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Stop   /stɑp/   Listen
Stop

noun
1.
The event of something ending.  Synonym: halt.
2.
The act of stopping something.  Synonym: stoppage.  "His stoppage of the flow resulted in a flood"
3.
A brief stay in the course of a journey.  Synonyms: layover, stopover.
4.
The state of inactivity following an interruption.  Synonyms: arrest, check, halt, hitch, stay, stoppage.  "Held them in check" , "During the halt he got some lunch" , "The momentary stay enabled him to escape the blow" , "He spent the entire stop in his seat"
5.
A spot where something halts or pauses.
6.
A consonant produced by stopping the flow of air at some point and suddenly releasing it.  Synonyms: occlusive, plosive, plosive consonant, plosive speech sound, stop consonant.
7.
A punctuation mark (.) placed at the end of a declarative sentence to indicate a full stop or after abbreviations.  Synonyms: full point, full stop, period, point.
8.
(music) a knob on an organ that is pulled to change the sound quality from the organ pipes.
9.
A mechanical device in a camera that controls size of aperture of the lens.  Synonym: diaphragm.
10.
A restraint that checks the motion of something.  Synonym: catch.
11.
An obstruction in a pipe or tube.  Synonyms: block, blockage, closure, occlusion, stoppage.



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"Stop" Quotes from Famous Books



... Milly, trying to stop her. But Tiza ran past her as quick as lightning down the garden path towards the cherry tree, and in another minute, in spite of the shower of wet she shook down on herself as she climbed up, she was sitting high and safe among the branches, where there was no catching ...
— Milly and Olly • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... This dog was much afraid of the glass, and I had only to present it to him at lunch time to make him keep his distance. I used to keep my door open at lunch, for the amusement of observing how I could make him stop exactly at the threshold without stepping over it. If he had passed over it I could always send him back by casting toward him a few drops of water from the bottom of the glass after drinking. Sitting, as was his ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 841, February 13, 1892 • Various

... one ceaseless roar, like the working of a million of hammers on a million of anvils. I can scarcely bear it; my hands clutch the door-posts convulsively. I lean out as far as I can, but see nothing but a company of soldiers preceded by two gendarmes, who are entering the Court. They stop before the door of the house. Several of them go in, and then I hear the sound of a door suddenly opened and shut, and heavy steps on the wooden floor. I feel myself trembling; this man they have come to ...
— Paris under the Commune • John Leighton

... He did not stop to unhitch the horses, just hooking them to the corral fence. Then he lifted the child from the buckboard and ...
— The Watchers of the Plains - A Tale of the Western Prairies • Ridgewell Cullum

... The twelve apostles had a Christ, and he never could have had a Judas unless he had had twelve apostles. If I have played the Judas, who has been my Christ that I have played the Judas with? Was it Thad. Stevens? Was it Wendell Phillips? Was it Charles Sumner? These are the men that stop and compare themselves with the Savior, and everybody that differs with them in opinion, and to try to stay and arrest their diabolical and nefarious policy, is to be denounced as ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 2 (of 2) of Volume 6: Andrew Johnson • James D. Richardson

... frozen eternal to the sunless ground To where in San Diego's torrid clime The swarthy Greaser swelters in his grime— Beneath your stupid nose can you not see The dunce whom once you dandled on your knee? O mighty master of a thousand schools, Stop teaching wisdom, or ...
— Black Beetles in Amber • Ambrose Bierce

... is merely an occasional expression of a novel, individual, and refreshing point of view. Mr. Jerome alone among American politicians has made a specialty of plain speaking. He has revolted against the tradition in our politics which seeks to stop every leak with a good intention and plaster every sore with a "decorative phrase." He has, says Mr. Hodder, "a partly Gallic passion for intellectual veracity, for a clear recognition of the facts before him, however ugly, ...
— The Promise Of American Life • Herbert David Croly

... behind their backs, and after several other wild cries and jumps, and having for a moment thrown herself flat upon the ground, she declared to each and all their future—their fortune, good or bad. I did not stop to see the result of the ceremony. The slaves carry these mysteries with them in their servitude, and the practice of such indecent and profane things tolerated by the Muslims of the coast. The Moors and Arabs, indeed, have great faith in these mysteries, and resort to ...
— Narrative of a Mission to Central Africa Performed in the Years 1850-51, Volume 1 • James Richardson

... her, single in the field, Yon solitary Highland lass! Reaping and singing by herself, Stop here, or gently pass! Alone she cuts and binds the grain 5 And sings a melancholy strain. Oh, listen! for the vale profound Is overflowing with ...
— Narrative and Lyric Poems (first series) for use in the Lower School • O. J. Stevenson

... have put a stop to the affair if he had gone out to Canada,' roundly asserted Mervyn; 'but of course he ...
— Hopes and Fears - scenes from the life of a spinster • Charlotte M. Yonge

... may be truth in this thought, though roughly expressed. Few things are more improbable than that we (the human species) should be the highest order of beings in the universe: that animated nature should ascend from the lowest reptile to us, and all at once stop there. If there be classes above us of rational intelligences, clearer manifestations may belong to them. This may be one of the distinctions. And it may be one to which ...
— Evidences of Christianity • William Paley

