Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




US   /əs/  /jˈuˈɛs/   Listen
US

noun
1.
North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776.  Synonyms: America, the States, U.S., U.S.A., United States, United States of America, USA.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"US" Quotes from Famous Books



... Let us suppose a mind thoroughly imbued with these new truths, to be placed on the orbit of Saturn, and let him observe[3110]. Amidst this vast and overwhelming space and in these boundless solar archipelagoes, how small is our own sphere, and the earth, what a grain ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 1 (of 6) - The Ancient Regime • Hippolyte A. Taine

... years later, after long suffering, like her husband, the last silence fell on this brave and stormy nature. Let us thank God for it as we look out upon Europe and see what her son ...
— A Writer's Recollections (In Two Volumes), Volume II • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... carbonic acid, and what remains behind, becomes richer in nitrogen and mineral matters. A parallel case, showing the dissipation of carbonaceous matter, and the increase in the percentage of nitrogen and mineral matter in what is left behind, is presented to us in fresh and rotten dung; in long or fresh dung, the percentage of organic matter, consisting chiefly of very imperfectly decomposed straw, being larger, and that of nitrogen and mineral matter ...
— Talks on Manures • Joseph Harris

... to guides, I am reminded that our acquaintanceship with the second member of the Mark Twain brotherhood was staged in Paris. This gentleman wished himself on us one afternoon at the Hotel des Invalides. We did not engage him; he engaged us, doing the trick with such finesse and skill that before we realized it we had been retained to accompany him to various points of interest in and round ...
— Europe Revised • Irvin S. Cobb

... "let us perish but exhibit all our points. Your arms and hands were modeled for some untraced Greek ancestress and born again. Your neck is almost as good as mine, ...
— The Sisters-In-Law • Gertrude Atherton

... whose silvery voice we no longer hear humbly invoking the divine blessing; or perhaps the mother, and how studiously we keep our eye away from the seat where her generous hand was wont to pour our tea. Perhaps the little one, the idol of the household, whose chirruping voice was wont to set us all laughing with droll remarks, expressed in baby dialect. How we miss the little high-chair that was always drawn up 'close by papa!' How our eyes will swim and our hearts swell up and choke us when we see it pushed back into ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. I, No. VI, June, 1862 - Devoted To Literature and National Policy • Various

... O Bharata, the son of Kunti, king Yudhishthira the just, along with his brothers, then asked Markandeya saying, 'It hath been heard by us that both Vaka and Dalvya are of great souls and endowed with immortality and that those Rishis, held in universal reverence, are the friends of the chief of the gods. O Holy One, I desire to listen lo the (history of the) meeting of Vaka and Indra ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... of the world. A woman of her sort has no sympathy to expect; her stock in trade vanishes without replenishment, and her business does not build. In spite of herself she cannot help envying and imitating the good women. As a certain great man has confessed, "There is so much good in the worst of us," that there is hardly any fun in being bad. It is almost impossible to be very bad or very good very ...
— We Can't Have Everything • Rupert Hughes

... in it, so I knew the turnkey had never come to the top of the water again, and, indeed, there was but little chance he should after that first knock. Elzevir said nothing to me, till I spoke: 'Let us fling the jewel down the well after him, Master Block; it was evilly come by, and will ...
— Moonfleet • J. Meade Falkner

... said, slowly, "that eighth verse settles it: 'For meat commendeth us not to God, for neither if we eat are we the better, neither if we eat not are we the worse.' It certainly can do no one any harm if I let cards alone, and it is equally certain that it may do harm if I play them. I should think my ...
— The Chautauqua Girls At Home • Pansy, AKA Isabella M. Alden

... seen similar games, so there's no need of my describing this one, even if I could. It was my first experience, however, and it impressed me greatly. When the teams appeared I recognized Running Elk at a distance. So did the hordes of madmen behind us, and I began to understand for the first time what it was that the old man in the seat next ...
— Laughing Bill Hyde and Other Stories • Rex Beach

... Confuted) that Churchyard's aged muse might well be "grandmother to our grandiloquentest poets at this present." Francis Meres (Palladis Tamia, 1598) mentions him in conjunction with many great names among "the most passionate, among us, to bewail and bemoan the perplexities of love." Spenser, in "Colin Clout's come home again," calls him with a spice of raillery "old Palaemon" who "sung so long until quite hoarse he grew." His writings, with the exception ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 3 - "Chitral" to "Cincinnati" • Various

... can read for himself. But please come with me to the churchyard; let us wander there where the sun shines and the trees grow green. Each of the narrow houses is like a closed book, with the back placed uppermost, so that one can only read the title and judge what the book contains, but can tell nothing about it; but I know something ...
— What the Moon Saw: and Other Tales • Hans Christian Andersen

... feature of this unconformability is that the beds of the younger formation rest upon a worn and eroded surface formed by the beds of the older series (fig. 18); and a moment's consideration will show us what this indicates. It indicates, beyond the possibility of misconception, that there was an interval between the deposition of the older series and that of the newer series of strata; and that during this interval the older beds were raised ...
— The Ancient Life History of the Earth • Henry Alleyne Nicholson

... us back to our muttons—in this case only a defenceless baby lamb. Now tell me what you are here for, trying to cajole me with your good looks ...
— Beyond The Rocks - A Love Story • Elinor Glyn

... here, just as much as if you really owned it; nobody can take it from you; there it is, and there it must remain. That is the reason they built our academy on this high hill, so it should be ours, a part of our education,—'Grow into us,' Miss Ashton says, and ...
— Miss Ashton's New Pupil - A School Girl's Story • Mrs. S. S. Robbins

... little in the beginning, there is still truth in the assertion of the devotee that if you practice them they will begin to mean something to you. This is not merely that a meaning will be self-induced. It is more than that. They will put us in the volitional attitude, the emotional mood, where the meaning is able to penetrate. Just as all the world acknowledges that there is an essential connection between good manners and good morals, between military discipline and physical courage, so there ...
— Preaching and Paganism • Albert Parker Fitch

... going to be posted by the last of the tourists, luckily a clergyman, whom we begged to baptize the boy, as there is a possibility that snows may close us in before ...
— That Stick • Charlotte M. Yonge

... so cheap. All the way to Indian Head and back for a quarter. It's a godsend for us poor tired folks who have to stay in town all summer. And you know what that means, ...
— The Statesmen Snowbound • Robert Fitzgerald

