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Tree   /tri/   Listen
Tree

verb
(past & past part. treed; pres. part. treeing)
1.
Force a person or an animal into a position from which he cannot escape.  Synonym: corner.
2.
Plant with trees.
3.
Chase an animal up a tree.  "Her dog likes to tree squirrels"
4.
Stretch (a shoe) on a shoetree.  Synonym: shoetree.



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"Tree" Quotes from Famous Books



... days afterwards, Jack discovered, one fine morning, on the other side of a hedge, a summer apple-tree bearing tempting fruit, and he immediately broke through the hedge, and climbing the tree, as our first mother did before him, he culled ...
— Mr. Midshipman Easy • Frederick Marryat

... of reddish brown hue, with here and there a village, its walls of the same colour. It looks a desert, because there are no signs of crops, which were reaped two months ago, and no hedgerows, but here and there an acacia tree. Not a traveller is stirring on the road, not a soul to be seen in the fields, but an occasional stunted bullock is standing in such shade as their trees afford. At about every ten miles a station is reached, each exactly like the previous one and the next following.... Gradually ...
— Studies in Literature and History • Sir Alfred Comyn Lyall

... or rather that which answers the purpose of a barb, being supplied by a small piece lashed horizontally across the top of the end of the curve. These peculiar wooden hooks are grown; the roots of a tree called ngiia, whose wood is of great toughness, are watched when they protrude from a bank, and trained into the desired shape; specimens of these hooks may be seen in almost any ethnographical museum. To sink the line, coral stones of three or four pounds weight are used, attached ...
— By Rock and Pool on an Austral Shore, and Other Stories • Louis Becke

... tropical woods, and the roof was thatched with cocoanut leaves, which required poles to keep them in place. It had several doors, and cross-latticed windows. There was no particular shape to the structure, and certainly nothing of neatness or comeliness about it. A large banana tree grew near it; a woman stood at one of the doors, staring with wonder at the strangers, and a couple of half-naked coolies were at work farther away. The morality of the residents of this ...
— Across India - Or, Live Boys in the Far East • Oliver Optic

... unfathomably a forest of scrub pine and pinon, rising, here and there, into loftier growth. It was as if man, with his imperious interventions, had set those thin steel parallels as an irrefragable boundary to the mutual encroachments of forest and desert, tree and cactus. A single, straggling trail squirmed its way into the woodland. One might have surmised that it was winding hopefully if blindly toward the noble mountain peak shimmering in white splendor, mystic and wonderful, sixty miles away, but seeming ...
— Success - A Novel • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... suffering from a great drought, and the people feared a water famine, they consulted an old man known by the name of St. Francis, who was very wise and very holy. He told the people to follow him singing psalms and hymns to the Willow Vale, on the Low Road. There he cut a wand from a willow tree, and stuck it into the ground, and forthwith a copious supply of water appeared which had flowed steadily ever since. The wand had been so firmly and deeply stuck into the ground by St. Francis that it took root and ...
— From John O'Groats to Land's End • Robert Naylor and John Naylor

... I had a cart I drove a little mule to. I took a barrel of water to the field. I got it at the well. I put it close by in the shade of a tree. Trees was plentiful! Then I took the breakfast and dinner in my cart. I done whatever come to my lot in Indian Nation. After the war I made a plowhand. "Say there, from 1864 to 1937 Sol Lambert farmed." Course I hauled and cut wood, but my job is farmin'. I share croppe. I worked fer ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves, Arkansas Narratives, Part 4 • Works Projects Administration

... The Kiosk is a Turkish summer house: the palm is without the present walls of Athens, not far from the temple of Theseus, between which and the tree, the wall intervenes.—Cephisus' stream is indeed scanty, and Ilissus has ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... in early summer, when almost every one else in Fairfield had put her house plants out of doors, there were still three flower pots on a kitchen window sill. Mrs. Bickford spent but little time over her rose and geranium and Jerusalem cherry-tree, although they had gained a kind of personality born of long association. They rarely undertook to bloom, but had most courageously maintained life in spite of their owner's unsympathetic but conscientious care. Later in the season she would ...
— The Life of Nancy • Sarah Orne Jewett

... where I am. Beulah, put down that window, will you? Mary must think that I have been converted into a Polar bear; and, mother, have some coal brought up. If there is any truth in the metempsychosis of the Orient, I certainly was a palm tree or a rhinoceros in the last stage of my existence." She shivered, and wrapped a heavy shawl up ...
— Beulah • Augusta J. Evans

... chiefly in the islands and swampy parts of the mainland within a distance of fifty to a hundred miles to the west of Para; but there are plenty of untapped trees still growing in the wilds of the Tapajos, Madeira, Jurua, and Jauari, as far as 1800 miles from the Atlantic coast. The tree is not remarkable in appearance; in bark and foliage it is not unlike the European ash. But the trunk, like that of all forest trees, shoots up to an immense height before throwing off branches. The trees seem to be no man's property hereabout. The people we met with told us they came ...
— The Naturalist on the River Amazons • Henry Walter Bates

... in fear of me? and you, like an impudent rogue, must come and fling my gates open at your pleasure! Are you careless of your life? Do not you care what you do? But I will make you an example for all rogues under the sun! Dost thou not see how many thousand heads hang upon yonder tree—heads of those who have offended against my laws? But thy head shall hang higher than all the rest for an example!" But Tom made him answer: "You shall not find me to be one of them." "No!" said the giant, in astonishment ...
— Young Folks Treasury, Volume 2 (of 12) • Various

... a deeper type. For her the world held no other man, and life's blossom once blighted, no second crop of happiness could grow, at least on the same tree. To such a character as this, the only possibility of throwing out fresh bloom is when the tree is grafted by the great ...
— Earl Hubert's Daughter - The Polishing of the Pearl - A Tale of the 13th Century • Emily Sarah Holt

... I need them now," he said, smiling, and with the child still in his arms drew her to a window looking northward. As far as the eye could see, nothing but snow, like a blanket spread over the land. Here and there in the wide expanse a tree silhouetted against the sky, a tracery of eccentric beauty, and off in the far distance a solitary horseman riding ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... sight of the shack which stood at the water's edge, mid-way between Aldercliffe and Pine Lea, and was sheltered from view by a grove of thick pines. Its bare, boarded walls had silvered from exposure to the weather until it was scarcely noticeable against the gray tree trunks. Nevertheless, its crude, rough sides, its staring windows, and its tarred roof looked cheerless and deserted enough. But for Ted Turner it possessed none of these forbidding qualities. Instead of being a hermitage it seemed a paradise, a ...
— Ted and the Telephone • Sara Ware Bassett

... was tying the horse to a tree, Hand appeared, silent, with an unfathomable disgust written on his countenance. As usual, he who was the least to blame came in for the hottest of the censure; and yet, there was a sort of fellowship indicated by Chamberlain's extraordinary arraignment of them both. ...
— The Stolen Singer • Martha Idell Fletcher Bellinger

