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Quid   /kwɪd/   Listen
Quid

noun
(pl. quid, quids)
1.
The basic unit of money in Great Britain and Northern Ireland; equal to 100 pence.  Synonyms: British pound, British pound sterling, pound, pound sterling.
2.
Something for something; that which a party receives (or is promised) in return for something he does or gives or promises.  Synonym: quid pro quo.
3.
A wad of something chewable as tobacco.  Synonyms: chaw, chew, cud, plug, wad.



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"Quid" Quotes from Famous Books



... guides and food, and feared their own Indian servants more than the enemy. A watch of two pirates kept a guard all that night, with orders to shoot any Indian who showed a sign of treachery. They rose before it was light and pushed on into the woods, biting on the bullet, or the quid, to help them to forget their hunger. By ten o'clock they arrived at the house of a brisk young Indian, who had been a servant to the Bishop of Panama, the man who gave the gold ring to Sawkins. Here they had a feast of yams and sweet potatoes, boiled into a broth with ...
— On the Spanish Main - Or, Some English forays on the Isthmus of Darien. • John Masefield

... addere studui, sicque quaedam addendo, quaedam vero fastidiose vel inepte dicta excerpendo, pluraque etiam corrigendo, sed et capitularia praeponendo. Vobis O fratres mei exactoresque hujus rei prout ingenioli mei parvitas permisit obedivi. Jam rogo cessate plus tale quid exigere a me." At the end of the Life he ...
— Notes & Queries 1849.12.22 • Various

... why I want to win it back—and more also." He looked round desperately. "Anybody want a birthright? For two hundred and fifty quid—I'd change ...
— Jonah and Co. • Dornford Yates

... the captain was making inquiry rather of himself than his auditor, remained discreetly silent, merely availing himself of a chance to throw a tremendous quid of "navy" into ...
— Ralph Granger's Fortunes • William Perry Brown

... complacently, hitched up his pantaloons, took a seat beside us, and, after extracting a jack-knife from one pocket, and a hand of tobacco from the other, and deliberately supplying himself with a fresh quid, he mentioned, apologetically, that he supposed the Doctor had ...
— The Complete Works of Whittier - The Standard Library Edition with a linked Index • John Greenleaf Whittier

... ourself we are convinced that the suppression of intemperance in spirituous liquors will never be effected while the agents and advocates of our Temperance Societies, lecture with a pinch of snuff in their fingers and a huge tobacco quid in their mouths. Tobacco slays its thousands, and doubtless one tenth of the drunkards in our land have become so by first indulging in the use of the dirty plant, and thus creating an unnatural thirst that called for liquid fire to ...
— A Disquisition on the Evils of Using Tobacco - and the Necessity of Immediate and Entire Reformation • Orin Fowler

... I won't," answered Mr Bracher, putting a quid, which he had been working into form, into his mouth; "I don't want money, and I wouldn't take a thousand dollars for the black if I did: ...
— With Axe and Rifle • W.H.G. Kingston

... The skipper rolled his quid of tobacco in his cheek reflectively a moment. "Well, no," he said, "I guess nothin' to speak of. They're too busy answering the batteries; it's only the stray shot that comes our way. There's a thousand chances to one agin' its hitting us, ...
— The Bay State Monthly, Volume 3, No. 5 • Various

... the addition of the index, from the 1514 edition of Aldus. In the preface is found the often quoted inscription placed over the door of Aldus to discourage the idle visitor: Quisquis es: rogat te Aldus etiam: atque etiam: ut, si quid est, quod a se velis: perpaucis agas, etc. The edition of 1533, with the imprint in aedibus haeredum Aldi Manutii Romani & Andreae Asulani Soceri and a short preface by Paulus Manutius (it was his first book as director of the press) is also essentially unchanged, but his edition of 1546, ...
— Catalogue of the William Loring Andrews Collection of Early Books in the Library of Yale University • Anonymous

... are, sir," responded the carpenter, turning his quid in his mouth as the skipper obediently seated himself on the wheel grating, while I made a rush for the companion. I turned up the cabin lamp, procured a tumbler, and was in the act of measuring out a liberal dose of lime juice when I heard the carpenter's voice suddenly ...
— Turned Adrift • Harry Collingwood