... at this moment is only kept up by a species of artifice; if the illusion which stands for reality were destroyed, if the confidence at present inseparable from the working staff were to fail, what would become of us with a deficit of a hundred millions every year? Without a doubt no time must be lost in filling up a void so enormous; and that can be done only by great measures. The plan I have formed appears to me the one that can solve so difficult a problem. Solely occupied with this great ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume VI. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... in her round of seeking, let us look at the sphere in which her future was to lie. In 1889 Chicago had the peculiar qualifications of growth which made such adventuresome pilgrimages even on the part of young girls plausible. Its many and growing commercial ...
— Sister Carrie • Theodore Dreiser

... afraid of you. Now, why don't you make us fellows behave? You ought to protect the little boys from fellows that impose on them. Then you'd be a king worth the having. All the boys and girls would ...
— The Hoosier School-boy • Edward Eggleston

... We know the effect of habit in all mechanical operations, and the Spaniards bear constant testimony to the adroitness and accuracy of the Peruvians in this. Their skill is not more surprising than the facility with which habit enables us to master the contents of a printed page, comprehending thousands of separate characters, by a single glance, as it were, though each character must require a distinct recognition by the eye, and that, too, without ...
— History Of The Conquest Of Peru • William Hickling Prescott

... out here have their boundaries marked by wire fences, and it is supposed to be a deadly sin to cut these. Well, the lodge-keeper's son dashed off in search of help. A chap called Chester, an Old Wykehamist, and I were dipping sheep close by, so he came to us and told us what had happened. We nipped on to a couple of horses, pulled out our revolvers, and tooled after him. After a bit we overtook him, and that's when the trouble began. The johnny had dismounted when we arrived. I thought he was simply tightening ...
— Mike • P. G. Wodehouse

... handiwork of your dear mother, and they decorated the walls of your own nursery when you were a little child at your mother's knee. For over ten long years they have surrounded me and kept your faces fresh in my memory—though, truth to tell, it needed no such reminders to do that. Come, let us ...
— Blown to Bits - The Lonely Man of Rakata, the Malay Archipelago • R.M. Ballantyne

... there was a dull soft sound, once, twice, thrice repeated. We rushed forward, but too late. The gates were closed upon us. The two folds of the great Porte St. Lambert, and the little postern for foot-passengers, all at once, not hurriedly, as from any fear of us, but slowly, softly, rolled on their hinges and shut—in our faces. I rushed forward with all my force and ...
— A Beleaguered City • Mrs. Oliphant

... sin. What a source, for example, of mischief without end in our country parishes is the one practice of calling a child born out of wedlock a 'love-child,' instead of a bastard. It would be hard to estimate how much it has lowered the tone and standard of morality among us; or for how many young women it may have helped to make the downward way more sloping still. How vigorously ought we to oppose ourselves to all such immoralities of language. This opposition, it is true, will never be easy or pleasant; for many who will endure ...
— On the Study of Words • Richard C Trench

... whether they meant to make a gipsy of me. They were very careful not to let me be seen by other travellers. When the road was clear, they would let me follow the caravan on foot; but when people drove past us, and whenever we came to a village (they always avoided the big towns), they hurried me into the waggon, and kept me from peeping out. At night, when we pitched our camp, after a long day's journey of sixteen ...
— Jim Davis • John Masefield

... here in the Elizabethan wars—and a nice hand he made of them; not, God knows, that we ought to regret it, but I like a good general whether he is for us or against us—devil a doubt of that: well, when Essex was over here conducting them (with reverence be it spoken) it so happened that he had a scoundrel with him by name Hamilton—and a thorough scoundrel was ...
— The Evil Eye; Or, The Black Spector - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... ELLIPSIS} Their words and precepts, O King, and the glory of their worship and their hope of receiving reward, which they look for in another world, according to the work of each one, you can learn about from their writings. It is enough for us to have informed your Majesty in a few words concerning the conduct and truth of the Christians. For great, indeed, and wonderful is their doctrine for him who will study it and reflect upon it. And verily this is a new people, and there ...
— A Source Book for Ancient Church History • Joseph Cullen Ayer, Jr., Ph.D.

... will come with me to William of Normandy, and help us against Harold, the perjured, then will William do for him all that Harold would have ...
— Hereward, The Last of the English • Charles Kingsley

... your mother? And do you look down on me? Yet I'll be bound you think you know a sight more than both of us put together." ...
— Carette of Sark • John Oxenham

... every one of us," said Mrs. Morell, with tears, to the elderly homely governess, "that we are under the deepest obligations to you. But for you, the children would have grown up without any education at all. And, for the greatest service you or ...
— The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 2, January, 1851 • Various

... was the reply. "Everybody knew that the young leddy an' you were on the Wye: 'deed to goodness, some of us thought you were in it. Anyways, it was long ...
— Cynthia's Chauffeur • Louis Tracy

... back, I tried to see what was going on from some high ground close by. Rain was falling heavily, and the atmosphere was foggy and misty. I watched as best I could for some little time what was going forward, until I felt assured that the tide of battle was flowing very favourably for us. I then got back as quickly as possible to Headquarters at St. Omer, where reports were awaiting me. I learnt that the town had been heavily bombed by hostile aircraft during the day. Much damage was done to buildings, and several soldiers and civilians had been ...
— 1914 • John French, Viscount of Ypres

... said, "alone of all of us you do not risk your head in this adventure. For that reason, and to prevent all hesitation, I venture to propose the order should ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 7 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... has happened to us? We've been drifting apart. We're very far apart now. You don't really want to come back at all. And I—I could easily say, 'Then don't come.' I'm capable of that just now. And you ...
— The House of Toys • Henry Russell Miller