... nation. Hearing that Cardinal Pole, more sincere in his religious opinions, and less guided by the maxims of human policy, after having sent contrary advice to the queen, had set out on his journey to England, where he was to exercise his legatine commission, he thought proper to stop him at Dillinghen, a town on the Danube; and he afterwards obtained Mary's consent for this detention. The negotiation for the marriage meanwhile proceeded apace; and Mary's intentions of espousing Philip became generally known to the nation. The commons, who hoped that they had gained the queen ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part C. - From Henry VII. to Mary • David Hume

... advantageous branches of their trade, had obliged him to concert with other powers such measures as might give a check to the ambitious views of those who were endeavouring to render themselves formidable, and put a stop to the further progress of such dangerous designs. He told them that the enemies of his government were already very busy, by their instruments and emissaries in those courts whose measures seemed most to favour their purposes, ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... shreds of details, a combination of which may serve the desired purpose; or action is taken in the dark, which sometimes succeeds and becomes a fertile source of further combinations; or we are brought to a dead stop. All action is random in respect of any of the minute actions which compose it that are not done in consequence of memory, real or supposed. So that random, or action taken in the dark, or illusion, lies at ...
— Unconscious Memory • Samuel Butler

... "Stop!" thundered the mulatto, who seemed to divine the sheriff's purpose. "Move a muscle, and I 'll blow ...
— The Wife of his Youth and Other Stories of the Color Line, and - Selected Essays • Charles Waddell Chesnutt

... place, while he gave orders to his gardeners, builders, and workmen. Whenever they tried to put forward their arguments, he would rush ahead, enjoying the fright and dismay of his helpless victims. At times he would stop to make some ribald and jeering remark, as, "Why don't you eat pork, you fools?" at which the Egyptians following loudly applauded. Philo and his comrades, half-dead with agony, could only pray; and in response to the prayer, says our moralizing chronicler, the emperor's heart was ...
— Philo-Judaeus of Alexandria • Norman Bentwich

... father, saw him. He sacrificed himself in order that his son might be rich and happy some day. He was separated from him because of political opinions. Certainly, I approve of political opinions, but there are people who do not know where to stop. Mon Dieu! a man is not a monster because he was at Waterloo; a father is not separated from his child for such a reason as that. He was one of Bonaparte's colonels. He is dead, I believe. He lived at Vernon, where I have a brother who is a cure, and ...
— Les Miserables - Complete in Five Volumes • Victor Hugo

... and the devoted black servants—sometimes, I say, as I thought of all these, as I loved to do when I settled myself in bed for the night, or when in summer I lay on my back in the grass looking up at the flying clouds, I would have to stop and fix my attention sharp, to be sure whether it ever had been a reality, or whether it might not be, after all, only a dream. I think my father was afraid of the fascination of the cape for us boys—afraid its charms, if we once partook of them freely, might distract our attention from the ...
— Captain Mugford - Our Salt and Fresh Water Tutors • W.H.G. Kingston

... they at last came to a large lake, the head waters of the river. The surrounding scenery of the lake was most surprisingly beautiful. They immediately named this lake Ke-tchi-ne-bissing, which name it bears to this day. Here the Ottawas concluded to stop and occupy the surrounding country. Therefore, they pitched their tents and formed a great village. They continued to reside around the lake for untold ages. And here too they had many hard battles with the Iroquois; but the Iroquois were not able to conquer them ...
— History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan • Andrew J. Blackbird

... its eventually drop out, it will have had a curious history. It will have played the role of a stop-gap between his in its non-personal use (see footnote 11, page 167) and ...
— Language - An Introduction to the Study of Speech • Edward Sapir

... Would like to hug and kiss you all round, but can't stop. (Kisses his hand and bows.) A Merry Christmas to you all, and ...
— Little Prudy's Sister Susy • Sophie May

... us, which some pretend, That work in England is without an end: Well may we change, but we shall never mend. Yet, if you can but bear the present Stage, We hope much better of the coming age. What would you say, if we should first begin To stop the trade of love behind the scene, Where actresses make bold with married men? 40 For while abroad so prodigal the dolt is, Poor spouse at home as ragged as a colt is. In short, we'll grow as moral as we can, Save here and there a woman or ...
— The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Vol II - With Life, Critical Dissertation, and Explanatory Notes • John Dryden

... attention to gaining his object by means of a little stratagem. Not far from the house on the road leading to the store stood an old pump, concealed from view by an intervening building and a rising hill. Here this youthful disciple of Father Matthew made it a practice regularly to stop, and pouring out half the contents of the jug he carried, refilled it with the ...
— Sword and Pen - Ventures and Adventures of Willard Glazier • John Algernon Owens

... rode over the hills and far away. Every now and then he would stop a passer-by and ask him if he had seen a ...
— The Firelight Fairy Book • Henry Beston

... his father Alec, with his blue eyes wide open, used to listen to stories like the Yarn we have read of the marvellous adventures of Livingstone.[50] Sometimes Mr. Mackay would stop and draw triangles and circles with his stick. Then Alec would be learning a problem in Euclid on this strange "blackboard" of the road. He learned the Euclid—but he preferred the ...
— The Book of Missionary Heroes • Basil Mathews

... us; Ben has his gun and may have a chance to shoot some game on the way—more than likely, he will have no chance at all; it will take us several days to reach Stroudsburg, which, I believe, is the nearest point. Don't you think it best that we should stop at the house and get what ...
— The Daughter of the Chieftain - The Story of an Indian Girl • Edward S. Ellis

