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Soar   /sɔr/   Listen
Soar

verb
(past & past part. soared; pres. part. soaring)
1.
Rise rapidly.  Synonyms: soar up, soar upwards, surge, zoom.
2.
Fly by means of a hang glider.  Synonym: hang glide.
3.
Fly upwards or high in the sky.
4.
Go or move upward.
5.
Fly a plane without an engine.  Synonym: sailplane.



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"Soar" Quotes from Famous Books



... cloud was, and how he got under it, and why he did not get away from it, were points that lifted themselves into the realm of pure conjecture. There was no man in the club with strong enough wing to his imagination to soar to the supposition that Van Twiller was embarrassed in money matters. Was he in love? That appeared nearly as improbable; for if he had been in love all the world—that is, perhaps a hundred first families—would have ...
— Short Story Classics (American) Vol. 2 • Various

... therefore, was merely a stepping-stone on the way to the usual course of preferment. A fellow looked forwards to settling in a college living, or if he had the luck to act as tutor to a nobleman, he might soar to a deanery or a bishopric. The fellows who stayed in their colleges were probably those who had least ambition, or who had a taste for an easy bachelor's life. The universities, therefore, did not form bodies of learned men interested ...
— The English Utilitarians, Volume I. • Leslie Stephen

... respectable, elderly bird sighs for no better abiding-place, no wider prospect than that patch of the universe which he sees between the bars. But now and then there is hatched a wild young fledgeling, which beats its wings against the inexorable wires, and would fain soar away into that wide outer world, to prosper or perish ...
— Birds of Prey • M. E. Braddon

... Diana's pride, which denied cowardice in the joy of being envied, was forgotten in the primitive emotion of fear. What my sister did I could not see, as the monoplane mounted so quickly; but almost at once I realized that she must have signalled her wish to descend, for the Eagle ceased to soar, dropped, and began gently gliding down. A moment later the great winged form was landing once more close to ...
— Secret History Revealed By Lady Peggy O'Malley • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... my heart. For me it sings, unseals my sorrow, thaws compassion, floods with love the sunless world, nor, ceasing, abates its tenderness but deftly, subtly, weaves in and out until in this pattern, this consummation, the cleft ones unify; soar, sob, sink to rest, sorrow ...
— Monday or Tuesday • Virginia Woolf

... his shadow, Spake and said: "O Pau-Puk-Keewis, Never more in human figure 345 Shall you search for new adventures; Never more with jest and laughter Dance the dust and leaves in whirlwinds; But above there in the heavens You shall soar and sail in circles; 350 I will change you to an eagle, To Keneu, the great war-eagle, Chief of all the fowls with feathers, Chief of Hiawatha's chickens." And the name of Pau-Puk-Keewis 355 Lingers still among ...
— The Song of Hiawatha - An Epic Poem • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... minds, which, like the elements, Might furnish forth creation:—Italy! Time, which hath wronged thee with ten thousand rent Of thine imperial garment, shall deny, And hath denied, to every other sky Spirits which soar from ruin:—thy decay Is still impregnant with divinity, Which gilds it with revivifying ray; Such as the great of ...
— Fair Italy, the Riviera and Monte Carlo • W. Cope Devereux

... schoolboy. I followed as well as I could, though no sooner was I outside the tower, than my head began to swim. There was nothing of the eagle about me. The earth was enough for me, and no ambitious desire to soar ever entered my mind. Still things did not go badly until I had ascended 150 steps, and was near the platform, when I began to feel the rush of cold air. I could scarcely stand, when clutching the railings, I looked upwards. The railing ...
— A Journey to the Centre of the Earth • Jules Verne

... flitting and skipping over the sleep of the vegetables and human beings spread out there in heaps pending the dawn. However, what surprised Florent was the sight of some huge pavilions on either side of the street, pavilions with lofty roofs that seemed to expand and soar out of sight amidst a swarm of gleams. In his weakened state of mind he fancied he beheld a series of enormous, symmetrically built palaces, light and airy as crystal, whose fronts sparkled with countless streaks of light filtering ...
— The Fat and the Thin • Emile Zola

... indeed to close our eyes with those we cherish near, And wafted upward by their sighs soar to some calmer sphere; But whether on the scaffold high or in the battle's van The fittest place where man can die is where he ...
— Poems with Power to Strengthen the Soul • Various

... pieces give me an idea of that bird. The colouring of the swan is pure; his attitudes are graceful; he never displeases you when sailing on his proper element. His feet may be ugly, his notes hissing, not musical, his walk not natural; he can soar, but it is with difficulty:—still, the impression the swan leaves is that of grace. ...
— Letters of Horace Walpole, V4 • Horace Walpole

... flight; Be thy course to left or right, Be thou doom'd to soar or sink, Pause upon ...
— The Fair Maid of Perth • Sir Walter Scott

... rather surprised into this step, for, in general, he was no friend to marriages or giving in marriage, and seemed rather to regard that state of society as a necessary evil,—a thing lawful, and to be tolerated in the imperfect state of our nature, but which clipped the wings with which we ought to soar upwards, and tethered the soul to its mansion of clay, and the creature-comforts of wife and bairns. His own practice, however, had in this material point varied from his principles, since, as we have seen, he twice knitted for himself ...
— The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... these wings and soar with us to the brow of yonder cliff, from which we can have a grand bird's-eye view of the vale almost from its entrance to the point where it is lost and absorbed in the majestic recesses of ...
— The Rover of the Andes - A Tale of Adventure on South America • R.M. Ballantyne