... giant's plan, And to his brother thus began: "O Lakshman, let Viradha still Hurry us onward as he will, For look, Sumitra's son, he goes Along ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... it availed itself early; even in the time of Homer it was noted for its wealth. It was subdued by the Dorians, and for five generations the royal power rested with the descendants of Aletes [107], of the family of the Heraclidae. By a revolution, the causes of which are unknown to us, the kingdom then passed to Bacchis, the founder of an illustrious race (the Bacchiadae), who reigned first as kings, and subsequently as yearly magistrates, under the name of Prytanes. In the latter period the Bacchiadae were certainly not ...
— Athens: Its Rise and Fall, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... earth? is it under the earth, or on the earth, or in seas, or in streams, or in hills, or in valleys? Has He sons and daughters? has He gold and silver? Is there a profusion of every good in his kingdom? Tell us plainly how we shall see Him, and how is He to be loved, and how is He to be found. Is He young or old? or is He ever-living? Is He beautiful, or have many fostered His son, or is His daughter handsome, and dear to men of the world?" St. Patrick, full of the Holy Spirit, responded, ...
— The Most Ancient Lives of Saint Patrick - Including the Life by Jocelin, Hitherto Unpublished in America, and His Extant Writings • Various

... our daily life is furtive; work a craft; art a participation—it is in miniature the goal of statesmanship. If Chicago were like Hull House, we say to ourselves, then vice would be no problem—it would dwindle, what was left would be the Falstaff in us all, and only a spiritual anemia could worry over that jolly and ...
— A Preface to Politics • Walter Lippmann

... secret between us," he said, with a distinctly guilty look about the sky-line, as though to make sure there were no sheriffs and bloodhounds on ...
— The Prairie Mother • Arthur Stringer

... as he promised. An hour has passed since we said good-night; and here I still sit, with my pen in my hand, thinking of him. No words of mine can describe what has passed between us. The end of it is all I can write in these pages; and the end of it is that he has shaken my resolution. For the first time since I saw the easy way to Armadale's life at Thorpe Ambrose, I feel as if the man whom I have doomed in my own thoughts had ...
— Armadale • Wilkie Collins

... Yankee, Sir," he said, "no two of us look alike, or talk alike; but being free and enlightened citizens, we jist talk as ...
— Nature and Human Nature • Thomas Chandler Haliburton

... us will be dead. If it's me, of course, there's no use worryin'; if it's Hal, of course, I'm done in the eyes of the ...
— Way of the Lawless • Max Brand

... here a few days earlier," Captain Drake said, when he read this notice, "for John Garrett would assuredly have joined us, and his aid would have been no slight assistance in the matter in which we are about to engage. However, it will not do to despise his caution; therefore, lest we be attacked while on shore by the Spaniards, we will even ...
— Under Drake's Flag - A Tale of the Spanish Main • G. A. Henty

... inherited is unimportant for us. But the number and diversity of inheritable deviations of structure, both those of slight and those of considerable physiological importance, is endless. Dr. Prosper Lucas's treatise, in two large volumes, is the fullest and the best on this subject. No breeder doubts how strong is the tendency ...
— On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection • Charles Darwin

... species include the manatee, seals, sea lions, turtles, and whales; drift net fishing is hastening the decline of fish stocks and contributing to international disputes; municipal sludge pollution off eastern US, southern Brazil, and eastern Argentina; oil pollution in Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, Lake Maracaibo, Mediterranean Sea, and North Sea; industrial waste and municipal sewage pollution in Baltic Sea, ...
— The 2001 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... do, and it seemeth as if God himself were content with that for the time. What the very right thing is, concerning which we may now differ, we must come to see together one day—the same, and not another, to both, and this doing of what we see, is to each of us the path thither. Let God judge us, Dorothy, for his judgment is light in the inward parts, showing the truth and enabling us to judge ourselves. For me to judge thee and thee me, Dorothy, would with it bear no light. Why, Dorothy, knowest thou not—yet how shouldst ...
— St. George and St. Michael • George MacDonald

... Roosevelt advocated peace, he believed that the best means to preserve peace was suitable preparation for war. In his message to Congress, 1904, he said; "There is no more patriotic duty before us as a people than to keep the navy adequate to the needs of this country's position. Our voice is now potent for peace, and is so potent because we are not afraid of war. But our protestations would neither receive nor deserve the slightest attention if we were impotent ...
— History of the United States, Volume 6 (of 6) • E. Benjamin Andrews

... lady!" said Spence warmly. "And now let us consider my side of it. After the month that I have spent here—do you really think that I intend ...
— The Window-Gazer • Isabel Ecclestone Mackay

... might probably have got many more scalps and prisoners—could we have known in time whether or not we were discovered, which we took for granted until getting within three miles when some circumstances occurred that gave us reason to think otherwise, though uncertain.—Col. Floyd, with 300 men, was ordered to advance and bring on an action or attack the town, Major Wells with a party of horse being previously detached by a different route as a party of observation: although ...
— Chronicles of Border Warfare • Alexander Scott Withers

... And in that awful hour when manhood failed And God forsook, He still was wrong to think With tenderest solicitude and care Upon his mother, and leave her in the charge Of John. And He was wrong who gave us hearts To yearn, and sensibilities to meet Those "clinging tendrils" thou wouldst have us cut. If thou art right, sweet Alice, There were no ties of infancy, or age; Of consanguinity: or noble bond Of wide humanity, or sacred home: For without love,—e'en our poor earthly ...
— Laura Secord, the heroine of 1812. - A Drama. And Other Poems. • Sarah Anne Curzon

... [Footnote: Trochilus rubus.] is the only species that is known in Canada. With us it builds and breeds, and then returns to summer skies and warmer airs. The length of the humming-bird is only three inches and a half, and four and a quarter in extent, from one tip of the wing to the other. When on the wing, the bird ...
— Lady Mary and her Nurse • Catharine Parr Traill

... fare as well as the skeptic, with this difference, that in case there is any hereafter, I shall know that in my ignorance I lived a life of blessedness with reference to the now experienced eternity; while, in case there is no hereafter for us, we shall just be equal. Again I repeat it, let me have the side where I take no risks when viewed from the skeptic's standpoint, and where I can "repose in a paradise of illusions," in preference to the ...
— The Christian Foundation, Or, Scientific and Religious Journal, - Volume I, No. 9. September, 1880 • Various

... said Beatrice, pausing and looking back. "I can see, and I fancy the stranger is standing still and looking at us. Back there, by the hedge. Perhaps she is in trouble. Shall I run and ...
— The Honorable Miss - A Story of an Old-Fashioned Town • L. T. Meade

... representation as it presents itself to us. Leaving a detailed account of the means by which it is proposed to give effect to these great desiderata to a later chapter, let us indicate briefly where they strike at the root of the evils of the ...
— Proportional Representation Applied To Party Government • T. R. Ashworth and H. P. C. Ashworth