... look," said Rose, whispering as softly as before. "We're awfully tired waiting, and keeping so still. It will help some to know what time it is, and if he sees me looking at the clock, perhaps he'll say he's 'MOST ready to stop painting." ...
— Princess Polly's Playmates • Amy Brooks

... Bulalio, Holder of the Axe, Chief of the People of the Axe, go up against the Halakazi, with Galazi the Wolf, my brother. If but ten men follow us, yet we will go. Now, choose, you soldiers! Let those come who will, and let those who will stop at home with the women and the ...
— Nada the Lily • H. Rider Haggard

... doubly enlisted on the side of John Pearson, the basket-maker. In the first place, he knew that this persecution of the unpopular old man was only a blind to save somebody else; that they were thieves who cried, "Stop thief!" And he felt consequently that this was a chance to put his newly-formed resolutions into practice. The Old Testament religious life, which consists in fighting the Lord's enemies, suited Bud's temper and education. It might lead to something better. It was the ...
— The Hoosier Schoolmaster - A Story of Backwoods Life in Indiana • Edward Eggleston

... and, by that means, bring, perhaps, irreparable mischief on the Company's affairs in China. For I was further informed, that the Mandarins were always ready to take occasion, even on the slightest grounds, to put a stop to their trading; and that it was often with great difficulty, and never without certain expence, that they could get such restraints taken off. These impositions were daily increasing; and, indeed, found it a prevailing opinion, in ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 17 • Robert Kerr

... feels—" Alice would stop short in perplexity. Why shouldn't he go? She had known Mrs. Moulton from the days when they both were brides, the Moultons' house was near, and it was dull for Gogo here, under the sitting-room lamp. If he had only been as contented as Mary, ...
— The Heart of Rachael • Kathleen Norris

... the river— In the stream the bucket flashes; Now 'tis back—and down, or ever You can wink; the burden dashes. Again, again, and quicker! The floor is in a swim, And every stoup and bicker Is running o'er the brim. Stop, now stop! For you've granted All I wanted Well and neatly— Gracious me! I'm like to drop— I've ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 348 • Various

... room to suppose that future experience may discover the propriety and utility of other exceptions. I suspect it to be impossible in the nature of the thing to fix the salutary point at which the operation of the institution ought to stop, and this is with me a strong argument for leaving the matter to the discretion of the legislature. This is now clearly understood to be the case in Great Britain, and it is equally so in the State of Connecticut; and yet it may be safely affirmed that more numerous encroachments ...
— The Federalist Papers

... in your writings, for which we know you were not morally responsible, we, Christ's representative on earth, are still touched with his love and pity for one so unfortunate as you. With your help we shall stop the mouths of calumny, and set you right before the world. We shall use our great resources to save the Rincon honor which, through the working of Satan within you, is now unjustly besmirched. We shall labor to restore ...
— Carmen Ariza • Charles Francis Stocking

... sez Judy, pullin' her mother by the shawl. "'Twas none av Terence's fault. For the love av Mary stop ...
— Life's Handicap • Rudyard Kipling

... "I'll stop at Gavey's, and come back in the Sark cutter if it has begun to ply. If not, Tardif must bring me over ...
— The Doctor's Dilemma • Hesba Stretton

... ought to stop here; but the fate of a part of Rob Roy's family was so extraordinary, as to call for a continuation of this somewhat prolix account, as affording an interesting chapter, not on Highland manners alone, but on every stage of society in which ...
— Rob Roy, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... schools may be had in a better normal training of the teachers. At the present time the normal schools are inadequate to the task of supplying teachers and beyond the supplying of teachers for the city, they stop short. The training of teachers for country schools must become a part of the normal provision for ...
— The Evolution of the Country Community - A Study in Religious Sociology • Warren H. Wilson

... Circumstances may withdraw a politician from temptation to any but political dishonesty; but under temptation, a dishonest politician would be a dishonest cashier,—would be dishonest anywhere,—in anything. The fury which destroys an opponent's character, would stop at nothing, if barriers were thrown down. That which is true of the leaders in politics, is true of subordinates. Political dishonesty in voters runs into general dishonesty, as the rotten speck taints the whole apple. A community whose politics ...
— Twelve Causes of Dishonesty • Henry Ward Beecher

... you boys stop here a while and help me out?" she asked, saying at last in a burst of hopeful eagerness what had been in her heart to say from the first. She held out her hand to each of them in a pretty way of appeal, turning from one to the other, her gray ...
— The Duke Of Chimney Butte • G. W. Ogden

... decided at what towns they should stop on their long journey. They were as follows: Castelnovo, Civitacastellana, Narni, Terni, Spoleto, and Foligno; it was expected the Duke Guidobaldo or his wife would meet Lucretia at the last-named place and accompany her to Urbino. ...
— Lucretia Borgia - According to Original Documents and Correspondence of Her Day • Ferdinand Gregorovius

... I can't stop it! It's quite hysterical. Give me a water-bottle;" and then, after an application to the unstoppered mouth, "Oh dear! How they did run! I hope poor Dallas has seen it all. I wish he had been here. Hah! I'm better now. Why, Maine, ...
— Trapped by Malays - A Tale of Bayonet and Kris • George Manville Fenn

