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English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




See   /si/   Listen
See

verb
(past saw; past part. seen; pres. part. seeing)
1.
Perceive by sight or have the power to perceive by sight.  "Can you see the bird in that tree?" , "He is blind--he cannot see"
2.
Perceive (an idea or situation) mentally.  Synonyms: realise, realize, understand.  "I just can't see your point" , "Does she realize how important this decision is?" , "I don't understand the idea"
3.
Perceive or be contemporaneous with.  Synonyms: find, witness.  "You'll see a lot of cheating in this school" , "The 1960's saw the rebellion of the younger generation against established traditions" , "I want to see results"
4.
Imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind.  Synonyms: envision, fancy, figure, image, picture, project, visualise, visualize.  "I can see what will happen" , "I can see a risk in this strategy"
5.
Deem to be.  Synonyms: consider, reckon, regard, view.  "I consider her to be shallow" , "I don't see the situation quite as negatively as you do"
6.
Get to know or become aware of, usually accidentally.  Synonyms: discover, find out, get a line, get wind, get word, hear, learn, pick up.  "I see that you have been promoted"
7.
See or watch.  Synonyms: catch, take in, view, watch.  "This program will be seen all over the world" , "View an exhibition" , "Catch a show on Broadway" , "See a movie"
8.
Come together.  Synonyms: come across, encounter, meet, run across, run into.  "How nice to see you again!"
9.
Find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort.  Synonyms: ascertain, check, determine, find out, learn, watch.  "See whether it works" , "Find out if he speaks Russian" , "Check whether the train leaves on time"
10.
Be careful or certain to do something; make certain of something.  Synonyms: ascertain, assure, check, control, ensure, insure, see to it.  "See that the curtains are closed" , "Control the quality of the product"
11.
Go to see for professional or business reasons.  "We had to see a psychiatrist"
12.
Go to see for a social visit.
13.
Go to see a place, as for entertainment.  Synonym: visit.
14.
Take charge of or deal with.  Synonyms: attend, look, take care.  "I must attend to this matter" , "She took care of this business"
15.
Receive as a specified guest.  "The minister doesn't see anybody before noon"
16.
Date regularly; have a steady relationship with.  Synonyms: date, go out, go steady.  "He is dating his former wife again!"
17.
See and understand, have a good eye.
18.
Deliberate or decide.  "Let's see--which movie should we see tonight?"
19.
Observe as if with an eye.
20.
Observe, check out, and look over carefully or inspect.  Synonym: examine.  "I must see your passport before you can enter the country"
21.
Go or live through.  Synonyms: experience, go through.  "He saw action in Viet Nam"
22.
Accompany or escort.  Synonym: escort.
23.
Match or meet.
24.
Make sense of; assign a meaning to.  Synonyms: construe, interpret.  "How do you interpret his behavior?"



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"See" Quotes from Famous Books



... anxiety to get possession of the stock was not to him an evidence of public confidence, and an argument, therefore, in favor of such an institution, but "a mere scramble for so much public plunder." He could only see that "stock-jobbing drowns every other subject. The coffee-house is in an eternal buzz with the gamblers." "It pretty clearly appears also," he said, "in what proportions the public debt lies in the country, what sort of ...
— James Madison • Sydney Howard Gay

... my boy. You've done a fine thing; but you haven't solved a problem that has no solution... You are upset by it now, but after a while you'll see it and the disappointment will go. But you haven't failed... I don't believe you will ever understand all you ...
— Youth Challenges • Clarence B Kelland

... could dress you thus for your own wedding," said the farmer's wife, who seemed to be overflowing with kindness today. "I should like to see you mistress of a respectable farm, and you would not be a bad bargain for any man; but nowadays such things don't happen, for money runs after money. Well, do you be contented—so long as I live you shall ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VIII • Various

... was an elevated pinnacle of rocks on the rising ground upon which we were encamped; and from the top of these I was able in the course of the day to get bearings and angles to many important objects; I could also see many fixed points in my survey, so that the day could not be considered as altogether a ...
— Journals Of Two Expeditions Of Discovery In North-West And Western Australia, Vol. 1 (of 2) • George Grey

... Proserpine, Where that Aeaean isle forgets the main, And only the low lutes of love complain, And only shadows of wan lovers pine— As such an one were glad to know the brine Salt on his lips, and the large air again— So gladly from the songs of modern speech Men turn, and see the stars, and feel the free Shrill wind beyond the close of heavy flowers, And through the music of the languid hours They hear like Ocean on a western beach The surge ...
— Book of English Verse • Bulchevy

... stage they are men who, beyond the routine of life, should not be trusted, being "fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils." On the other hand, there are those whose lot it has been from earliest childhood to see the fair side of humanity, who have been surrounded with clear and candid countenances, in the changes of which might be traced the working of passions strong and simple, the impress of a firm and tender nature, wearing when it looked abroad the glow of sympathy, and when it looked within the ...
— English Prose - A Series of Related Essays for the Discussion and Practice • Frederick William Roe (edit. and select.)