... from the grass the White Ensign dipped three times in salute to the Royal Standard floating from the flagstaff on the palace roof. Then, as the driving propellers whirled round till they became two intersecting circles of light, the Auriole swept up over the tree-tops and vanished through the clouds. And so began the first voyage of ...
— The World Peril of 1910 • George Griffith

... the way along a path winding among almond and peach trees in full bloom, in the shadow of the weird eucalyptus and the feathery pepper tree. Then with a little word of pleasure he hurried forward. Conyngham caught sight of a black dress and a black mantilla, of fair golden hair, and a fan upraised against the rays of ...
— In Kedar's Tents • Henry Seton Merriman

... Ohio sweeps down in calmness and majesty. With its surface of quicksilver, and the little waves dancing up in gladness, and its heavy dull wash, it rolls along its mighty mass of waters, hastening to pour itself into the mightier mass of the Mississippi. Occasionally a giant tree, torn from its place, and cast root and branch into the flood, comes booming down, and glides swiftly past on its long, long race. Pleasantly the ripples break over the prostrate monarch of the forest that is lodged against the beach, and projects, ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, February 1844 - Volume 23, Number 2 • Various

... declared, "and you mustn't either. I'm sure you ought to be able to paint some beautiful pictures down here, Allan. And, Arnold, you shall have your writing-table out under the chestnut tree there. You will be so comfortable, and I'm sure you'll be able to ...
— The Master Mummer • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... insanity, both in art and literature? A few years of influence have sufficed; and now Satanism, Occultism and other absurdities are flourishing; not to mention that, according to some accounts, the Cities of the Plains are reconciled with new Rome. Isn't the tree judged by its fruits? And isn't it evident that, instead of a renascence, a far-spreading social movement bringing back the past, we are simply witnessing a transitory reaction, which many things explain? The old world would rather not die, and is struggling ...
— The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete - Lourdes, Rome and Paris • Emile Zola

... which no more In Nature's gorgeous round I find; Something that charm'd in days of yore, And filled with Sabbath peace my mind; Which added lustre to the flower, And verdure to the field and tree, And wings to every sunny hour, While roseate health ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, June 1844 - Volume 23, Number 6 • Various

... and panting, she leant against a tree, looking at him with a strange expression, in which melancholy mingled with resentment; passing slowly into something else—that soft and shaken look, that yearning of one longing and yet fearing to be loved, which had struck dismay into ...
— The Case of Richard Meynell • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... for Boxer to make his way into the open air and find a fallen tree limb of sufficient thickness to throw over the chasm as a make-shift bridge. As soon as the limb was secure, Larry and Leroy came over, and then the party of three made their way to the mouth of ...
— The Campaign of the Jungle - or, Under Lawton through Luzon • Edward Stratemeyer

... rose the forest echoed with sounds and song. The leaves moved with life, as a thousand bright-plumed birds flashed from tree to tree. The green parrot screamed after his mate, uttering his wild notes of endearment. They are seen in pairs flying high up in the heavens. The troupiale flashed through the dark foliage like a ray of ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXIII No. 4 October 1848 • Various

... added to what Dr. Trench has so well said, that Calderon's auto, "El arbol del mejor Fruto" (The Tree of the choicest Fruit), is founded on the same sublime theme. It is translated into German by Lorinser, under the title of "Der Baum der bessern ...
— The Two Lovers of Heaven: Chrysanthus and Daria - A Drama of Early Christian Rome • Pedro Calderon de la Barca

... the social parasites, represented by thieves, drunkards, and persons of the baser sort whose business it is to trade in human passion. We revolt from the red aphides upon the plant, the caterpillar upon the tree, the vermin upon bird or beast. How much more do we revolt from those human vermin whose business it is to propagate parasites upon the body politic! The condemnation of life is that a man consumes more than he produces, taking ...
— A Man's Value to Society - Studies in Self Culture and Character • Newell Dwight Hillis

... still an alien to it. He lived in the world, as the last of the Grisly Bears lived in settled Missouri. And as when Spring and Summer had departed, that wild Logan of the woods, burying himself in the hollow of a tree, lived out the winter there, sucking his own paws; so, in his inclement, howling old age, Ahab's soul, shut up in the caved trunk of his body, there fed upon the sullen paws ...
— Moby Dick; or The Whale • Herman Melville

... a Place called Hackney-Lane, where she look'd behind her, and saw a little Old Woman Muffled in a Riding-hood." This dame had asked whither she was going, had told her to pluck some sticks from an oak tree, had bade her bundle them in her gown, and, last and most wonderful, had given her a large crooked pin.[27] Mrs. Gardiner, so the account goes, took the sticks and threw them into the fire. Presto! Jane Wenham came into the room, pretending an errand. It was afterwards found ...
— A History of Witchcraft in England from 1558 to 1718 • Wallace Notestein

... frightened, and told Miss Bray, and she sent for the doctor quick. That afternoon they took me to the hospital, and the last thing I saw was little Josie White crying like her heart would break with her arms around a tree. ...
— Mary Cary - "Frequently Martha" • Kate Langley Bosher

... the same performance as on the first occasion, pulled down the branch and hoisted himself to the top of the wall, from which he was able to reach the bigger boughs of the tree. ...
— The Confessions of Arsene Lupin • Maurice Leblanc

... disabled by paralysis, occupied on the other side of the landing a single room, where she lived in morose and voluntary solitude. The street was a deserted one; the windows of the rooms overlooked the gardens of the Deaf and Dumb Asylum, above which rose the rounded crest of a lofty tree, and the square tower ...
— His Masterpiece • Emile Zola

... open door which led into a garden, a mild and balmy air fanned my temples and soothed my heated brow; and as the light curtain waved to and fro with the breeze, the odor of the rose and the orange-tree ...
— Charles O'Malley, The Irish Dragoon, Volume 2 (of 2) • Charles Lever

... the forehead of each of the two heads rises a serpent. Herakles in tunic and lion's skin, armed with bow, quiver, and sword, stoops towards the dog. He holds a chain in his left hand, while he stretches out his right with a petting gesture. Between the two is a tree, against which leans the club of ...
— Cerberus, The Dog of Hades - The History of an Idea • Maurice Bloomfield

... help now! My Son hath loved full well thee; Pray Him that I may die, That I not forgotten be! Seest thou, Maudeleyn, now My Son is hanged on a tree, Yet alive am I and thou,— And thou, ...
— Our Lady Saint Mary • J. G. H. Barry

... must be forever nameless. If she loved people, she loved them for what they were, if she despised them she despised them for what they did, or for lack of power to feel they could not do. Silence under a tree was a far more talkative experience with her than converse with one or a thousand dull minds. Her throng was the air, and her wings were the multitude of flying movements in her brain. She had only to think and she was amid numberless minarets and golden domes, she had only ...
— Adventures in the Arts - Informal Chapters on Painters, Vaudeville, and Poets • Marsden Hartley

... steep inclines, past placid lakes, past waving yellow mustard beds, beside highways where the breastplate of Mother Earth gleamed emerald and ruby against the background of billions of tiny, shining diamonds of the iceplant, past the old ostrich tree reproduced by etchers of note the world over, with grinding brakes, sliding down the breathless declivity leading to the shore, Linda stopped at last where the rock walls lifted sheer almost to the ...
— Her Father's Daughter • Gene Stratton-Porter

... conquest; Worms are gnawing at my vitals, In my hull their dwelling-places, And ill-omened birds of heaven Build their nests within my rigging; Frogs and lizards of the forest Play about my oars and rudder; Three times better for this vessel Were he but a valley birch-tree, Or an aspen on the heather, With the squirrels in his branches, And the dogs beneath them barking!" Wainamoinen, old and faithfull Thus addressed the ship at anchor: "Weep no more, thou goodly vessel, Man-of-war, no longer murmur; Thou shalt sail to ...
— The Kalevala (complete) • John Martin Crawford, trans.