... state: thus in a democracy the supreme power is lodged in the whole people; on the contrary, in an oligarchy it is in the hands of a few. We say then, that the form of government in these states is different, and we shall find the same thing hold good in others. Let us first determine for whose sake a city is established; and point out the different species of rule which man may ...
— Politics - A Treatise on Government • Aristotle

... which belongs to older countries, compacted, by frequent war and united by memories of common danger and common triumph, it has been simply because our national existence has never been in such peril as to force upon us the conviction that it was both the title-deed of our greatness and its only safeguard. But what splendid possibilities has not our trial revealed even to ourselves! What costly stuff whereof to make a ...
— The Writings of James Russell Lowell in Prose and Poetry, Volume V - Political Essays • James Russell Lowell

... St. John! leave all meaner things To low ambition, and the pride of kings. Let us (since life can little more supply Than just to look about us, and to die) Expatiate free o'er all this scene of man; A mighty maze! but not without a plan; A wild, where weeds and flowers promiscuous shoot; Or garden, tempting with forbidden fruit. ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... hear me talk of visiting my wife, under such circumstances, and after such a formal separation. But so it was; and I can say further, though we have had the misfortune to be divided, I do not believe that any human being ever heard either of us cast any reflection, or throw out any the slightest imputation against the other. I have always treated her and spoken of her as the amiable mother of my children, and she, I believe, has spoken of me at all times as the ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 2 • Henry Hunt

... on all that explosive you make, Tom Swift!" begged Walter Titus. "We were so successful with this tunnel, thanks to you, that the government is going to have us dig another. Will you ...
— Tom Swift and his Big Tunnel - or, The Hidden City of the Andes • Victor Appleton

... beyond conception in objects which may gratify the most unbounded passion in this pursuit. It is the country where formerly the harp of the minstrel poured forth some of its sweetest strains; and the lay and the fabliaux of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, which delight us in the text of Sainte Palaye, and in the versions of Way, owed their existence to the combined spirit of chivalry and literature, which never slumbered upon the ...
— A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume One • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... informed, are now being bred successfully once more. It surprises us to hear this announced as a triumph. One would have thought that in these days of beauty culture a clear complexion would have been ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, June 24, 1914 • Various

... I take for granted, must produce a piece of some kind or another; a bad one for us, no doubt, and yet perhaps better than we should get the year after. I suppose the King of Prussia is negotiating with France, and endeavoring by those means to get out of the scrape with the loss only of Silesia, and ...
— The PG Edition of Chesterfield's Letters to His Son • The Earl of Chesterfield

... to delight to surround itself. He had also about him the halo of American humor, having just been up to answer a charge of murder, in another county, of which he was extravagantly innocent. He carried a crook, as seemed fitting, and had with him two sheep-dogs, one of which the kindly man assured us he had frequently cured of a recurrent disease by cutting off pieces of its tail. This sacrificial part having been pretty well used up, the beast's situation in view of another attack was very ticklish. And it had, in fact, the air of occupying the anxious-seat. The Mexican, ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, October 1885 • Various

... obey. The reign of independent Barbarism is now contracted to a narrow span; and the remnant of Calmucks or Uzbecks, whose forces may be almost numbered, cannot seriously excite the apprehensions of the great republic of Europe. [6000] Yet this apparent security should not tempt us to forget, that new enemies, and unknown dangers, may possibly arise from some obscure people, scarcely visible in the map of the world, The Arabs or Saracens, who spread their conquests from India to Spain, had languished in poverty and contempt, ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 3 • Edward Gibbon

... sable, langued gules. "So ho!" said the guide when! had described it, "So ho! the Mountain Cat is at home again.... And here comes scouring one of the whelps," he added in alarm. A young man, black-avised, bare-headed, pressing a lathered horse, bore down upon us. He seemed to gain exultation with every new pulse of his strength: the Genius of Brute Force, handsome as he was evil. And yet not evil, unless a wild beast is evil; which it probably is not. He soon reached us, pulled up short with a clatter of hoofs, and hailed me in ...
— Earthwork Out Of Tuscany • Maurice Hewlett

... said Sancho, "should the herbs of the field fail us, which your worship says you know of, and with which you have told me ...
— The Junior Classics, V4 • Willam Patten (Editor)

... a propriety in the coat of a man of fashion, an unstudied ease, a graceful symmetry, a delicacy of expression, that has always filled us with the profoundest admiration of the genius of the artist; indeed, no ready money could purchase coats that we have seen—coats that a real love of the subject, and working upon long credit, for a high connexion, could alone have given ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. CCCXXVIII. February, 1843. Vol. LIII. • Various

... Let us now return to the solid matter from which the fatty acids have been removed by pressure. This brown, earthly-looking cake consists of vegetable impurity washed off from the cloth, of short fibers, and of various dye stuffs. It is divided into two lots: That which contains indigo, and that which ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 447, July 26, 1884 • Various

... "Tell us how you cleaned out the Hydraulic Company, Hector," said the prospector, and added aside to me, "I'm switching him off onto another track. He's not cheerful on this one, and it's hardly fair play to listen ...
— Lorimer of the Northwest • Harold Bindloss

... has informed us, that at the coming out of this first part, he was with him at the Three Cup tavern in Holborn drinking a glass of Rhenish, and made these ...
— The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753) - Volume II • Theophilus Cibber

... country been on a specie basis when this crisis came upon us, the twenty millions of coin held by the New York banks at that time would have been available for their relief, and have formed a part of the circulation; whereas for all practical purposes it was useless ...
— Lippincott's Magazine. Vol. XII, No. 33. December, 1873. • Various

... Those trees seemed to us terrestrial animals, in no wise so different from brute beasts as not to have skin, fat, flesh, veins, arteries, ligaments, nerves, cartilages, kernels, bones, marrow, humours, matrices, brains, and articulations; for they certainly have some, since Theophrastus will have it so. But in this ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... least, as she had learned from Margaret. And I know all about your wonderful voice and the possibilities that lie in front of you, if you can have proper training. I am not a wealthy woman, but I have more than enough for both of us, and if you will stay with me we will go to Paris, Milan, or any other place that Madame Martelli says you ought to go to. And you shall have the best teaching ...
— The Rebellion of Margaret • Geraldine Mockler