... we crossed the highest part of the pass, nearly four thousand feet above the sea, and descended a naked valley to the inn of Bjoberg. The landlord received us very cordially; and as the inn promised tolerable accommodation, he easily persuaded us to stop there for the night. His wife wore a frightful costume, which we afterwards found to prevail throughout all Hemsedal and Hallingdal. It consisted simply of a band across the shoulders, above the breasts, passing around the arms and over ...
— Northern Travel - Summer and Winter Pictures of Sweden, Denmark and Lapland • Bayard Taylor

... to carry slavery into the Territories, opens the discussion of the merits of that institution. Gentlemen say they wish to stop the discussion; that there has been too much of it already; that such a discussion would be especially unfortunate now. I do not propose to enter upon it here. But I desire to know in what manner you could more effectually invite discussion than by placing your proposed ...
— A Report of the Debates and Proceedings in the Secret Sessions of the Conference Convention • Lucius Eugene Chittenden

... which I cannot stop to mention,—the sailor, browned by the seas and sun, and full of stolen Bordeaux wine; the haberdasher; the carpenter; the weaver; the dyer; the tapestry-worker; the cook, to boil the chickens and the marrow-bones, and bake the pies and tarts,—mostly ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume VI • John Lord

... from one knot of people to another, whilst his peculiar appearance drew a running fire of witticisms as he went, so that he reminded me irresistibly of a snipe skimming along through a line of guns. We saw him stop for an instant by the yellow barouche, and hand something to Sir Lothian Hume. Then on he came again, until at last, catching sight of us, he gave a cry of joy, and ran for us full speed with a note held out at ...
— Rodney Stone • Arthur Conan Doyle

... active, yapping, unpleasant cur that seemed to think it rare fun to snap at Jacky's heels, then bound out of reach. A joke is a joke, but this horrid beast did not know where to stop, and Jack's first and second visits to the Bonamy hut were quite spoiled by the tyranny of the dog. If Jack could have got hold of him he might have settled the account to his own satisfaction, but he was not ...
— Monarch, The Big Bear of Tallac • Ernest Thompson Seton

... "I won't stop then this morning," said Bonbright. "I'll get along over to the far place. I wanted to have speech with your uncle. He was at Aunt Nancy's the other day and we had some talk; he knows more about what I'm aiming at up here then I do. A man of his age and good sense ...
— Judith of the Cumberlands • Alice MacGowan

... "Stop that man!" said the magistrate, pointing to the vague recesses into which the spectator had disappeared. An officer of the court went out hastily. Presently returning: "He is gone," said ...
— A Son of Hagar - A Romance of Our Time • Sir Hall Caine

... with tranquillity; for, notwithstanding the vast concourse who thronged to the scene throughout the day, no disturbance took place. But the operations of government against the repealers did not stop here. A few days afterwards the public were startled by the announcement of the arrest of Mr. O'Connell and his coadjutors, on charges of conspiracy, sedition, and unlawful assembling. Mr. O'Connell entered into recognisances, himself ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. - From George III. to Victoria • E. Farr and E. H. Nolan

... activity recommenced. He piled up the wooden furniture on the bed of withered verbena branches, filled the interstices with dead leaves that he collected from the garden, laid the smaller things—books, papers, pictures—where they would assist the conflagration, and did not stop until the pyre had reached to the level of the veranda railing. He reflected grimly that there was a chance of sparks setting fire to the house itself, and calculated the extent of the gravel between, deciding that if he was there to ...
— Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land • Rosa Praed

... way some men can get to the top," Fyfe answered quietly. "They concentrate on the object to be attained. That's all that counts until they're in a secure position. Then, when they stop to draw their breath, sometimes they find they've done lots of things they wouldn't do again. You watch. By and by Charlie Benton will cease to have those violent reactions that offend you so. As it is—he's a youngster, bucking a big game. Life, when you have ...
— Big Timber - A Story of the Northwest • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... 31. 'If an academy should be established for the cultivation of our style, which I, who can never wish to see dependance multiplied, hope the spirit of English liberty will hinder or destroy, let them, instead of compiling grammars and dictionaries, endeavour with all their influence to stop the license of translators, whose idleness and ignorance, if it be suffered to proceed, will reduce us to babble a dialect of France.' Ib. p. 49. 'I have rarely admitted any words not authorised by former writers; for I believe that whoever knows the ...
— The Life Of Johnson, Volume 3 of 6 • Boswell

... far more exciting spectacle than any flea on earth, however scarce and arctic. He said he'd asked at least forty men that day where they was born—waiters, taxi-drivers, hotel clerks, bartenders, and just anybody that would stop and take one with him, and not a soul had been born nearer to the old town than Scranton, Pennsylvania. "It's heart-rending," he says, "to reflect that I'm alone here in this big city of outlanders. I haven't even had the nerve to go down to West ...
— Somewhere in Red Gap • Harry Leon Wilson

... beasts he kept upon the hill, And he sate in the dale; And thus, with sighs and sorrows shrill, He gan to tell his tale. "O Harpalus,"—thus would he say— "Unhappiest under sun, The cause of thine unhappy day By love was first begun!... O Cupid, grant this my request, And do not stop thine ears, That she may feel within her breast The pains of my despairs! Of Corin that is careless, That she may crave her fee, As I have done in great distress, That loved ...
— Tudor and Stuart Love Songs • Various

