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Ravish   Listen
Ravish

verb
(past & past part. ravished; pres. part. ravishing)
1.
Force (someone) to have sex against their will.  Synonyms: assault, dishonor, dishonour, outrage, rape, violate.
2.
Hold spellbound.  Synonyms: delight, enchant, enrapture, enthral, enthrall, transport.



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"Ravish" Quotes from Famous Books



... he lieth waiting secretly, even as a lion lurketh he in his den: that he may ravish ...
— The Book of Common Prayer - and The Scottish Liturgy • Church of England

... for not only did it feel tighter in it, but transferring his fingers from guiding his prick, he touched and played with my clitoris, and produced such excessive lubricity that I went off and spent with a scream of delight before he was ready; but continuing with finger and cock to ravish me inside and out, he soon brought me again to such a pitch of lewdness that I was quite ready to spend with him when the grand crisis arrived. Nothing could exceed the pleasure; my internal pressures, he declared, were the most exquisite he had ever experienced. My clitoris, too, he declared ...
— The Romance of Lust - A classic Victorian erotic novel • Anonymous

... have I seen when Caesar would appear, And on the stage at half-sword parley were Brutus and Cassius—oh, how the audience Were ravish'd, with what wonder they went thence When some new day they would not brook a line Of ...
— A Life of William Shakespeare - with portraits and facsimiles • Sidney Lee

... heart that nestled fond in thee, That heart how sunk, a prey to grief and care; So deckt the woodbine sweet yon aged tree; So, from it ravish'd, leaves ...
— Poems And Songs Of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... Baron the bright locks admired; He saw, he wished, and to the prize aspired. Resolved to win, he meditates the way, By force to ravish, or by fraud betray; For when success a lover's toil attends, Few ask, if fraud ...
— Playful Poems • Henry Morley

... made: Here rose one little state: another near Grew by like means, and joined, through love or fear. Did here the trees with ruddier burdens bend, And there the streams in purer rills descend? What war could ravish, commerce could bestow, And he returned a friend, who came a foe. Converse and love mankind might strongly draw, When love was liberty, and Nature law. Thus States were formed; the name of king unknown, 'Till common interest placed the sway in one. 'Twas virtue only (or in ...
— Essay on Man - Moral Essays and Satires • Alexander Pope

... or oppress, ruin, damage, upon, persecute, slander, defame, injure, pervert, victimize, defile, malign, prostitute, vilify, disparage, maltreat, rail at, violate, harm, misemploy, ravish, vituperate, ill-treat, misuse, reproach, wrong. ...
— English Synonyms and Antonyms - With Notes on the Correct Use of Prepositions • James Champlin Fernald

... of a world of praise, That dost so high the Grecian glory raise, Ulysses' stay thy ship, and that song hear That none pass'd ever, but it bent his ear, But left him ravish'd, and instructed more By us than any ever heard before. For we know all things, whatsoever were In wide Troy labor'd, whatsoever there The Grecians and the Trojans both sustain'd, By those high issues that the gods ordain'd; And whatsoever all the earth can show To inform a knowledge ...
— THE ADVENTURES OF ULYSSES • CHARLES LAMB

... the South below the mountain regions, seldom impresses at first, but it grows upon acquaintance; and in a little while, where once all things looked monotonous and unattractive, we learn to discover sweet influences that ravish us from ourselves at every step we take, into worlds and wilds, where all is fairy-like, ...
— Guy Rivers: A Tale of Georgia • William Gilmore Simms

... the Brahmin, like the Thug of seven victims, has tasted the sugar of blood, sweeter upon his tongue than to the lips of an eager babe the pearl-tipped nipple of its mother. Henceforth he must slay, slay, slay, mutilate and ravish, burn and slay, in the name of ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II, No. 8, June 1858 • Various

... reach the topless starry brows Of steep Olympus, crown'd with freshest boughs Of Daphnean laurel, and the praises sing Of mighty Cynthia: truly figuring (As she is Hecate) her sovereign kind, And in her force, the forces of the mind: An argument to ravish and refine An earthly soul and make it more devine. Sing then with all, her palace brightness bright, The dazzle-sun perfection of her light; Circling her face with glories, sing the walks, Where in her heavenly magic mood she stalks, Her arbours, thickets, and her wondrous game, ...
— Shakespeare's Lost Years in London, 1586-1592 • Arthur Acheson

... if we were not loyal to the Madrid authorities, the slaves should be freed to prey upon us. Blood would flow like water. The incendiary torch would be placed in the hands of the negroes, and they should be incited to burn, steal, and ravish! Cuba should be Spanish or African. There was a time when this threat had great force, and its execution was indeed to be dreaded; but that time is past, and no such fear now exists. The slaves are being gradually freed, and are amalgamating ...
— Due South or Cuba Past and Present • Maturin M. Ballou

... the writer, and break the illusion of the reader. The finest passages are those which are lyric in form as well as in spirit. "I should much commend," says the excellent Sir Henry Wotton in a letter to Milton, "the tragical part if the lyrical did not ravish me with a certain Dorique delicacy in your songs and odes, whereunto, I must plainly confess to, you, I have seen yet nothing parallel in our language." The criticism was just. It is when Milton escapes from the shackles of the dialogue, when he is discharged from ...
— Critical and Historical Essays Volume 1 • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... the example for, and to be a control on all the rest? But what is worse, you do not come directly to the trial of this right to property. You are desired to surround and circumvent it; you are desired obliquely to steal an iniquitous judgment, which you dare not boldly ravish. At this judgment you can only arrive by a side wind. You have before you a criminal process against an offender. One of the charges against him is, that he has robbed matrons of high and reverend place. His defence is, that they had not the ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. XII. (of XII.) • Edmund Burke