... daughter sent back word: "I am not able either to come to speech with Atossa or to see any other of the women who live here with me; for as soon as this man, whosoever he may be, succeeded to the kingdom, he separated us and placed us in different apartments by ourselves." When Otanes heard this, the matter became more and more clear to him, and he sent another message in to her, which said: "Daughter, it is right for thee, nobly born as thou art, ...
— The History Of Herodotus - Volume 1(of 2) • Herodotus

... better; but now how to accomplish it. You know the Portuguese proverb says, 'You go to hell for the good things you intend to do, and to heaven for those you do.' Now let us see what you will do. Dublin, I suppose, you've seen enough of by this time; through and through—round and round—this makes me first giddy, and then sick. Let me show you the country—not the face of it, but the ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. 6 • Maria Edgeworth

... true—to her. The oracle of so many years had spoken finally. Only other people did not find her out at once . . . I would not go so far as to say she believed it altogether. That would be hardly possible. But then haven't the most flattered, the most conceited of us their moments of doubt? Haven't they? Well, I don't know. There may be lucky beings in this world unable to believe any evil of themselves. For my own part I'll tell you that once, many years ago now, it came to my knowledge that a ...
— Chance • Joseph Conrad

... around two or three squares, down to the post office and back to our rooms again. This already has become a melancholy task; but we must choose it, or its sadder alternative,—the old buck-saw. True there are students among us who will have exercise if cramming professors are ever so vexed. They will not study on Sunday; they escape to the woods, admire nature—desecrate the Sabbath. They find relaxation at the billiard table, make effigies in the ...
— The University of Michigan • Wilfred Shaw

... are to advocate such a change, the abolition of the common-law defenses of the employer. For the purposes of this debate, it is immaterial to us whether this change is brought about by a simple extension of the employer's liability, or whether it is accompanied, as in many of our states, by a system of workman's compensation. Likewise, it is a consideration extraneous to the issues of ...
— Elements of Debating • Leverett S. Lyon

... quit ourselves like men in our right and just cause. Keep us faithful unto death, calm in danger, patient in suffering, merciful as well as brave, true to our Queen, ...
— From Aldershot to Pretoria - A Story of Christian Work among Our Troops in South Africa • W. E. Sellers

... misunderstanding, at any rate, I had to suffer for my unyielding way, inasmuch as the behaviour of our hosts immediately changed from talkative hospitality and childish curiosity to dull silence and suspicious reticence. The people sat around us, sullen and silent, and would not help us in any way, refused to bring firewood or show us the water-hole, and seemed most anxious to get rid of us. Under these circumstances it was useless to try to do any of my regular work, and I had ...
— Two Years with the Natives in the Western Pacific • Felix Speiser

... went to see it and M. Hebert sent us some curious, delicious dried fruits. M. de Champlain is quite sure we shall grow them in time and have beautiful gardens, and fine people who know many ...
— A Little Girl in Old Quebec • Amanda Millie Douglas

... the king to the miner—all a part of a big complicated machine that's grinding us slowly to bits, making us all more ...
— Nocturne • Frank Swinnerton

... Union-Jack was hoisted, and, giving way to their feelings, all stood up in the boat, and gave three distinct cheers. "The eye of every native along the banks had been fixed upon that noble flag, at all times a beautiful object," says Captain Sturt, "and to them a novel one, as it waved over us in the heart of a desert. They had, until that moment, been particularly loquacious, but the sight of that flag and the sound of our voices hushed the tumult; and while they were still lost in astonishment, the boat's head was speedily turned, the sail was sheeted home, both wind and ...
— Australia, its history and present condition • William Pridden

... hand. "You are wrong. Just now, Karnia is doing us the honor of asking an alliance with us. A ...
— Long Live the King • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... a newer and worse sort of world. I dare say it is so. You have been always very kind, but I almost doubt whether you can change us, now. I have sometimes thought that you and mamma were hardly fit for ...
— The Way We Live Now • Anthony Trollope

... was beloved by a', my lassie, She was beloved by a'; But an angel fell in love wi' her, An' took her frae us a'. ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... principle, and the masses of the hard-working people of this nation, men and women, do not think upon principles. They can only think on the one eternal struggle wherewithal to be fed, to be clothed, and to be sheltered. Therefore I ask you not to compel us to have this question settled by what you term ...
— Debate On Woman Suffrage In The Senate Of The United States, - 2d Session, 49th Congress, December 8, 1886, And January 25, 1887 • Henry W. Blair, J.E. Brown, J.N. Dolph, G.G. Vest, Geo. F. Hoar.

... manner in Book III., which opens with an address to Light—one of the most beautiful passages in the poem, in which he alludes to his blindness when expressing his thoughts and sentiments with regard to this ethereal medium, which conveys to us the ...
— The Astronomy of Milton's 'Paradise Lost' • Thomas Orchard

... Austria had entered secretly into the coalition of Russia and England against the Emperor. The army collected in the camp of Boulogne received orders to march on the Rhine, and his Majesty departed to rejoin his troops about the end of September. As was his custom, he informed us only an hour in advance of his departure; and it was curious to observe the contrast of the confusion which preceded this moment with the silence that followed it. Hardly was the order given, than each one busied himself hastily with his own wants and those of his Majesty; ...
— The Private Life of Napoleon Bonaparte, Complete • Constant

... surprise us. If the vestiges of former aristocratic distinctions were not so completely effaced in the United States, the Americans would be less simple and less tolerant in their own country—they would require less, and be less fond of borrowed ...
— Democracy In America, Volume 2 (of 2) • Alexis de Tocqueville

... three of us for a serious business like that. No, I felt lonesome and unhappy, so I went out to look at the sea, and watch the pretty ships ...
— The Works of Rudyard Kipling One Volume Edition • Rudyard Kipling

... never meant a word I said!" he began, with exaggerated trepidation. "Why the dickens didn't you murder the whole yapping bunch of us, Grant?" He clapped his hand affectionately upon the other's shoulder. "We kinda run amuck yesterday afternoon," he confessed cheerfully, "but it sure ...
— Good Indian • B. M. Bower

... things is grievously wrong, for it should be as easy for us to secure trade in the Orient as for any European nation, and assuredly easier than for Germany. We have had such years of material prosperity and progress as were never known in the history of any people, it is true; but every cycle of prosperity has been succeeded ...
— East of Suez - Ceylon, India, China and Japan • Frederic Courtland Penfield

