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Revocation   /rˌɛvəkˈeɪʃən/   Listen
Revocation

noun
1.
The state of being cancelled or annulled.  Synonym: annulment.
2.
The act (by someone having the authority) of annulling something previously done.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Revocation" Quotes from Famous Books



... Like the royal power of those days, you won in fact, while you lost in right. Political Protestantism has gained an ascendancy over people's minds. If you have no mind to issue your Edict of Nantes; or if, when it is issued, you publish a Revocation; if you should one day be accused and convicted of repudiating the Charter, which is simply a pledge given to maintain the interests established under the Republic, then the Revolution will rise again, terrible in her strength, and strike but a single blow. It will not be the ...
— The Thirteen • Honore de Balzac

... pressing upon the matter of the will, and the marquise, to whom this insistence seemed rather alarming, began to experience some of her former fears. Finally, the abbe pressed her so hard as to make her reflect that since, after the precautions which she had taken at Avignon, a revocation could have no result, it would be better to seem to yield rather than irritate this man, who inspired her with so great a fear, by constant and obstinate refusals. The next time that he returned to the subject she accordingly replied that she was ready to offer her husband this ...
— CELEBRATED CRIMES, COMPLETE - THE MARQUISE DE GANGES—1657 • ALEXANDRE DUMAS, PERE

... English State still professes the form of Protestant Christianity defined in the Prayer-book, and "tolerates" dissenters from it as the Christian States of the middle ages tolerated the Jews, and as in France, during the interval between the promulgation of the Edict of Nantes and its revocation, a State definitely and even pronouncedly Catholic tolerated the Huguenots. Each dissentient religious body claims its right to exist in virtue of some specific Act of Parliament. Theoretically it is still an exception, though the exceptions have ...
— A History of the United States • Cecil Chesterton

... can practically, as well as doctrinally, confute the Jesuitical equivocations and mental reservations. And if this must needs be the sense which now the reverend brother gives, and was the sense intended, why saith he that he did publicly recal that declaration? He might make a revocation of it, in the sense wherein I understood it: but how could he make a revocation of it as himself understood it, and as he saith the sense must needs be? Was this his sorrow for our taking offence at a Scripture truth, a sorrow to be sorrowed for? Why did he not rather make a second declaration ...
— The Works of Mr. George Gillespie (Vol. 1 of 2) • George Gillespie

... the company, there were hard words said in the town offices of Messrs. Trewhitt and Slocumb, Chiawassee attorneys, and a torrent of persuasive ones poured into the Major's ear—the latter pointing to the crying necessity for the revocation of the power of attorney, ...
— The Quickening • Francis Lynde

... Seventy Years; but when he left Avignon they came to terms with Charles VI. of France, and so the Diois was united to Dauphine in 1404. Louis XIV. restored the separate bishopric, but ruined the town by the revocation of the Edict ...
— Ice-Caves of France and Switzerland • George Forrest Browne

... (1679-1767), a learned Frenchman, was born of Protestant parents at Uzes, in Languedoc. His father died when he was but two years of age; and when, on the revocation of the edict of Nantes in 1685, the authorities took steps to have him educated in the Roman Catholic faith, his mother contrived his escape. For two years his brother and he lived as fugitives in the mountains of the Cevennes, but they at ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... either a major previous violation or more than one minor citation. Again, the driver would have been under immediate arrest. The law was mandatory. One big strike and you're out—two foul tips and the same story. And "out" meant just that. Fines, possibly jail or prison sentence and lifetime revocation of driving privileges. ...
— Code Three • Rick Raphael

... relating to taxes and conscription, I order the Hungarian crown to be returned to Ofen, and, as soon as I shall have recovered from my illness, I promise to take the coronation-oath. [Footnote: This is the revocation edict, which, promulgated a few weeks before the death of Joseph, caused such astonishment throughout Europe—Gross-Hoffinger, iii., p. 290.] Write this out and bring it to me for signature. Then deliver it into the ...
— Joseph II. and His Court • L. Muhlbach

... sentence does not remove. In short, as applicable to your case, it becomes virtually a complete and formal attestation of your innocence. Alban Morley will take care to apprise those of your old friends who may yet survive, of that revocation of unjust obloquy, which this royal deed implies—Alban Morley, who would turn his back on the highest noble in Britain if but guilty of some jockey trick on the turf! Live henceforth openly, and in broad daylight if you please; and trust to us three—the Soldier, ...
— What Will He Do With It, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... know why I am here, and under his name. Enough for you that it has saved your child's future, and secured him his heritage past all revocation. Yet remember! a word from you within the next few days destroys it all. After that, I ...
— Two Men of Sandy Bar - A Drama • Bret Harte