... the entering of the room; the putting away of bowl and robe; his eating; his leaving the village; his going the rounds of the village for alms; his entering the village for alms; his departure from the monastery; his offering adoration in the courts of the shrine and of the Bodhi tree; his washing the bowl; what he did between taking the bowl and rinsing his mouth; what he did at dawn; what he did in the middle watch of the night; what he did in the first watch of the night. Thus he must consider what he did for a whole ...
— Four-Dimensional Vistas • Claude Fayette Bragdon

... and took a wedge of pie from the grub-locker. "Yes, I went through a whole bunch of 'em once—pretty good pie this, cook, though gen'rally those artificial apples that swings on strings ain't in it with the natural tree apples for pie—once when we were laying somewhere to the east'ard of Sable Island, in a blow and a thick fog—fresh halibuting—and right in the way of the liners. And I expect I was going around like a man asleep, because the skipper comes up and begins to talk to ...
— The Seiners • James B. (James Brendan) Connolly

... our infirmity, we compassionate so as to relieve the needy; helping them, as we would be helped; if we were in like need; not only in things easy, as in herb yielding seed, but also in the protection of our assistance, with our best strength, like the tree yielding fruit: that is, well-doing in rescuing him that suffers wrong, from the hand of the powerful, and giving him the shelter of protection, by the mighty strength of ...
— The Confessions of Saint Augustine • Saint Augustine

... carried off without vulgarity. His trousers were rolled high, after the fashion of the day, to show dark red socks of the same color as his tie and of a shade harmonious to the stripe in the pattern of shirt and suit and to the stones in his cuff links. He looked clean, with the cleanness of a tree after the measureless drenching of a storm; he had a careless, easy air, which completely concealed his assiduous and self-complacent self-consciousness. He embraced his mother ...
— The Second Generation • David Graham Phillips

... turn of the rope around a tree, and with me fast on the other end lowered away. In no time I was on the bottom. And in but a short while he had carried all the articles from the cache and lowered them down to me. He hauled the rope up and hid it, and before he went away called ...
— The Iron Heel • Jack London

... first steps in cultivation would probably result, as I have elsewhere shewn (8. 'The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication,' vol. i. p. 309.), from some such accident as the seeds of a fruit-tree falling on a heap of refuse, and producing an unusually fine variety. The problem, however, of the first advance of savages towards civilisation is at present much too difficult ...
— The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex • Charles Darwin

... and to her sister Peace, That lieth in her grave. When wilt thou cease To feed upon my quiet!—thou Despair! That art the mad usurper, and the heir, Of this heart's heritage! Go, go—return, And bring me back oblivion, and an urn! And ye, pale stars, may look, and only find, The wreck of a proud tree, that lets the wind Count o'er its blighted boughs; for such was he That loved, and loves, the silent Agathe!" And he hath left the sanctuary, like one That knew not his own purpose—The red sun Rose early over incense of bright mist, That girdled a pure sky ...
— The Death-Wake - or Lunacy; a Necromaunt in Three Chimeras • Thomas T Stoddart

... of humanity, in love with my name, and, as young, uneducated people commonly do, wrote it down everywhere. Once I had carved it very handsomely and accurately on the smooth bark of a linden-tree of moderate age. The following autumn, when my affection for Annette was in its fullest bloom, I took the trouble to cut hers above it. Towards the end of the winter, in the mean time, like a capricious lover, I had wantonly ...
— Autobiography • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

... had gone up a tree like a squirrel and was laughing down through the branches at a raw-boned cousin on the ground ...
— Black Jack • Max Brand

... League by the president, Mrs. Guilford Dudley. As Dr. Shaw rose to respond she was presented by Miss Louise Lindsey, vice-regent of the Ladies' Hermitage Association, with a gavel made from the wood of a hickory tree planted by General Jackson at the Hermitage, his home. She spoke of memories which made Nashville dear to the whole country; referred to the merry barbecue which had been held for their entertainment the preceding day "at the old mansion of that great Democrat, Andrew ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V • Ida Husted Harper

... shalt it abie,* *suffer for By God and by the holy sacrament; For soothly thou art one of his assent To slay us younge folk, thou false thief." "Now, Sirs," quoth he, "if it be you so lief* *desire To finde Death, turn up this crooked way, For in that grove I left him, by my fay, Under a tree, and there he will abide; Nor for your boast he will him nothing hide. See ye that oak? right there ye shall him find. God save you, that bought again mankind, And you amend!" Thus said this olde man; And evereach of these riotoures ran, Till they came to the tree, and there ...
— The Canterbury Tales and Other Poems • Geoffrey Chaucer

... could tell him a great deal about Ruth. He acknowledged that he had not sought Adam the Swabian for weapons, but on account of his beautiful daughter. The girl was slender as a fir-tree! And her face! once seen could never be forgotten. So might have looked the beautiful Judith, who slew Holophernes, or Queen Zenobia, or chaste Lucretia of Rome! She was now past twenty and in the bloom of her beauty, but cold as glass; and though she liked ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... Sedan. The graves of our men have consecrated these immortal battlefields and our sacred dead will live on in the memory of the republic forever. As for those who return, crowned with victory, they shall now be first and foremost under the roof tree of the great motherland, who sent them forth with aching yet uplifted heart, confident that they would honor her ...
— America's War for Humanity • Thomas Herbert Russell

... it hard, at this distance, to photograph her as she looks, or ought to look to-day. She does not sit still long enough to be "taken." I see a lively girl in pretty short dresses and very long stockings,—quite a Tom-boy, if I remember rightly. She paddles a raft, she climbs a tree, she skates and tramps and coasts, she is usually very muddy, and a little torn. There is apt to be a pin in her gathers; but there is sure to be a laugh in her eyes. Wherever there is mischief, there is Gypsy. Yet, ...
— Gypsy's Cousin Joy • Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

... forfeit in Finn's jaws for the animal's lack of agility. Though, when one says lack of agility, it is fair to add that only a very swiftly moving creature could have escaped the two hounds at all; and, once it reached a tree-trunk, this reptile showed simply wonderful cleverness in climbing, running up fifty feet of iron-bark trunk as quickly as it could cover the level ground, and keeping always on the far side of the ...
— Finn The Wolfhound • A. J. Dawson

