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Tree

noun
1.
A tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms.
2.
A figure that branches from a single root.  Synonym: tree diagram.
3.
English actor and theatrical producer noted for his lavish productions of Shakespeare (1853-1917).  Synonym: Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree.



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"Tree" Quotes from Famous Books



... another. She tore a handful of the blossoms from a syringa tree and commenced crushing them in her fingers. The sound of footsteps scarcely disturbed her. The butler appeared, followed by Lady Anne. The former excused himself ...
— The Mischief Maker • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... called the boy running after, "do but stop and rest awhile. See, your feet are really bleeding from the sharp stones you have traveled over. Look, what a soft green bank yonder under the shade of that great tree. Do but sit down upon it for a moment. You will be able to go on all the faster after a quiet rest, then I ...
— A Kindergarten Story Book • Jane L. Hoxie

... an apple-tree, gathering the fruit, symbolizes theft. Next comes a disgusting representation of gluttony: a man relieving himself of a pig he has swallowed, the tail alone remaining in his mouth. Then follow a young man and woman, ...
— Brittany & Its Byways • Fanny Bury Palliser

... not both cling to the rope and lend the unfortunate victim of the accident a hand. Nor was there a tree or bush to which he might tie ...
— A Little Miss Nobody - Or, With the Girls of Pinewood Hall • Amy Bell Marlowe

... in the blackest masses above the Frauenthor and the Ortlieb mansion. Ere the storm burst the oppressive atmosphere had burdened the hearts within as heavily as it weighed outside upon tree, bush, ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... she, "will take us far back into the past. It will be necessary for me to dwell on some incidents in the first settlement of this country, and I propose that we first prepare and enjoy the Christmas tree. After this, if your courage holds, you shall hear an over-true tale." Pretty creature, how little she knew what was ...
— The Brick Moon, et. al. • Edward Everett Hale

... as to the future of his children, and even as to his own old age. Few comforts for him, not even those of a glass of wine to stimulate him, or of tobacco to soothe his nerves, for these are forbidden to him by the rules of his Order. Unless he can reach the very top of his particular tree also, which it is most unlikely that he will, no public recognition even of his faithful, strenuous work, and who is there that at heart does not long for public recognition? In short, nothing that is desirable to man save the consciousness of a virtue which, after all, he must feel to ...
— Regeneration • H. Rider Haggard

... some way transparent. From the Emblem before mentioned a rose-coloured light pervaded the scene; scarcely discernible in the general atmosphere, faintly but distinctly traceable in every herb, shrub, and tree, more distinguishable and concentrated in each animal. But in plant or animal the condensed light was never separated and individualised, never parted from, though obviously gathered and agglomerated out of, the generally diffused ...
— Across the Zodiac • Percy Greg

... apart," she struck in. She had recovered. I admired the quickness of women's wit. Mental agility is a rare perfection. And aren't they agile! Aren't they— just! And tenacious! When they once get hold you may uproot the tree but you won't shake them off the branch. In fact the more you shake ... But only look at the charm of contradictory perfections! No wonder men give in—generally. I won't say I was actually charmed by Mrs Fyne. I was not delighted with her. What ...
— Chance - A Tale in Two Parts • Joseph Conrad

... after the fashion of humanity, in love with my name, and, as young, uneducated people commonly do, wrote it down everywhere. Once I had carved it very handsomely and accurately on the smooth bark of a linden-tree of moderate age. The following autumn, when my affection for Annette was in its fullest bloom, I took the trouble to cut hers above it. Towards the end of the winter, in the mean time, like a capricious lover, ...
— Autobiography • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

... makes a very good remark on the nest of this bird, but I found one once under the roots of a tree at Neddivattam, and it was a most beautiful nest, built entirely of the fibrous bark of the Nilghiri nettle, in the shape of an oven, with a hole to go in at one side. It contained four pure white delicate eggs. Another one found near the same place was of the same ...
— The Nests and Eggs of Indian Birds, Volume 1 • Allan O. Hume

... household of Saul, so in the dirty hut of the tailor, Shmul, the mother occupied the first place, and was the object of general care and reverence. Such a thing as a son, be he rich or poor, neglecting those who gave him life, is never seen in Israel. "Like the branches of a tree, we all sprang from her," said the head of ...
— An Obscure Apostle - A Dramatic Story • Eliza Orzeszko

... was ever much monotony in the neighbourhood of the Heavenly Twins; they managed to introduce variety into everything, and their quickness of action, when both were roused, was phenomenal. One day while at work they saw a sparrow pick up a piece of bread, take it to the roof-tree of an angle of the house visible from the schoolroom window, drop it, and chase it as it fell; and the twins had made a bet as to which would beat, bird or bread, quarrelled because they could not agree as to which had bet on bird and which on bread, and boxed each other's ears almost ...
— The Heavenly Twins • Madame Sarah Grand

... turned out, Tad Butler had gone. On a piece of paper pinned to a tree they found a note reading: "I'm ...
— The Pony Rider Boys in the Ozarks • Frank Gee Patchin

... once there was a golden egg which a royal eagle had laid, away up in a tree. It was so high up that it could hardly be seen. But a youth, who though poor was brave, saw it, and longed for it. He knew that if he could get it, it would bring wealth and prosperity to him. So he tried to climb. One who loved him stopped him, saying, 'You will fall and ...
— King Arthur and His Knights • Maude L. Radford

... to tell gramma," cried Viny, wholly off her balance, "dis berry same minnit. Lawks! but won't she be tickled to leave the ole shell! Den I'll git my bunnet an' go wid yer, Miss Ca, in tree ...
— Twilight Stories • Various

... little town, which contains more than two thousand inhabitants, Russians, Persians and Turkomans. There is not much to see, however, either within it or around it; there are no trees—not even a palm tree—only pasturages and fields of cereals, watered by a narrow stream. My good fortune furnished me with a companion, or I should rather say a ...
— The Adventures of a Special Correspondent • Jules Verne

... 255 Its unsuccessful issue much excite My sorrow; for I brought with me the faith That, if France prospered, good men would not long Pay fruitless worship to humanity, And this most rotten branch of human shame, 260 Object, so seemed it, of superfluous pains, Would fall together with its parent tree. What, then, were my emotions, when in arms Britain put forth her free-born strength in league, Oh, pity and shame! with those confederate Powers! 265 Not in my single self alone I found, But in the minds of all ingenuous youth, Change and subversion from ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, Vol. III • William Wordsworth

... length his lonely cot appears in view, Beneath the shelter of an aged tree; Th' expectant wee things toddlin', stacher thro' To meet their dad, wi' flichterin noise an' glee. His wee bit ingle, blinkin' bonnily, His clean hearth-stane, his thriftie wine's smile, The lisping infant prattling on his knee, Does a' his weary carking cares beguile, An' makes ...
— Six Centuries of English Poetry - Tennyson to Chaucer • James Baldwin