... in 1528. The lands of Laggan Achidrom, being four merks, the three merks of Killianan, and the four merk lands of Invergarry, being in the King's hands, were disposed by him to John Mackenzie, after the King's minority and revocation, in 1540, with a precept, under the Great Seal, and sasine thereupon by Sir John Robertson in January 1541. But before this, in 1521, he acquired the lands of Fodderty and mill thereof from Mr John Cadell, ...
— History Of The Mackenzies • Alexander Mackenzie

... which was afterwards approved by parliament. The poor girl was in this extremity when, happily for her, M. de Mandeville, a worthy man from either Normandy or Picardy, who had served in the black musketeers, resolved upon attempting the revocation of the severe sentence which had been passed upon her, by addressing the king thro' my mediation; he accordingly followed me to Marly, where I then was, and lost no time in forwarding to me the following billet:— "MADAME,— Beauty has ever been found the inseparable ...
— "Written by Herself" • Baron Etienne Leon Lamothe-Langon

... principles similar to those of the Society of Friends. They were descendants of the Camisards, a sect of Protestants who took refuge in the mountains of the Cevennes during the persecution which followed the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, and were descended originally from the Albigenses. Their three most distinguished pastors were Claude Brousson, who took part in the sufferings at the general persecution of the Protestants; Jean Cavalier, the soldier-pastor who led ...
— Elizabeth Fry • Mrs. E. R. Pitman

... people of the United States, as appropriate. The Secretary shall exercise primary responsibility for providing such advisories or warnings. (b) Required Elements.—In administering the Homeland Security Advisory System, the Secretary shall— (1) establish criteria for the issuance and revocation of such advisories or warnings; (2) develop a methodology, relying on the criteria established under paragraph (1), for the issuance and revocation of such advisories or warnings; (3) provide, in each ...
— Homeland Security Act of 2002 - Updated Through October 14, 2008 • Committee on Homeland Security, U.S. House of Representatives

... that this is still 'the election,' the ignorant election of the common-weal which is under criticism, and though this election has been revoked in the play already, and this is a banished man we are trying here, there was a play in progress when this play was played, in which that revocation was yet to come off; and this Poet was anxious that the subject should be considered first from the most comprehensive grounds, so that the principle of 'the election' need never again be called in question, so that the revolution should end in the state, and ...
— The Philosophy of the Plays of Shakspere Unfolded • Delia Bacon

... born, in 1661. Here, also, it was that Mme. de Maintenon first appeared at the councils, and that the king publicly asked her advice as to whether he should accept the throne of Spain for the Duc d' Anjou. Here, also, in 1685, he signed the revocation of the edict of Nantes. The great Cond died in the palace. Louis XV. was married here to Marie Leczinska in 1725; and here the Dauphin, his son, died in 1765. Louis XIV. delighted in Fontainebleau for its ...
— Seeing Europe with Famous Authors, Volume 3 • Various

... influenced by Eusebius of Nicomedia who, by powerful court interest, was soon recalled from exile and even became the leading ecclesiastical adviser of Constantine. The policy of this bishop was to prepare the way for the revocation of the decree of Nicaea by a preliminary rehabilitation of Arius (a), and by attacking the leaders of the opposite party (b). Constantine, however, never consented to the abrogation of the creed ...
— A Source Book for Ancient Church History • Joseph Cullen Ayer, Jr., Ph.D.

... We still possess the first draft of the Charter, which presents considerable variations from the document in its final form, among others the following. According to the draft the King was to give an assurance that he would never obtain from the Pope a revocation of the arrangements agreed on; the archbishop, the bishops, and the Papal plenipotentiary, Master Pandulph, were to guarantee this assurance. We see to what quarter the anxieties of the nobles pointed, how they wished above all to obtain security against the influences of ...
— A History of England Principally in the Seventeenth Century, Volume I (of 6) • Leopold von Ranke

... commotion in their own country. The name makes it more probable that they were Alsatians who quietly moved across the Rhine, either when their province was first ceded to France, or perhaps later, at the time of the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, in 1685. When Engel Freund quitted Germany the disturbing influences of the French Revolution may have had a considerable share in determining his departure. He landed at New York in 1797 and established himself in Hester ...
— Life of Father Hecker • Walter Elliott