... this coast we might see two small round hils, seeming to vs about a league one from the other, which is the Cape, and betweene them are great store of trees, and in all our dayes sailing we saw no land so high as ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of - The English Nation, Vol. 11 • Richard Hakluyt

... order to invade by land or by sea any part whatever of Greek territory thus left defenceless, or to permit the installation of Venizelist authorities in any territories actually in the possession of the Royal Government which they might see fit to occupy hereafter for military reasons. Lastly, they signified their readiness to raise the blockade as soon as special delegates should judge that the evacuation of troops and material had been partly carried out, and that its ...
— Greece and the Allies 1914-1922 • G. F. Abbott

... the steamers to coal at this point, and the party went on shore. From the deck they could see up the principal street. The French post-office, for there is also an Egyptian, was close to the wharf; and they hastened to that, for most of them had written letters to their friends at home. It was still Egypt, and the place was true to its national character; for the travellers were ...
— Asiatic Breezes - Students on The Wing • Oliver Optic

... 'that you should not be less wise than a sailor lad; think no shame to be glad when your heart bids you, whatever sorrows lie before or behind you. And I'll keep you in countenance, whenever I see your fair mournful sister reproving your gaiety with her eyes; but you must do the same by me with my father and your aunt. Is it a ...
— Andrew Golding - A Tale of the Great Plague • Anne E. Keeling

... would study law. Of course it's a little embarrassing to have her engaged at once before she's seen anything of society here, but perhaps it's all for the best, after all: the main thing is that she should be satisfied, and I can see that she's only too much so. Yes, she's very much taken with him; and I ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... he could facilitate communication with the Emperor. On that day Napoleon had been at a review. Duroc knew Madame Hatzfeld, whom he had several times seen on his visits to Berlin. When Napoleon returned from the review he was astonished to see Duroc at the palace at that hour, and inquired whether he had brought any news. Duroc answered in the affirmative, and followed the Emperor into his Cabinet, where he soon introduced Madame Hatzfeld. The remainder of the scene is described in Napoleon's letter. It may ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... our heroes and heroines of the sky to those who have not already met them, we will proceed to see how Miss Prescott receives the startling plans that her young charges are ...
— The Girl Aviators' Motor Butterfly • Margaret Burnham

... bumping along ahead of his train. But he has no need to slow up, for occasional cross-beams stick out far enough to admit of standing out of reach, and when he comes up alongside, he and the fireman look out of the window of the cab and see me squatting on the end of one of these handy beams, and letting the ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle V1 • Thomas Stevens

... more similar to the corresponding articles of the present day than one would have expected to find. But yet there were many differences, both of form and structure, which made them extremely curious to see. ...
— Rollo in Naples • Jacob Abbott

... calamities afflict a country, the people must believe themselves abandoned by the Deity; but here we ever feel the protection of heaven; we see that he interests himself for man, that he has deigned to treat him as a ...
— Corinne, Volume 1 (of 2) - Or Italy • Mme de Stael

... your idea, I'm your man," I answered. "Let me first take my bearings, and then I'll see what I can do against it. You get out of the way, but be sure to stand by to rush the passage directly the ...
— A Bid for Fortune - or Dr. Nikola's Vendetta • Guy Boothby

... the end, I could see three of him in the ring at once, an' I wouldn't know which to hit an' ...
— The Valley of the Moon • Jack London

... Norman knows nothing of this. She simply asked me to give you the money. This is my own doing entirely. You see, I must exercise my judgment on my dear niece's behalf. Of course it may not be necessary to show her the receipt; but if it should ever be advisable it is ...
— The Man • Bram Stoker

... withdraw millions of miles into space: it looks smaller and smaller. We lose sight of those distinctive spires of flame, those terrible movements. It only gives an even effulgence, a steady unflickering light. Turn one quarter round. Still we see our world, but it ...
— Recreations in Astronomy - With Directions for Practical Experiments and Telescopic Work • Henry Warren

... executed by the late Lord Leighton. The fine roads and splendid scenery might occupy at least a day if time permitted; but if, like us, one must hasten onward, a run over the main roads of New Forest will give opportunity to see much of its ...
— British Highways And Byways From A Motor Car - Being A Record Of A Five Thousand Mile Tour In England, - Wales And Scotland • Thomas D. Murphy

... Sacrament, which as the minister told him, could not be given him by the canon without his confession. Yet this did not prevail; he said he would die without receiving it, as he had before answered a French minister, who said, Lewis Houssart, since you are condemned on full evidence, and I see no reason but to believe you guilty, I must, as a just pastor, inform you that if you persist in this denial, and die without confession, you can look for nothing but to be d——; to which Houssart replied, You must look ...
— Lives Of The Most Remarkable Criminals Who have been Condemned and Executed for Murder, the Highway, Housebreaking, Street Robberies, Coining or other offences • Arthur L. Hayward

... which man feels that he is originally passive, namely, his observations and emotions. He is here impelled by the eager wish to know whether the power which has produced them in him be not something foreign and unworthy. Hence we see man employed, from his very childhood, in communicating those observations and emotions; the conceptions of his understanding, concerning whose origin there can be no doubt, he allows to rest in his own mind, and still more easily he determines to refrain from the expression ...
— The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: - Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English, Volume 5. • Various