... imp their wings with other men's plumes, wherewith they soar high in common esteeme, yet have not the ingenuity with that son of the Prophet to ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 30. Saturday, May 25, 1850 • Various

... scaling it; you seem to have set yourself the task that Aornus [Footnote: i.e., birdless.] presented to the Macedonians; how sheer it was on every side! it was true, they thought, even a bird could hardly soar that height; to take it would be work for a Dionysus or Heracles. Then in a little while you discern two roads; or no, one is no more than a track, narrow, thorny, rough, promising thirst and sweat. But I need say no more of it; Hesiod has described it long ...
— Works, V3 • Lucian of Samosata

... thou'lt sing! for well thy magic muse Can to the topmost heaven of grandeur soar; Or stoop to wail the swain that is no more! Ah, homely swains! your homeward steps ne'er lose; 90 Let not dank Will[46] mislead you to the heath; Dancing in mirky night, o'er fen and lake, He glows, to draw you downward to your death, In his bewitch'd, low, marshy, ...
— The Poetical Works of William Collins - With a Memoir • William Collins

... they think that girls have nothing to do all day, when they have quite as much as men if not more; you don't know anything about them. And I think poetry is the most restful thing to read when one's tired, you see our minds soar to higher things than yours, you study the Racing Calendar and the newspapers, ...
— Lippa • Beatrice Egerton

... none of those lofty inspirations which naturally generate new forms of melody. He seldom trusts himself to be lyrical, and when he does his versification is nearly as monotonous as it is in his narrative poetry. We must not expect to soar with Crabbe into any of the loftier regions; to see the world 'apparelled in celestial light,' ...
— Hours in a Library - New Edition, with Additions. Vol. II (of 3) • Leslie Stephen

... a prison make, Nor iron bars a cage; Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage. If I have freedom in my thought, And in my love am free, Angels alone, that soar ...
— All Saints' Day and Other Sermons • Charles Kingsley

... nestle by me, trusting-hearted; Lay in my loving hands your head: Then back shall come your peace departed, Through the world's baseness long since fled; And deep from out your heart upspringing, Love's downy wings will soar to view, The darling smiles like magic bringing Around ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 1 • Charles Dudley Warner

... elevation. We are told they are to be elevated by the suffrage—and that by hanging on to the election tickets in the hands of their wives, the men are to be elevated with them. What, therefore, is the ground women now occupy, and from whence they are to soar upward on the paper wings of the ballot? The principal facts connected with that position are self-evident; there is nothing vague or uncertain here; we have but to look about us and the question is answered. We already know, for instance, from daily observation ...
— Female Suffrage • Susan Fenimore Cooper

... well covet death rather than life. Many have been led by this belief to put an end to their existence. When overwhelmed with trouble, perplexity, and disappointment, it seems an easy thing to break the brittle thread of life, and soar away into the bliss of the ...
— The Great Controversy Between Christ and Satan • Ellen G. White

... on her neck a large magnet. She said that it would one day happen that this magnet would attract the lightning, and that she would consequently soar into the sun. I longed to tell her that when, she got there she could be no higher up than on the earth, but I restrained myself; and the great charlatan hastened to say that there could be no doubt about it, and that he, and he only, could increase the force of the magnet ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... its spoil by a bird much inferior in size and weight and which has not the slightest pretensions to the art. An eagle had captured a "mainsail" fish (banded dory) which loomed black against its snowy breast as in strenuous spirals it sought to gain sufficient height whence to soar over the spur of the hill to its eyrie. The fish, though not weighty, was awkward to carry, and the presence of the boat rather baffled the bird, which was shadowed in envious though discreet flight by a white-bellied ...
— My Tropic Isle • E J Banfield

... the pointed crest that projects upwards and backwards from the hind part of the head. The crested lark has a pretty song, which is often poured forth when the bird is in the air. This species does not soar so high as the skylark. Like the latter, ...
— Birds of the Indian Hills • Douglas Dewar

... which could sink so deep—that gentle humor, which could soar so lightly—that delicate perception, which nothing could escape—that wide sympathy, which ranged so far—those sweet moralities, which rang so true; it is indeed hard and sad to feel that these must be silent for us ...
— The Land of Thor • J. Ross Browne

... more secrets unchanged and unchanging, than there are stars that connect with the earth, or mysteries fathomed by science. In the bosom of truth undeniable, truth all absorbing, man shall doubtless soar upwards; but still, as he rises, still shall his soul unerringly guide him; and the grander the truth of the universe, the more solace and peace it may bring, the more shall the problems of justice, morality, happiness, love, ...
— Wisdom and Destiny • Maurice Maeterlinck