... his favorite Virginia; and that Morse figured out the telegraph with a pipe in his mouth. I never could corroborate these statements, though I don't doubt them a bit. But, be that as it may, the man, woman or child who tries to deprive us of the solace and inspiration of tobacco, is like the goat that tried to butt a train off the track. He is not only trifling with one of the greatest factors in civilization, but he is toying with a ...
— Said the Observer • Louis J. Stellman

... ROBERT MAYER was educated for D the medical profession. In the summer of 1840, as he himself informs us, he was at Java, and there observed that the venous blood of some of his patients had a singularly bright red colour. The observation riveted his attention; he reasoned upon it, and came to the conclusion that the ...
— Fragments of science, V. 1-2 • John Tyndall

... alighted on a particular summit of the mountain, like a second sun. Then Yama possessed of great intelligence, and fully conversant with virtue, who had occupied a summit on the south, in a voice deep as that of the clouds, said these auspicious words, 'Arjuna, behold us, the protectors of the worlds, arrive here! We will grant thee (spiritual) vision, for thou deservest to behold us. Thou wert in thy former life a Rishi of immeasurable soul, known as Nara of great might At the command, O child, of Brahma, thou hast been born among men! O sinless one, by thee ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... praise the finest genius could bestow on it. But let us hear the editor.—He tells us, that "It is a vast disadvantage to authors to publish their private undigested thoughts, and first notions hastily set down, and designed only as materials for a future structure." And he adds, "That the work may not come short ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. II (of 3) - Edited, With Memoir And Notes, By His Son, The Earl Of Beaconsfield • Isaac D'Israeli

... additional matter has not been in mass sufficient to perplex the compiler. Hence we really see in this Map something like the idea of Asia that the Traveller himself would have presented, had he bequeathed a Map to us. ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo Volume 1 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... forced herself to smile, and gazed pleasantly up to the moon. "God bless thee, golden, rapid wanderer!" she said. "Thou shalt accompany us to-night, and pray, dear moon, send all clouds home, and remain as bright and clear as now; for our route is a dangerous one, and if thou dost not help us, we may easily fall into an abyss, and—Hush, hush, ...
— Andreas Hofer • Lousia Muhlbach

... be friends, and I promised him e'er he left to watch ever over the welfare of his people. My father loveth me so much that in order to free me I think he will do as the English wish, and so I will go with Captain Argall that the strife may cease between them and us. But," and here her voice rose so that Claw-of-the-Eagle had to remind her of their danger by a pressure on the hand, "but I will not intercede for that traitor Japezaws and his crafty squaw. My father may wreak vengeance on them when ...
— The Princess Pocahontas • Virginia Watson

... bad as that," Lois replied with a smile. "I was not frightened, only startled. Anyway, we are glad to see you, for you have deserted us of late." ...
— Under Sealed Orders • H. A. Cody

... Lucius Annus Florus (2d century after Christ). Cui subjungitur Lucii Ampelii liber memorialis. Londini, ex officin Jacobi Tonson, ...
— The Library of William Congreve • John C. Hodges

... there is a larger proportion of short words, there are more words repeated, more assonances, and a freer use of the emphasis gained by the recurrence of verbs in the same or cognate tenses. Where passages thus characterised have come down to us still in the making, the effect is forced and fragmentary; where they succeed, they combine in a novel manner the rushing freedom of the old trochaics with the majesty which is the distinguishing feature of Virgil's style. The ...
— Latin Literature • J. W. Mackail

... best, after all. You do not want me to stay always in Simiti. And if I go, you will go with me, or soon follow. Oh, Padre dear, you have told me that up in that great country above us the people do not know God as you and I are learning to know Him. Padre—I want to go and tell them about Him! I've wanted to ...
— Carmen Ariza • Charles Francis Stocking

... wrong By ours was done the Greek or Latin tongue, Thou hast redeem'd, and opened us a mine Of rich and pregnant fancy, drawn a line Of masculine expression, which, had good Old Orpheus seen, or all the ancient brood Our superstitious fools admire, and hold Their lead more precious than thy burnish'd gold, Thou hadst been their exchequer.... Let others carve the rest; it will ...
— Gossip in a Library • Edmund Gosse

... a Negro in a day like this Demands strange loyalty. We serve a flag Which is to us white freedom's emphasis. Ah! one must love when Truth and Justice lag, To be a Negro ...
— The Book of American Negro Poetry • Edited by James Weldon Johnson

... without moving her eyes as if afraid of losing a single word; so that Nekhludoff was not afraid of meeting her eyes and kept looking at her all the time. And his mind passed through those phases in which a face which we have not seen for many years first strikes us with the outward changes brought about during the time of separation, and then gradually becomes more and more like its old self, when the changes made by time seem to disappear, and before our spiritual eyes rises only the principal ...
— Resurrection • Count Leo Tolstoy

... generous animal, and I felt that I might trust to Brutus's honour. And to do him justice, he observed the compact with strict good faith. Some of his 'tips,' it is true, very nearly tipped me off, but their result was to bring us closer together; our relations were less strained; it seemed to me that I gained more mastery over him every day, and was ...
— The Talking Horse - And Other Tales • F. Anstey

... wasn't it, that there was a leak somewhere in our own crowd?" He laughed out suddenly. "You poor fool! Did you think you could pull that sort of stuff forever? Did you? Well, then, how do you like the 'leak' to-night? You get the idea, don't you? Everybody, every last soul that is in with us, got the details of what they thought was a straight play to-night—and it leaked to you, as I knew it would; and you walked into the trap, as I knew you would, because the bait was good and juicy, and looked the easiest thing to annex that ever happened. Fifty thousand ...
— The White Moll • Frank L. Packard

... external regulations of society. The thought suffices them, without investing itself in the flesh and blood of action. So it seemed to be with Hester. Yet, had little Pearl never come to her from the spiritual world, it might have been far otherwise. Then, she might have come down to us in history, hand in hand with Ann Hutchinson, as the foundress of a religious sect. She might, in one of her phases, have been a prophetess. She might, and not improbably would, have suffered death from the stern tribunals of the period, for attempting to undermine the ...
— The Scarlet Letter • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... great scarcity fell on the land, he could no longer procure daily bread. Now when he thought over this by night in his bed, and tossed about in his anxiety, he groaned and said to his wife, "What is to become of us? How are we to feed our poor children when we no longer have anything even for ourselves?" "I'll tell you what, husband," answered the woman, "early tomorrow morning we will take the children out into the forest to where it is the thickest, and there ...
— The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: - Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English, Volume 5. • Various