... assent to the things which are of faith, we may observe a twofold cause, one of external inducement, such as seeing a miracle, or being persuaded by someone to embrace the faith: neither of which is a sufficient cause, since of those who see the same miracle, or who hear the same sermon, some believe, and some do not. Hence we must assert another internal cause, which moves man inwardly to assent to matters ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... aye get on with the gaffer," replied Robertson, "an' I dinna see what way ither folk canna do ...
— The Underworld - The Story of Robert Sinclair, Miner • James C. Welsh

... visitors were welcomed by the men, women, and children of the trading post. There were Mr. and Mrs. Bradley, who where anxious to see the children, a young Puritan pastor, who had recently come from England, and to whom the new settlement in the woods was assigned, and among other great and distinguished men, Captain John ...
— Three Young Pioneers - A Story of the Early Settlement of Our Country • John Theodore Mueller

... healing to make me try it; I had no great hope of getting any good from it—it was a CHANCE I tried, partly because my thought was interested by the new possibility it seemed to open, partly because it was the only chance I then could see. I went to X in Boston, from whom some friends of mine had got, or thought they had got, great help; the treatment was a silent one; little was said, and that little carried no conviction to my mind, whatever influence was exerted was that of another person's ...
— The Varieties of Religious Experience • William James

... and a time to haue been, when man was not. For saie thei, the begynner of thynges visible, wrapped vp bothe heauen and earth at one instant, togither in one paterne, and so a distinction growing on betwixte these meynte bodies, the worlde to haue begon in suche ordre as we see. The aire by nature to be continually mouyng, and the moste firie parte of thesame, for the lightenesse thereof, moste highe to haue climbed. So that sonne and Moone, and the planetes all, participatyng ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries - Vol. II • Richard Hakluyt

... impressions which are more or less different from one another—let us say that out of ten impressions in each, six are the same in all, and four are different from all the rest—are successively presented to the mind, it is easy to see what must be the nature of the result. The repetition of the six similar impressions will strengthen the six corresponding elements of the complex idea, which will therefore acquire greater vividness; while the four differing impressions of each will not only acquire no greater strength ...
— Hume - (English Men of Letters Series) • T.H. Huxley

... And this he set about doing loyally. He retained McKinley's Cabinet,* who were working out the adjustments already agreed upon. McKinley was probably the best-natured President who ever occupied the White House. He instinctively shrank from hurting anybody's feelings. Persons who went to see him in dudgeon, to complain against some act which displeased them, found him "a bower of roses," too sweet and soft to be treated harshly. He could say "no" to applicants for office so gently that they felt no resentment. For twenty years he had advocated ...
— Theodore Roosevelt; An Intimate Biography, • William Roscoe Thayer

... "You see how matters stand, beloved. Either I must surrender myself, or all these brave men must perish, and we with them. For myself, I am ready to die, but I am not willing that you and they should die. Also, if I yield, I can do no worse than die, whereas perchance after ...
— The Wanderer's Necklace • H. Rider Haggard

... see it all; now I see it all. What threatens to be your ruin, Antonio, is this man's hatred against me. For I must tell you that this nephew of the Pope's, a proud, coarse, boorish clown, was amongst the animals in my picture to whom the ...
— Weird Tales. Vol. I • E. T. A. Hoffmann

... passage from Sybil, in which Lord Beaconsfield described the same event. And yet, as far as my observation has gone, the citations from this fine description have always stopped short just at the opening of the most appropriate passage; my readers, at any rate, shall see it and judge it for themselves. If there is one feature in the national life of the last sixty years on which Englishmen may justly pride themselves it is the amelioration of the social condition of the workers. ...
— Collections and Recollections • George William Erskine Russell

... his stand, whip in hand, just inside the cage, with Hansen opposite him, to see that the animals, on entry, went each straight to his own bench or pedestal. Any mistake in this connection was sure to lead to trouble, each beast being almost childishly jealous of its rights. Inside the long passage an attendant was opening one cage ...
— Kings in Exile • Sir Charles George Douglas Roberts

... but this could not everywhere be the case: for in the next broad street I had to cross, and, unfortunately for me, at the very hour in which the boys were coming out of school, a humpbacked lout of a fellow—I see him yet—soon made the discovery that I was without a shadow, and communicated the news, with loud outcries, to a knot of young urchins. The whole swarm proceeded immediately to reconnoitre me, and to pelt me with mud. "People," cried they, "are generally accustomed to take their shadows with them ...
— Peter Schlemihl etc. • Chamisso et. al.