... thoroughbred steed, You may laugh with delight as you ride the ocean, You may rush afar in your touring car, Leaping, sweeping, by things that are creeping - But you never will know the joy of motion Till you rise up over the earth some day, And soar like an ...
— Hello, Boys! • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... who then governed this country, and the mean tenor of whose prolonged administration we have delineated in another work, was impressed with the necessity of reconstructing the episcopal bench on principles of personal distinction and ability. But his notion of clerical capacity did not soar higher than a private tutor who had suckled a young noble into university honours; and his test of priestly celebrity was the decent editorship of a Greek play. He sought for the successors of the apostles, for the stewards of the mysteries of Sinai and of ...
— Tancred - Or, The New Crusade • Benjamin Disraeli

... my gentle Mephistophilis, And grant me my [113] request, and then I go. Thou know'st, within the compass of eight days We view'd the face of heaven, of earth, and hell; So high our dragons soar'd into the air, That, looking down, the earth appear'd to me No bigger than my hand in quantity; There did we view the kingdoms of the world, And what might please mine eye I there beheld. Then in this show let me an actor be, That this proud ...
— Dr. Faustus • Christopher Marlowe

... enacting equitable laws for the security of persons and property—on which bases the national prosperity of all countries must rest. But should your ambition, not content with bestowing blessings like these on your native land, lead you to soar almost above mortal acts, distant oceans would unite, and the extremities of the globe approach at your command.[9] Thus might your name be rendered immortal, and Egypt become again the emporium of commerce, and one of the richest and happiest nations upon earth. How infinitely great the glory ...
— The Life of Thomas, Lord Cochrane, Tenth Earl of Dundonald, Vol. II • Thomas Lord Cochrane

... evolved from its awful depth of being. Deity progresses through its expressions of the cosmos. The Ego, your God, finds progressive expression through you, through your soul. That soul is not immortal that becomes separated from its Ego—its God. So, soul, spread your spiritual wings and soar upward. ...
— The Light of Egypt, Volume II • Henry O. Wagner/Belle M. Wagner/Thomas H. Burgoyne

... simplest combination ... Dost soar to heaven's complexest essence, rife With grandeurs, unaffronted to the ...
— Robert Browning • C. H. Herford

... oneiromancy, or the art of taking omens from dreams, during sleep the soul was released from the body, and thus enabled to soar into spiritual regions and commune with celestial beings. Therefore memories of ideas suggested in dreams ...
— Primitive Psycho-Therapy and Quackery • Robert Means Lawrence

... richest perfume, and changed to odorless pink before morning; exquisite vetches, with bloom like our sweet pea, and of more than fifty varieties; harebells in great clumps, and castilleias which dot the State with scarlet; rosy cyclamens "on long, lithe stems that soar;" and mertensias, whose delicate bells, blue as a baby's eyes, turn day by day to pink; the cleome, which covers Denver with a purple veil; the whole family of pentstemons, and ...
— A Bird-Lover in the West • Olive Thorne Miller

... whose souls their stupidity bears most heavily. But stay—they do not oppress all women alike! There are women whose spiritual needs never soar above the alphabet. When these men are men of family, and one expects to find their wives sitting with clinched hands and set teeth, simply enduring life and praying for death, one is often surprised to see that they are generally stout women, who wear many diamonds ...
— From a Girl's Point of View • Lilian Bell

... the sea, the battle, and the shore, Heard as we hear one word arise and soar, Beheld one name above them tower and glow— Nelson: a light that time ...
— A Channel Passage and Other Poems - Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles - Swinburne—Vol VI • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... gulls that twitter on the rush-grown shore When fall the shades of night, That o'er the waves in loving pairs do soar When shines the morning light— 'Tis said e'en these poor birds delight To nestle each beneath his darling's wing That, gently fluttering, Through the dark hours ...
— Japanese Literature - Including Selections from Genji Monogatari and Classical - Poetry and Drama of Japan • Various

... one end of the country to the other as any of our wild birds. He is protected by law in a great many states and by custom in nearly all localities where they breed. It is one of the pleasantest sights along the coast to watch a number of these great birds as they soar at an elevation above the water, watching for fish to come near the surface, when, with folded wings, the bird speeds downward and plunges into the water, rarely missing his prey. In many localities ...
— The Bird Book • Chester A. Reed

... morning gale! Full on their bucklers beams the rising ray, Their glittering helmets flash a brighter day, The shout of war rings echoing o'er the vale: Far reaches as the aching eye can strain The splendid horror of their wide array. Ah! not in vain expectant, o'er Their glorious pomp the Vultures soar! Amid the Conqueror's palace high Shall sound the song of victory: Long after journeying o'er the plain The Traveller shall with startled eye See their white bones then blanched by ...
— Poems • Robert Southey

... which holds himself within its thrall, and shall sacrifice God to him. She humbly and fervently entreats the holy Father to grant her a divorce from these bonds of matrimony which so cruelly oppress her, and to set her soul free that it may soar upwards unrestrained. It is the letter of a woman who did wish to serve God, but who was incapable of recognising that it was possible to do it without shutting herself up in stone walls, and ...
— A Forgotten Hero - Not for Him • Emily Sarah Holt

... Scopoli, etc.) (** Vagrant cuckoo; so called because, being tied down by no incubation or attendance about the nutrition of its young, it wanders without control.) (*** Charadrius aedicnemus.) (**** Gryllus campetris.) (***** In hot summer nights woodlarks soar to a prodigious height, and hang singing in the air. (****** The light of the female glow-worm (as she often crawls up the stalk of a grass to make herself more conspicuous) is a signal to the male, which is a slender dusky scarabaeus.) (******* See the story ...
— The Natural History of Selborne • Gilbert White