... nature's prodigality. I said, "Yes, the landscape is beautiful, but how much of its beauty penetrates to the heart of the men who are in the midst of it and battling with it? How much of consolation does the worn and weary renter find in the beauty of cloud and tree or in the splendor of the sunset?—Grace of flower does not feed or clothe the body, and when the toiler is both badly clothed and badly fed, bird-song and leaf-shine cannot bring content." Like Millet, I asked, "Why should all of a man's waking hours be spent in an ...
— A Son of the Middle Border • Hamlin Garland

... Jack started on his long journey around the open field. Now, Happy Jack's eyes are bright, and there is very little that Happy Jack does not see. So, as he was jumping from one tree to another, he spied something down on the ground which excited ...
— The Adventures of Prickly Porky • Thornton W. Burgess

... lay in the dry grass of a tiny glade that ran down to the tree-fringed bank of the stream. On either side of the glade was a fence, of the old stake-and-rider type, though little of it was to be seen, so thickly was it overgrown by wild blackberry bushes, scrubby oaks and young madrono trees. In the rear, a gate through a low paling fence led ...
— The Turtles of Tasman • Jack London

... operator afloat on a gliding machine to realise that this all proceeded from cyclonic action; so that more was learned in this respect in a week than had previously been acquired by several years of experiments with models. There was a pair of eagles, living in the top of a dead tree about two miles from our tent, that came almost daily to show us how such wind effects are overcome and utilised. The birds swept in circles overhead on pulseless wings, and rose high up in the air. Occasionally there was a side-rocking motion, as of a ship ...
— A History of Aeronautics • E. Charles Vivian

... without personal interest in their result. Some benefits might come to our husbands and brothers, but none to us. We are permitted to talk about liberty, but we may not enjoy it. We may water the tree with our tears, while our husbands pluck and enjoy the fruit. Of what advantage is it to us to live in a Republic? Our social position is no better than it was in the days of Queen Elizabeth. Men have made great progress since that day; from being subjects ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... good and evil; he has eaten of the tree and insists on going his own way. He knows best. Is not this the age of science and Kultur? We must not cry out if the road we have ...
— Raemaekers' Cartoons - With Accompanying Notes by Well-known English Writers • Louis Raemaekers

... everlasting punishment regards its proof, that all opportunity for repentance is confined to this life. Only two or three texts are quoted in proof of this very important position. One is taken from the book of Ecclesiastes, and declares, that, "in the place where the tree falleth, there it shall be;" of which there is no evidence that it has any relation to the subject; or, if it has, that it carries the least authority with it. Another passage asserts that "there is no work, nor device, nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave whither thou goest." But ...
— Orthodoxy: Its Truths And Errors • James Freeman Clarke

... now been given of the early years of flying in England may serve to show what a wealth of private enterprise lay ready to the hand of the Government when the building of the air force began. The Royal Air Force, like the tree of the Gospel parable, grew from a small seed, but it was nourished in a rich soil. The great experiment of flying attracted a multitude of adventurous minds, and prepared recruits for the nation long before the nation asked for them. This early predominance ...
— The War in the Air; Vol. 1 - The Part played in the Great War by the Royal Air Force • Walter Raleigh

... ere we be drowsy, Give our boots a grease. Homer's heroes did so, Why not such as we? What are sheets and servants? Superfluity. Pray for wives and children Safe in slumber curled, Then to chat till midnight O'er this babbling world. Of the workmen's college, Of the price of grain, Of the tree of knowledge, Of the chance of rain; If Sir A. goes Romeward, If Miss B. sings true, If the fleet comes homeward, If the mare will do,— Anything and everything— Up there in the sky Angels understand us, And no "saints" are by. Down, and bathe at day-dawn, Tramp from lake ...
— Alton Locke, Tailor And Poet • Rev. Charles Kingsley et al

... nobles, Madame du Barri, terrified by the scenes of violence daily occurring, prepared to fly from France. She invested enormous funds in England, and one dark night went out with the Duke de Brissac alone, and, by the dim light of a lantern, they dug a hole under the foot of a tree in the park, and buried much of the treasure which she was unable to take away with her. In disguise, she reached the coast of France, and escaped across the Channel to England. Here she devoted her immense revenue to the relief of the emigrants who were every day flying ...
— Maria Antoinette - Makers of History • John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott

... bright little boy six years old. He goes with his papa and mamma every summer to stay a few months at a nice place in the country. In front of the house, near the fence, stands a large elm-tree, which is the home of many ...
— The Nursery, February 1877, Vol. XXI. No. 2 - A Monthly Magazine for Youngest Readers • Various

... rolled past a certain large oak tree in the Park, Freda suddenly remembered Rowland Prothero. About a twelvemonth ago she had left him beneath that oak, humbled and deeply pained, doubtless, by her haughty words. Now she was similarly pained ...
— Gladys, the Reaper • Anne Beale

... something doing presently, if Mart's manner meant anything at all. Mart was a peaceable soul, and in the approaching crisis Luck knew he would climb hurriedly upon the fence of neutrality and stay there; and Luck could fight or climb a tree as ...
— The Phantom Herd • B. M. Bower

... Columbus. At last came the 11th of October, and with it indubitable signs of land. The diary mentions their finding on that day a table-board and a carved stick, the carving apparently wrought by some iron instrument. Moreover, the men in one of the vessels saw a branch of a haw tree ...
— The Life of Columbus • Arthur Helps

... at our hero with the fury of a wild cat, and would have quickly laid him beside the pirate if he had not leaped actively aside. A small tree received the blow meant for him, and the merchant passed on with ...
— Under the Waves - Diving in Deep Waters • R M Ballantyne

... and {48} celebrated their festal days.[1] They believed that Cybele resided on the high summits of Ida and Berecyntus, and the perennial pines, in conjunction with the prolific and early maturing almond tree, were the sacred trees of Attis. Besides trees, the country people worshiped stones, rocks or meteors that had fallen from the sky like the one taken from Pessinus to Pergamum and thence to Rome. They also venerated certain animals, especially the most powerful ...
— The Oriental Religions in Roman Paganism • Franz Cumont

... complete this prince's happiness, a frightful dream disturbed his repose, and filled him with great anxiety.(1053) "He saw a tree in the midst of the earth, whose height was great: the tree grew, and was strong, and the height of it reached unto heaven, and the sight thereof to the end of the earth. The leaves were fair, and the fruit much; and in it was meat for all: the beasts of the field had ...
— The Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, • Charles Rollin

... 1895), for Mme. Modjeska, afterwards revamped as "The Toast of the Town" (November 27, 1905) for Viola Allen. Interest in the period of Beau Brummell stretched over into "The Last of the Dandies" for Beerbohm Tree. But otherwise the bulk of his work came each season as a Fitch novelty. He often played against himself, the popularity of one play killing the chances of the other. For instance, when "Lovers' Lane" opened in ...
— Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911: The Moth and the Flame • Clyde Fitch

... silence and smoothness of their six-cylinder up the tree-hung road, through the sleeping village and along the narrow lane to Market Burnham. When they were within about a hundred yards of the gate, Granet brought the car to ...
— The Kingdom of the Blind • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... himself for his nefarious work, and in a twinkling he had Dick's hands bound behind him and had a gag placed in the youth's mouth. Then he had the lad bound fast to a nearby tree. ...
— The Rover Boys on Treasure Isle - The Strange Cruise of the Steam Yacht • Edward Stratemeyer