... they not done! We see towns spring up in a few years where only a few cottages formerly stood, and wild glens transformed into fruitful valleys, by means of railways in their neighbourhood developing traffic and trade, and creating employment by placing them in communication with larger towns, and thus ...
— Lectures on Popular and Scientific Subjects • John Sutherland Sinclair, Earl of Caithness

... showed me the idol of jealousy, to which the Israelites burned incense; and the angel of the Lord said to me: Thou seest the abominations which the children of Israel commit, in turning away from my sanctuary; thou shalt see ...
— The Phantom World - or, The philosophy of spirits, apparitions, &c, &c. • Augustin Calmet

... predecessors, or look forward along the course which modern research is disclosing, we shall honour most in him not the rounded merit of finite accomplishment, but the creative power by which he inaugurated a line of discovery endless in variety and extension. Let us attempt thus to see his work in true perspective between the past from which it grew, and the present which is its consequence. Darwin attacked the problem of Evolution by reference to facts of three classes: Variation; Heredity; Natural Selection. His work was not as the laity suppose, a sudden and unheralded ...
— Evolution in Modern Thought • Ernst Haeckel

... had fallen down upon the Temple of Time, demolishing it and leaving only ruins. It had also fallen on a strip of the city, taking with it several buildings and leaving only rubble. The King, Wagner, and Bernibus could just barely be seen amongst the crowds that had dashed out of doors to see what was going on, and I could tell that Bernibus was smiling at my escape as he looked at my wind sailor a thousand feet in the air. A friend who rejoices in your advancement, even at his own cost, ...
— The Revolutions of Time • Jonathan Dunn

... found himself on the free highway once more, he faltered. He would see how Sylvia bore herself in the new surroundings before he put it all behind him. This time he found a bit of shade and a fence rail for the too friendly nag, and entering the Jenks-Smith grounds afoot, followed the crowd that ...
— People of the Whirlpool • Mabel Osgood Wright

... science, says Bloom. It's only a natural phenomenon, don't you see, because on account ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... was. I forgot that. Well, it don't much matter, for there's a prettier girl than Eve here. Don't you see her? Martha, I think they called her—down there by the summer-'ouse, feedin' the hanimals, or ...
— Dusty Diamonds Cut and Polished - A Tale of City Arab Life and Adventure • R.M. Ballantyne

... by the fall. He heard, though he did not see, the escape of Sunnysides; and for one black moment all in the present was blotted out. But that was only the dizziness, and the reeling pain in his head; and there was the sky filled with gray-black, contending clouds; and ...
— The Heart of Thunder Mountain • Edfrid A. Bingham

... wailing if from the shore we see a small boat overturned, and human beings miserably perishing! Here, however, not one boat-load, but the entire world of men perish in the waters; a world composed not only of grown persons, but also babes; not only of criminal and wicked ones, but also simple-hearted matrons and virgins. They ...
— Commentary on Genesis, Vol. II - Luther on Sin and the Flood • Martin Luther

... The sleeper's first vision of it was given him by Dr. Leete, who took him to the house top and let him see the Boston of the future. Wide avenues replace the crowded, noisy streets. There are no shops but only here and there among the trees great marble buildings, the emporiums from which the goods are delivered to ...
— The Unsolved Riddle of Social Justice • Stephen Leacock

... to see the warrant, and for the first time learned the nature of the accusation; he then sent a messenger after Mr. Tippit, and that gentleman, in compliance with the summons, soon made his appearance. Him Pownal engaged ...
— The Lost Hunter - A Tale of Early Times • John Turvill Adams

... Britannica, 7 vols. folio, 1747. Concerning the discussion on 1 John, v. 7, consult Darling, Cyclopaedia Bibliographia; London, 1854. For other Unitarian publications, in addition to those mentioned below, see Beard, Unitarianism in its Actual Condition, ...
— History of Rationalism Embracing a Survey of the Present State of Protestant Theology • John F. Hurst

... See despatch from the Governor of Natal to Admiral Harris, dated 9.3.00, and letter from the Colonial Office ...
— History of the War in South Africa 1899-1902 v. 1 (of 4) - Compiled by Direction of His Majesty's Government • Frederick Maurice

... was unintelligible to them, as was theirs to him, although they addressed him in several of the dialects of New South Wales, and some few of the most common words of the South Sea islands. With some difficulty they made him comprehend their wish to see his place of residence. He pointed over the hills, and proceeded onwards; but his pace was slow and wandering, and he often stopped under pretence of having lost the track; which led them to suspect that his only aim was to amuse ...
— An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 2 • David Collins

... wary, therefore, what persecutions we raise against the living labours of public men; how we spill that seasoned life of man preserved and stored up in books; since we see a kind of homicide may be thus committed, sometimes a martyrdom, and, if it extend to the whole impression, a kind of massacre, whereof the execution ends not in the slaying of an elemental life, but strikes at that ethereal and fifth essence, the ...
— The Glory of English Prose - Letters to My Grandson • Stephen Coleridge

... Disturbance employed his Thought till Morning, when rising and dressing himself very richly, he walked to the appointed Place. Erizo, who was the Gentleman whose Sword he had broke, was in the Place before him; and Gonzago entered at the same Time with him. Erizo, was surprized to see Gonzago, as much as he was to find Erizo there. 'I don't remember, Friend (said Gonzago) that I desired your Company here this Morning.' 'As much as I expected yours,' answered Erizo. 'Come, Gentlemen, (said Dangerfield, interrupting them) I must fight you ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn - Volume V • Aphra Behn