... such a condition, a king might have spoken. "I bear you to witness," cried Cromwell, exultingly, "he hath refused quarter. Of a surety, his blood be on his head.—One of you bring down the barrel of powder. As he loves to soar high, we will add what can be taken from the soldiers' bandoliers.—Come with me, Pearson; thou understandest this gear.—Corporal Grace-be-here, stand thou fast on the platform of the window where Captain Pearson and I stood but even now, ...
— Woodstock; or, The Cavalier • Sir Walter Scott

... well as body; but without a friend, and only a shirt and pair of trousers to put on, and carry me home. Yet with all this I have a contented mind, entirely resigned to the will of Providence, which conduct alone enables me to soar ...
— The Eventful History Of The Mutiny And Piratical Seizure - Of H.M.S. Bounty: Its Cause And Consequences • Sir John Barrow

... soar above the Cap of Liberty and other granite peaks. Robins, larks, and humming birds swarm in the warm valley, and abundance of grass grows in the ...
— The Harris-Ingram Experiment • Charles E. Bolton

... of their considering Caps, and now they find that you can soar alone, they send for you to knip your spreading Wings. Now, by my Soul, ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn - Volume IV. • Aphra Behn

... came from shooting albatross!" I heard him exclaim. "Dey like to live as much as man. Dey love freedom. Soar high, high up in de sky, den swoop down, and fly along de foaming waves. Ah, if I had wings like dem, I no peel potatoes and boil ...
— In the Eastern Seas • W.H.G. Kingston

... the sea-birds wheel and soar until their white wings turn to silver as they circle round the sun and sink into its brightness as ...
— Saronia - A Romance of Ancient Ephesus • Richard Short

... and adventures are too many to follow. Before, however, we end these cruises in the clouds altogether, there is time for a word or two about the many machines which have been made in the hope of enabling men to soar in the skies without the aid of a balloon. Attempts to do this were made long before the Montgolfiers sent up their paper bag at Annonay, and beyond the fact that machines have been invented which can lift themselves into the sky, very little progress has been ...
— Chatterbox, 1905. • Various

... pretend that we lawyers go to heaven. But I'll tell you what I have done, just to give you an idea of my work. In the first place, I have a castle perched so high up in the air, that the eagles, even in their highest soar, appear ...
— Olla Podrida • Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)

... single stroke of his wings, and that, too, not downward as may be supposed, but along a level, or a line often curving upward! How he executes this upward movement is not known. Some suppose that he possesses the power of inflating himself with heated air, which enables him to soar upward without using his wings. This theory is not very clear, and requires demonstration before it can be accepted as the true one. Others say that he is carried up by the impetus he has already obtained, by having previously descended from an equal or greater height. This is not true, however, ...
— The Boy Hunters • Captain Mayne Reid

... children. He praises old friends and laments his inability to make new ones. He commends Jane Austen, whose novels he has just finished reading. "Her flights," he remarks, "are not lofty, she does not soar on eagle's wings, but she is pleasing, interesting, equable, and yet amusing." He laments that he "can no longer debate and yet cannot apply his mind to anything else." One recalls Darwin's similar lament that his scientific ...
— John Marshall and the Constitution - A Chronicle of the Supreme Court, Volume 16 In The - Chronicles Of America Series • Edward S. Corwin

... thee on the shores of the changed Parthenope, fell senseless and cowering before that Phantom-Darkness, I knew that his spirit was not formed to front the worlds beyond; for FEAR is the attraction of man to earthiest earth, and while he fears, he cannot soar. But THOU, seest thou not that to love is but to fear; seest thou not that the power of which thou boastest over the malignant one is already gone? It awes, it masters thee; it will mock thee and betray. Lose not a moment; come to me. If there can yet be sufficient sympathy between ...
— Zanoni • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... earthwards, till sunlight touches the tops of the tallest trees, and the hippogriffs alight with a rattle of quills and fold their wings and gallop and gambol away till they come to some prosperous, wealthy, detestable town, and they leap at once from the fields and soar away from the sight of it, pursued by the horrible smoke of it until they come again to the pure ...
— The Book of Wonder • Edward J. M. D. Plunkett, Lord Dunsany

... with sad tales of bloodshed and ravage. Go and hear him;—go hear the bodes of thy brother Tostig, who wait without in our hall;—go, take axe, and take shield, and the men of earth's war, and do justice and right; and on thy return thou shalt see with what rapture sublime a Christian King can soar aloft ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... tempting with forbidden fruit. Together let us beat this ample field, Try what the open, what the covert yield; The latent tracts, the giddy heights, explore Of all who blindly creep, or sightless soar; Eye Nature's walks, shoot folly as it flies, And catch the manners living as they rise; Laugh where we must, be candid where we can, But vindicate the ways of God ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... stages I have rehearsed? you admit the impossibility yourself. As to your present mood, it is that of the man who cries and curses his luck because he cannot climb the sky, or plunge into the depths of the sea at Sicily and come up at Cyprus, or soar on wings and fly within the day from Greece to India; what is responsible for his discontent is his basing of hopes on a dream-vision or his own wild fancy, without ever asking whether his aspirations were realizable or consistent ...
— Works, V2 • Lucian of Samosata