... The hound was put upon his track, and in the morning was found watching the dead body of the negro. The dogs are trained to this service when young. A negro is directed to go into the woods and secure himself upon a tree. When sufficient time has elapsed for doing this, the hound is put upon his track. The blacks are compelled to worry them until they make them their implacable enemies: and it is common to meet with dogs which ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... antecedents which we trace in history, and more especially in the history of philosophy. Nor can mental phenomena be truly explained either by physiology or by the observation of consciousness apart from their history. They have a growth of their own, like the growth of a flower, a tree, a human being. They may be conceived as of themselves constituting a common mind, and having a sort of personal identity in ...
— Theaetetus • Plato

... man, the blacksmith, and brawny, if he had no spreading chestnut tree; busy not only shoeing farmhorses, but repairing American reapers and binders, whose owners profited exceedingly and saved the day. But not all farmers felt that they could afford ...
— My Year of the War • Frederick Palmer

... of woods and rivers, Anaitis. A very old fellow, regally crowned, lies asleep under an ash-tree, guarded by a watchman who has more arms and ...
— Jurgen - A Comedy of Justice • James Branch Cabell

... should know the truth; and, as I had been too intimate with the family to be ignorant of the haunts of Sir Barnard, I went to the Cocoa tree, a place to which he daily resorted, and there lounged away between two and three hours over the papers; hoping ...
— The Adventures of Hugh Trevor • Thomas Holcroft

... ye tall feed, an' warrant ye fust-cut health an' happiness. No cure, no pay. An' look here, keep that 'ere card I gev ye continooally on hand, an' peroose it day an' night. I tell ye it'll be the makin' on ye. An' don't forgit the golden rule:—Don't tech, don't g' nigh the p'is'n upus-tree of gravy; beware o' the dorg called hot biscuits; take keer o' the grease, an' the stomach'll take keer of itself. Ef you're in want o' bran-bread at any time, let me know, an' I'm your man,—Rink by name, an' Rink ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 14, No. 85, November, 1864 • Various

... safe to say that there was not a dry eye in that record assemblage. A most romantic incident occurred when a handsome young Oxford graduate, noted for his chivalry towards the fair sex, stepped forward and, presenting his visiting card, bankbook and genealogical tree, solicited the hand of the hapless young lady, requesting her to name the day, and was accepted on the spot. Every lady in the audience was presented with a tasteful souvenir of the occasion in the shape of a skull and crossbones ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... "before you start looking for the sliver in Levi's eye you had better dig the tree trunk out of your own." Strongly rebuked, Simon consented to eat with Levi and his friends, ...
— Men Called Him Master • Elwyn Allen Smith

... way of living for a whole year; and one day that by chance I had gone further into the wood than usual, I happened to light on a very pleasant place, where I began to cut down wood; and, in pulling up the root of a tree, I espied an iron ring, fastened to a trap-door of the same metal. I took away the earth that covered it, and, having lifted it up, saw stairs, which I descended, with my ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Volume 1 • Anonymous

... understood, both by the party opposed to Henry and by his own supporters. Whatever we may think of the dying prophecy attributed to Edward the Confessor, that the troubles which he foresaw for England should end when the green tree—the English dynasty—cut off from its root and removed for the space of three acres' breadth—three foreign reigns—should without human help be joined to it again and bring forth leaves and fruit, ...
— The History of England From the Norman Conquest - to the Death of John (1066-1216) • George Burton Adams

... verra angry at my reproof, but my Leddy W. just then came in, an' she said, with one of her ain gracious smiles—'For shame! Grace; the bairn's weel enough. Let us hope she maun prove a' blessin' to her parents. The straightest tree does na ...
— Flora Lyndsay - or, Passages in an Eventful Life • Susan Moodie

... punctured the silence sharply, though not loudly. Some large fruit pod bursting on a distant tree might have made such ...
— The Unspeakable Perk • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... the same pattern and colour of tree repeating themselves endlessly, till in a couple of hours they reached the castle hill which was to be the end of their journey, and beheld stretched beneath them the valley of the Murg. They ...
— A Laodicean • Thomas Hardy

... campfires, and perhaps with an unconscious attempt at self-justification repeated that she was a holy terror, and sank his pick into her grave up to the handle. At that moment a raven, which had silently settled upon a branch of the blasted tree above his head, solemnly snapped its beak and uttered its mind about the ...
— The Collected Works of Ambrose Bierce, Vol. II: In the Midst of Life: Tales of Soldiers and Civilians • Ambrose Bierce

... the guarantee that the Branch, i.e. the Messianic king (Jer. xxiii. 5, xxxiii, 15), no doubt Zerubbabel (Zech, iii. 8, vi. 12; Hag. ii. 23), is coming. In the fifth vision (iv.)[1] the prophet sees a lampstand with seven lamps and an olive tree on either side, the trees representing the two anointed leaders, Zerubbabel and Joshua, enjoying the divine protection. [Footnote 1: Except vv. 6b-10a, which appears to be a special assurance, hardly here in place, that Zerubbabel would finish the ...
— Introduction to the Old Testament • John Edgar McFadyen

... called at his house, my worthy cousin showed me his family tree, beginning with a Don Francisco, brother of Don Juan. In my pedigree, which I knew by heart, Don Juan, my direct ancestor, was a posthumous child. It was possible that there might have been a brother of Marco ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... the inner covering of yellow straw—which seemed strange and unnatural, somehow, when suddenly revealed in its glistening dryness, beneath the moist dark earth. Little crumbles of mould trickled down, in among the flattened shining straws. In a tree near Peter two pigeons were gurgling and rookety-cooing, mating for the coming year. He fell to sorting out the potatoes, throwing the bad ones on a heap aside—"tattie-walin'," as they call it in the north. The enervating softness was at work on Peter's head, too, and from time to time, ...
— The House with the Green Shutters • George Douglas Brown

... has as literally 'grown' as has an oak tree; and probably there is no more likeness between the Bible as we know it to-day and its earliest beginning, than we find between the mighty tree, and the acorn ...
— The Bible in its Making - The most Wonderful Book in the World • Mildred Duff

... deposit brought down by the river in the spring, and, when the river retired into its banks, became a series of mud flats, described as "mere quagmires of black dirt, stretching along for miles, unvaried except by the limbs of half-buried carrion, tree trunks, or by occasional yellow pools of what the children called frog's spawn; all together steaming up vapors redolent of the savor of death." In the previous year—not an unusually bad one—one-ninth of the Indian population on these flats had died in two months. The Mormons suffered not only ...
— The Story of the Mormons: • William Alexander Linn

... time they had reached the entrance of the grove and caught sight of the fair queen. "The fates protect me!" said Frank, suddenly stopping and planting himself against a tree. "It would be suicide to advance another step. And she is your niece, you say. Pray intercede for me, or in less than a month I shall be making faces through the ...
— Tempest and Sunshine • Mary J. Holmes

... the democracy, in the language of your own glorious Webster, "still lives," lives not as his great spirit did, when it hung 'twixt life and death, like a star upon the horizon's verge, but lives like the germ that is shooting upward, like the sapling that is growing to a mighty tree, the branches of which will spread over the commonwealth, and may redeem and restore Massachusetts to her once glorious ...
— Speeches of the Honorable Jefferson Davis 1858 • Hon. Jefferson Davis