... pawnbroking, and I know. This chap's suit hadn't been 'acked out in the City or in one of those places in Cheapside where they put notices in the window to say that the foreman cutter is the only man in the street who gets twelve quid a week. They hadn't come from Crouch End, neither. They was first-class West End garments. It's the same with clothes as it is with thoroughbred hosses and women—you can always tell them, no matter how they've come down in the world. And it's like that with boots too. ...
— The Hand in the Dark • Arthur J. Rees

... talkers. Jem Wilson has been to sea and he tells some wonderful tales Of whales, and spice islands, And pirates off the Barbary coast. He boasts magnificently, with his mouth full of nails. Stephen Pibold has a tenor voice, He shifts his quid of tobacco and sings: "The second in command was blear-eyed Ned: While the surgeon his limb was a-lopping, A nine-pounder came and smack went his head, Pull away, pull away, pull away! I say; Rare news for my Meg of Wapping!" Every Sunday People come in crowds (After church-time, of course) ...
— Men, Women and Ghosts • Amy Lowell

... Bruno, satis admirari non possum quid agas vt tot pecunias consumas. [23] Consumimus omnes de capitali. ...
— The Age of Erasmus - Lectures Delivered in the Universities of Oxford and London • P. S. Allen

... testimonium perhibe de malo: si autem bene, quid me caedis? ["If I have spoken ill, give testimony of the evil, but if well, why strikest thou me?" ...
— The History of Richard Raynal, Solitary • Robert Hugh Benson

... asked me if I knew hemp from flax, and of course I had to say I did not. So that put the lid on that. I've got to begin where Daniel began ten years ago—at the beginning—with this difference, that I get three hundred quid a year. In fact there's such a mixture of fairness and unfairness in Daniel's idea that you don't know where to ...
— The Spinners • Eden Phillpotts

... quaerat, quid causae sit, ut merum fundendum sit genio, non hostiam faciendam putaverint.... Scilicet ut die natali munus annale genio solverent, manum a coede ac sanguine abstinerent.—Censorin. de Die Natali, c. 2. Vide Taffin de ...
— The Phantom World - or, The philosophy of spirits, apparitions, &c, &c. • Augustin Calmet

... First-day loafe and looks at the oats and rye, The lunatic is carried at last to the asylum a confirm'd case, (He will never sleep any more as he did in the cot in his mother's bed-room;) The jour printer with gray head and gaunt jaws works at his case, He turns his quid of tobacco while his eyes blurr with the manuscript; The malform'd limbs are tied to the surgeon's table, What is removed drops horribly in a pail; The quadroon girl is sold at the auction-stand, the drunkard nods by the bar-room stove, The machinist ...
— Leaves of Grass • Walt Whitman

... however, the 'Voices' knew and it was for this that they were preparing her. At the beginning of the trial, 'she said she had come from God, and had nothing to do here, asking to be sent back to God from whom she came [dixit quod venit ex parte Dei, et non habet quid negotiari quidquam, petens ut remitteretur ad Deum a quo venerat]. 'Many times she said to him [the King], I shall live a year, barely longer. During that year let as much as possible be done.' The 'Voices' told her she would be taken before the feast of St. John, and that thus it must be, ...
— The Witch-cult in Western Europe - A Study in Anthropology • Margaret Alice Murray

... the quid, and some the smell; There are who think that smoke doth both excel, I smile to see these votaries so misled, And think their several tastes are idly bred. Perchance one, here and there, may virtue find, In 'bacco' fumes, when ...
— Religion in Earnest - A Memorial of Mrs. Mary Lyth, of York • John Lyth

... is absurd too: Malachi Mulligan, two dactyls. But it has a Hellenic ring, hasn't it? Tripping and sunny like the buck himself. We must go to Athens. Will you come if I can get the aunt to fork out twenty quid? ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... while in return China obtained a bare recognition of existing rights, namely the boundary between China and Korea and the jurisdiction over the Koreans in the Yenchi region. The two settlements were in the nature of quid pro quo though it is clear that the Japanese side of the scale heavily outweighed that of the Chinese. Now Japan endeavours to repudiate, for no apparent reason so far as we can see, the agreement which formed the ...
— The Fight For The Republic In China • B.L. Putnam Weale