... wealth acquired in this land. The plan lost its charms for me long ago—I would not have gone if I could have helped it—and now it is impossible. It has perished in flame and smoke. Mr. Fleet, you see before you a simple American girl. I claim and wish to be known in no other character. If nothing remains of my father's fortune I shall teach either ...
— Barriers Burned Away • E. P. Roe

... it!" she answered enthusiastically. "And I may never see it all again," she added ...
— Whosoever Shall Offend • F. Marion Crawford

... notice. He was sunk in silent reverie poking at his pipe. In spite of his confidence in the Almighty's increased goodwill towards the present dispensation, he was not prepared to say for certain what 'Lias Dawson did or didn't see. ...
— The History of David Grieve • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... the germ of your disorder," said the old man, "the great point is gained. I will see ...
— The Bee-Man of Orn and Other Fanciful Tales • Frank R. Stockton

... see Hanging down her head t'wards me, Guess I may what I must be: First, I shall decline my head; Secondly, I shall be dead; ...
— The Folk-lore of Plants • T. F. Thiselton-Dyer

... shows himself in his prose, Emerson shows himself in his verse. Only when he gets into rhythm and rhyme he lets us see more of his personality, he ventures upon more audacious imagery, his flight is higher and swifter, his brief crystalline sentences have dissolved and pour in continuous streams. Where they came from, or whither they flow to empty themselves, ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... into the barrow, and right dark it was, and a smell there was therein none of the sweetest. Now he groped about to see how things were below; first he found horse-bones, and then he stumbled against the arm of a high-chair, and in that chair found a man sitting; great treasures of gold and silver were heaped together there, and a small chest was set ...
— The Story of Grettir The Strong • Translated by Eirikr Magnusson and William Morris

... starlit night. The words of Maynard, the passionate resentment of her cousin toward the young captain merely added to the heavy burden of experience which had been crowded into the past few weeks. "Oh," she sighed longingly, "if I could only see Allan Scoville! He is so strong, unselfish and restful. I could tell him everything. He would know just how weary and depressed I am, nor would he want me to do what I can't, what I'm not ready for. Oh, what ...
— Miss Lou • E. P. Roe

... just now," he said to Captain Shaw, who still glowered from the rocking-chair. "Your young folks seemed to be havin' a great time. Well, I like to see young folks happy. They generally be," he chuckled maliciously; "'tis we old ones have the worst of it, soon as they begin to want ...
— The Life of Nancy • Sarah Orne Jewett

... on interior decorations from Proverbs vii, 16; "I have woven my bed with cords, I have covered it with painted tapestry brought from Egypt." There were painted tapestries made in Western Europe at a very early date, and collectors eagerly seek them (see Plate XIV). In the fourteenth century these painted tapestries were ...
— The Art of Interior Decoration • Grace Wood

... April, and all the vexation of the day came surging over her, almost spoiling her dinner and the pleasure of the evening. Almost—not quite! When you are "young and very sweet, with the jasmine in your hair," and have only to raise your eyes to see desire of you sitting unashamed in the eyes of the man you love, nothing can quite spoil your gladness of living. All the same, she stuck to the card-room the whole evening, and her resolution to give Sarle no chance of saying anything he might regret. He must have realized it after a ...
— Blue Aloes - Stories of South Africa • Cynthia Stockley

... to see, from the first day of the Revolution to the last, in all the provinces fighting for freedom, that there is not a single man who lacks bread, not a single woman compelled to stand with the wearied crowd outside the bakehouse-door, that haply a ...
— The Conquest of Bread • Peter Kropotkin

... hurried, down with her hair disheveled, threw herself at his feet, implored his pardon, and vowed constancy for the future. The King, overcome with the well-dissembled agonies of this beauty, raised her up, took her in his arms, and protested no man could see her, and not love her: he waited on her to her lodging, and there compleated the reconciliation. This easy behaviour of the King, had, with many other instances of the same kind, determined my lord Hallifax to assert, "That the love of King Charles II, lay as much ...
— The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753) - Volume II • Theophilus Cibber

... a bright lookout and prevent her doing that same," answered Jack. "Give her another shot from Long Tom, and we will see if that has a ...
— The Three Lieutenants • W.H.G. Kingston

... probably not admitted to their full confidence, as Aguinaldo and his immediate following wanted and were working for independence and independence alone, while the Filipinos who had long lived in Hongkong wanted to see the archipelago lost to Spain, but had no confidence in the ability of the country to stand alone or in the fitness of Aguinaldo and his following to direct the councils of a state. The character of the new refugees did not inspire confidence in these older men, who hoped ...
— The Philippines: Past and Present (vol. 1 of 2) • Dean C. Worcester

... while he whistled long and loud He heard a fierce mermaiden cry, 'O boy, tho' thou art young and proud, I see the place where thou ...
— Enoch Arden, &c. • Alfred Tennyson

