis terrible queer he never heard nowt; but he ain't got a ha'porth o' gumption, let alone that by time he's been cloppin' round his seven mile o' beat half a dozen ships might go to ...
— Dead Man's Rock • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... "we are auld freens; it is weel that we shud staun' thegither. If ye will trade a' yir furs wi' me this day, I'll get the meenister o' the Presybyterian Kirk tae mairry yir gran'dochter. He'll be gled eneuch tae gi'e Father Jois a dour by mairryin' twa o' his fowk. Sell me yir furs, an' I'll warrant ye ye'll hae ...
— The Drama of the Forests - Romance and Adventure • Arthur Heming

... "What's th' matter wi' che?" he demanded. He did not quite understand the words of this little man who glared at him steadily, but he knew that it was something about fighting. He snarled with the readiness of his class and heaved his shoulders contemptuously. "Ah, what's eatin' yeh? Take a walk! You ...
— Men, Women, and Boats • Stephen Crane

... said the old gentleman angrily; "the girlies are weel eneugh; I see naething the matter wi' them; they're no dresse like auld queens or stage-actresses;" and he glance his eye from Lady Maclaughlan to his elegant daughter-in-law, who just then entered, hanging, according to custom, on her husband, and preceded ...
— Marriage • Susan Edmonstone Ferrier

... similarly a bloodthirsty and fearsome demon. She is most virulent in the springtime. At Cromarty she is quaintly called "Gentle Annie" by the fisher folks, who repeat the saying: "When Gentle Annie is skyawlan (yelling) roond the heel of Ness (a promontory) wi' a white feather on her hat (the foam of big billows) they (the spirits) will be harrying (robbing) the crook"—that is, the pot which hangs from the crook is empty during the spring storms, which ...
— Myths of Babylonia and Assyria • Donald A. Mackenzie

... do it: my boat's too good. So look here, if you two likes to come for a bit o' fishing, I'll take the big scrarping spoon with me, and go to a bank I know after we've done, and try and fish you up a basket o' oysters. If you comes you comes, but if you arn't wi' me soon arter dinner, why, I hystes my sail and goes by myself. ...
— Cormorant Crag - A Tale of the Smuggling Days • George Manville Fenn

... 'Nay,' and so the old 'ooman put herself into a woundy passion wi' I. 'Not make a dinner of horsebeans, you dainty dog,' says she; 'I wish you may never have a worse.'—'Noa, mother,' says I, 'I hope I never shall.' And she did put herself into such a tantrum, to be sure—so I bolted; whereby, ...
— The Sketches of Seymour (Illustrated), Complete • Robert Seymour

... to a mad-house. You was clean off your head an' didn' know me from Adam; an' I never let on that I knew you or the ship you'd sailed in. 'Seemed to me the hand o' God was in it, an' I saw my way to cry quits wi' Naomi." ...
— The Delectable Duchy • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... John Barleycorn! What dangers thou canst make us scorn! Wi' tippenny, we fear nae evil; Wi' ...
— Lights and Shadows in Confederate Prisons - A Personal Experience, 1864-5 • Homer B. Sprague

... my Jean, when the bell ca's the congregation Owre valley an' hill wi' the ding frae its iron mou', When a'body's thochts is set on his ain salvation, Mine's set ...
— Songs of Angus and More Songs of Angus • Violet Jacob

... I'll be wantin', when I know how you burns my best 'namel saucepan in the doin' of it. 'Tis a mercy I've got the honey all in, and now there'll be the apples to be gathered and preserved; and who's to have the doin' of it, wi' you, whose heart and hands are only in the dressmakin', and me a achin' and smartin' wi' pains from head to toe, ...
— The Carved Cupboard • Amy Le Feuvre

... Garfield, who at once said, "I guess they won't know me when I get home, with my new suit—and a dog!" The two romped the decks thenceforth, early and late. It was good to see them romp, while "Friday" "barkit wi' joy." ...
— Voyage of the Liberdade • Captain Joshua Slocum

... answered. "She winna be there, I daursay, but I wad jist like to see; for I wadna like her to be beeried gin sae be 'at she was there, wi'oot ...
— The Seaboard Parish Vol. 3 • George MacDonald

... he. "Then perhaps canst tell me the name of a great loathly lump of a brother wi' freckled face an' a hand like a spade. His eyes were black an' his hair was red an' his voice like the parish bull. I trow that there cannot be two ...
— The White Company • Arthur Conan Doyle

... Away wi' carking care and gloom That make life's pathway weedy O! A cheerful glass makes flowers to bloom And lightsome ...
— The Love Affairs of a Bibliomaniac • Eugene Field

... he answered, his countenance resuming its customary aspect of resigned melancholy. "I be a brand plucked from the burning, I be. There beant much wrong wi' Deacon Sawyers, now." ...
— Novel Notes • Jerome K. Jerome

... was fourteen foot deep," said the farmer. "What d'ye think we dug oot from the bottom o't? Weel, it was just the skeleton of a man wi' a spear by his side. I'm thinkin' he was grippin' it when he died. Now, how cam' a man wi' a spear doon a hole fourteen foot deep? He wasna' buried there, for they aye burned their dead. What make ...
— The Last Galley Impressions and Tales - Impressions and Tales • Arthur Conan Doyle