... approached him in walking from the bow of the vessel towards him, I said to him, "Pilot, what do you think of the prospect of getting to Rainbow Bluff?" He replied, "I think we will get there by and by, if we have patience and the rebels don't blow us up." Just as I was turning to pace to the bow of the Valley City, I heard a report ashore like that of a number of barrels of fire-crackers exploding. Simultaneously with this explosion, I heard the zipping of bullets in the air close to my head, and striking the bulwarks of ...
— Reminiscences of Two Years in the United States Navy • John M. Batten

... Jacob from its shrine, and to wrest from my grasp the records I refused to deliver. All was done as the usurper commanded. Most of my brethren were slain. Myself and the remainder were turned out upon the waste. We retired to the Monastery of Cambuskenneth; but there oppression found us. Cressingham, having seized on other religious houses, determined to swell his hoards with the plunder of that also. In the dead of night the attack was made. My brethren fled; I knew not whither to go; but, determined to fly far from the tracts of our ravagers, ...
— The Scottish Chiefs • Miss Jane Porter

... night; they gave Masaniello, which I had never seen; and when the tenor sang, "Behold how brightly breaks the morning," it came on us both as a delicious surprise—it was such a favorite song at Brossard's—"amis! la matinee est belle...." Indeed, it was one of the songs Barty sang on the boulevard for the poor woman, six or seven ...
— The Martian • George Du Maurier

... the robin red-breast, the mottled sides of the Saranac trout, the upholstery of a spider's web, the waist of the wasp fashionably small without tight lacing, the lustrous eye of the gazelle, the ganglia of the star-fish, have been discoursed upon; but it is left to us, fagged out from a long ramble, to sit down on a log and celebrate the admirable qualities of a turtle. We refer not to the curious architecture of its house—ribbed, plated, jointed, carapace and plastron divinely fashioned—but to its ...
— Around The Tea-Table • T. De Witt Talmage

... answers,—two of them distinct, and one indistinct. These answers are, (1.) We mean three somethings, which we cannot define; (2.) We mean three Persons, like Peter, James, and John; (3.) We mean three manifestations, characters, or modes of being. Let us ...
— Orthodoxy: Its Truths And Errors • James Freeman Clarke

... namesake, with the simple diversions of driving about the dusty, flat country, varied by "veranda parties" and moonlight rows with the rare young men who dared to stay away from business through the week. All of life, the sages tell us, is largely a matter of proportion. Como, Wisconsin, was breathless excitement to Milly Ridge at eighteen, as she testified to her hostess in a thousand ...
— One Woman's Life • Robert Herrick

... us," she said; "but is he less harsh for himself? He forgives nothing; but he has never needed to be forgiven himself. He does not understand youth, but he has never been young himself; and at twenty he was as grave and as cold as you ...
— Other People's Money • Emile Gaboriau

... yesterday. If you wish it, I will thank you again to-day. But it is a compliment which becomes very much the reverse if it be repeated too often. You are sharp enough to understand that I have done everything in my power to save us both from this trouble." ...
— The Duke's Children • Anthony Trollope

... medical care. Mrs. Catherick is rather a strange person in her manners, but extremely respectable-looking. She seemed sorely put out when she found that there was no foundation—none, at least, that any of us could discover—for the report of her daughter having been seen in ...
— The Woman in White • Wilkie Collins

... he resumed more tenderly, probing her for an evidence. "All any of us have, except that he is not in a condition for ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... a multitude so vast and in a condition so deplorable makes our hearts sad, and shows us how imperative is the call to each of us to do all we can to carry to them, or, if this is impossible, to aid in sending to them, the blessed truth which alone can make them happy. Poor Oowikapun was now in this sad company. All his fears are ...
— Oowikapun - How the Gospel Reached the Nelson River Indians • Egerton Ryerson Young

... admission of visitors. We had therefore some difficulty in gaining an entrance, as the man whose attention we had attracted did not at first understand why we could not come again the next day. When we explained the nature of our journey, he kindly admitted us through the gate. The lighthouse and its surroundings were scrupulously clean, and if we had been Her Majesty's Inspectors of Lighthouses, if such there be, we could not have done otherwise than report favourably of our visit. The ...
— From John O'Groats to Land's End • Robert Naylor and John Naylor

... utter love; no sovereign song Speak all it would for love's sake. Yet would I Fain cast in moulded rhymes that do me wrong Some little part of all my love: but why Should weak and wingless words be fain to fly? For us the years that live not are not dead: Past days and present in our hearts are wed: My song can say no ...
— Locrine - A Tragedy • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... cannot be enough admired, or too often repeated, "LEAD US NOT INTO TEMPTATION," was certainly dictated by infinite wisdom and goodness; and it should ever be borne in mind by those who are placed in stations of power and authority, and whose measures must necessarily have much influence on the happiness ...
— ESSAYS, Political, Economical and Philosophical. Volume 1. • Benjamin Rumford

... inflame man's soul within that he may transform and enrich his life without. No picture ever painted, no statue ever carved, no cathedral ever builded is half so beautiful as the Christ-formed man. What is man's value to society? Let him who knoweth what is in us reply: "What shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his ...
— A Man's Value to Society - Studies in Self Culture and Character • Newell Dwight Hillis

... she answered, 'I desire to. Bear with me for a moment more. The hand of Him who set His curse on murder, is heavy on us now. You cannot doubt it. Our son, our innocent boy, on whom His anger fell before his birth, is in this place in peril of his life—brought here by your guilt; yes, by that alone, as Heaven sees and knows, for he has been led astray in the darkness of his intellect, and that is the terrible ...
— Barnaby Rudge • Charles Dickens

... what assistance will be sent us in some way or other which we don't expect, if we trust in God," said Paul. "We didn't expect to get these onions a minute ago, and we shall have more before ...
— True Blue • W.H.G. Kingston