... Minister of Foreign Affairs, had, on the 20th of March, 1815, quitted the department of the Interior; and by an Imperial decree of the 23rd of the same month, his office of Secretary-General was conferred upon Baron Basset de Chateaubourg, formerly Prefect (see the 'Bulletin des Lois,' no. v. p. 34). The notice in the 'Moniteur' of the 14th of May, 1815, page 546, did not refer to M. Francois Guizot, but to M. Jean-Jacques Guizot, head-clerk at that time in the Ministry of the Interior, who was ...
— Memoirs To Illustrate The History Of My Time - Volume 1 • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... figure of a youth, denoting activity, with the motto, "The cloud of Jehovah rest on them, even when they go forth out of the camp." Here we have the origin of the cloud on the seal. And when we remember that Manasseh was brought up at the foot of the Pyramid, and could see it from his palace home at Memphis, then we get a cue to the figure of the Pyramid on ...
— The Lost Ten Tribes, and 1882 • Joseph Wild

... I cannot sleep. Every thing my eye rests on is harsh and ungraceful, because, having passed through the seven-times heated furnace, I must look through the covering and see ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, February 1844 - Volume 23, Number 2 • Various

... to see him; I miss him every day; My heart is weary with waiting, And sick of the long delay,— But I know his country needs him, And I ...
— Ballads • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... family fall a prey to Indian treachery, cannot be expected to hold any ultra-humanitarian views upon the subject. He has not been brought in contact with the several partially-civilized tribes, in whose advancement many see possibilities for the whole race. He cannot understand why the government allows the Indians to roam over enormous tracts of land, rich in minerals they will never extract and containing agricultural possibilities ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. XXVI., December, 1880. • Various

... others a diamond, hath excellent virtue, contra hostium injurias, et conjugatos invicem conciliare, to reconcile men and wives, to maintain unity and love; you may try this when you will, and as you see cause. If none of all these means and cautions will take place, I know not what remedy to prescribe, or whither such persons may go for ease, except they can get into the same [6297]Turkey paradise, ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... not from here— Although thy separate self do not appear; If I could part the light from out the day, There I should have thee! But thou art too near: How find thee walking, when thou art the way? Oh, present Christ! make my eyes keen as stings, To see thee at their heart, the glory ...
— A Book of Strife in the Form of The Diary of an Old Soul • George MacDonald

... ballad purposes; no one feels the necessity of apology either for ruthless aggression or for useless blood-letting; the scene is reported as it was presented to the eye of the spectator, not to his moralizing faculty. He is expected to see and to sing, not to scrutinize and meditate. In those rare cases in which a moral inference is drawn, it is always so obvious and elementary that it gives the impression of having been fastened on at the end of the song, in deference to ...
— The Book of Old English Ballads • George Wharton Edwards

... of the old bronze hatchet, perhaps the most wonderful civilizing agent ever invented by human ingenuity. Let us hark back now, and from the opposite side see what was ...
— Science in Arcady • Grant Allen

... "You see that clump of bushes on the other side of the road?" I said. "There's a path to the left of it. I took that path and he took this. We parted at the ...
— The Return of Dr. Fu-Manchu • Sax Rohmer

... on the open moor, with the lark soaring overhead, and the butterflies and bees hovering among the sweet-smelling furze blossoms, to see horses free and joyous, with no thought of bit or bridle, harness or saddle, whose hoofs had never been handled by the shoeing-smith, nor their coats touched with the singeing iron. Those little colts, with their thick heads, shaggy coats, and flowing tails, will have at least ...
— A Book of Natural History - Young Folks' Library Volume XIV. • Various

... begin. Brian de Bois-Gilbert stood ready for the combat, but a champion was still wanting for the appellant. Lest Jew or Pagan should charge the court with injustice, the Grand Master declared his readiness to wait till the shadows were in the west, to see if a champion would appear for the culprit. But the general belief prevailed that no one would stand up for her; and the craven knights whispered to each other, when the day was far gone, that the time had come for declaring the pledge of ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... mentally, morally, and aesthetically to be a thing of beauty in your eyes and a joy for ever. Alas, you have no vision for the beautiful and intrinsically complete; you can't appreciate an aristocracy when you see one. We have even flung open our parks and grounds for your benefit, and let you admire our mansions, and you knocked down the ornaments, and smudged the tapestry and the antimacassars, and trod on the flower-beds, and pulled up the young trees, and ...
— 'That Very Mab' • May Kendall and Andrew Lang

... he had previously caused to be investigated,) alluding circumstantially to the leading facts in their personal or family career; a furlough accompanied this letter, and they were requested to repair to Paris, where the emperor anxiously desired to see them. Thus was the paternal interest expressed, which their leader took in each man's fortunes; and the effect of every such letter, it was not doubted, would diffuse itself through ten thousand ...
— The Caesars • Thomas de Quincey

... fleet!" exclaims another man; "It's useless now,—it has no work to do! But let France use her navy all she can, You'll see if Prussia ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 22, August 27, 1870 • Various

... it's squeak! squeak! squeak! Far and farther crawls the wire! To crowd and pinch another inch Is all their heart's desire. The world is over-stocked with men, And some will see the day When each must keep his little pen, ...
— Songs of the Cattle Trail and Cow Camp • Various

... Macleod called out, "you will take the dog—here is the string; and you will see he does ...
— Macleod of Dare • William Black

... Where do you suppose I came in? Still, I'll say no more about it, for I see you are trying to pump me. Let it pass. How do you find the state ...
— Cupid's Middleman • Edward B. Lent