... his wish to do so must be still less. There could be no possible inducement to him to come back to a place which had so nearly been his own, and the possession of which he had lost in so painful a manner. Every tree about the place, every path across the wide park, every hedge and ditch and hidden leafy corner, had had for him a special interest,—for they had all been his own. But all that was now over. They were not only not his own, but they belonged to one who was ...
— Castle Richmond • Anthony Trollope

... Scandinavian origin, from bol or bole, a tree-trunk, and werk, work, in Ger. Bollwerk, which has also been derived from an old German bolen, to throw, and so a machine for throwing missiles), a barricade of beams, earth, &c., a work in 15th and 16th century fortifications designed to mount artillery ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 - "Bulgaria" to "Calgary" • Various

... much as a blade of grass or a tree to say 'Good neighbour' to," said Molyneux, interrupting his companion's audible reverie. "Crows and horses must fare sumptuously in ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 2 (of 2) • John Roby

... legion! Our mothers must have heard that the Flower Mission intended giving us some Thanksgiving dinners, for there were our five inevitable little cat's-paws,—the identical five that applied just before the Christmas tree, disappeared in vacation, turned up the day before we went to the Mechanics' Fair, were lost to sight the day after, presented themselves previous to the Woodward's Garden expedition, and then went into retirement till to-day. Where am I going to 'sit' another child, pray? They were two in ...
— The Story of Patsy • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... her early death; for, if she continues to sing, I wouldn't give her at the most more than six months longer to live." Krespel's heart was lacerated as if by the stabs of hundreds of stinging knives. It was as though his life had been for the first time overshadowed by a beautiful tree full of the most magnificent blossoms, and now it was to be sawn to pieces at the roots, so that it could not grow green and blossom any more. His resolution was taken. He told Antonia all; he put the alternatives before her—whether she ...
— Stories by Foreign Authors: German • Various

... distressed and moved by the death of Chief Justice Field, in April, 1899. It was his custom to read his sermons to me in his study before preaching. He chose for his sermon on April 16, the decease of the great jurist, and his text was Zachariah xi, 2: "Howl fir tree, for the cedar has fallen." Many no doubt remember this sermon, but no one can realise the depths of feeling with which the Doctor read it to me in the secret corner of his workroom at home. But his heart ...
— T. De Witt Talmage - As I Knew Him • T. De Witt Talmage

... mentioned it only twice this morning, and I have set Hephaestus to work to make him another, of yew-tree wood. It will be less incommodious, more fitted to this place, and in a very short time Zeus will ...
— Hypolympia - Or, The Gods in the Island, an Ironic Fantasy • Edmund Gosse

... backbone, Mrs. Eddy takes delight in going back to the ancestral tree and in tracing those branches which are identified with good and great names both in Scotland ...
— Pulpit and Press • Mary Baker Eddy

... from his back. Twice did he entangle himself in barbed wire deliberately. Once did I have to coerce him with many stripes to pass a tank. Then the heavens opened upon us and it rained. It rained until I was wet to the skin, in spite of sheltering beneath a tree, one branch of which, owing to the stubborn temper of my steed, struck me a stinging blow across the face. So in no joyful spirit I came at last to Amiens, this whited sepulcher, this Circe's capital, this den of thieves, this home of vampires. There I dined, ...
— Now It Can Be Told • Philip Gibbs

... tell you, Ensign Dudley, that the science, and wisdom, and philosophy of Europe, have been exceeding active in this matter; and they proved to their own perfect satisfaction, which is the same thing as disposing of the question without appeal, that man and beast, plant and tree, hill and dale, lake and pond, sun, air, fire and water, are all wanting in some of the perfectness of the older regions. I respect a patriotic sentiment, and can carry the disposition to applaud the bounties ...
— The Wept of Wish-Ton-Wish • James Fenimore Cooper

... Christ's fan material nor his axe at the root of the tree, nor are the waters which he said should flow from the bodies of believers, nor the waters which he promised should be in them a well of living water springing up unto everlasting life;[156] nor the living fountains of water, where God shall wipe away all tears from ...
— Water Baptism • James H. Moon

... lay aside all self-designs, and after our fasts and humiliations may have a day of rejoicing and thankfulness, may eat our meat with gladness, and our bread with a merry heart; then shall we sit each man under his own fig-tree, and the voice of the turtle shall be heard in our land, a bird famous for constancy ...
— The World's Best Orations, Vol. 1 (of 10) • Various

... dignity upon Milton's. We may, perhaps, guess at its merits from this fragment of a speech in prose, addressed to Adam by Eve: 'What ails the sot?' says the new termagant. 'What are you afraid of?... Take it, you fool, and eat.... Take it, I say, or I will go and cut down the tree, and you shall never eat any of it at all; and you shall still be a fool, and be governed by your wife for ever.' This, and much more gross buffoonery of the same kind, is apparently intended to recommend certain sound moral aphorisms to the vulgar; but the cool arithmetical ...
— Hours in a Library, Volume I. (of III.) • Leslie Stephen

... was listening to the weird call of that persistent whip-poor-will, perched in some neighboring tree, and sending ...
— Phil Bradley's Mountain Boys - The Birch Bark Lodge • Silas K. Boone

... lived. And when the sun was so low, and the shadows so long on the grass that the Grey Goose felt ready to run away at the sight of her own neck, little Miss Jane Johnson, and her "particular friend" Clarinda, sat under the big oak-tree on the Green, and Jane pinched Clarinda's little finger till she found that she could keep a secret, and then she told her in confidence that she had heard from Nurse and Jemima that Miss Jessamine's niece had been a very naughty girl, and that that horrid wicked ...
— Jackanapes, Daddy Darwin's Dovecot and Other Stories • Juliana Horatio Ewing

... saw in Southampton County. They stopped opposite the cabin of a free colored man who was hoeing in his little field. They called out, 'Is this Southampton County?' He replied, 'Yes Sir, you have just crossed the line, by yonder tree.' They shot him dead and rode on."[7] A slaveholder went to the woods accompanied by a faithful slave, who had been the means of saving his master's life during the insurrection. When they reached a retired ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 5, 1920 • Various

... was the girl who had saved life. Of that grim teacher opposite and, later, of a farmer's son out of a tree where he was hanging. Very creditable, of course, though it couldn't affect herself, Mrs. Ebenezer Vavasour-Stark, and she fixed ...
— Dorothy's Travels • Evelyn Raymond

... Schamir, the chief talisman, and how through its aid he won to the Sun's Sister for a little while; and concerning his dealings with the handsome Troll-wife (in which affair the cat he bribed with butter and the elm-tree he had decked with ribbons helped him); and with that beautiful and dire Thuringian woman whose soul was a red mouse: we have in this place naught to do. Besides, the Foolish Prince had put aside such commerce when the ...
— The Cords of Vanity • James Branch Cabell et al