... man, woman, or child lived and breathed, had his virtues and his failings, constituted in Page's imagination a tremendous fact. He could not wound such a living creature any more than he could wound a flower or a tree; consequently he treated every person as an important member of the universe. Not infrequently, indeed, he stormed at public men, but his thunder, after all, was not very terrifying; his remarks about such personages as Mr. Bryan merely reflected his indignation ...
— The Life and Letters of Walter H. Page, Volume II • Burton J. Hendrick

... down, that mast o' gowd! "Set up a mast o' tree! "It disna become a forsaken lady. "To ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Vol. II (of 3) • Walter Scott

... use? And turning down another path he came on something rather taller than himself, that glowed in the darkness as though a great moon, or some white round body, had floated to within a few feet of the earth. Approaching, he saw it for what it was—a little magnolia-tree in the full of its white blossoms. Those clustering flower-stars, printed before him on the dark coat of the night, produced in John more feeling than should have been caused by a mere magnolia-tree; and ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... its entrance. Two miles further we encamped at Moreau creek, a stream of twenty yards width, on the southern side. The next morning, we passed at an early hour, Cedar island on the north, so called from the abundance of the tree of that name; near which is a small creek, named Nightingale creek, from a bird of that species, who sang for us during the night. Beyond Cedar island, are some others of a smaller extent, and at seven miles distance a creek fifteen or twenty yards wide, ...
— History of the Expedition under the Command of Captains Lewis and Clark, Vol. I. • Meriwether Lewis and William Clark

... property of the state; yet, in all the great monarchies of Europe, there are still many large tracts of land which belong to the crown. They are generally forest, and sometimes forests where, after travelling several miles, you will scarce find a single tree; a mere waste and loss of country, in respect both of produce and population. In every great monarchy of Europe, the sale of the crown lands would produce a very large sum of money, which, if applied to the payment ...
— An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations • Adam Smith

... value transpired through the simplest intercourse and amid the most commonplace incidents of service. Men felt, rather than realized, that under the slight, quaint, boyish exterior there lay the elements of a great man, who would one day fulfil his own boast of climbing to the top of the tree; and he had been made a full captain in 1779, when not quite twenty-one. According to the rule of the British service, already mentioned, this assured for life his precedence over Saumarez, promoted ...
— Types of Naval Officers - Drawn from the History of the British Navy • A. T. Mahan

... chameleon is put upon a black tree," he said on one occasion when the matter was under discussion, "you have really no right to blame him for becoming black too; it is simply his nature. If Arthur is like that it isn't his fault. He wasn't consulted, I fancy, ...
— The Pagans • Arlo Bates

... the anchorage off Princess Royal Harbour I went to Oyster Harbour to procure flowering specimens of a tree which had hitherto been a subject of much curiosity to botanists: at our former visits the season was too far advanced; and Mr. Brown was equally unfortunate. The plant resembles xanthorrhoea, both in its trunk and leaves, but ...
— Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia] [Volume 2 of 2] • Phillip Parker King

... What did the darned thing want? Casey would go when he, got good and ready. Perhaps he would go that way, and perhaps he would not. Right here was good enough for Casey Ryan at present; and you could ask anybody if he were the man to follow another man's pointing, much less a Joshua tree. ...
— The Trail of the White Mule • B. M. Bower

... it would be even harder to guess is that of the word spruce. We now use this word to describe a kind of leather, a kind of ginger beer, and a variety of the fir tree, and also in the same sense as "spick and span." The word used to be pruce, ...
— Stories That Words Tell Us • Elizabeth O'Neill

... ass, or his agent, from behind has urged—my wild career across the sandy heaths of Hampstead, and my canoe has startled the screaming wild-fowl from their lonely haunts amid the sub-tropical regions of Battersea. Adown the long, steep slope of One Tree Hill have I rolled from top to foot, while laughing maidens of the East stood round and clapped their hands and yelled; and, in the old-world garden of that pleasant Court, where played the fair-haired children of the ill-starred ...
— Diary of a Pilgrimage • Jerome K. Jerome

... estate and influence, I halted within five miles of his house, where we remained till the twilight, at which time we set forward, and, by the favour of a dark night, reached a copse about half-a-mile from the village where Mrs. Sagely lived. Here we left our horses tied to a tree, and went directly to the house of my old benefactress, Strap trembling all the way, and venting ejaculatory petitions to heaven for our safety. Her habitation being quite solitary, we arrived at the door ...
— The Adventures of Roderick Random • Tobias Smollett

... the "elan vital" and suggests that the acts of choice of the human personality are made as naturally and inevitably, under the pressure of the "shooting out" of the spirit, as leaves grow upon the tree, he is falling into the old traditional blunder of all pantheistic and monistic thinkers, the blunder namely of attributing to a universal "God" or "life-force" or "stream of tendency" the actual personal achievements ...
— The Complex Vision • John Cowper Powys

... and British rifles, against which, he tells us (in the Nineteenth Century, January 1921) the insurgents could not do much. Eleven of these volunteers were killed and they were buried underneath the tree where Nikita used to administer his brand of justice. All kinds of incriminating documents were found upon the dead and captured rebels, as also a significant letter from the Italian Minister accredited to Nikita, which was addressed to the chancellor of the Italian ...
— The Birth of Yugoslavia, Volume 2 • Henry Baerlein

... a wide defile, hedged in by two chains of reddish hillocks, when a nauseous odor struck their nostrils, and they believed that they saw something extraordinary at the top of a carob tree; a lion's head ...
— The George Sand-Gustave Flaubert Letters • George Sand, Gustave Flaubert

... goes without saying," he said; "there must be an unlimited amount of capital behind it, or it wouldn't continue to flourish like a green bay tree; but that's not in the nature of a discovery. Anybody with any power of observation at all would have come ...
— Outside Inn • Ethel M. Kelley

... much to attempt the telling of that day: how they lay on the ground beneath the giant-limbed cottonwoods, and listened to the waters going past; how they talked of the wild woodland life about them, of flower and tree, and moss and vine, and the creatures that nested and denned and lived therein; how they caught a goodly catch of bass and perch, and the Doctor, pulling off his boots, waded in the water like another boy, while the hills echoed with their ...
— The Calling Of Dan Matthews • Harold Bell Wright

... in a tree comes from the root in unbroken connection; but the fact that each branch comes from the one root, does not prove at all that each branch was the only one. It is precisely the same with the Church. Every church ...
— The Kingdom of God is within you • Leo Tolstoy

... who had seen him, 'a fine man, tall as a tree, and strong and straight, having keen blue eyes, and a reddish beard on his chin, as the men of Flanders do ...
— The Life and Death of Richard Yea-and-Nay • Maurice Hewlett

... says, "I was sorely tossed in a bitter season, not knowing what bread or bed did mean." But "the ravens fed me in the wilderness," and a hollow tree often served him for a shelter.(444) Thus he continued his painful flight through the snow and the trackless forest, until he found refuge with an Indian tribe whose confidence and affection he had won while endeavoring to teach them the truths of ...
— The Great Controversy Between Christ and Satan • Ellen G. White