... returned. "Nor can I make a whole book out of only one character. But I am going to try and draw a word picture of the West by writing of the things that I see. And I am going to try and have some real characters in it. I shall try to have them talk ...
— The Two-Gun Man • Charles Alden Seltzer

... to swim if you just sit on the beach and dream," reminded Marjorie. "I feel that it's my stern duty to see that your education as a water paddler is not ...
— Marjorie Dean - High School Sophomore • Pauline Lester

... museum at Paris. In 1826, while on a visit at Tours, whither he had gone to see his mother-in-law, he was engaged to assess a "Virgin" by Valentin and a "Christ" by Lebrun, paintings which Abbe Francois Birotteau had inherited from Abbe Chapeloud, having left them in an apartment recently ...
— Repertory Of The Comedie Humaine, Complete, A — Z • Anatole Cerfberr and Jules Franois Christophe

... tree; a wood-cutter, a fisherman, or a house, opens for the spectator a vista that may be interpreted by the intelligent. A veritable picture is a window that reveals a landscape. That which is most valuable in a gallery like this is the perfect truth not everywhere found, for the eyes that see a picture that is really representative, setting forth the colors, the light, and the substance of things find that which does not fade when ...
— The Story of the Philippines and Our New Possessions, • Murat Halstead

... Pipes of an inch bore, the 'best known conduit' for the parallel drains. (See Evidence before Lords' Committee on Entailed Estates, ...
— Farm drainage • Henry Flagg French

... allowed to carry away their "goods" with them. This was well, for otherwise how would they buy the wherewithal to live? Very well; these people were all to go out by the one gate, and at the time set for them to depart we young fellows went to that gate, along with the Dwarf, to see the march-out. Presently here they came in an interminable file, the foot-soldiers in the lead. As they approached one could see that each bore a burden of a bulk and weight to sorely tax his strength; and we said among ourselves, truly these folk are well off for poor common ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... shalt be sure of, Marian, The doctor's wealth will keep thee royally: Besides, thou shalt be ever near thy friends, That will not see thee wrong'd by any man. Say then, wilt ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VIII (4th edition) • Various

... only because I cannot see our men, who have fought so bravely and who have endured extreme hardship and danger so uncomplainingly, go to destruction without striving so far as lies in me to avert a doom as fearful as it ...
— Rough Riders • Theodore Roosevelt

... said to Sir Tristram: It is shame to see the lord's cousin of this place defoiled. Abide, said Sir Tristram, and I shall redress it. And in the meanwhile Sir Dinadan was on horseback, and he jousted with Lucan the butler, and there Sir Lucan smote Dinadan through the thick of the thigh, and so he rode his way; and Sir Tristram was ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... puffed out his chest as he spoke. He must, I think, have rather fancied himself in the part of a twentieth century Puritan horse soldier. I looked round at O'Donovan to see how he was taking the suggestion. Oliver Cromwell I supposed, could not possibly be one of his favourite heroes. But I had misjudged O'Donovan. His sympathy with rebels of all nations was evidently stronger than his dislike of the typical ...
— The Red Hand of Ulster • George A. Birmingham

... irruption of the Northern Barbarians has there been the like. Everywhere immeasurable Democracy rose monstrous, loud, blatant, inarticulate as the voice of Chaos. Everywhere the Official holy-of-holies was scandalously laid bare to dogs and the profane:—Enter, all the world, see what kind of Official holy it is. Kings everywhere, and reigning persons, stared in sudden horror, the voice of the whole world bellowing in their ear, "Begone, ye imbecile hypocrites, histrios not heroes! Off with you, off!" and, what was peculiar and notable in this year for the first ...
— Latter-Day Pamphlets • Thomas Carlyle

... exists for three years is a success. That no industrial community had ever endured for three years, save as it was founded on a religious concept, was a fact that he overlooked. Also, he failed to see that the second generation of communists did not coalesce, and as a result that thirty-three years was the age limit for even a successful community; and that, if it still survived, it was because it was reorganized under a ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Volume 11 (of 14) - Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Businessmen • Elbert Hubbard

... here be raised whether it is possible to reduce all the causes of crime to causes in the social environment—that is, all subjective causes to objective. Many writers have contended that this is possible, but we shall see that there are causes in heredity and causes in psychological conditions, to say nothing of some possible free will in individuals, which cannot be derived from social conditions and which would produce crime quite independent of objective social conditions, unless these subjective factors were ...
— Sociology and Modern Social Problems • Charles A. Ellwood

... eight blazed forth, and their contents, consisting of round-shot with a charge of grape on top of each, went hurtling through the air in the direction of the boats. The aim was excellent, the shot flashing up the water all round the boats; but, so far as I could see, not a man among either of their crews was touched. I heard Mendouca cheer his men on, urging them to stretch out, and get so close to the ship, that by the time that the guns were again loaded, it would be impossible to depress the muzzles sufficiently ...
— The Pirate Slaver - A Story of the West African Coast • Harry Collingwood