... hills he once kept court— He who his country's eagle taught to soar And fired those stars which shine o'er ...
— The Hudson - Three Centuries of History, Romance and Invention • Wallace Bruce

... Brooklynite or New Yorker, leading a life replete with too much luxury, or tired and careworn about his personal affairs, crosses the ferry or goes up Broadway, his fancy does not thus 'soar away into the colors of the sunset' as did Whitman's, nor does he inwardly realize at all the indisputable fact that this world never did anywhere or at any time contain more of essential divinity, or of eternal meaning, than is embodied in the fields of vision over which his eyes so carelessly ...
— Talks To Teachers On Psychology; And To Students On Some Of Life's Ideals • William James

... the least, But, when that hog, his mind would feast Fattens the intellectual beast With old, or new, without ambition,— I'll teach the pig to soar on high, (If pigs had pinions, by the bye) How'er the last may satisfy, The bonne ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... only six days, or six weeks, it lasted almost six years, and would perhaps still continue, but for the particular circumstances which caused it to cease, and restored me to nature, above which I had, wished to soar. ...
— The Confessions of J. J. Rousseau, Complete • Jean Jacques Rousseau

... and domestic duties, as to settle it in one's mind that one is a poet. I have, therefore, taken great pains to advise other persons laboring under the impression that they were gifted beings, destined to soar in the atmosphere of song above the vulgar realities of earth, not to neglect any homely duty under the influence of that impression. The number of these persons is so great that if they were suffered to indulge ...
— The Poet at the Breakfast Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... soul in riper years. For Nature gave him strength, and fire, to soar, On Fancy's wing above this vale of tears; Where dark cold-hearted sceptics, creeping, pore Through microscope of metaphysic lore: And much they grope for truth, but never hit. For why? their powers, inadequate ...
— The Minstrel; or the Progress of Genius - with some other poems • James Beattie

... ways of heaven are altogether inscrutable, and soar as far above and beyond the works and the comprehensions of man as the sun, flaming in majesty, is above the tiny boy's evening rocket. It is the controller of Nature alone that can bring light out of darkness, and order out of confusion. ...
— The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner • James Hogg

... eagerly gazed upon the blue sky of the free North, which at times constrained me to cry out from the depths of my soul, Oh! Canada, sweet land of rest—Oh! when shall I get there! Oh, that I had the wings of a dove, that I might soar away to where there is no slavery; no clanking of chains, no captives, no lacerating of backs, no parting of husbands and wives; and where man ceases to be the property of his fellow man. These thoughts have revolved in my ...
— Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, an American Slave, Written by Himself • Henry Bibb

... with thy heart to God, if thou wouldst hope in Him. Then see what in thee is most displeasing to God. This it is which holdeth thy hope down. Strike firmly, repeatedly, in the might of God, until it give way. Thy hope will soar at once with thy thanks ...
— Daily Strength for Daily Needs • Mary W. Tileston

... her. She was sitting on the floor, reading a hymn and humming the tune of it to herself, when something stirred at the window. She glanced up; a white dove was sitting on the ledge and looking at her. When the eyes of the dove and of the girl met, the bird flew away. Barefoot watched it soar out over the fields and ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VIII • Various

... heard of him if he did. But it is only a theory of mine, this living on air. It would be fine, wouldn't it? Of course it may be impossible—most likely it is. You see, I am not unpractical. I never forget the present. When I soar ahead into the future, I always leave a string by which to find my way ...
— The Cruise of the Snark • Jack London

... divinest lore: And now I view thee, 'tis, alas! with shame That I in feeblest accents must adore. When I recount thy worshippers of yore I tremble, and can only bend the knee; Nor raise my voice, nor vainly dare to soar, But gaze beneath thy cloudy canopy In silent joy to think at last I look ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... and higher From the earth thou springest, Like a cloud of fire: The blue deep thou wingest, And singing still dost soar, and soaring ...
— Graded Memory Selections • Various

... mine are one, Which, on the shaft that made him die, Espied a feather of his own, Wherewith he wont to soar so high. ...
— Familiar Quotations • Various

... was one of the most profound minds that the world has ever seen; but he had the misfortune to be too much in advance of his age. He excited the wonder of his contemporaries, who, however, were unable to follow him to the heights at which his daring intellect was accustomed to soar. His most important ideas lay, therefore, buried and forgotten in the folios of the Royal Society, until a new generation gradually and painfully made the same discoveries, and proved the exactness of his assertions and the truth ...
— Six Lectures on Light - Delivered In The United States In 1872-1873 • John Tyndall

... felt a little afraid to put the primrose to her lips, but the sun shone so brightly and the cloudless sky looked so blue, and she thought how delightful it must be to soar in the air on such a glorious day, and she told herself she would just change for a few minutes to ...
— The Bountiful Lady - or, How Mary was changed from a very Miserable Little Girl - to a very Happy One • Thomas Cobb