... Gettin' weary, carryin' 'round my share of the money?" chuckled the voice of Dan Jaggers. Then that shaggy young bully stepped out from behind a tree. ...
— The Submarine Boys on Duty - Life of a Diving Torpedo Boat • Victor G. Durham

... he?" thought Murray, and he obeyed the natural instinct which prompted him to drag himself up amongst the evergreen boughs of the tree, which slowly rocked to ...
— Hunting the Skipper - The Cruise of the "Seafowl" Sloop • George Manville Fenn

... on coming into the garden, I found that Mrs. Church and her daughter had departed. I was informed of this fact by old M. Pigeonneau, who sat there under a tree, having his coffee at a ...
— The Pension Beaurepas • Henry James

... antagonists stood on guard. There was a moment of profound silence. In a mural painting on the walls of a German cathedral, two men stand like this, and a little distance off, half hidden behind a tree, is the figure ...
— The Son of Monte Cristo • Jules Lermina

... devil at last discovered his whereabouts, and going to the forest climbed into the branches of the trees and began to interfere with Ivan's work. Ivan cut down a tree, which failed, however, to fall to the ground, becoming entangled in the branches of other trees; yet he succeeded in getting it down after a hard struggle. In chopping down the next tree he met with the same difficulties, and also with the third. Ivan had supposed he could cut ...
— The Kreutzer Sonata and Other Stories • Leo Tolstoy

... of angry tears, Rose-Marie felt her first moment of homesickness for the friendly little town with its wide, tree-shaded streets, its lawn parties, and its neighbours; cities, she had discovered, discourage the art of neighbouring! She felt a pang of emptiness—she wanted her aunts with their soft, interested eyes, and their ...
— The Island of Faith • Margaret E. Sangster

... love are we met, To honour a Name we can never forget! Father, and Founder, and King of a race That reigns and rejoices in every place,— Root of a tree that o'ershadows the earth, First of a Family blest from his birth, Blest in this stem of their strength and their state, Alfred the Wise, and the Good, and the Great! Chorus,—Hail to his Jubilee Day, The Day ...
— My Life as an Author • Martin Farquhar Tupper

... besieging Burwell Castle was struck by an arrow from a crossbow just as he had taken off his helmet to get air. The Templars, not daring to bury him, soldered him up in lead, and hung him on a crooked tree in their river-side orchard. The corpse being at last absolved, the Templars buried it before the west door of their church. He is to be known by a long, pointed shield charged with rays on a diamonded field. The next figure, of Purbeck marble in low relief, is supposed ...
— Old and New London - Volume I • Walter Thornbury

... certain man lying on a bed, now deprived for twelve days of the use of his tongue, at the bidding of the saint, who visited him, recovered his speech and received the Eucharist; and so fortified he breathed his last breath in a good confession.[637] O, fruitful olive tree in the house of God![638] O, oil of gladness,[639] giving both anointing and light! By the splendour of the miracle he gave light to those who were whole, by the graciousness of the favour he anointed the sick man, and obtained for him, ...
— St. Bernard of Clairvaux's Life of St. Malachy of Armagh • H. J. Lawlor

... range restlessly abroad, while the birds, numbed to the heart, are silent; or yet again the recluse in his cell, humorously comparing his quest of ideas to the pursuit of the mice by his pet cat. This deep love of inanimate and animate things becomes individualized in those poems in which every tree, every spring, every bird is described ...
— The Glories of Ireland • Edited by Joseph Dunn and P.J. Lennox

... streets of Gold City they debated over the estate, wondering if Andrew Malden had left anything for public charity, and whether the new lord of Pine Tree Mountain would rebuild the mill and open the Cove Mine. Pioneers of the hills met each other by the way and talked of how fast changes were coming in Grizzly county—Yankee Sam gone, Father Reynolds gone, and now Andy Malden. They shook their heads and wondered ...
— The Transformation of Job - A Tale of the High Sierras • Frederick Vining Fisher

... came to worry us more and more. A certain harmless singer of the cricket or perhaps of the tree-toad variety used to chirp his innocent note a short distance from our cabin. For all I know he had done so from the moment of our installation, but I had never noticed him before. Now I caught myself listening for ...
— The Mystery • Stewart Edward White and Samuel Hopkins Adams

... their seat on the old rustic built against the beech, which was the last tree on the brink of the cliff. A hundred feet below flowed the river, rippling softly along a narrow strip of sand which its current had thrown against the rocks. The ledge of towering granite formed a cave eighty feet ...
— The Clansman - An Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan • Thomas Dixon

... moment to him, during which his blood turned to wine and sang through his veins. Then she pulled down the shade. But it was her room—he had learned that; and thereafter he strayed there often, hiding under a dark tree on the opposite side of the street and smoking countless cigarettes. One afternoon he saw her mother coming out of a bank, and received another proof of the enormous distance that separated Ruth from him. ...
— Martin Eden • Jack London

... wind, a heavy wind pressing against the house; the howling of wind in a chimney, a chimney or oil-factory on fire; (4) the tipping of a load of coal, stones, or bricks, a wall or roof falling, or the crash of a chimney through the roof; (5) the fall of a heavy weight or tree, the banging of a door, only more muffled, and the blow of a wave on the sea-shore; (6) the explosion of a boiler or cartridge of dynamite, a distant colliery explosion, distant heavy rock-blasting and the boom of a distant ...
— A Study of Recent Earthquakes • Charles Davison

... utterly wiped out. Our drive lay over a terrific road. We crossed a vast sad plain, intersected with trenches, with nothing in sight but one monster deserted tank, still camouflaged, and here and there the silhouette of a blasted tree against the lowering sky. These dead trees of the battle line! Sometimes, with their bony limbs flung forth in gnarled unnatural gestures, they remind me of frantic skeletons suddenly petrified in their dance of death. They ...
— Where the Sabots Clatter Again • Katherine Shortall

... of Agamemnon's tree Beneath the earth, as to one dead, This cup of love I pour to thee. Oh, pardon, that ...
— The Iphigenia in Tauris • Euripides

... amused smile, how, to help himself to calmness, he had sat on the terrace and thought of his socks, and then had counted the windows between his and Jane's. There were five of them. He knew her window by the magnolia tree and the seat beneath it where he had chanced to sit, not knowing she was above him. He leaned far out and looked towards it now. The curtains were drawn, but there appeared still to be a light behind them. Even as he watched, it ...
— The Rosary • Florence L. Barclay

... really unrhythmical playing of certain performers reminds us of a person suffering from palpitation of the heart. Liszt's description of the rubato is most suggestive: "A wind plays in the leaves, life unfolds and develops beneath them, but the tree remains the same." In Chopin, accordingly, the ground rhythm should always be preserved, though varied with ...
— Music: An Art and a Language • Walter Raymond Spalding