... viglare mecum, qui exhortabamini mori pro me? Vel Judam non videtis, quo modo non dormit, sed festinat tradere me Judaeis? Quid dormitis? Surgite, et orate, ne intretis in tentationem. Vel Judam non videtis, quo modo non dormit, ...
— The St. Gregory Hymnal and Catholic Choir Book • Various

... Saint Fulgentius said: 'Et si mithetur in stagnum ignis et sulphuris qui nudum vestimento non tegit, quid passures est qui vestimento crudelis expoliat? Et si rerum suarem avarus possessor requiem non habebit, quomodo aliaenarum rerum insatiabilis raptor?' Meaning, 'And if he who never clothed the naked is sent to the pond of fire and sulphur, where will he, who cruelly stripped ...
— The Story of the Philippines and Our New Possessions, • Murat Halstead

... outwards in two dwarf curls. The mouth is coarse as well as thick-lipped; the teeth rarely project as in the Negro, but they are not good; the habit of perpetually chewing coarse Surat tobacco stains them [16], the gums become black and mottled, and the use of ashes with the quid discolours the lips. The skin, amongst the tribes inhabiting the hot regions, is smooth, black, and glossy; as the altitude increases it becomes lighter, and about Harar it is generally of a cafe au lait colour. ...
— First footsteps in East Africa • Richard F. Burton

... where we finish our evenings, the little serving-maids now bow to us, on our arrival, with an air of respectful recognition, as belonging to the fast set of Nagasaki. There we carry on desultory conversations, full of misunderstandings and endless 'quid pro quo' of uncouth words, in little gardens lighted up with lanterns, near ponds full of goldfish, with little bridges, little islets, and little ruined towers. They hand us tea and white and pink-colored sweetmeats flavored with pepper that taste strange and ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... copiousness of Livy conceals many a tale of wonder; the graver of Tacitus etches many a fatal stroke; and the secret history of Suetonius too often raises a suspicion of those whispers, Quid rex in aurem reginae dixerit, quid Juno fabulata sit cum Jove. It is certain that Plutarch has often told, and varied too in the telling, the same story, which he has applied to different persons. A critic in the Ritsonian style has said of the grave Plutarch, Mendax ille Plutarchus ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli

... I ses. 'He comes into a public-'ouse down my way sometimes. Artful 'Arry, he's called, and, for 'arf-a-quid, say, he'd frighten Uncle Dick 'arf to death. He's big and ugly, and picks up a living by selling meerschaum pipes he's found to small men wot don't want 'em. Wonderful gift o' the ...
— Ship's Company, The Entire Collection • W.W. Jacobs

... dixi et dicam caelitum, Sed eos non curare opinor, quid agat humanum genus; Nam si curent, bene bonis sit, male ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... of nice," he said, then colored with embarrassment and spat a quid of spruce-gum ...
— The Maid-At-Arms • Robert W. Chambers

... it." Not pleased with the impeaching tone of this reply, our informant made his way to another ward, where he put the same question to the first policeman who came along. Without giving him a direct reply, the officer winked, shifted his quid of tobacco so as to display his Check to full advantage, and pointed with his thumb over his shoulder at indefinite city "slums" behind him. Let the "Countryman" understand that, as things are at present, he may stand ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 7, May 14, 1870 • Various

... at least as remarkable as this prophecy, if prophecy it can be called, is not recorded. Pontius, the disciple and biographer of Cyprian, relates a similar intimation which preceded the martyrdom of his master, and adds: 'Quid hac revelatione manifestius? quid hac dignatione felicius? ante illi praedicta sunt omnia quaecunque postmodum subsecuta sunt.' (Vit. et Pass. Cypr. ...
— A Reply to Dr. Lightfoot's Essays • Walter R. Cassels