... women had wept bitterly, tortured in advance, and in spite of her irons, has knelt down imploring with cries and clamour the revocation of this order, objecting that her limbs were in such a feeble state, and her bones so tender, that they would break like glass; and finally, has offered to purchase her freedom from this by the gift all her goods to the chapter, and to quit ...
— Droll Stories, Volume 2 • Honore de Balzac

... "The revocation of the two terms of a Proposition to their true relation; a proposition being always an equation of its subject and ...
— A System Of Logic, Ratiocinative And Inductive • John Stuart Mill

... captain and adjutant of the West Norfolk Militia, was of an ancient but reduced Cornish family, tracing descent from the de Burghs, and entitled to carry their arms. His mother, Ann Perfrement, was a native of Norfolk, and descended from a family of French Protestants banished from France on the revocation of the edict of Nantes. He was the youngest of two sons. His brother, John Thomas, who was endowed with various and very remarkable talents, died at an early age in Mexico. Both the brothers had the advantage of being at some of the first ...
— George Borrow and His Circle - Wherein May Be Found Many Hitherto Unpublished Letters Of - Borrow And His Friends • Clement King Shorter

... the 'Satirist' almost ought to be thanked for his revocation; it is done handsomely, after five ...
— The Works of Lord Byron: Letters and Journals, Volume 2. • Lord Byron

... had been sent on important business by the sovereigns in December, 1495. Columbus, who had returned to Spain in June, 1496, protested against what he considered an invasion of his monopoly, and on June 2, 1497, the sovereigns issued a decree which for the moment was practically equivalent to a revocation of the general license accorded to navigators by the decree of April 10, 1495. Observe that this revocation was not issued until after the third squadron had sailed. The sovereigns were not going to be balked ...
— Amerigo Vespucci • Frederick A. Ober

... now issued, I cannot expect a full revocation of it, but I beg the privilege of taking post at New York, or any point you may name within the new military division other than Washington. This privilege is generally granted to all military commanders, and I see no good reason ...
— The Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman, Complete • William T. Sherman

... perhaps because of its inconvenient distance from the scene of his official work. In December of the year in which the lease was given, he transferred it to one Richard Synot. In the following year Lord Grey was recalled. 'The Lord Deputy,' says Holinshed, 'after long suit for his revocation, received Her Majesty's letters for the same.' His rule had been marked by some extreme, perhaps necessary, severities, and was probably somewhat curtly concluded on account of loud complaints made against him on this score. Spenser ...
— A Biography of Edmund Spenser • John W. Hales

... to him He was born bored; he was so accustomed to live out of himself He was scarcely taught how to read or write It is a sign that I have touched the sore point Pope not been ashamed to extol the Saint-Bartholomew Revocation of the edict of Nantes Seeing him eat olives with a fork! Touched, but like a man who does not wish to seem so Unreasonable love of admiration, was his ruin Who counted others only as they ...
— Widger's Quotations from The Court Memoirs of France • David Widger

... relations with the affairs of Church and State are equally important, is a debatable point. True, the edict in favour of Protestant worship, fathered by Henry IV., was a momentous and significant event; but the revocation, and the subsequent massacres of the rascally Carrier, well-nigh wiped that out. The history of the city is one long record of warfare and bloodshed. Though holding the command of the Loire, the city has ever been more closely identified with Brittany. ...
— The Cathedrals of Northern France • Francis Miltoun

... had at least the grace to devote a chapter of his 'Politique tiree de l'Ecriture Sainte' to the theme that 'God does not love war.' But in the eyes of Bossuet the dominant fact in the life of Louis XIV. was the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes and the savage persecution of the Huguenots, and this was sufficient to place him among the best ...
— The Map of Life - Conduct and Character • William Edward Hartpole Lecky

... later time Nerac, which had been a prosperous town, was ruined by the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes; for the Protestant population, who had been the most diligent and industrious in the town and neighbourhood, were all either "converted," hanged, sent to the galleys, or forced to emigrate to England, Holland, or Prussia. Nevertheless, the people ...
— Jasmin: Barber, Poet, Philanthropist • Samuel Smiles



Words linked to "Revocation" :   repeal, state, annulment, revoke, abrogation



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