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Unwind   /ənwˈaɪnd/   Listen
Unwind

verb
(past & past part. unwound; pres. part. unwinding)
1.
Reverse the winding or twisting of.  Synonyms: unroll, wind off.
2.
Separate the tangles of.  Synonym: disentangle.
3.
Become less tense, rest, or take one's ease.  Synonyms: decompress, loosen up, relax, slow down, unbend.  "Let's all relax after a hard day's work"
4.
Cause to feel relaxed.  Synonyms: loosen up, make relaxed, relax, unlax, unstrain.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Unwind" Quotes from Famous Books



... I saw the struggling wretch grasp the tail of the reptile with one hand, and seek to unwind the folds that bound him. As well might he have attempted to bend or loosen bars of iron, for with a slight effort the snake freed that portion of his body, and raising his head, hissed, as though with scorn, at the effort of ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... uncover her arm and unwind the bandages and I saw the tender flesh was very angry and inflamed, whereupon I summoned Resolution from his cooking, who at my desire brought the chest of medicines with water, etc., and set myself to soothe and cherish this painful wound as gently as I might, ...
— Martin Conisby's Vengeance • Jeffery Farnol

... and there I tend, Till my life's threads unwind, A various womanhood in blend - Not one, but ...
— Late Lyrics and Earlier • Thomas Hardy

... than a whole generation ago. I could depend on a kind welcome from my contemporaries,—my coevals. But where are those contemporaries? Ay de mi! as Carlyle used to exclaim,—Ah, dear me! as our old women say,—I look round for them, and see only their vacant places. The old vine cannot unwind its tendrils. The branch falls with the decay of its support, and must cling to the new growths around it, if it would not lie helpless in the dust. This paper is a new tendril, feeling its way, as it best may, to whatever it can wind around. The thought ...
— Over the Teacups • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... I who am tired, my father,' he said. 'It is only that my legs cannot take such good long steps as thine; and walk as we will the road ever seems to unwind itself further and further in front, like the magic white thread ...
— Knights of Art - Stories of the Italian Painters • Amy Steedman

... is, O Memmius, to see through The very nature of fire-fraught thunderbolt; O this it is to mark by what blind force It maketh each effect, and not, O not To unwind Etrurian scrolls oracular, Inquiring tokens of occult will of gods, Even as to whence the flying flame hath come, Or to which half of heaven it turns, or how Through walled places it hath wound its way, Or, after proving its dominion ...
— Of The Nature of Things • [Titus Lucretius Carus] Lucretius

... confined to its mere successful composition, for having achieved the miraculous feat of alleging in fourteen ways without punctuation that the defendant did something, and with a final fanfare of "saids" and "to wits" inserted his verb where no one will ever find it, the indicter must then be able to unwind himself, rolling in and out among the "dids" and "thens" and "theres" until he is once more safely upon the terra firma of foolscap at the head of the ...
— By Advice of Counsel • Arthur Train

... the soul which is oppressed by the yoke of Nature. It is the expression of that tendency within us towards a freedom which is impossible, but of which we nevertheless dream. An iron law presides over our destiny. Around us and within us, the series of causes and effects continues to unwind its hard chain. Every single one of our deeds bears its consequence, and this goes on to eternity. Every fault of ours will bring its chastisement. Every weakness will have to be made good. There is not a moment of ...
— George Sand, Some Aspects of Her Life and Writings • Rene Doumic

... think the spring began to unwind of itself," answered Mr. Mugg. "Or our walking around may have jarred the engine, and started it off. At any rate no harm is done, and now we must finish unpacking ...
— The Story of a Plush Bear • Laura Lee Hope

... are several things necessary, in order that the silk worm should be a good one to make silk from. In the first place, the fibre of the silk that he spins must be fine, and also strong. In the next place, it must easily unwind from the cocoon. Then the animal must be a tolerably hardy one, so as to be easily raised in great numbers. Then the plant or tree that it feeds upon must be a thrifty and hardy one, and easily cultivated. The mulberry silk worm has been ...
— Rollo in Rome • Jacob Abbott