... silly conditions like that!" the man grumbled. "If I knew where they were, I'd earn the quid soon enough, but I don't, and that's the long and the short of it! And if you ain't going to pay the eighteen and six, well, I've answered all the questions ...
— The Tempting of Tavernake • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... kind are the derivatives length from long, strength from strong, darling from dear, breadth from broad, from dry, drought, and from high, height, which Milton, in zeal for analogy, writes highth; Quid te exempta juvat spinis de pluribus una [Horace, Epistles, II. ii. 212]; to change all would be too much, and to change ...
— Preface to a Dictionary of the English Language • Samuel Johnson

... gratiae, quid opus est illi dicere Ora pro nobis? Non est probabile eam consuetudinem a gravibus viris inductam, sed ab inepto quopiam, qui, quod didicerat apud Poetas propositioni succedere invocationem, pro Musa supposuit Mariam."—Des. Erasmi Roterod. Apologia adversus ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 231, April 1, 1854 • Various

... had time to feel either. One of our men had an apple in his pocket. He handed it to the captain. 'There, captain,' said he, 'what is sent to one is sent to all. Serve it out, if you please, among us: if any one has a quid in his pouch, or a bit of biscuit, let him do the same!' We all felt in our pockets, but could find nothing to eat; so the captain took the apple, and, cutting it into seven bits, each took one, and munched away at it as ...
— Fred Markham in Russia - The Boy Travellers in the Land of the Czar • W. H. G. Kingston

... the bars, as he walks on a First Day loafe, and looks at the oats and rye, The lunatic is carried at last to the asylum, a confirmed case, He will never sleep any more as he did in the cot in his mother's bedroom; The jour printer with gray head and gaunt jaws works at his case, He turns his quid of tobacco, while his eyes blurr with the manuscript; The malformed limbs are tied to the anatomist's table, What is removed drops horribly in a pail; The quadroon girl is sold at the stand—the drunkard ...
— Whitman - A Study • John Burroughs

... Zora, but she gave no sign until they heard a rollicking song outside and Tylor burst into the room. He was nearly seven feet high and broad-shouldered, yellow, with curling hair and laughing brown eyes. He was chewing an enormous quid of tobacco, the juice of which he distributed generously, and had had just liquor enough to make him jolly. His entrance was ...
— The Quest of the Silver Fleece - A Novel • W. E. B. Du Bois

... don't be flowery," said the sailor, renewing his quid. "Moreover, if you'll take the advice of an old salt you'll keep a tighter grip o' that belayin'-pin you've got hold of, unless you wants to be washed overboard. Now then, fire away! I'm all attention, as the cat said at the ...
— Blue Lights - Hot Work in the Soudan • R.M. Ballantyne

... quid magis nascitur Iliade: so I say of SPENSER's Fairy Queen; I know not what more excellent or exquisite poem ...
— An English Garner - Critical Essays & Literary Fragments • Edited by Professor Arber and Thomas Seccombe

... strangeness of our few years of life as neighbours inclines me to be of service to you provided I myself am not the sufferer. As to that I am prepared to take the risk. You see mine is only the usual sort of generosity—the sort which provides for an adequate quid pro quo. Of course, if you think that the undertaking of my affairs would block you in other directions do not hesitate to say so. This is a matter of business between us, pure ...
— A Prince of Sinners • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... to metal of the same shape; they are then termed marling-spikes (called stabbers by sail-makers—which see). Also, the piece of oakum with which the vent of a gun is plugged. Some call it the vent-plug (which see). Also, colloquially used for a quid or chew of tobacco, or a small but thick piece of anything, as of meat ...
— The Sailor's Word-Book • William Henry Smyth

... Sugarcane brew Extraction of the juice Boiling Fermentation Mead Drinking General remarks The sumsm-an Drinking during religious and social feasts Evil effects from drinking Tobacco preparation and use The betel-nut masticatory Ingredients and effect of the quid Betel chewing accessories ...
— The Manbos of Mindano - Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, Volume XXIII, First Memoir • John M. Garvan