... retained for many years the gift of discerning the earth-visiting spirits; but on one occasion, happening to meet the fairy lady who had given her the child, she attempted to shake hands with her. "What ee d' ye see me wi'?" whispered she. "Wi' them baith," answered the matron. The fairy accordingly breathed on her eyes; and even the power of the box failed afterwards to restore their enchanted vision. A Carnarvonshire story, probably incomplete, makes no mention of the ointment conferring supernatural sight; ...
— The Science of Fairy Tales - An Inquiry into Fairy Mythology • Edwin Sidney Hartland

... mun very nearly did," answered the captain; "indeed, if it hadn't ha' been for young Garge Saint Leger—who, bein' out of his time, I've made pilot in place of poor Matthews, who was killed in a bout wi' the Barbary rovers on our outward voyage—he'd ha' had us, sure as pigs baint nightingales. But Garge have got the fiend's own gift for tongues and languages, and the night avore we sailed he happened to be ashore lookin' round Santander, and while he were standin' ...
— The Cruise of the Nonsuch Buccaneer • Harry Collingwood

... apparel, seemed to have been a follower of the camp,—"I ken them weel, and the tale's as true as a bullet to its aim and a spark to powder. O bonnie Corriewater, a thousand times have I pulled gowans on its banks wi' ane that lies stiff and stark on a foreign shore in a bloody grave;" and, sobbing audibly, she drew the remains of a military cloak over her face, and allowed the story ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends - Scotland • Anonymous

... man wi' tott'ring gait, Wi' body bent, and snowy pate, Aw met one day;— An' daan o' th' rooad side grassy banks He sat to rest his weary shanks; An' aw, to wile away my time, O'th' neighbouring hillock did recline, ...
— Yorkshire Ditties, Second Series - To which is added The Cream of Wit and Humour - from his Popular Writings • John Hartley

... was in church, hymn-playin', wi' Luke Stock hangin' roond door,' he retorted bitterly, rebuffing ...
— Victorian Short Stories • Various

... the amorous Silvy Said to her shepherd, 'Sweet, how do you? Kiss me this once, and then God be wi' you, My sweetest dear! Kiss me this once and then God be wi' you, For ...
— Lyrics from the Song-Books of the Elizabethan Age • Various

... mornin'," MacDonald continued, "win' a word frae the Book aboot the Lord providin', an' he'd starve if nabody was by t' cook his meal. He canna build a fire wi'oot scorchin' his fingers. He lays hold o' a paddle like a three months' babby. He bids ye pit yer trust i' the Lord, an' himself rises up wi' a start every time a wolf raises the long howl at nicht. I didna believe there was ever sae helpless a creature. An' for a' that he's the laddie ...
— Burned Bridges • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... believe as we have been murdered and throw'd overboard, or else he'll think that we're among the dead as'll be unrecognisable. Then, thinkin' us dead—for he'll not dream that it's been possible for us to have hidden ourselves here and escaped these ruffians—he will continue his v'yage wi'out troublin' to come back here; and here we shall remain, perhaps till we die. That's the reason why I'm so anxious to attract their attention afore they runs out o' sight of us; for, if we're not seen now, you may depend ...
— Across the Spanish Main - A Tale of the Sea in the Days of Queen Bess • Harry Collingwood

... out," said Peter quietly. "The hoss-stealer's come, an' nearly killed his mother ter begin with; an' if yer don't get yer physic-box an' come wi' me, ...
— On the Track • Henry Lawson

... Our cat's dead. What did she die wi'? Wi' a sair head. A' you that kenned her While she was alive, Come to her burying ...
— Magnum Bonum • Charlotte M. Yonge

... story. The time is about 1824-1830. In the Scotch dialect "weel a weel" means "all right"; "till" means "to"; "I'se" means "I shall"; "he's" means "he shall"; "ower clean to beil" means "too clean to suppurate"; "fremyt" means "strange"; "a' the lave" means "all the rest"; "in the treviss wi' the mear" means "in the stall with ...
— Short Stories Old and New • Selected and Edited by C. Alphonso Smith

... then ceased, and Wi-ki sent Ka-tci to bring him a light. Ka-tci went out, and soon returned with a burning corncob, while all sat silently awaiting Wi-ki's preparation for the great O-mow-uh smoke, which was one of the most sacred acts performed by the ...
— Archeological Expedition to Arizona in 1895 • Jesse Walter Fewkes

... wi' Wallace bled,"' sang Hollyhock in her rich, clear voice. 'Aweel, I love him better than ever, the bonnie lad with ...
— Hollyhock - A Spirit of Mischief • L. T. Meade

... and retired in grief * From tryst-place and camp where my dearlings lay: I turned me unknowing the way nor joyed * My soul, but in hopes to return some day. Oh listen, my friend, to the words of love * God forbid thy heart forget all I say! O my soul when thou partest wi' them, part too * With all joys of life nor ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 8 • Richard F. Burton



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