... with a forestalling tear And previous sigh, beginneth to entreat, Bidding him spare, for love, her lieges dear: "Alas!" quoth she, "is there no nodding wheat Ripe for thy crooked weapon, and more meet,— Or wither'd leaves to ravish from the tree,— Or crumbling battlements for thy defeat? Think but what vaunting monuments there be Builded in spite and ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood

... with his hair; And when love speaks, the voice of all the gods Makes heaven drowsy with the harmony. Never durst poet touch a pen to write, Until his ink were tempered with love's sighs; Oh, then his lines would ravish savage ears, And plant in tyrants mild humility. From women's eyes this doctrine I derive: They sparkle still the right Promethean fire; They are the books, the arts, the academes, That show, contain, and nourish all the world; Else, none at all ...
— Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher • S. T. Coleridge

... been by instinct, for her culture in such matters was small,—how to use her voice so that neither its tenderness nor its wrath should be misapplied. There were pieces in verse that she could read,—things not wondrously good in themselves,—so that she would ravish you; and she would so look at you as she did it that you would hardly dare either to avert your eyes or to return her gaze. Sir Florian had not known whether to do the one thing or the other, and had therefore seized her in his arms. Her face was oval,—somewhat ...
— The Eustace Diamonds • Anthony Trollope

... gracious Nature gives, When his proud glory gladdens every view, And no base worm within his beauties lives, We nothing question of what sex it be, Nor ask more of it than that it should lend His lovely gaze for ravish'd eye to see, And on the blessed air his fragrance spend. We ask not that the star which lights the heaven Should be or male or female to our sense, Suffic'd in this, that it empearls the even, And happies all our under reverence. Then might'st not thou, who wert both rose and star, ...
— Sonnets of Shakespeare's Ghost • Gregory Thornton

... Graces attend you! for without them 'ogni fatica e vana'. If they do not come to you willingly, ravish them, and force them to accompany you in all you think, all you say, and all ...
— The PG Edition of Chesterfield's Letters to His Son • The Earl of Chesterfield

... were on pretty good terms now, and I had coaxed her arm under mine,—my left arm, of course. That leaves one's right arm free to defend the lovely creature, if the rival—odious wretch! attempt, to ravish her from your side. Likewise if one's heart should happen to beat a little, its mute language will not be without its meaning, as you will perceive when the arm you hold begins to tremble, a circumstance like to occur, if you happen to be a good-looking ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... "Shall each man," cried he, "find a wife for his bosom, and each beast have his mate, and I be alone? I had feelings of affection, and they were requited by detestation and scorn. Man! You may hate, but beware! Your hours will pass in dread and misery, and soon the bolt will fall which must ravish from you your happiness forever. Are you to be happy while I grovel in the intensity of my wretchedness? You can blast my other passions, but revenge remains—revenge, henceforth dearer than light or food! I may die, but first you, my tyrant and tormentor, shall curse the sun ...
— Frankenstein - or The Modern Prometheus • Mary Wollstonecraft (Godwin) Shelley

... early hour to quit the beaux for bed; She has, contemning fear, gone down the dance, Till she perceived the rosy morn advance; Then has she wonder'd, fainting o'er her tea, Her drops and julep should so useless be: Ah! sure her joys must ravish every sense, Who buys a portion at such vast expense. Among those joys, 'tis one at eve to sail On the broad River with a favourite gale; When no rough waves upon the bosom ride, But the keel cuts, nor rises on the tide; Safe from the stream the ...
— The Borough • George Crabbe

... drinking on this grand gala day. The Marine Band, however, is always ordered from the Navy Yard and stationed in the spacious front hall, from whence they swell the rich saloons of the palace with 'Hail to the Chief!' 'Wha'll be King but Charley?' and other humdrum airs, which ravish with delight the ears of warriors who have never smelt powder. As the people's cash, and not his own, pays for all the services of the Marine Band, its employment at the palace does not conflict with the peculiar views of the President in regard to the obvious difference between ...
— Perley's Reminiscences, Vol. 1-2 - of Sixty Years in the National Metropolis • Benjamin Perley Poore

... reserving nothing for herself, and to have begotten, as the Conquistadores did, free men on poor Indian slaves? Apart from all this, does our mysticism count for nothing in the world of thought? Perhaps the peoples whose souls Helen will ravish away with her kisses may some day have to return to this mysticism to ...
— Tragic Sense Of Life • Miguel de Unamuno

... your nimble Fingers played, With pleasing softness did they swiftly rove, While, at each touch, they made his Heart-strings move. As round his Breast, his ravish'd Breast they crowd, We hear their ...
— Gossip in a Library • Edmund Gosse

... into compliance with his brutal desires. But with a virtue as exalted as that of the Roman matron, who resisted, but in vain, the advances of the son of Tarquin, and with a yet higher courage, she sprang from his attempted embrace, exclaiming, 'Stop! Thinkest thou, then, that thou canst ravish mine honor from me, as thou hast wrested from me my fortune and my liberty? Be assured that I can die and be avenged!' Having said this, she drew from her bosom a poniard, which she would have plunged into his breast, had he not avoided the blow. From that moment she became an object not only of ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 2, August, 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... Scandinavian chief, named Baraid, who advanced as far as Ciarraighe (Kerry): "And they left not a cave under ground that they did not explore; and they left nothing, from Limerick to Cork, that they did not ravish." What treasures the antiquarian of the nineteenth century must have lost by this marauder! How great must have been the wealth of the kings and princes of ancient Erinn, when so much remains after so much was taken! In 877 the Black Gentiles took refuge in Scotland, after ...
— An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800 • Mary Frances Cusack



Words linked to "Ravish" :   set on, attack, assail, disenchant, please, gang-rape



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