... is it," cried poor Campian, "give her ten, give her ten, brother Pars—Morgans, I mean; and take care of your shins, Offa Cerbero, you know—Oh, virago! Furens quid faemina possit! Certainly she is ...
— Westward Ho! • Charles Kingsley

... step forward, still facing his father with obstinate eyes. One of the books slipped from his arm and fell to the floor, with open leaves, but he let it lie. He was watching his father's jaws as they rose and fell over the quid of tobacco. ...
— The Voice of the People • Ellen Glasgow

... leaves no doubt either of its causes or its meaning. "Non multo post sponsalia contrahuntur," he says, "Henrico plus minus tredecim annos jam nato. Sed rerum non recte inceptarum successus infelicior homines non prorsus oscitantes plerumque docet quid recte gestum quid perperam, quid factum superi volunt quid infectum. Nimirum Henricus Septimus nulla aegritudinis prospecta causa repente in deteriorem valetudinem prolapsus est, nec unquam potuit affectum corpus pristinum statum recuperare. Uxor in aliud ex alio malum regina omnium laudatissimia ...
— The Reign of Henry the Eighth, Volume 1 (of 3) • James Anthony Froude

... quidem regio, sed relligione priorum Nota, Caledonias panditur inter aquas; Voce ubi Cennethus populos domuisse feroces Dicitur, et vanos dedocuisse deos. Hue ego delatus placido per coerula cursu Scire locum volui quid daret ille novi. Illic Leniades humili regnabat in aula, Leniades magnis nobilitatus avis: Una duas habuit casa cum genitore puellas, Quas Amor undarum fingeret esse deas: Non tamen inculti gelidis latuere sub antris, Accola Danubii qualia saevus habet; Mollia non decrant vacuae ...
— Life Of Johnson, Volume 5 • Boswell

... quid enim peccasti, dente sinistro. Quod te discerptum turba sacrata velit? R. Invisum dixi verum, propter quod et olim, Vel dominum letho ...
— Books Fatal to Their Authors • P. H. Ditchfield

... literarum libri non studiorum instrumenta, sed coenationum ornamenta sunt. Paretur itaque librorum quantum satis sit, nihil in apparatum. Honestius, inquis, hoc te impensae, quam in Corinthia pictasque tabulas effuderint. Vitiosum est ubique, quod nimium est. Quid habes, cur ignoscas homini armaria citro atque ebore captanti, corpora conquirenti aut ignotorum auctorum aut improbatorum, et inter tot millia librorum oscitanti, cui voluminum suorum frontes maxime placent titulique? Apud desidiosissimos ...
— The Book-Hunter - A New Edition, with a Memoir of the Author • John Hill Burton

... knees of an old pair of buckskin breeches; while the spotted handkerchief round his neck preserved at once its owner from catching cold and his neck-cloth from being dirtied. Next him sat another man, with a tankard in his hand and a quid of tobacco in his cheek, whose eye was rather more vivacious, and ...
— The Man of Feeling • Henry Mackenzie

... far as any sect avows me, it is mine) has not done ill in a worldly sense in the Hawaiian Kingdom. When calamity befell their innocent parishioners, when leprosy descended and took root in the Eight Islands, a quid pro quo was to be looked for. To that prosperous mission, and to you, as one of its adornments, God had sent at last an opportunity. I know I am touching here upon a nerve acutely sensitive. I know ...
— Lay Morals • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Minucius Felix, Octavius, p. 96, Ouzel (chap. 11, Boenig). 'Quid quod toti orbi et ipsi mundo cum sideribus suis minantur incendium, ruinam moliuntur?' The doctrine in their mouths became a very different thing from the Stoic theory of the periodic re-absorption of the universe in the Divine Element. Ibid., ...
— Five Stages of Greek Religion • Gilbert Murray

... then, as they pushed and dragged him in, turned to one side or the other, looking daggers at those who conducted him. He was sober, although his eyes bore testimony to recent intoxication, and his face, which was manly and handsome, was much disfigured by an enormous quid of tobacco in his right cheek, which gave him an appearance of natural deformity. As soon as he was near enough to the pacha, the attendants let him go. Jack shook his jacket, hitched up his trousers, and said, looking furiously at them, "Well, you beggars, ...
— The Pacha of Many Tales • Frederick Marryat