... every thing was so carefully arranged, and the influence of Napoleon so boundless, that not a soldier left the ranks. Each man received his slice of bread and cheese, and quaffed his cup of wine, and passed on. It was a point of honor for no one to stop. Whatever obstructions were in the way were to be at all hazards surmounted, that the long file, extending nearly twenty miles, might not be thrown into confusion. The descent was more perilous than the ascent. But fortune seemed to smile. The sky was clear, the weather delightful, and in four days ...
— Napoleon Bonaparte • John S. C. Abbott

... according to our computation here, will begin his journey towards us to-morrow from the Corunna, and if his Excellency makes no stop by the way will arrive in this Court about twenty days hence, hardly sooner. I rest, dear brother, your most ...
— Memoirs of Lady Fanshawe • Lady Fanshawe

... Midway, the half-way stop between Charleston and Augusta, was a little kingdom of itself in the years of its greatness when William Gilmore Simms was monarch of the fair domain. It was far from being a monastery, though its master ...
— Literary Hearthstones of Dixie • La Salle Corbell Pickett

... was waving his arms for us to stop, and as we did, he ran forward. He peered in at us and I ...
— The Gold of the Gods • Arthur B. Reeve

... the movement. Nothing could be more amazing than the uncritical quality of the whole performance. The first check to the movement came in 1838, when the Bishop of Oxford animadverted upon the Tracts. Newman professed his willingness to stop them. The Bishop did not insist. Newman's own thought moved rapidly onward in the only course which was still ...
— Edward Caldwell Moore - Outline of the History of Christian Thought Since Kant • Edward Moore

... responsi-what's-its-name," said Charlotte, suddenly appearing among us. "Thank you, Mr Desborough; I'd rather not stop here when Hatty ...
— Out in the Forty-Five - Duncan Keith's Vow • Emily Sarah Holt

... chance to say, "Must they come to an end?" But Kate was near; and besides, a snub from Angela might stop the "journeyings" then and there. So he answered with a mere compliment, as any man may, meaning nothing at all or a great deal. To save her from danger, it was worth while to have been born, he ...
— The Port of Adventure • Charles Norris Williamson and Alice Muriel Williamson

... Eugene Schuyler, the author of "Turkestan," in order to demonstrate to the Russian government that its prestige had not put a stop to the slave trade, as was then alleged, purchased a young boy slave for one hundred roubles, the average price of the human article in Bokhara, and brought him to St. Petersburg. The boy was subsequently apprenticed to a Tartar watchmaker, and later became a convert to the Russian church. According ...
— Buchanan's Journal of Man, June 1887 - Volume 1, Number 5 • Various

... as he can tell! Why, I do believe if he could find little boys and girls to talk to, he would begin in the morning as soon as he had got through his breakfast, and do nothing but tell stories about what he has seen, until it was time to go to bed at night. I don't know but he would want to stop once or twice to eat. Jack loves a good dinner as well ...
— Jack Mason, The Old Sailor • Theodore Thinker

... reached a corner of the farmer's field at an early hour in the evening. Young Boone gave the customary signal to his mounted companion preceding him, to stop, an indication that he had shined the eyes of a deer. Boone dismounted, and fastened his horse to a tree. Ascertaining that his rifle was in order, he advanced cautiously behind a covert of bushes, to reach the right distance ...
— The First White Man of the West • Timothy Flint

... the animal eats well throughout. Thirst is increased, but not a great deal of water is taken at one time. If a bucket of water is placed in the manger the patient will dip its nose into it and swallow a few mouthfuls, allowing some of it to drip back and then stop, to return to it in a short time. The coat becomes dry and the hairs stand on end. At times the horse will have chills of one or the other leg, the fore quarters, or hind quarters, or in severe cases of the whole body, with trembling of the muscles ...
— Special Report on Diseases of the Horse • United States Department of Agriculture

... any system of cordons in dealing with such an enemy, useful as a string of posts might be in checking smugglers; and besides this change of plan, there were indications that he would himself soon take charge in Spain. There was need of this, for his generals and boy-soldiers did not stop to hold the Duero; evacuating Madrid, they never halted until they were behind the Ebro, in what they considered a kind of French borderland. The siege of Saragossa was abandoned, and Duhesme evacuated Catalonia. Junot's situation ...
— The Life of Napoleon Bonaparte - Vol. III. (of IV.) • William Milligan Sloane

... and leaning over the front of the bus to hail the driver. "Hi! You!" But the driver did not hear, and the bus drove forward like fate. The Major, who had hitherto seemed to be exempt from the general perturbation of Wimbledon troops, suddenly showed excitement. "We must stop this bus somehow! Why the devil doesn't he stop? ...
— The Roll-Call • Arnold Bennett

... the attraction is here—it's Bernardine; but I'll block his little game," he muttered. "The few weeks that I've been out of the city he has been making great headway; but I'll stop that." ...
— Jolly Sally Pendleton - The Wife Who Was Not a Wife • Laura Jean Libbey

... If I can stop one heart from breaking, I shall not live in vain; If I can ease one life the aching, Or cool one pain, Or help one fainting robin Into his nest again, I shall not live in ...
— Ontario Teachers' Manuals: Literature • Ontario Ministry of Education

... Avebury,— ... Allow me to wish every success to your Bill for preserving beautiful birds from destruction. To stop the import is the only way—short of the still more drastic method of heavily fining everyone who wears feathers in public, with imprisonment for a second offence. But we are not yet ripe ...
— Alfred Russel Wallace: Letters and Reminiscences Vol 2 (of 2) • James Marchant