... called after him just as far as they could see him, and when they were sure he was gone they thought they would come down and celebrate. But they didn't do it—not just yet. There wasn't one of them that could unwind himself from his limb, except old Mr. Waters, who had got only a teaspoonful of the medicine, which very likely was just about the right amount. Mr. Waters swung quite loose and free from his limb, and got down without much trouble, and it took him all ...
— Hollow Tree Nights and Days • Albert Bigelow Paine

... I bought a label at the bookstall and wrote it for him. He went round and round my leg looking for me. "Funny thing," he said as he began to unwind, "he was here a moment ago. I'll just go round once more. I rather think ... Ow! Oh, there you are!" I stepped off him, unravelled the lead and dragged him ...
— Once a Week • Alan Alexander Milne

... know the absolute, or God, you must be the absolute; or, in other words, God only can find God. This is the simple doctrine, when you unwind the veil he has cleverly hung over it. True, he denounces pantheism; but here is pantheism of the eclectic patent, differing from that of other systems only in subtlety of expression, wherein Cousin certainly excels. One of the most profound philosophical writers ...
— Beulah • Augusta J. Evans

... chief dies, he is buried in rather a peculiar fashion. As soon as life is extinct—some say even before the last breath is drawn—the bystanders break the spine by a blow from a large stone. They then unwind the long rope that encircles the loins, and lash the body together in a sitting posture, the head being bent over the knees. Ox-hides are then tied over it, and it is buried with its face to the north, as already described when ...
— A Further Contribution to the Study of the Mortuary Customs of the North American Indians • H.C. Yarrow

... a man muffled up to the eyes in a vast red scarf—or not so much red as pink, salmon colour—which he proceeded gradually to unwind, revealing at length the features of Mr. James Tod Brown, the senior partner of the firm of Brown, Brown & Brown, of Little Britain. Save for a curious nervousness of speech which caused him to repeat every remark several times, Mr. James Tod Brown was a typical lawyer, in ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 159, December 8, 1920 • Various

... under his cassock, a sign of perturbation; Courtlandt continued to unwind; the Barone glanced fiercely ...
— The Place of Honeymoons • Harold MacGrath

... worshipers on all hands. He is a marvelous talker on a deep subject. I do not see how even Spencer could unwind a thought more smoothly or orderly, and do it in a cleaner, clearer, crisper English. He astounded Twichell with his faculty. You know when it comes down to moral honesty, limpid innocence, and utterly blemishless ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... the strong note of character in each, fill any author with the certitude of success, especially of their own histrionic. They might in short have represented any mystery they would; the point being predominantly that the key to the mystery, the key that could wind and unwind it without a snap of the spring, was there in her pocket—or rather, no doubt, clasped at this crisis in her hand and pressed, as she walked back and forth, to her breast. She walked to the end and far out of the light; she returned and saw ...
— The Golden Bowl • Henry James

... turned upwards towards me. It will smell the honey, but will not guess that it carries it itself, and it will crawl upwards in the hope of getting to the hive from which that honey came. Keep the rest of the silk firmly held, and gradually unwind it as the beetle climbs up. Mind you do not let it slip, for my very life depends on that ...
— Hindu Tales from the Sanskrit • S. M. Mitra and Nancy Bell

... speaking I felt my soul carried out into the light of God's face, and my grave clothes were taken off one by one as Janet would unwind my plaid, and I stood a living man ...
— Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush • Ian Maclaren

... attention to their collection and arrangement. Who? It would have been idle to shape even a conjecture, but for a circumstance, that appeared to offer a certain clue; and, not without bitter thoughts, did I try to unwind it. The thread which was warped around the flower-stalks was of yellow silk. The strands were finely twisted; and I easily recognised the bullion from the tassel of a sash. That thread must have been taken from the sash ...
— The Wild Huntress - Love in the Wilderness • Mayne Reid



Words linked to "Unwind" :   affect, roll out, turn, vege out, straighten, strain, wind, disentangle, relax, take it easy, tense, move, change state, uncoil, sit back, undo, vegetate, displace



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