... the charity which "believeth all things." Those who have never been initiated into the penetralia of these institutions, know enough of them to be satisfied that they are not precisely schools of science—or, if they are, that the sciences they exult in, are not those which soar towards heaven, but those which have to do with the auriferous bowels of the earth, and the full-fed cattle upon ...
— The Wedding Guest • T.S. Arthur

... green; On his fair brow a flowery crown was seen, Where the pale Primrose with the Cowslip vied, And fragrant Violets shone in purple pride. Upon a Bull he rode, whose horns were gay With many a golden flower and budding spray. Around him every vernal Songster fled, While the Lark soar'd and whistled o'er his head. And now he smil'd with joy, and now, apace, The crystal tears bedew'd his alter'd face. Like the young Fondling on his Mother's breast, Who cries for absent joys, and thinks them best: 'Mid smiles, and tears, and frowns, he onward ...
— The First of April - Or, The Triumphs of Folly: A Poem Dedicated to a Celebrated - Duchess. By the author of The Diaboliad. • William Combe

... I! It was of herself I was thinking. She's got to suffer so. One hates to see a person take a cloud for something tangible and keep falling off, to be bruised and beaten. If she could always soar—but the ...
— Joyce's Investments - A Story for Girls • Fannie E. Newberry

... good, that blessed mind, That is so much to heavenly things inclin'd That it aloft will soar, and always be Contemplating on blest eternity. That mind that never thinks itself at rest, But when it knows it is for ever blest; That mind that can be here no more content, Than he that in the prison doth lament; That blessed mind that counts itself then free When it can ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... I, a woman born To live by music, and to soar and sing, As stars for shining, flowers for blossoming, Could never sit beneath the stars and mourn With missing ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. XVII. No. 101. May, 1876. • Various

... falling stars and sparks have but one existence; over water, like the swan "on St. Mary's lake," they have two. The displays last for nearly an hour, and consist almost entirely of rockets. Every kind of rocket is there: rockets which simply soar with a rush, burst into stars and fall; rockets which when they reach the highest point of their trajectory explode with a report that shakes the city and must make some of the campanili very nervous; rockets which burst into a million sparks; rockets which burst ...
— A Wanderer in Venice • E.V. Lucas

... dreams, and orient shore! Ah miracle in sea and sky! Ah youth that fleeting love made soar To heaven! The glory upon high To dusk hath waned, yet comes once more A ...
— Iolaeus - The man that was a ghost • James A. Mackereth

... or chance's crime, Each apart, our burdens each we bore; Heard, in monotones like bells that chime, Chime the sounds of sorrows, float and soar Joy's full carols, near or far before; Heard not yet across the alternate rhyme Time's tongue tell what sign set fast of yore Stands a sea-mark ...
— A Midsummer Holiday and Other Poems • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... charms of thine, heaven-born! In truth thou'rt like a living fairy from the azure skies! The spring of life we now enjoy; we are yet young in years. Our union is, indeed, a happy match! But. lo! the milky way doth at its zenith soar; Hark to the drums which beat around in the watch towers; So raise the silver lamp and let us soft under ...
— Hung Lou Meng, Book II • Cao Xueqin

... splendour, and a triumph, and a joy, That on the brightness of thine azure breast Settest the constellated stars like gems, To flash the glory of thy loveliness Through all the fulness of unmeasured space. Can madness in its raving cast a thought To soar unto thy blessed perfectness, Nor stand subdued with reverence and awe In contemplation of the Infinite? O Earth! thou Mother and true Monitress! Can thy frail children close their ears for aye 'Gainst the deep-hearted ...
— Eidolon - The Course of a Soul and Other Poems • Walter R. Cassels

... a little. Visions of theatres and supper with his wife at the Savoy afterwards, and cosy night drives back into the sweet-smelling country behind your own chauffeur once more teased a fancy which even now did not soar beyond the confines of domestic pleasures. He pictured his wife in new dresses by Jay—she was fifteen years younger than himself, and "paid for dressing" as they said. He had always delighted—as men older than their wives will—in the admiration she excited from ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... thrilling moment, and the lights would be lowered. Each lighting and holding a powerful electric hand-light—one red, one blue—we should signal the drummer and plunge simultaneously into space, flash past each other in mid-flight, exchanging lights as we passed (this was the trick), and soar to opposite platforms again, amid frenzied applause. There ...
— Tales of the Five Towns • Arnold Bennett

... must be, like a living breeze, To flutter among the flowering trees; Lightly to soar, and to see beneath, The wastes of the blossoming purple heath, And the yellow furze, like fields of gold, That gladden some fairy region old. On mountain tops, on the billowy sea, On the leafy stems of the forest tree, How pleasant the life of a ...
— New National Fourth Reader • Charles J. Barnes and J. Marshall Hawkes

... laugh; —-se de laugh at. relmpago m. lightning flash. relinchar whinny, neigh. reloj m. clock, timepiece. remiso, -a slow. remolino m. whirl, whirling, vortex, eddy, whirlwind. remontarse rise, soar, tower. remordimiento m. remorse. remover remove, move, take away. rencor m. grudge, hatred. rendido, -a worn out, overcome. rendir surrender, give up, overcome, yield. renegar de deny, ...
— El Estudiante de Salamanca and Other Selections • George Tyler Northup