... other day, as it might be, was Justice-General of the shire, Sheriff of the same, Regality Lord, with rights of pit and gallows. My place goes up to the knowe beside his gallows; but his Grace's regality comes beyond this, and what does he do but put up his dule-tree there that I may see it from my window and mind the fact. It's a fine country this; man, I love it! I'm bound to be loving it, as the saying goes, waking and sleeping, and it brought me back from France, that I had no illwill to, and kept me indoors in the 'Forty-five,' though my heart was ...
— Doom Castle • Neil Munro

... September 12th, having got to about one hundred fifty leagues west of Ferro, they discovered a large trunk of a tree, sufficient to have been the mast of a vessel of one hundred twenty tons, and which seemed to have been a long time in the water. At this distance from Ferro, and for somewhat farther on, the current was found to set strongly to the northeast. Next day, when they had run fifty leagues farther westward, ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 8 - The Later Renaissance: From Gutenberg To The Reformation • Editor-in-Chief: Rossiter Johnson

... other with waking eyes, saw a snow-white dove—the same, firm believers in miracles suggested, which had brought down the holy oil for the anointment of Clovis at his coronation at Reims—flutter through the wood, and finally alight on the stump of a tree. ...
— Facts About Champagne and Other Sparkling Wines • Henry Vizetelly

... withdraw your resignation and stay? Oh, I say, Marky, we shall be awfully up a tree without you here. Why ever are you going? ...
— The Master of the Shell • Talbot Baines Reed

... 10), obtains principally, if not solely, in living things, and in what appertains to living things, and in objects of art. A lake, as such, has no natural dimensions: it may be ten miles long, it may be a hundred; but an elephant or an oak-tree cannot go beyond a certain growth. There is a vast range between the temperature of a blast-furnace and the temperature of the ice-pack on the Polar Sea, but very limited is the range possible in the blood of a living man. Viewed artistically, a hill may be too low, or ...
— Moral Philosophy • Joseph Rickaby, S. J.

... of fitness approaching to comeliness, and are really picturesque when lichen-coated, but poor features of landscape as compared to these universal hedges. I am disappointed in the trees, so far; I have not seen one large tree as yet. Most of those I see are of very moderate dimensions, feathered all the way up their long slender trunks, with a lop-sided mop of leaves at the top, like a wig which has slipped awry. I trust that I am not finding everything couleur de rose; but I certainly do find the ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... looking behind her at her shadow as she went. At first she had taken it for a little black creature that made game of her, but when she perceived that it was only where she kept the moon away, and that every tree, however great and grand a creature, had also one of these strange attendants, she soon learned not to mind it, and by-and-by it became the source of as much amusement to her as to any kitten its tail. It was long before she was quite at home with the trees, ...
— Harper's Young People, December 16, 1879 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... The people believe them demi-gods, as poor and miserable as they are. They likewise imagine them to be saints, because they lead a hard and solitary life; having very often no other lodging than the hollow of a tree, or a cave, and sometimes living exposed to the air on a bare mountain, or in a wilderness, suffering all the hardships of the weather, keeping a profound silence, fasting a whole year together, and making profession of eating nothing which ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Volume XVI. (of 18) - The Life of St. Francis Xavier • John Dryden

... year was very warm with peculiarly still days, and Halcyone and her master, Cheiron, spent most of their time during their hours of study, under the apple tree. They had got to a stage of complete understanding, and seemed to have fitted into each other's lives as though they ...
— Halcyone • Elinor Glyn

... reverently and recited a paternoster to the first image that came along, which seemed to be that of a great saint. It was the figure of an old man with an exceptionally long beard, seated at the edge of a grave under a tree filled with all kinds of stuffed birds. A kalan with a clay jar, a mortar, and a kalikut for mashing buyo were his only utensils, as if to indicate that he lived on the border of the tomb and was doing ...
— The Reign of Greed - Complete English Version of 'El Filibusterismo' • Jose Rizal

... weather was fine, the royal family were conducted to the garden by four municipal officers and the commander of a legion of the National Guard. As there were a number of workmen in the Temple employed in pulling down houses and building new walls, they only allowed a part of the chestnut-tree walk for the promenade, in which I was allowed to share, and where I also played with the young Prince at ball, quoits, or races. At two we returned to the Tower, where I served the dinner, at which time Santerre regularly came to the Temple, attended by two aides-de-camp. ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... revolver on my left arm, took careful aim and fired. The bird towered madly, executed a wild waltz, and went round the corner. The noise of the shot disturbed some members of his harem, and a hen fluttered into the branches of a tree close by. Francis potted her, and she fell at our feet. Here, at least, was supper; but at the first corner we turned, in search of a place in which to camp for the night, we found the rest of the feathered brood feeding on the carcase of a pig which literally ...
— The Making Of A Novelist - An Experiment In Autobiography • David Christie Murray

... quite satisfied with their own, we can only say that this lady is the representative of a vast class of her countrymen, whom the wits and philosophers of the eighteenth century have brought to this condition. The leaves of the Diderot and Rousseau tree have produced this goodly fruit: here it is, ripe, bursting, and ready to fall;—and how to fall? Heaven send that it may drop easily, for all can see that the time ...
— The Paris Sketch Book Of Mr. M. A. Titmarsh • William Makepeace Thackeray

... two friends went out to idle away the morning under the shade of a tree in the park. Noon came, and Richard never appeared. One o'clock struck, and still there were no signs of an answer from Mr. Darch. Midwinter's patience was not proof against the delay. He left Allan dozing on the grass, and went ...
— Armadale • Wilkie Collins

... through the plains that were supposed to occupy the central portion of the horseshoe formation at that time associated in the public opinion with Lake Torrens. More fortunate than his predecessors, he found permanent water in a gum-tree creek, and saw some fair-sized sheets of water, one of which he named Blanche Water, or Lake Blanche. Some further excursions led to the discovery of more fresh water and well-grassed pastoral country. The aboriginals, too, ...
— The Explorers of Australia and their Life-work • Ernest Favenc

... to receive these revelations she gave up her games and her excursions. Henceforth she seldom danced round the fairies' tree, and then only in play with the children.[300] It would seem that she also took a dislike to working in the fields, and especially to herding the flocks. From early childhood she had shown signs of piety. Now she gave herself up to extreme devoutness; she ...
— The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2) • Anatole France

... this city, we entered upon a most extraordinary and extensive plain; it is called the Crau, and is a principal and singular domain, belonging to and situated on the south side of that city; it is ten leagues in diameter; on which vast extent, scarce a tree, shrub, or verdure is visible; the whole spot being covered with flint stones of various sizes, and of singular shapes. Petrarch says, as Strabo, and others have said before him, that those flint stones fell from Heaven like hail, when Hercules was fighting ...
— A Year's Journey through France and Part of Spain, Volume II (of 2) • Philip Thicknesse

... you please;" and the word was underscored. "If I had time I would have every tree about the ...
— Mr. Scarborough's Family • Anthony Trollope

... that he was remote from all observation, he pressed into a little copse, and there reclined on the grass, leaning against the stem of a tree. The moon was now hidden from him, but by looking upward he could see its light upon a long, faint cloud, and the blue of the placid sky. His mood was one of ineffable peace. Only thoughts of beautiful things came into his mind; he had reverted to an earlier period of life, when as ...
— New Grub Street • George Gissing