... despair is worst: Be strong, and scale it!" Fifty years he scaled Those hills; so long it seemed. A cavern next Entering, with mole-like hands he scooped his way, And reached at last the gates of morn. Ah me! A stone's cast from him rose the Tree of Life: He heard its sighs ecstatic: Full in view The Beatific River rolled; beyond All-glorious shone the City of the Saints Clothed with God's light! And yet from him that realm Was severed by ...
— Legends of the Saxon Saints • Aubrey de Vere

... the lad; and of course all were astonished by his earnest announcement of the apparition. The old grandmother hastened to look out. There sat her father still, on the bench by the apple-tree, leaning against the trunk. But the sight did not satisfy her. She ran out to him. The smile of salutation was still on his lips, which seemed just saying, "Sarvant, Sah," to the Judge. But those lips would never move again. They were ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 14, No. 83, September, 1864 • Various

... her head. "It is not a Mohican arrow, but a Pequot one," she said. "It was driven into the tree by a warbow. See, how deeply it entered the tree! And how strong the flint is and how well preserved, in spite of its being driven into the hard wood. That arrow was sent ...
— Three Young Pioneers - A Story of the Early Settlement of Our Country • John Theodore Mueller

... is an old tale goes, that Herne the Hunter, Some time a keeper here in Windsor Forest, Doth all the winter-time, at still midnight, Walk round about an oak, with great ragg'd horns; And there he blasts the tree, and takes the cattle; And makes milch-kine yield blood, and shakes a chain In a most hideous and ...
— William Shakespeare • John Masefield

... ceremony" is performed from commune to commune. The keys of the church are forcibly taken from the cure the seats are burned, and, frequently, the woodwork marked with the seigneur's arms. They march to the seigneur's mansion, tear down his weathercocks, and compel him to furnish his finest tree, together with feathers and ribbons with which to deck it, without omitting the three measures which he uses in the collection of his dues in grain or flour. The maypole is planted in the village square, and the weathercocks, ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 2 (of 6) - The French Revolution, Volume 1 (of 3) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... me! to flee me!" repeated the colonel, seating himself on a bench with his back to a tree that shaded it, and letting his head fall upon ...
— Adieu • Honore de Balzac

... idea of his direction. I should be a lost man the moment I ventured out of call. Woodcraft must be a sixth sense which we lost with the rest of our Eden birthright when we strayed from innocence, when we ceased to sleep with one ear on the ground, and to spell our way by the moss on tree-trunks. In these solitudes, as we call them, ranks and clouds of witnesses rise up to prove us deaf and blind. Busy couriers are passing every moment of the day; and we do not see, nor hear, nor understand. We are the stocks and stones. Packer ...
— The Desert and The Sown • Mary Hallock Foote

... unlucky moment he is half inclined to reduce even 'resemblance' to 'contiguity.'[521] Resemblance is, he even suggests, merely 'a case of frequency,' because we generally see like things together. When we see one tree or sheep, we generally see several trees or sheep. J. S. Mill mildly remarks upon this quaint suggestion as the 'least successful simplification' in the book. He argues the point gravely. Sheep, it is clear, are not seen to be like because ...
— The English Utilitarians, Volume II (of 3) - James Mill • Leslie Stephen

... when they died—it turned them gray to live with him; both had died before they were fifty; and here he was the sole owner of a wonderful young head, with hair that reached to the waist, with lips like cool fruit from an orchard-tree, and the indescribable charm of youth and loveliness which the young themselves never really understood. That was what he used to say to himself; it was only age could appreciate youth and beauty; ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... of this timber from which to select, although, because of the ships built by Don Juan de Silva, the supply of it is now obtained from a distance. That wood is used only for this purpose, for the tree is short and not straight. Capstans of one piece, gears, and some stringer-plates [trancaniles] for the curved parts of the prows of vessels and the snatch-cleats for the wales, are also made from that wood. That said wood is ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVIII, 1617-1620 • Various

... the Hazna of Zinder. It seems the Sarkee himself is still half pagan, for at the beginning of every year he proceeds with his officers to a tree, the ancient god of paganism, and there distributes two goffas of wada (about 100,000), three bullocks and sheep, and ghaseb, to the poor. These things are really offered to the deities of his ancestors, though the poor of the country get the benefit of them. There are ...
— Narrative of a Mission to Central Africa Performed in the Years 1850-51, Volume 2 • James Richardson

... There are oranges of many varieties, some of them resembling large melons. Honey and wax is found in the trees, where the bees make it. The wax is worth sixteen or twenty reals an arroba, and a jar of honey one real. I saw a tree which had many honeycombs hanging on the branches. The mountains are fuller of wild boars than are the commons of Espana of swine and cattle in acorn time. One of those swine, if it is fat, is worth two reals, but only one if not fat; and ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XXII, 1625-29 • Various

... know it a man must live here, and he will see the promising and ardent men sinking one after another in a deadly torpor, wrapped up in self-contemplation, dead to their Redeemer, and useless to His Church, under the baneful breath of this accursed upas tree. I say accursed, because I believe that St. Paul would use the same language to Oxford as he did to the Galatian Church, "I would they were even cut off which trouble you"; accursed, because I believe that the curse of God will fall on it He has denounced it on the Papal hereby, ...
— Occasional Papers - Selected from The Guardian, The Times, and The Saturday Review, - 1846-1890 • R.W. Church

... arguments be as thick as fireflies, O Doge!" Jack answered, "everyone bearing a torch to illumine the outer darkness of ignorance! May every happy thought I have for Little Rivers spring up in a date-tree wonderful! Then, before the year is out, you will have a forest of date-trees stretching from foothills to foothills, across ...
— Over the Pass • Frederick Palmer

... passage and looking up as Gerald came in indicated a chair. Gerald sat down and for a few moments Kit studied him quietly. It was obvious that he felt some strain, but his look was resolute and Kit owned that he had more pluck than he had thought. The room was very quiet and the shadow of a big ash tree fell across the open window. The musical tinkle of a binder working among the corn came faintly down ...
— The Buccaneer Farmer - Published In England Under The Title "Askew's Victory" • Harold Bindloss

... Andrews. "If he had been as strange to that gilgie as you were, and had got the same directions he gave you, he would have found it first shot. When a certain class of bushman says 'mallee', he means any sort of scrub except lignum; and when he says 'mulga', he means any tree except pine or currajong. Same mental slovenliness in women. A woman will tell a yarn that no man can make head or tail of, but it's as clear as day to any other woman. And if you tell a woman a yarn, ...
— Such is Life • Joseph Furphy

... For so an entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ." "Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they may have right to the tree of life and enter through the gates into the city." Men in disobedience to the gospel feel, when they approach the cold Jordan of death, that every thing upon which they built their hopes is being swept ...
— The Christian Foundation, Or, Scientific and Religious Journal, Volume I, No. 11, November, 1880 • Various

... their walls every spring, so that from the river the country houses looked trim and neat at all seasons. Between the river and the uplands ran the roadway, close to which the habitants set their conspicuous dwellings with only in rare cases a grass plot or shade tree at the door. In winter they bore the full blast of the winds that drove across the expanse of frozen stream in front of them; in summer the hot sun blazed relentlessly upon the low roofs. As each house stood but a few rods from its ...
— Crusaders of New France - A Chronicle of the Fleur-de-Lis in the Wilderness - Chronicles of America, Volume 4 • William Bennett Munro