... in the verandah. Peter would perhaps look up and see her standing there, and realise why she kept watch. Perhaps he would stop ...
— Jan and Her Job • L. Allen Harker

... office in Rockyille to his plantation, and it was too dark to catch a glimpse of him. At any rate, she would do the best she could. She would put the curtains of the sitting-room back, so the light could shine out, and perhaps George would stop to warm his hands and say a word to her mother. Kitty turned to go in when she ...
— Mingo - And Other Sketches in Black and White • Joel Chandler Harris

... read them," said Jean. "Through the War I tried to, but I had to stop. The writing was too ...
— Penny Plain • Anna Buchan (writing as O. Douglas)

... stop at the valley of Oil Creek. It extended down the Alleghany to Franklin, and up the valley of French Creek, which enters the Alleghany seven miles below the mouth of Oil Creek. Wells were sunk at all these points, and many of them yielded from three ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. 5, Issue 2, February, 1864 • Various

... he gave the grandees another lesson. The serf-owning spirit had fostered in France, through many years, a rage for duelling. Richelieu determined that this should stop. He gave notice that the law against duelling was revived, and that he would enforce it. It was soon broken by two of the loftiest nobles in France—by the Count of Bouteville Montmorency and the Count des ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 11 • Various

... brought her a long way, in a train. Something dreadful had happened, which had made him stop loving her. She could not guess what, for she had done nothing wrong so far as she knew: but a few days before, her nurse, a kind old woman of a comfortable fatness, had put her into a room where her father was and gently shut ...
— The Guests Of Hercules • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... the present seeming purpose to yield to no accommodation of the national difficulties, and if troops shall be raised in the North to march against the people of the South, a fire in the rear will be opened upon such troops, which will either stop their march altogether or wonderfully ...
— The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government • Jefferson Davis

... "Stop, boys," said I, "you must have on clean clothes to-day. You don't want your father and mother to see you all ...
— Helen's Babies • John Habberton

... the voices of the redcoats. Closer and closer the soldiers came, and then some of them appeared opposite the opening. Dick's heart was in his mouth. He held his breath and wondered if some of the redcoats would stop and haul him out from his hiding-place. But no, nothing of the kind occurred. It was now evident that he had not been seen as he was entering the hollow tree, and the redcoats merely walked past, without looking through the opening, and Dick was ...
— The Dare Boys of 1776 • Stephen Angus Cox

... "Stop! stop! or I'll blow ye into smithereens! I've got a double barreled cannon wid me, and if ye want to save yer life, s'render ...
— The Launch Boys' Adventures in Northern Waters • Edward S. Ellis

... journey, that you cannot stop now," said Ford. "Mellen, I have something to say to you—better send these men away unless you want our little ...
— A Noble Woman • Ann S. Stephens

... the crisis.] For such prosecutions there was indeed some excuse, for the prospect was threatening. Mithridates might at any moment stop the supplies from Asia. The soldiers of the enemy were men who had fought in Roman armies and been trained to Roman discipline; they were led by able captains, and were more numerous than the forces opposed ...
— The Gracchi Marius and Sulla - Epochs Of Ancient History • A.H. Beesley

... dashed hard work, pleasing is, sometimes. I know that. But it isn't so hard as earning money, believe me! Now you wouldn't be like the majority of women. You'd keep your share of the bargain, and handsomely. If you don't marry, and marry fifty miles above you, you'll be very silly. For you to stop here is an outrage against commonsense. It's merely monstrous. If I wasn't an old man I wouldn't tell you this, naturally. Now you needn't blush. I expect I'm not far off thirty years older than you—and you're young enough ...
— When Winter Comes to Main Street • Grant Martin Overton

... anything worth taking. Beowulf is lousy with fissionables; they'll give us all the plutonium we can load, in exchange for gadolinium, which we sell them at about twice Sword-World prices. We trade plutonium on Amaterasu for gadolinium, and get it for about half Sword-World prices." He pressed the stop-button, until he could remember the ancient formula. "You may quote me as saying that whoever has advised His Majesty that that isn't good business is no friend to His Majesty or ...
— Space Viking • Henry Beam Piper

... a mystic. What he says of Novalis may with equal truth be said of himself: 'He belongs to that class of persons who do not recognise the syllogistic method as the chief organ for investigating truth, or feel themselves bound at all times to stop short where its light fails them. Many of his opinions he would despair of proving in the most patient court of law, and would remain well content that they should be disbelieved there.' In philosophy we shall not be very far wrong if we rank Carlyle as a follower of Bishop Berkeley; ...
— Obiter Dicta • Augustine Birrell

... over the entire province of Uppland and did not stop again until he came to the great water-falls at Aelvkarleby where he alighted on a rock in the middle of the rushing rapids below the roaring falls. Again he relaxed ...
— The Wonderful Adventures of Nils • Selma Lagerlof

... that end by enraging the Americans, applied to the committee of New York State for leave to go into the city and remonstrate with the British upon such cruel treatment, which he doubted not but that he should put a stop to. The committee, however, either from knowing what effect the cruelties would have in strengthening the opposition to Britain, or from jealousies of his being in some other way of disservice to the American cause or from these united, would not ...
— Life And Times Of Washington, Volume 2 • John Frederick Schroeder and Benson John Lossing

... I can't stop at make-believe, when once I begin," she replied. "You know I hate all play-acting and comedy. You have wished it. Was it my idea or yours? Did I persuade you or did you inflame my imagination? I ...
— Venus in Furs • Leopold von Sacher-Masoch

... du Museum,' tom. ix. p. 128, says that moulting and incubation alone stop these ducks laying. Mr. B. P. Brent makes a similar remark in the 'Poultry Chronicle,' 1855, ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication, Vol. I. • Charles Darwin

... yon stile, (Fine flowers i' the valley;) That I may stop and breathe awhile," (Wi' the red, green, ...
— Ballad Book • Katherine Lee Bates (ed.)