... I hinted at," Sir Charles went on. "There was a chance of a fortune there. I recognized that chance, and I became a director. And there was risk, too. We took our chance, and the chance failed. We gambled desperately, and again fortune failed us. Certain people who were against us have made unhappy discoveries. That is why those men are watching me. But if I can send the chairman a letter to-morrow assuming innocence and regret and enclosing a cheque for L5,000 to cover my fees and to recover all the shares I have sold, then I come out ...
— The Slave of Silence • Fred M. White

... Bride; indeed the reader may prefer making the comparisons for himself. Harris's alterations follow the general pattern of Restoration adaptations from the earlier drama, it is true. On the other hand, a relatively small number of such plays allow us to see the professional actor feeling his way through the emotions and actions of the scenes. To compare a play like The City Bride with its source is like visiting the rehearsals of an acting company of the time. Such a play has an ...
— The City Bride (1696) - Or The Merry Cuckold • Joseph Harris

... of the foregoing narrative. [Footnote: See p. lxvi.] With regard to his determination in the latter instance, justice must allow that his situation was one of extreme difficulty, and admitted probably of no alternative. In both cases our knowledge of the facts is much too imperfect to enable us to form a correct opinion as to the propriety of his conduct, much less to justify us ...
— The Journal Of A Mission To The Interior Of Africa, In The Year 1805 • Mungo Park

... you, who, when I did ask to see you, came here promising a world of confidence; how is it that, nevertheless, it is you who are silent, leaving it for me to speak? Since, then, we both wear masks, either let us both retain them or put them ...
— The Man in the Iron Mask • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... your kindness in helping us, the bandage hardly seemed necessary," said Crosby, as he took it off, when they had entered Rosmore's room, the same room ...
— The Brown Mask • Percy J. Brebner



Words linked to "US" :   Tennessee, Pacific Northwest, Connecticut River, ME, partridge, Mel Gibson, md, Calif., mestizo, schnozzle, Rhode Island, cola, tart, Niobrara, Mountain State, West Virginia, Idaho, Iowa, Coyote State, ms, District of Columbia, Volunteer State, Washington's Birthday, freshman, recall, Washington, Great Lakes, one dollar bill, Tar Heel State, inch, IA, Vermont, north, Alaska, Missouri, North Star State, nd, Utah, ne, Niobrara River, Little Rhody, clam, Treasure State, Nebraska, Indiana, jersey, US Senate, Athabascan, VT, Marshall Islands, Peach State, union, AK, Athapaskan language, water spaniel, beak, California, Saint Lawrence River, leather fern, trapezoid, dollar bill, Oklahoma, ga, Mississippi, sextillion, South Dakota, February 2, North America, west, pineapple weed, Wyoming, CT, Hawaii, combination in restraint of trade, New Mexico, New England, octillion, US Marshals Service, Empire State, Marlowe, mt, totem, Battle Born State, NY, ut, AZ, Presidents' Day, federal office, 1000000000000, Virginia, Senna alata, buck, Old Line State, Old Dominion, OAS, Connecticut, Organization of American States, staff member, marine, State Department, nation, southernism, WI, ar, FL, quadrillion, National Intelligence Community, quintillion, one million million, Dakota, NH, Boston Tea Party, multiple voting, Bluegrass State, county, Matricaria matricarioides, Athabaskan, Peace Garden State, Yosemite Falls, ma, Empire State of the South, TX, yank, St. Lawrence, US Attorney General, snoot, il, February 22, desperate criminal, US House of Representatives, Badger State, US Army, Granite State, Kansas, D.C., Montana, WY, US Air Force Academy, trapezium, inaugural, Athapascan, New River, US House, mn, North Dakota, dollar, Gopher State, hi, billionth, Green Mountain State, South Carolina, Pine Tree State, Great Lakes State, trillion, ok, Saint Lawrence, Land of Enchantment, Hoosier State, U.S., OH, south, Palmetto State, Pelican State, US Navy, Missouri River, WA, Louisiana Purchase, TN, War between the States, Equality State, Silver State, independent agency, North American country, Texas, Beaver State, WV, midwestern United States, Nevada, reapportionment, Sunshine State, sc, Nutmeg State, Lincoln's Birthday, KY, Yukon River, Mississippi River, Northerner, United States, Delaware, NC, Yankee, Illinois, department of the federal government, United States Intelligence Community, United States Civil War, Grand Canyon State, honker, Minnesota, ringworm cassia, SD, America, RI, Maryland, Wolverine State, tribe, North Carolina, Centennial State, Bill of Rights, Philip Marlowe, American, Georgia, snout, Sooner State, snake dance, Mel Columcille Gerard Gibson, Intelligence Community, paleface, middle west, 1000000000, Sunbelt, Ocean State, dope, discount rate, nm, ringworm shrub, Hedeoma, al, US Coast Guard, id, rayless chamomile, septillion, old man, federation of tribes, Yukon, Hawai'i, Aloha State, Gibson, NV, Midwest, Rio Grande, US Military Academy, golden fern, Ohio, Camellia State, Old North State, western United States, New York, mo, First State, DE, first-year, US Border Patrol, Yosemite, Constitution State, US Trade Representative, east, Heart of Dixie, desperado, Arkansas, la, Lone-Star State, ic, eastern United States, Magnolia State, Oregon, Alabama, Land of Opportunity, KS, Everglade State, Last Frontier, Athapaskan, pa, billion, Acrostichum aureum, NATO, Show Me State, ladino, US Marine Corps, Florida, DC, in, Mormon State, United States of America, Keystone State, Ohio River, Bay State, shamanism, Land of Lincoln, co, US Mint, mestiza, Old Colony, Rio Bravo, teacake, schnoz, Beehive State, Diamond State, inaugural address, NJ, Gem State, Cassia alata, New York State, Twin Falls, reallocation, nozzle, hooter, Mid-Atlantic states, twin, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, Evergreen State, Niagara River, Niagara, Social Security number, maquiladora, Kentucky, February 12, American state, free state, Golden State, American Civil War, Buckeye State, Old Dominion State, North American nation, St. Lawrence River, US Cabinet, VA, Michigan, Groundhog Day, Maine, Garden State, US Congress, New Jersey, Louisiana, Republic of the Marshall Islands, barrio, ca, Sunflower State, New Hampshire, joint resolution, slave market, Arizona, Hawkeye State, Wisconsin, reallotment, mi, Colorado, federal department, Pennsylvania, staffer, Prairie State, OR, colony



Copyright © 2019 Free-Translator.com