... Job, probably the oldest writing in existence, is full of vivid descriptions of the wild denizens of the flood and desert; and it is expressly recorded of the wise old king, that he "spake of trees, from the cedar tree that is in Lebanon, even unto the hyssop that springeth out of the wall; and also of beasts, and of fowl, and of creeping things, and of fishes." Solomon was a zoologist and botanist; and there is palpable ...
— The Testimony of the Rocks - or, Geology in Its Bearings on the Two Theologies, Natural and Revealed • Hugh Miller

... You can plan to stay with Linda afterward. I'll meet you by the sycamore tree just beyond the Bates' place at eight sharp—give you the best time you ever had in your life. Believe me, I'm some little spender when ...
— Wild Wings - A Romance of Youth • Margaret Rebecca Piper

... consolation for you to know that Van Kuyp will be famous? What is his fame or his failure to you? Where do you, Alixe Van Kuyp, come in? Why must your charming woman's soul be sacrificed, warped to this stunted tree of another's talent? You are silent. You say he is trying to make me deny Richard! You were never more mistaken. I am interested in you both; interested in you as a noble woman—stop! I mean it. And interested in Richard—well—because ...
— Visionaries • James Huneker

... he was preparing for death the king's parrot flew from its cage and alighted on a rosebush in Zadig's garden. A peach had been driven thither by the wind from a neighboring tree, and had fallen on a piece of the written leaf of the pocketbook to which it stuck. The bird carried off the peach and the paper and laid them on the king's knee. The king took up the paper with great eagerness and read the words, which formed no sense, ...
— Library of the World's Best Mystery and Detective Stories • Edited by Julian Hawthorne

... John, "my poor brother Will and I were wont to play there when we herded the cattle on the hill. It was climbing yon ash tree that stands out above that he got the fall that was the death of him at last. I've never gone nigh the place with mine own good will since that day—nor knew the children had done so—but methought 'twas a lonesome place and on mine own land, where we might safest ...
— Under the Storm - Steadfast's Charge • Charlotte M. Yonge

... Odds my Life—I am not sorry that He has run out of the course a little—for my Part, I hate to see dry Prudence clinging to the green juices of youth—'tis like ivy round a sapling and spoils the growth of the Tree. ...
— The School For Scandal • Richard Brinsley Sheridan

... must be remembered that the main Hindu gods are three in number. They are all sprung from a common origin, Brahma, but they are quite separate beings. They do not form a trinity, i.e. three in one or one in three. And each of them has a wife and a family. The following genealogical tree will, I hope, ...
— Deccan Nursery Tales - or, Fairy Tales from the South • Charles Augustus Kincaid

... for years rooted his thoughts to his village. His guest had been like the Bird in the Fairy Tale, settling upon the quiet branches, and singing so loudly and so gladly of the enchanted skies afar, that, when it flew away, the tree pined, nipped and withering in the sober sun in which before it had basked contented. The guest was, indeed, one of those men whose animal spirits exercise upon such as come within their circle the influence ...
— Night and Morning, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... government virtually abdicated. Two utter strangers appeared in a theatrical way at its doors, and suggested in writing to the Great Council that to appease the spirit of the times they should plant the liberty-tree on the Place of St. Mark, and speedily accede to all the propositions for liberalizing Venice which the popular temper seemed to demand. Such were the terror and disorganization of the aristocracy that instead of punishing the intrusion of the ...
— The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte - Vol. I. (of IV.) • William Milligan Sloane

... took up his abode in a rum-selling tavern in a somewhat lonely location on the seaboard. Here he drank for many days without stint, keeping himself the whole time in a state of semi-intoxication. One night he stood leaning against a tree, looking listlessly and vacantly out upon the ocean; the waves breaking on the beach, and the white sails of passing vessels vaguely impressing him like the pictures of a dream. He was startled by a voice whispering hoarsely ...
— The Complete Works of Whittier - The Standard Library Edition with a linked Index • John Greenleaf Whittier

... expensive plates that had been so lavishly bespoken, and in great part completed, for the "History of Human Error," and, above all, the liabilities incurred on "The Capitalist;" what with the plant, as Mr. Peck technically phrased a great upas-tree of a total, branching out into types, cases, printing-presses, engines, etc., all now to be resold at a third of their value; what with advertisements and bills that had covered all the dead-walls by ...
— The Caxtons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... of Ra arrived at the town of Het-Aha; its forepart was made of palm wood, and the hind part was made of acacia wood; thus the palm tree and the acacia tree have been sacred trees from that day to this. Then Heru-Behutet embarked in the Boat of Ra, after he had made an end of fighting, and sailed; and Ra said unto Thoth, "Let this Boat be called . . . . . . .;" and thus hath it been called ...
— Legends Of The Gods - The Egyptian Texts, edited with Translations • E. A. Wallis Budge

... Chippy suddenly set up a great twitter. Anybody could see that he was frightened. And one of Jolly Robin's sons, perched in an apple tree near the stone wall where Mr. Chippy lived in a wild grapevine, wondered ...
— The Tale of Grumpy Weasel - Sleepy-Time Tales • Arthur Scott Bailey

... dragon, the tooth of a wolf, the maw of the ravenous salt-sea shark, the mummy of a witch, the root of the poisonous hemlock (this to have effect must be digged in the dark), the gall of a goat, and the liver of a Jew, with slips of the yew-tree that roots itself in graves, and the finger of a dead child. All these were set on to boil in a great kettle, or caldron, which, as fast as it grew too hot, was cooled with a baboon's blood. To these they poured in the blood of a sow that had eaten her young, and they threw into the flame ...
— Tales from Shakespeare • Charles and Mary Lamb

... north, we thought that Sierra Leone might be best, and turned our head in that direction, the bark being at that time nearly hull down on our starboard quarter. Suddenly as we looked at her we saw a dense black cloud of smoke shoot up from her, which hung like a monstrous tree upon the sky line. A few seconds later a roar like thunder burst upon our ears, and as the smoke thinned away there was no sign left of the Gloria Scott. In an instant we swept the boat's head round again ...
— Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

... with Khizr, when Musa turned in fear to flee? What man foresees the flow'er or fruit whom Fate compels to plant the tree? ...
— The Kasidah of Haji Abdu El-Yezdi • Richard F. Burton

... Cotton is a precious resource, and which cannot fail with you. I wish the cargo of olive plants sent by the way of Baltimore, and that which you will perceive my correspondent is preparing now to send, may arrive to you in good order. This is the object for the patriots of your country; for that tree once established there, will be the source of the greatest wealth and happiness. But to insure success, perseverance may be necessary. An essay or two may fail. I think, therefore, that an annual sum ...
— Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson - Volume I • Thomas Jefferson