... but to halt and wait for daylight. Indeed, I was too faint to ride further. Slight exertion fatigued me; and, no longer in dread of immediate danger I deemed it more prudent to stop, and, if possible, gain strength by rest. I dismounted, gave my horse to the grass; and, having wrapped myself in the warm robe, soon entered upon the enjoyment of sleep—sweeter and more natural than the involuntary slumber in which I had been ...
— The Wild Huntress - Love in the Wilderness • Mayne Reid

... their country, for he hoped that the valor which had expelled the Guelphs, would be sufficient to defend her. Farinata was a man of undaunted resolution, and excelled greatly in military affairs: being the head of the Ghibelline party, and in high estimation with Manfred, his authority put a stop to the discussion, and induced the rest to think of some other ...
— History Of Florence And Of The Affairs Of Italy - From The Earliest Times To The Death Of Lorenzo The Magnificent • Niccolo Machiavelli

... to stop their trembling. "I was riding through the pass," she told him briefly. "I saw your ...
— Shoe-Bar Stratton • Joseph Bushnell Ames

... to mind that he had not been sworn, as he usually was, before he gave his evidence, now bound what he had declared with so many oaths and imprecations that the landlady's ears were shocked, and she put a stop to his swearing, by assuring him of her belief. Upon which he said, "I hope, madam, you imagine I would scorn to tell such things of any man, unless I knew them to be true. What interest have I in taking away ...
— The History of Tom Jones, a foundling • Henry Fielding

... for their proceedings, and obtained a verdict and damages; and he further proceeded against Baillie Fordyce (one of his kidnappers, and others, from whom he obtained 200L. damages, with costs. The system was thus effectually put a stop to. ...
— The Life of Thomas Telford by Smiles • Samuel Smiles

... turned on to it, they could maintain a heap of water twenty feet deep over its level surface? Is it not obvious that the water, whatever momentary accumulation might take place at first, would not stop there, but that it would dash, like a mighty mill-race, southwards down the gentle slope which ends in the Thames? And is it not further obvious, that whatever depth of water might be maintained over the cricket-ground so long as all the mains poured on to it, anything which floated there would ...
— The Lights of the Church and the Light of Science - Essay #6 from "Science and Hebrew Tradition" • Thomas Henry Huxley

... tell you that you needn't be nervous about to-night. We have our men well under control, and the police ought to be able to deal with the rabble. If they can't—if there's any sign of rioting—we step in and stop it ...
— The Red Hand of Ulster • George A. Birmingham

... v.; not permitted &c 760; unlicensed, contraband, impermissible, under the ban of; illegal &c 964; unauthorized, not to be thought of, uncountenanced, unthinkable, beyond the pale. Adv. on no account &c (no) 536. Int. forbid it heaven!, &c (deprecation) 766. hands off!, keep off!, hold!, stop!, desist!, cease and desist!, avast!, Phr. that will never do; don't you dare; forget it; don't even think about doing it; go ahead; make ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... never heard of. Good! She fixes her wedding-day without consulting me and irrespective of my affairs. Good again! She's old enough to do it, and quite competent. Meanwhile I lose control of the machine, so to speak. I see myself racing on to something, and can't stop. I can only lie back and watch, to see what happens. I've got to leave that to fate, or God, or whatever it is that directs our affairs when we can no longer manage them ourselves." He took another sip of cognac, and pulled for a minute nervously at his cigar. "I thought ...
— The Street Called Straight • Basil King

... down the street to escape the infuriated mob which he believed would pursue him. The knowledge that he was cut off from the day's festivities made him wince with pain as he ran. Not until he came out upon the road across the prairie did he stop—breathless, worn out, crying. During the next two hours the boy wandered on the prairie and in the woods gathering wild flowers. By the time the exercises in the Willow Creek opera house were finished and the procession was formed, Bud Perkins had a heaping armful of field blossoms. ...
— The Court of Boyville • William Allen White

... for a long time the conversation was sustained by Vincent and myself. The steamer put in at Cleveland just at dusk. The stop was brief, however, and we left the beautiful and thriving city looking like a queen on the Ohio shore under the bridal veil of night. The evening was brilliant with moonlight. The lake was like a mirror or an enchanted sea. Hour after hour passed, and we still ...
— Bay State Monthly, Vol. II, No. 1, October, 1884 - A Massachusetts Magazine • Various

... why Don and Ed soon exasperated them by comfortably purchasing suits ready made; why Dorry's cheeks grew rosier; why Uncle was pleased; why Jack was proud; and why Lydia was morally sure the D's would break their precious necks, if somebody didn't put a stop to it. ...
— Donald and Dorothy • Mary Mapes Dodge