... whole syllable, rotundus, round; fragilis, frail; securus, sure; regula, rule; tegula, tile; subtilis, subtle; nomen, noun; decanus, dean; computo, count; subitaneus, sudden, soon; superare, to soar; periculum, peril; mirabile, marvel; as magnus, main; dignor, deign; tingo, stain; tinctum, taint; pingo, paint; ...
— A Grammar of the English Tongue • Samuel Johnson

... following many and follow'd by many, inaugurate a religion, I descend into the arena, (It may be I am destin'd to utter the loudest cries there, the winner's pealing shouts, Who knows? they may rise from me yet, and soar ...
— Leaves of Grass • Walt Whitman

... not have had that." Or suppose we took him the round of the West-End clubs and restaurants and made him estimate how many dinners London can produce at a pinch at the price of his local daily minimum, say, and upward; or borrow an aeroplane at Hendon and soar about counting all the golfers in the Home Counties on any week-day afternoon. "You suffer at the roots of things, far below there, but see all this nobility and splendour, these sweet, bright flowers ...
— An Englishman Looks at the World • H. G. Wells

... mother until her death—"as handy as a woman," so the neighbors said. Yet he knew that all this tribute to the lower life was only something mysteriously decreed, perhaps to ballast the soul lest it soar too high. The real things were fiddle-playing and writing verse, sometimes inspired by nature and again by love or death, and publishing it in the county paper. Jerry had one consolation, one delight, besides and above Marietta. This was the poetess, ...
— Country Neighbors • Alice Brown

... gay old place to bring up on all the rocks down there. And how about our chum Nat; he never had any longing to soar through the air. But tell us what's doing, Elmer," said ...
— Pathfinder - or, The Missing Tenderfoot • Alan Douglas

... with the microscope we have caught sight of the marvelous world of the infinitesimally small, have seen what human eye had never beheld, and have watched unseen life building up and breaking down all living organisms. We have learned how to walk secure in the depths of ocean, to soar in mid-air, to rush on our way unimpeded through the stony hearts of mountains. We see the earth grow from a fire-ball to be the home of man; we know its anatomy; we read its history; and we behold races of animals which passed away ages before the eye of man ...
— Education and the Higher Life • J. L. Spalding

... can daunt the swallow and the pigeon. So saying, he rang the alarm-bell, which was only kept for fires and burglaries, and summoned the household. 'A murrain on ye for being so pestilent slow!' he shouted. 'Gadsooth, ye knaves! let loose the petrol, or I soar ...
— The Slowcoach • E. V. Lucas

... background to the powerful personality who chose it as his own home. Daniel Webster, when his eyes first turned to this infinite reach of largeness, instinctively knew it as the place where his splendid senses would find satisfaction, and his splendid mind would soar into an even loftier freedom. Webster loved Marshfield with an intensity that made it peculiarly his own. Lanier, in language more intricate and tropical, exclaimed of his "dim sweet" woods: "Ye held me ...
— The Old Coast Road - From Boston to Plymouth • Agnes Rothery

... I received from him were more than humiliating to a man of fine feelings and a spirit such as I possessed. I said nothing to him, but I poured out my soul in secret prayer to my Heavenly Father, asking Him to open the door for my deliverance, so that my proud spirit, which was bound down, might soar in ...
— The Mormon Menace - The Confessions of John Doyle Lee, Danite • John Doyle Lee

... genius.' That tells the whole story. Misconstruction, condemnation, and isolation are the penalties enforced upon the great leaders in the realm of advanced thought, by the bigoted people of their time. The thinkers soar beyond the common herd, whose soul-wings are not strong enough to fly aloft to clearer atmospheres, and consequently they censure or ridicule what they are powerless to reach. George Sand, even to a greater extent than her contemporary, ...
— Elizabeth Fry • Mrs. E. R. Pitman

... soaring as only his free soul could soar; he indicated the tent at his back, whence issued the sound of Rouletta ...
— The Winds of Chance • Rex Beach

... are crushed by their own weight. Human limits had been surpassed: the genius of Napoleon, in attempting to soar above time, climate, and distance, had, as it were, lost itself in space; great as was its measure, ...
— The Two Great Retreats of History • George Grote

... catch yon Orient gleam, while purpling still the lowlands lie; And pearly mists, the morning-pride, soar incense-like to ...
— The Kasidah of Haji Abdu El-Yezdi • Richard F. Burton

... and the priests read the Requiem Mass, the little organ pealed the De Profundis as if inspired; and when the imperious triumphant music of Handel followed, Teresa's fresh young soprano seemed, to her excited imagination, to soar to the gates of heaven itself. When she looked down again the lights were dim in the incense, her senses swam in the pungent odor of spices and gum. The Bishop was walking about the catafalque casting holy water with a brush against the coffin above. ...
— The Spinner's Book of Fiction • Various

... cow was wont to soar With Daedalean art above the moon; But ah! the cardboard cows That by the railroad browse To no elopement ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, August 5th, 1914 • Various

... which reason herself attains by the power of dialectic, using the hypotheses not as first principles, but only as hypotheses—that is to say, as steps and points of departure into a world which is above hypotheses, in order that she may soar beyond them to the first principle of the whole; and clinging to this and then to that which depends on this, by successive steps she descends again without the aid of any sensible object, from ideas, through ideas, and ...
— The Republic • Plato