... scenic representations, "without the aid of words," mystically shadowing forth in symbolic forms the doctrine of the transmigration of souls. He assumed successively the shapes of a rabbit, a hen, a grain of wheat, a horse, a tree, and so on through a wide range of metamorphoses enacted by the aid of ...
— The Destiny of the Soul - A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life • William Rounseville Alger

... Bonhill, in Dumbartonshire. Arms, az. "a bend, or, between a lion rampant, ppr., holding in his paw a banner, arg. and a bugle-horn, also ppr. Crest, an oak-tree, ppr. Motto, Viresco." ...
— Henry Esmond; The English Humourists; The Four Georges • William Makepeace Thackeray

... a sycamore tree, sycamore tree, sycamore tree, I looked me out upon the sea, A Christmas day in ...
— Rhymes Old and New • M.E.S. Wright

... of him in the court of his great dust-coloured mansion at Ocana, where the broad eaves were full of a cooing of pigeons and the wide halls had dark rafters painted with arabesques in vermilion, in a suit of black velvet, writing at a table under a lemon tree. Down the sun-scarred street, in the cathedral that was building in those days, full of a smell of scaffolding and stone dust, there must have stood a tremendous catafalque where lay with his arms around him ...
— When Winter Comes to Main Street • Grant Martin Overton

... past ages a Chinese[3] settler had taken to wife a daughter of the aborigines, by whom he had a female child. Her parents lived in a hilly district (Bulud hill), covered with a large forest tree, known by the name of opih. One day a jungle fire occurred, and after it was over, the child jumped down from the house (native houses are raised on piles off the ground), and went up to look at a half burnt opih log, ...
— British Borneo - Sketches of Brunai, Sarawak, Labuan, and North Borneo • W. H. Treacher

... have heard rehearsed By harmonists itinerant, Who modern worthies celebrate, Yet scarcely make a dinner on't. Some of whom sprang from noble race, And some were in a pig-sty born, Dependent upon royal grace Or triple tree ...
— The English Spy • Bernard Blackmantle

... which many allow themselves to be sacrificed to their love of wealth reminds one of the cupidity of the monkey—that caricature of our species. In Algiers, the Kabyle peasant attaches a gourd, well fixed, to a tree, and places within it some rice. The gourd has an opening merely sufficient to admit the monkey's paw. The creature comes to the tree by night, inserts his paw, and grasps his booty. He tries to draw it back, but it is clenched, and he has not the wisdom to unclench ...
— Self Help • Samuel Smiles

... other; or they may be passed through a loose loop below to prevent their separating. The double-stirrup leather and the riding exactly on the buckles of the girths, are great abominations. I go farther in this way myself, and cut off the inside girth flap immediately below the tree of the saddle. It is wholly unnecessary when the buckles of the girths are removed from under the weight of the rider. The absence of this inner girth-flap gives a much firmer, and to me a much pleasanter, seat; while to the horse the saddle is much cooler, and a little lighter. ...
— Hints on Horsemanship, to a Nephew and Niece - or, Common Sense and Common Errors in Common Riding • George Greenwood

... arisen in silence and were peering into the blackness of the night whence the sound apparently came. Anderson thought he saw a figure emerge from behind a tree far off in the distance and he immediately gave chase, opening fire as he did so. Several times he fired into the dark space before him, for it was bristling with shade, notwithstanding the obscure light of ...
— The Loyalist - A Story of the American Revolution • James Francis Barrett

... "Up against the tree over there," answered Phil, pointing. "I had that spot picked out when I painted it. We'll set it so that it will look as if his bearship was ...
— Dave Porter at Star Ranch - Or, The Cowboy's Secret • Edward Stratemeyer

... special notice. Suddenly a dainty patent-leather shoe floated towards me on the surface of the stream. It evidently had just dropped in, for it was right side up with care, and was disporting itself right merrily. "Did ever Jove's tree drop such fruit?" I quoted, as I fished it out on my stick; and just then I heard a distressed voice saying, "Oh, aunt Celia, I've lost my smart little London shoe. I was sitting in a tree, taking a pebble out of the heel, when I saw a caterpillar, and I dropped it into the river, the shoe, ...
— A Cathedral Courtship • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... of the chapel. For two days, he and Jean, his brother-in-law, had worked in the forests, cutting down young trees of fir, balsam, and dogwood. The balsams were full of small cones of a brilliant purple color; and the dogwoods were waving with showy white flowers. Pierre set each tree in a box of moist earth, so that it looked as thriving and fresh as it had done in the forest; first, a fir, and then a dogwood, all the way from the door to the altar, reached the gay and fragrant wall. Great masses of Linnea vines, in full bloom, ...
— Hetty's Strange History • Helen Jackson

... under the stars with her desert lover; she had, strong in a great love, fearlessly climbed the high wall of racial distinction crowned with the spikes of custom and convention; she had watched the seed of happiness burst and blossom until it had grown into a great tree; but she had forgotten that no tree, however deep its roots, however strong its branches, is safe, so long as Fate, in senile jealousy, can tear the heavens into ribbons ...
— The Hawk of Egypt • Joan Conquest

... such gigantic stature that when she laid her head on one hill near Mecca, her knees rested on two other hills in the plain, about two gun-shots asunder. Adam was as tall as a palm tree.—Moncony, Voyage, ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1 - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook • The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D.

... encourages the bold friar. So long as the axe is not laid at the foot of the tree, which bears the poisonous but golden fruit, the moderate man applauds the blows. "Luther's cause is considered odious," writes Erasmus to the Elector of Saxony, "because he has, at the same time, attacked the bellies of the monks and the bulls of the Pope." He complains that the zealous man had ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... prepared him for enduring the hardships of the position he was destined to fill; here, too, is where tradition says he accomplished the feat of throwing a stone across the Rappahannock, and here, too, stood the traditional cherry tree, about the destruction of which with his little hatchet he would not utter a falsehood. Yonder, just across the Rappahannock, in a small, unostentatious burying ground, the immortal remains of 'Mary, mother of Washington,' were buried—sacred spot, ...
— Continental Monthly , Vol IV, Issue VI, December 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy. • Various

... is not one chiefly by profession, must be prepared to tread the winepress alone. He may indeed flourish like the bay-tree in a grateful environment, but more often he will rather resemble a reed shaken by the wind. Whether starved or fed by the accidents of fortune he must find his essential life in his own ideal. In spiritual life, heteronomy is suicide. ...
— The Life of Reason • George Santayana

... "ain't you pannin' me out a leetle too fine? It mought 'a' been this way, an' it mought 'a' been that. But I've no business to point if I can't find. When a man's got to the bottom of his pile, you can't fo'ce him to borrow. 'Sposin' I set you barkin' up the wrong tree; what good's that ...
— Overland • John William De Forest

... something about the ceremony, concluded they were assisting, and, after a little questioning with himself, led his horse to the gate, made fast the reins to it, went in, and approached the little assembly. Ere he reached it, he saw them kneel, whereupon he made a circuit and got behind a tree, for he would not willingly seem rude, and he dared not be hypocritical. Thence he descried Juliet kneeling with the rest, and could not help being rather annoyed. Neither could he help being a little struck with the unusual kind of prayer the curate ...
— Paul Faber, Surgeon • George MacDonald