... Maitland, having been summoned to the flag-ship of Lord Keith, acquainted General Bertrand that he would convey to the Admiral anything which Bonaparte (who had expressed an urgent wish to see his lordship) might desire to say to him. Bertrand requested the captain to delay his departure until a document, then in preparation, should be completed: the "PROTEST OF HIS MAJESTY THE LATE EMPEROR OF THE ...
— Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte, Complete • Louis Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne

... coming years, as life grew less busy, to see more of my old playmate, and this is a very unexpected blow. Be sure I sympathize with you most tenderly, and could not resist the impulse to tell you so. Little as we have met, I owe to your kind and frank interest in me a sense of very ...
— As I Remember - Recollections of American Society during the Nineteenth Century • Marian Gouverneur

... when ye see Jerusalem compassed with armies, then know that her desolation is at hand. 21 Then let them that are in Judaea flee unto the mountains; and let them that are in the midst of her depart out; and let not ...
— The Gospel of Luke, An Exposition • Charles R. Erdman

... most hospitable institution in the world toward "wet paint," still turns away very many more canvases than it admits. Their departure is like the retreat of the Ten Thousand. Into the Salon one year six thousand eager frames crowded, but when the public came to see, only thirteen hundred were left to tell ...
— Without Prejudice • Israel Zangwill

... flies than a wild gander!" he mused, watching the great bird curiously and with a certain sympathy. "We'll see what happens when another flock ...
— The Watchers of the Trails - A Book of Animal Life • Charles G. D. Roberts

... would like you to cash, and pay the captain, whose name we do not know, the money we took from his desk. We hope that what is left will square up for the clothes and money we took from your room. You see, as we did not give Casey but a little of the money, and it came in mighty handy for us two when we got ashore, it seems that we are obligated to return it. I will only say, to conclude, that we ...
— The Wreck of the Titan - or, Futility • Morgan Robertson

... and blessedness therein. Things that loomed large dwindle, and dangers melt away. The landscape is the same in shadow and sunshine; but when the sun comes out, even snow and ice sparkle, and tender beauty starts into visibility in grim things. So, if we see God, the black places of life are lighted; and we cease to feel the pressure of many difficulties of speculation and practice, both as regards His general providence and His revelation in ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... her belt of rivers flows in two opposite ways. Yesterday you crossed the North Platte, almost at its source (for it rises out of the snow among the Wind-River Mountains, and out of your stage-windows you can see, from Laramie Plains, the Lander's Peak which Bierstadt has made immortal); that stream runs into the sea from whose historic shores you came; you might drop a waif upon its ripples with the hope of its reaching New Orleans, New York, Boston, ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 78, April, 1864 • Various

... you for making me smile, for I assure you I want it. I wish—if you would not think me encroaching upon your politeness in honouring me with this visit—You see," continued he, opening the doors of the back drawing-room, and pointing to large packages, "you see we are all preparing for a march: my mother has left town half an hour ago—my father engaged to dine abroad—only I at home—and, in ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. 6 • Maria Edgeworth

... here am I in the dress circle, private box," said Tortillard, seating himself at the top of the stairs. He raised the light to endeavor to see what was going on in the cellar, but the darkness was too great; so faint a light could not dissipate it. Bras-Rouge's hopeful could distinguish nothing. The struggle between the Schoolmaster and La Chouette was silent and furious, without a word, without a cry. Only, from time ...
— The Mysteries of Paris V2 • Eugene Sue

... who is to slay his mother's suitors; he sees, too, the possible fate of his father. Ulysses has essentially the same problem as Agamemnon, though he has not the faithless wife in addition; Telemachus beholds his duty in the deed of Orestes, according to Greek consciousness. We shall see hereafter how Ulysses takes due precaution not to be slain in his own land, as Agamemnon was. In disguise he will go to his own palace and carefully note the situation in advance, and then ...
— Homer's Odyssey - A Commentary • Denton J. Snider

... through the land,—internecine wars, rebellions, and massacres, such as marked the history of India until our rule became well established there. Lord Ripon closed his eyes to all this—doctrinaire at heart, he could see nothing but his own crotchets. The native, he declared, must have local self-government. But Baron Huebner found that the people did not understand or desire this much vaunted contrivance. The native, he says, 'refuses to be elected by his ...
— The Quarterly Review, Volume 162, No. 324, April, 1886 • Various

... but still their country! A land of telegraphs, which told in an instant, as they landed on the levee, that all the twenty-nine were well, and begged them to be at the college on Tuesday evening, so as to see "Much Ado about Nothing." For at Antioch they act a play the night before Commencement. A land of Pullman's palace-cars. And lo! they secured sections 5 and 6, 7 and 8, in the "Mayflower." Just time to kiss ...
— The Brick Moon, et. al. • Edward Everett Hale

... the revolt in Dresden occurred, which, as a sort of forlorn hope, he thought might be the beginning of a general uprising in Germany. "After what has been said, who could be so blind as not to see that I had now no choice but to turn my back upon a world, to which no ties of sympathy bound me," he says, thus clearly indicating his active participation in the May-revolt. It was not long before the Prussians appeared, who had only waited the signal from ...
— Life of Wagner - Biographies of Musicians • Louis Nohl



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