... pleasures of a Bohemian carouse or proclaiming the agonies of a consuming passion, it is all one to his singers. So soon as they drop the intervallic palaver which points the way of the new style toward bald melodrama they soar off in a shrieking cantalena, buoyed up by the unison strings and imperiled by strident brass until there is no relief except exhaustion. Happy, careless music, such as Mozart or Rossini might have written for the comedy scenes in "La Bohme," there is next to none in Puccini's score, ...
— Chapters of Opera • Henry Edward Krehbiel

... o'ermaster, Power of mere beauty; in dreams, Alba, thou hauntest me still. Is it religion? I ask me; or is it a vain superstition? Slavery abject and gross? service, too feeble, of truth? Is it an idol I bow to, or is it a god that I worship? Do I sink back on the old, or do I soar from the mean? So through the city I wander and question, unsatisfied ever, Reverent so I accept, ...
— Amours de Voyage • Arthur Hugh Clough

... occupation, (in Ps. cxlii. n. 6, p. 548,) especially in time of tribulations and temptations, (in Ps. cxviii. l. 12, n. 10, p. 313.) The world is to be shunned, at least in spirit; first, because it is filled on every side with snares and dangers, secondly, that our souls may more freely soar above it, always thinking on God; hence, he says, our souls must be, as it were, spiritual birds of heaven, always raised high on the wing; and he cries out, "Thou art instructed in heavenly science: what hast thou to ...
— The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints - January, February, March • Alban Butler

... you soar into such eloquence, before. You have subjugated me! What shall I do? Sing 'God save the Queen,' or shout 'For England and St. George'? I'm at your service. But then," she added mischievously, "I don't think it was such a wonderful thing for its garrison to hold out over three ...
— All Aboard - A Story for Girls • Fannie E. Newberry

... delights, languishing smiles, and first caressing, stammering utterance of love, you who can be seen, who are you? Are you less in God's sight than all the rest, beautiful cherubim who soar in the alcove and who bring to this world man awakened from the dream divine! Ah! dear children of pleasure, how your mother loves you! It is you, curious prattlers, who behold the first mysteries, touches, trembling ...
— Child of a Century, Complete • Alfred de Musset

... is never the inspiring motive of a real poet, to reach a certain degree of excellence which may be denominated "promising." Many a feather has been shed, and many a wing broken, in attempting to soar beyond it. We shall not describe Mr. Taylor with the epithet. We see nothing to justify it in his volume, on every page of which there is actual performance. Maturity may indeed add to his powers, and further ...
— The International Monthly Magazine, Volume 5, No. 1, January, 1852 • Various

... need them to keep out the cold, they must be made of brick, Milton's gorgeous testimony to the contrary notwithstanding. But when you undertake to show up the softness and beauty of brickwork, you soar a little too high for me. If our masons would only make walls that are able to bear their own weight; not use more than half as much mortar as brick, and that made of sand instead of dirt; if they would build chimney-flues that will carry the smoke to the top of the building, ...
— Homes And How To Make Them • Eugene Gardner

... broad, stone-strewed valley, partly covered with withered puma-grass, on which a flock of graceful vicunas are quietly grazing, as seemingly unconscious of our presence as the great condors which soar above the snowy peaks that look down ...
— Mr. Fortescue • William Westall

... would not continue such as to necessitate their expatriation. The delegates hoped to establish a Manual Labor College at New Haven that Negroes might there acquire that "classical knowledge which promotes genius and causes man to soar up to those high intellectual enjoyments and acquirements which place him in a situation to shed upon a country and people that scientific grandeur which is imperishable by time, and drowns in ...
— The Education Of The Negro Prior To 1861 • Carter Godwin Woodson

... climbed high, and my reward is small. Here I stand with wearied knees—earth, indeed, at a dizzy depth below, but heaven far, far beyond me still. Oh that I could soar up into the very zenith, where man never breathed nor eagle ever flew, and where the ethereal azure melts away from the eye and appears only a deepened shade of nothingness! And yet I shiver at that cold and solitary thought. What ...
— Twice Told Tales • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... hundred except as the twelfth member of forestry, until it appeared at the top of National Affairs. Here was a broad enough field, certainly,—the Trusts, the Tariff, the Gold Standard, the Foreign Possessions,—and Mr. Crewe's mind began to soar in spite of himself. Public Improvements was reached, and he straightened. Mr. Beck, a railroad lawyer from Belfast, led it. Mr. Crewe arose, as any man of spirit would, and walked with dignity up the aisle and out of the house. This deliberate attempt to crush genius ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... air they soar and skim, Whose voices make the emptiness of light A windy palace. Quavering from the brim Of dawn, and bold with song at edge of night, They clutch their leafy pinnacles and sing Scornful of man, and from his toils ...
— Georgian Poetry 1918-19 • Various



Words linked to "Soar" :   ascension, ascending, uprise, move up, billow, pilot, aviation, glide, come up, arise, wallow, climb, fly, aviate, soar up, lift, ascent, air, go up, wing, rise, air travel



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