Words linked to "Tree" :   Indian beech, Lysiloma bahamensis, kola nut tree, Brachystegia speciformis, Brya ebenus, Chinese parasol, red sanderswood, two-dimensional figure, Muntingia calabura, wild fig, manoeuver, ironwood, quandang, Butea frondosa, common coral tree, basswood, Diospyros ebenum, negro pepper, crown, Castanopsis chrysophylla, satinwood, puka, kino, woody plant, kowhai, Phellodendron amurense, padouk, break-axe, lemonwood, Pouteria zapota, brazilian ironwood, Baphia nitida, frijolito, yellow jacaranda, Dovyalis hebecarpa, gliricidia, breakax, kurchee, souari nut, millettia, snowy tree cricket, wild tamarind, Sophora japonica, mayeng, sissoo, dhak, Jamaican cherry, heartwood, Caesalpinia bonduc, maneuver, locust, camachile, Andaman marble, aalii, Santalum album, chaulmoogra, sisham, padauk, azedarach, channelize, head, Lysiloma latisiliqua, Pterocarpus marsupium, go after, Diospyros kurzii, Spanish tamarind, African walnut, Vangueria madagascariensis, maple-leaved bayur, arbor, tanbark oak, Melia Azadirachta, sapote, Meryta sinclairii, kitembilla, erythrina, Plagianthus betulinus, Leucadendron argenteum, Sophora tetraptera, pride-of-India, Hoheria populnea, rosewood, white popinac, Sophora sinensis, American olive, inga, andelmin, tree-worship, Fusanus acuminatus, Jamaica bayberry, Taraktogenos kurzii, kingwood, Leucaena leucocephala, Chrysolepis chrysophylla, Enterolobium cyclocarpa, Oxandra lanceolata, Spanish elm, peacock flower fence, dhawa, Azadirachta indica, Gymnocladus dioica, nakedwood, marble-wood, yellowwood, granadillo, msasa, histrion, tag, set, limb, guama, duramen, Dalbergia retusa, red sanders, Jamaica dogwood, balata, Sabinea carinalis, amboyna, Pterocarpus macrocarpus, keurboom, oak, hornbeam, Butea monosperma, Ruptiliocarpon caracolito, ketembilla, Schinus terebinthifolius, Dalbergia sissoo, Inga laurina, tipu, Virgilia divaricata, teak, hop hornbeam, Castanea chrysophylla, kurchi, role player, coral-wood, plane figure, soapberry, southern beech, give chase, sapling, kitambilla, Cordia gerascanthus, medlar, rose chestnut, beefwood, Dalbergia cearensis, Acrocarpus fraxinifolius, chase after, mammee, Lovoa klaineana, Crescentia cujete, pernambuco wood, Holarrhena pubescens, hackberry, cassia, kiaat, Parkinsonia florida, Pomaderris apetala, ligneous plant, coralwood, white mangrove, Sophora secundiflora, dhava, channelise, quandong, Chloroxylon swietenia, Stenocarpus salignus, Triplochiton scleroxcylon, Cordyline australis, coffee, Nauclea diderrichii, Myroxylon balsamum, dita bark, woods, Aegiceras majus, vegetable hummingbird, fish fuddle, elephant's ear, Barbados pride, Hydnocarpus wightiana, lancewood, elm, albizia, albizzia, tree lizard, Conocarpus erectus, stump, laurelwood, elongate, Piscidia piscipula, winter's bark, alder, chestnut, lepidobotrys, Sesbania grandiflora, trunk, cocobolo, Holarrhena antidysenterica, ribbonwood, samba, golden chinkapin, birch, Peruvian balsam, Sarcocephalus diderrichii, litchi tree, steer, Sloanea jamaicensis, blue fig, bayberry, ash, clusia, bole, Tarrietia argyrodendron, turreae, obechi, manoeuvre, Laguncularia racemosa, Taraktagenos kurzii, Pseudobombax ellipticum, Drimys winteri, Hydnocarpus laurifolia, olive-tree agaric, carib wood, opepe, Plagianthus regius, dagame, Myroxylon pereirae, willow, big-tree plum, chicot, Calocarpum zapota, toothache tree, Inga edulis, mescal bean, sissu, Ceylon gooseberry, gum, wild cinnamon, silk wood, cladogram, caracolito, Pterospermum acerifolium, Eucarya acuminata, Calophyllum candidissimum, peachwood, shoetree, neem, wild orange, prickly ash, chinaberry, chase, looking glass tree, zebrawood, Melia azederach, dipterocarp, Pterocarpus santalinus, sandalwood tree, azederach, evergreen beech, dita, dog, actor, poon, Brisbane quandong, conessi, peach-wood, tonka bean tree, Lithocarpus densiflorus, true sandalwood, trifoliate orange, chinchona, palo verde, huamachil, palas, lacebark, scrub beefwood, Elaeocarpus grandis, red saunders, Cercidium floridum, bonduc, arishth, breakaxe, ice-cream bean, Idesia polycarpa, tree farm, Australian nettle, Melia azedarach, Osmanthus americanus, Vangueria infausta, linden, langset, margosa, sapwood, quira, Firmiana simplex, forest, bullock's heart tree, Calycophyllum candidissimum, Manilkara bidentata, Lansium domesticum, plant, Pithecellobium dulce, blackwood, Christmas bush, Calophyllum longifolium, Burmese rosewood, Pongamia glabra, Virgilia capensis, Palaquium gutta, Pisonia aculeata, Leucaena glauca, trifoliata, rowan tree, coral bean tree, langsat, burl, calabash tree, Caesalpinia coriaria, thespian, Pterocarpus angolensis, Pimenta acris, Schinus molle, maria, Caesalpinia bonducella, dak, wood, houhere, pollard, soft tree fern, Clusia flava, point, camwood, Orites excelsa, Burma padauk, incense tree, beech, calabash, devilwood, stemma, trail, divi-divi, tail, Ceratopetalum gummiferum, Schinus chichita, Psychotria capensis, Bombax malabarica, mahogany, giant chinkapin, ebony, Virgilia oroboides, Persian lilac, casuarina, Kirkia wilmsii, souari, stretch, Tectona grandis, pride of Bolivia, coral bean, palm, direct, brazilwood, angelim, marblewood, silver ash, African sandalwood, track, screw pine, lime, Pterocarpus indicus, platan, button mangrove, molle, Caesalpinia echinata, pandanus, guide, wild medlar, Calophyllum calaba, chaulmugra, Poncirus trifoliata, theatrical producer, Montezuma, idesia, calabura, frijolillo, aroeira blanca, Japanese pagoda tree, cockspur, conacaste, black walnut tree, player, acacia, red sandalwood, Xylopia aethiopica, Stenocarpus sinuatus, arere, Caesalpinia ferrea, Piscidia erythrina, Bombax ceiba, Myroxylon balsamum pereirae, sycamore, princewood, balata tree, black mangrove, simal, oak chestnut, snag, Mesua ferrea, calaba, Hydnocarpus kurzii



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