... M. Sabathier, "had his leg broken by the fall of a tree. Eight years afterwards the two fragments of the bone had not yet joined together again—the two ends could be seen in the depths of a sore which was continually suppurating; and the leg hung down quite limp, swaying in all directions. Well, it was sufficient for this man to drink a glassful ...
— The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete - Lourdes, Rome and Paris • Emile Zola

... did more than all her life before it to fill her with the bitter fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Her illusions fell away from her, and her sweet childish faith was broken down. She saw herself as she was: a simple girl, a child ignorant of the ways of the world, going alone on a long journey unknown to her, thinking to succour her father in prison, and carrying ...
— The Scapegoat • Hall Caine

... Vancouver's Island, navigable for boats or small stern-wheel steamers, on the banks of which are extensive tracts of excellent land, varying from 20 to 100 feet in elevation, and clothed with a rich luxuriant grass. This land is ready for the plough, is entirely clear of the pine-tree, and studded here and there with a better kind of oak than is usually found on the cleared lands of Vancouver's Island. This river, which has received the name of Courtenay, in honour of Admiral Courtenay, who formerly commanded her majesty's ship Constance in ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. - From George III. to Victoria • E. Farr and E. H. Nolan

... to have Belle placed in one of the crowded city cemeteries. Would you not be willing to have her sleep in our tree-shadowed graveyard at Forestville? We could keep flowers on her grave there as long as ...
— Without a Home • E. P. Roe

... earth, stones, and a small wood. This mingled deluge of ice, gravel, and trees flung itself on the sand-bank near the bowlder. Repeated inundations spread over it year by year layers of mud, and enlarged its circumference by fresh deposits of pebbles: from the moldering tree-trunks sprung a luxuriant vegetation as quickly as the natural creations of the New World; and so arose a nameless island, of which no one had taken possession, over which was no landlord, no king, no authority, and no church—which belonged to no country ...
— Timar's Two Worlds • Mr Jkai

... anointed him with the Holy Spirit and with power: who went about doing good, and healing all that were oppressed of the devil; for God was with him. 39 And we are witnesses of all things which he did both in the country of the Jews, and in Jerusalem; whom also they slew, hanging him on a tree. 40 Him God raised up the third day, and gave him to be made manifest, 41 not to all the people, but unto witnesses that were chosen before of God, even to us, who ate and drank with him after he rose from the dead. 42 ...
— Epistle Sermons, Vol. II - Epiphany, Easter and Pentecost • Martin Luther

... have boiled a turnip: if a rat had got into it, he might have run away with it. The ground was dug in various places, as if for the purpose of further improvements, and here and there a sickly little tree was carefully hurdled round, and seemed pining its puny heart out at ...
— Pelham, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... life they load with hateful lies, And charge his lips with blasphemies; They nail him to the shameful tree: There hung the ...
— The Psalms of David - Imitated in the Language of The New Testament - And Applied to The Christian State and Worship • Isaac Watts

... tree at the junction of three roads, the two companies of fishermen met and fell into a general throng. There was a low wall around the tree-trunk, and, standing on this, Pete's head was clear above ...
— The Manxman - A Novel - 1895 • Hall Caine

... attributes and symbols of power, with torches in his hands as symbols of fire, sitting in the water and on the water, standing in the rain, riding in a canoe, enthroned on the clouds of heaven and on the cross-shaped tree of the four points of the compass, which, on account of its likeness to the Christian emblem, has many times been the subject of fantastic hypotheses. We see the god again on the Cab-sign, the symbol of the earth, with weapons, axe and spears, in his hands, planting kernels of maize, on a journey ...
— Representation of Deities of the Maya Manuscripts • Paul Schellhas

... GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE for Dec. 1791, by Sir Egerton Brydges, who chiefly compiled it from Hasted, compared with Berry's KENT GENEALOGIES, 474, where there are a few inaccuracies. It is, of course, a mere skeleton-tree, and furnishes no information as to the collateral branches, the connexion between the houses of Stanley and Lovelace, &c. Sir Egerton Brydges' series of articles on Lovelace in the GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, with the exception of that from which the foregoing table is taken, does ...
— Lucasta • Richard Lovelace

... but the sound was not repeated. That someone was on the other side of the rock I knew, for in a tree in the vicinity a thrush was hopping from twig to twig, sounding its alarm-cry ...
— The Czar's Spy - The Mystery of a Silent Love • William Le Queux

... young companions. Even when a mere youth he could lift as much as three full-grown men; and, "if you heard him fellin' trees in a clearin'," said his cousin, Dennis Hanks, "you would say there was three men at work by the way the trees fell. His ax would flash and bite into a sugar tree or sycamore, ...
— Eclectic School Readings: Stories from Life • Orison Swett Marden

... who had mapped it. To the north spread unfathomably a forest of scrub pine and pinon, rising, here and there, into loftier growth. It was as if man, with his imperious interventions, had set those thin steel parallels as an irrefragable boundary to the mutual encroachments of forest and desert, tree and cactus. A single, straggling trail squirmed its way into the woodland. One might have surmised that it was winding hopefully if blindly toward the noble mountain peak shimmering in white splendor, mystic and wonderful, sixty miles away, but seeming in ...
— Success - A Novel • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... typhoid, and young Price died within the week. In the hush that followed the death of her brother Isabelle lay waiting for the coming of her child.... Her older brother Ezra! He was like a sturdy young tree in the forest, scarce noticed in the familiar landscape until his loss. Quiet, hard-working "Junior," as the family called him,—what would the Colonel do without him? The old man—now he was obviously old even to Isabelle—would come to her room and sit ...
— Together • Robert Herrick (1868-1938)

... mood through it is one of quiet gayety, consequently one demanding a pleasant expression of countenance. The song picture must rustle by us like a fairy story. The picture shows us the fragrant nut tree putting forth its leaves in the spring; under it a maiden lost in reverie, who finally falls asleep, happy in her thoughts. All is youth and fragrance, a charming little picture, whose colors must harmonize. None of them should stand out from the frame. ...
— How to Sing - [Meine Gesangskunst] • Lilli Lehmann

... of the earthquake was so severe the floors and walls of the building collapsed at once and those of us who escaped made our way as best we could out of the ruins. On the side of the hotel where my room was there was a large tree. The side wall of my room fell against this tree, which also sustained that portion of the roof, preventing it from falling in ...
— Complete Story of the San Francisco Horror • Richard Linthicum

... animals at the sight of a lion. And it was thus that he, who, from audacity had sought to oppose and encounter Krishna in a combat hand to hand, was slain by Krishna and lay down lifeless, resembling a Karnikara tree uprooted by a gale. O Sanjaya, O son of Gavalgana, what they have told me of the activity of Krishna in cause of Pandu's sons, and what I remember of his past achievements, leave me no peace of mind. No foe whatsoever is capable of withstanding them, who ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli



Words linked to "Tree" :   Calophyllum candidissimum, erythrina, Firmiana simplex, Taraktogenos kurzii, rubber tree, give chase, Chrysolepis chrysophylla, cocobolo, Dovyalis hebecarpa, pandanus, nakedwood, stump, Cercidium floridum, coat tree, peach-wood, Peruvian balsam, teak, umbrella tree, Sophora japonica, ligneous plant, dipterocarp, red sandalwood, nut-leaved screw tree, Hydnocarpus laurifolia, ribbonwood, chicot, Christmas bush, Drimys winteri, Indian beech, kiaat, staff tree, channelise, southern beech, cotton-seed tree, pernambuco wood, white popinac, role player, Diospyros ebenum, locust, bonduc, Jamaica dogwood, ice-cream bean, Myroxylon toluiferum, Leucadendron argenteum, tree frog, African walnut, coffee, ironwood, winter's bark, satinwood, Pterocarpus angolensis, head, Sloanea jamaicensis, rose chestnut, chase after, camachile, Chinese parasol, stemma, souari nut, Lysiloma bahamensis, peacock flower fence, coral bean, margosa, tree hugger, opepe, Schinus chichita, Burma padauk, Persian lilac, screw pine, kitembilla, azedarach, true sandalwood, Ceylon gooseberry, Sesbania grandiflora, plant, red sanders, Piscidia erythrina, Pterocarpus indicus, black tree fern, wild medlar, silk wood, Virgilia oroboides, Ceratopetalum gummiferum, woods, palo verde, millettia, trifoliata, chocolate tree, kurchi, Castanopsis chrysophylla, bully tree, wild orange, padouk, quandong, manoeuvre, Calycophyllum candidissimum, vegetable hummingbird, amboyna, Hoheria populnea, hazel, Parkinsonia florida, turreae, Japanese pagoda tree, staff-tree family, manila tamarind, chinchona, Jamaican cherry, chinaberry, gliricidia, elm, sapling, coralwood, African sandalwood, Taraktagenos kurzii, Spanish elm, Lysiloma latisiliqua, marblewood, theatrical producer, Myroxylon pereirae, Manilkara bidentata, wild tamarind, Enterolobium cyclocarpa, Holarrhena pubescens, Muntingia calabura, inga, white mangrove, dhawa, Chloroxylon swietenia, albizzia, tail, Xylopia aethiopica, chaulmugra, caracolito, clusia, plane figure, Lansium domesticum, beefwood, crown, Orites excelsa, trifoliate orange, hop hornbeam, pride-of-India, birch, elongate, Triplochiton scleroxcylon, Pine Tree State, Pterocarpus marsupium, trunk, Santalum album, Schinus terebinthifolius, go after, Chinese lacquer tree, maneuver, Sarcocephalus diderrichii, medlar tree, soapberry, hornbeam, Idesia polycarpa, Caesalpinia bonducella, msasa, basswood, Poncirus trifoliata, Burmese rosewood, peachwood, chaulmoogra tree, sissoo, trail, langsat, silkwood, breakax, willow, calabura, Leucaena glauca, brazilwood, lepidobotrys, Melia Azadirachta, Montezuma, Dalbergia sissoo, track, zebrawood, maria, yellowwood, Pseudobombax ellipticum, idesia, sapwood, wild plum tree, bayberry, breakaxe, conessi, Diospyros kurzii, yellow jacaranda, rosewood, guide, Bombax malabarica, Aegiceras majus, padauk, balata, evergreen beech, puka, direct, frijolito, sissu, chaulmoogra, Schinus molle, Dalbergia cearensis, beech, American olive, coral-wood, devilwood, Laguncularia racemosa, platan, Caesalpinia coriaria, Bombax ceiba, Pterocarpus santalinus, Azadirachta indica, Nauclea diderrichii, channelize, Pimenta acris, Calocarpum zapota, Cordia gerascanthus, cassia, Palaquium gutta, elephant's ear, Vangueria madagascariensis, tree surgery, tipu, steer, actor, Cordyline australis, Stenocarpus sinuatus, keurboom, granadillo, Butea monosperma, Australian nettle, divi-divi, dak, andelmin, molle, lime, kingwood, langset, Plagianthus regius, sisham, brazilian ironwood, woody plant, Calophyllum calaba, tanbark oak, Meryta sinclairii, mescal bean, Dalbergia retusa, red saunders, Ruptiliocarpon caracolito, albizia, dagame, lacebark, medlar, cladogram, blackwood, Oxandra lanceolata, dita, pollard, palm, wild fig, arbor, Butea frondosa, coral bean tree, Barbados pride, black mangrove, Calophyllum longifolium, manoeuver, bole, mayeng, Pisonia aculeata, set, ebony, Sophora secundiflora, laurelwood, Hydnocarpus kurzii, souari, dhak, mulberry tree, lemonwood, Japanese angelica tree, maple-leaved bayur, Brisbane quandong, Clusia flava, burl, Pongamia glabra, Plagianthus betulinus, mammee, angelim, chestnut, Sabinea carinalis, Brya ebenus, kitambilla, marble-wood, hackberry, fish fuddle, poon, snag, giant chinkapin, arishth, Baphia nitida, neem, Alstonia scholaris, break-axe, guama, Spanish tamarind, negro pepper, aroeira blanca, golden chinkapin, button mangrove, Inga edulis, palas, Virgilia capensis, obeche, Fusanus acuminatus, azederach, Mesua ferrea, two-dimensional figure, silver ash, aalii, Phellodendron amurense, pride of Bolivia, Caesalpinia bonduc, Pterocarpus macrocarpus, Eucarya acuminata, wild cinnamon, oak chestnut, dhava, Tarrietia argyrodendron, scrub beefwood, Caesalpinia ferrea, camwood, cinchona tree, Adenanthera pavonina, histrion, lemon-wood, carib wood, Sophora sinensis, kowhai, princewood, Hydnocarpus wightiana, gum, ash, wood, tag, cockspur, Gymnocladus dioica, chase, houhere, Sophora tetraptera, Andaman marble, Myroxylon balsamum, conacaste, red sanderswood, arere, quandang, Lithocarpus densiflorus, duramen, Vangueria infausta, Brachystegia speciformis, huamachil, Osmanthus americanus, player, Lovoa klaineana, Melia azedarach, blue fig, Virgilia divaricata, sycamore, lancewood, casuarina, heartwood, mahogany, sapote, kino, bonsai, Psychotria capensis, Inga laurina, quira, stretch, Elaeocarpus grandis, forest, Piscidia piscipula, Caesalpinia echinata, Jamaica bayberry, prickly ash, linden, acacia, Leucaena leucocephala, kurchee, calaba, Pomaderris apetala, tamarind tree, Holarrhena antidysenterica, calabash, Conocarpus erectus, frijolillo, Stenocarpus salignus, Pterospermum acerifolium, Crescentia cujete, limb, Acrocarpus fraxinifolius, Castanea chrysophylla, Avicennia officinalis, Pithecellobium dulce, cranberry tree, oak, obechi, Pouteria zapota, Melia azederach, cinchona, dita bark, alder, samba



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