... tell a story in verse. In her romances style waits on matter, like an attentive and thoroughly trained handmaid. Both poetry and incident are sustained from beginning to end; and the reader would stop more often to admire the flowers along the path if he were not so eager to know the event. In this particular kind of verse-composition, she has shown a steady development. The first real illustration of her powers is seen in The Great Adventure of Max Brueck, in Poppy Seed, though why ...
— The Advance of English Poetry in the Twentieth Century • William Lyon Phelps

... groaned the Heap upon the floor—"take me home, Elizabeth! I daren't go alone. Beatrice will haunt me. My brain goes round and round. Take me away, Elizabeth, and stop with me. You are not afraid of her, you are afraid ...
— Beatrice • H. Rider Haggard

... sometimes turns round on its wire, leaving one or two strings undamped. Tighten the set screw. See that the dampers are in line; and that they will stop the tone properly when the key ...
— Piano Tuning - A Simple and Accurate Method for Amateurs • J. Cree Fischer

... verse—"Rest in Jehovah, and wait patiently for him." If evil-doers prosper, if they seem even more prosperous than the righteous, if they seem to get along without trouble, we should not be bothered over that. That is God's business. We see a great many evil things going on, and we should like to stop them. They grieve us in spirit, and this is but natural. But we ought not to fret ourselves over them. There is a vast difference between godly concern and human worry, and we need to learn this difference clearly. To be concerned about such things, ...
— Heart Talks • Charles Wesley Naylor

... a government can do much, even when it seems to have done little, in causing positive improvement, still greater are the issues dependent on it in the way of warding off evils, both internal and external, which else would stop improvement altogether. A good or a bad counselor, in a single city at a particular crisis, has affected the whole subsequent fate of the world. It is as certain as any contingent judgment respecting historical ...
— A System Of Logic, Ratiocinative And Inductive • John Stuart Mill

... where he had bandied fun with Warham and Erasmus or bent over the easel of Holbein. For a moment there may have been some passing impulse to yield. But it was soon over. Triumphant in all else, the monarchy was to find its power stop short at the conscience of man. The great battle of spiritual freedom, the battle of the Protestant against Mary, of the Catholic against Elizabeth, of the Puritan against Charles, of the Independent ...
— History of the English People, Volume III (of 8) - The Parliament, 1399-1461; The Monarchy 1461-1540 • John Richard Green

... to pay the purchase money, and to have the deeds properly recorded. I thought little of the journey, though it was above two hundred miles, because I was well acquainted with many friends, at whose houses I intended to stop. The third night after I left the woods, I put up at Mr.——'s, the most worthy citizen I know; he happened to lodge at my house when you was there.—He kindly inquired after your welfare, and desired I would make a friendly mention ...
— Letters from an American Farmer • Hector St. John de Crevecoeur

... with the stroke of midnight came the turning of the scale; her story should remain untold. It was not that upon the whole she thought it best not to attempt to tell it; but that she could not undertake so explosive a matter. To stop the wedding now would cause a convulsion in Giant's Town little short of volcanic. Weakened, tired, and terrified as she had been by the day's adventures, she could not make herself the author of such a catastrophe. But how refuse Heddegan ...
— Victorian Short Stories, - Stories Of Successful Marriages • Elizabeth Gaskell, et al.

... a quick bite of fish before he could stop her. "It has. First documentation I found was in the South Pacific air war in the '40s. One-man escorting fighter planes in several cases slipped out of bomber formations they were following at night and splashed. One of the explanations at ...
— A Fine Fix • R. C. Noll

... Rudolph began to doubt the instinct of horses, for the aspect of every thing around him became wilder every moment; but, happily, the rain had ceased falling, and as far as he could judge from the occasional glimpse he got of the sky, it had cleared up. On went Saladin, and did not stop until they entered an open glade; when, as if his task were quite accomplished, he came to a dead halt. Rudolph alighted, and looked about him: all was so still and beautiful, that it had the effect of calming the agitation of his spirits, and filling his mind with an indescribable awe,—it looked ...
— Holidays at the Grange or A Week's Delight - Games and Stories for Parlor and Fireside • Emily Mayer Higgins

... the bread-cloth, and put four at each end. Lay for as many persons as the Sewer has set potages for, and have plenty of bread and drink. Be lively and soft-spoken, clean and well dressed. Don't spit or put your fingers into cups. Stop all blaming ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... "Stop it at once!" "Put it down firmly!" "Don't stand any nonsense from them!" "Show them who are their betters," was the hasty advice given, and she turned again ...
— The Leader of the Lower School - A Tale of School Life • Angela Brazil

... king is so good and gracious, you must know, and these Furred Law-cats so curst and cruel, so mad, and thirsting after Christian blood, that we have less cause to fear in trespassing against that mighty sovereign's commands than reason to hope to live if we do not continually stop the mouths of these Furred Law-cats with such bribes and corruption. Besides, added he, to-morrow Gripe-men-all marries a furred law-puss of his to a high and mighty double-furred law-tybert. Formerly we used to call them chop-hay; ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... French Man appear'd very obliging in his Conversation, and told him he should have been glad of his Company, but that he was oblig'd to turn off on the Right Hand to a Friends House, whither he was going to divert himself a Day or Two. They had not gone a Hundred Rood farther, but he stop'd and desired the Englishman if he wou'd take a pinch of Snuff, and then look'd backward and forward with an ominous Countenance, he Collar'd the Englishman, and drawing a small Pistol out of his Pocket, without ...
— Memoirs of Major Alexander Ramkins (1718) • Daniel Defoe



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