... fellow who with a quid of tobacco bulging out his left cheek kept his eyes on the compass card. "This minute. ...
— Chance - A Tale in Two Parts • Joseph Conrad

... game?" said Jones to himself as he watched his master slip on to the platform by a gate instead of going through the booking office. "Well, I've had four quid out of it, any way, and it's no affair of mine." And ...
— Colonel Quaritch, V.C. - A Tale of Country Life • H. Rider Haggard

... (especially in political and social subjects), upon principles, which are true in the absence of all modifying causes, as though no such causes could exist. Other analogous fallacies are those a dicto simpliciter ad dictum secundum quid (the converse of the preceding), and a dicto secundum quid ad ...
— Analysis of Mr. Mill's System of Logic • William Stebbing

... times, sez our bloke. I did mean doin' It'ly this year; but sez Luck, "Oh, go 'ome and eat coke!" Leastways, that's as I hunderstand 'er. A narsty one, Luck, and no kid; Always gives yer the rough of 'er tongue when you're quisby, or short of a quid. ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 103, August 27, 1892 • Various

... round to see that no one was within ear-shot, then he leant forward and whispered the horse's name in William's ear. William laughed. "If you're so sure about it as all that," he said, "I'd sooner lend you the quid to back ...
— Esther Waters • George Moore

... drove his noble team Of raw-rump'd jennies, "Sand-ho!" was his theme: Just as he turned the corner of the drum, [1] His dear lov'd Bess, the bunter, chanc'd to come; [2] With joy cry'd "Woa", did turn his quid and stare, First suck'd her jole, then thus addressed ...
— Musa Pedestris - Three Centuries of Canting Songs - and Slang Rhymes [1536 - 1896] • John S. Farmer

... this; seeing that it was the people, through the instrumentality of your offices—through you as its servants—conferred on his Excellency, this power, authority, and government. According to the common rule law, therefore, 'quo jure quid statuitur, eodem jure tolli debet.' You having been fully empowered by the provinces and cities, or, to speak more correctly, by your masters and superiors, to confer the government on his Excellency, it follows that you require a like power in order to take it away ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... distrust and fear of them will be reflected even in the enchanted domain of marriage, and the husband, having yielded up most of his old rights, will begin to reveal anew jealousy of those that remain, and particularly of the right to a fair quid pro quo for his own docile industry. In brief, as women shake off their ancient disabilities they will also shake off some of their ancient immunities, and their doings will come to be regarded with a soberer and more exigent scrutiny than now prevails. The extension of the suffrage, ...
— In Defense of Women • H. L. Mencken

... The old Brunonian stimulating treatment has come into vogue again in the practice of Dr. Todd and his followers. The compounds of mercury have yielded their place as drugs of all work, and specifics for that very frequent subjective complaint, nescio quid faciam,—to compounds of iodine. [Sir Astley Cooper has the boldness,—or honesty,—to speak of medicines which "are given as much to assist the medical man as his patient." Lectures (London, 1832), p. 14.] Opium is believed in, ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... quid admirer? quid rideam? ubi gaudeam? ubi exultem, spectans tot ac tantos reges, qui in coelum recepti nuntiabantur, cum ipso Jove et ipsis suis testibus in imis tenebris congemiscentes!—Tunc magis tragoedi audiendi, ...
— A Mere Accident • George Moore

... interested in a novel or play. One, and this, I believe, was the most successful, was to draw a striking picture of the scene where the climax is reached—the wife crouching in the corner, the husband revolver in hand, the Tertium Quid calmly offering to read the documents which prove that he and not the gentleman with the revolver is really the husband of the lady—and then to go back to the beginning and explain how it ...
— An Adventure With A Genius • Alleyne Ireland

... to help me, and come down and talk to the skipper, for he will be under your orders, you know. He is such a delightful sailor-man, perfect down to his quid, and always says, 'Ay, ay,' in the orthodox fashion. Certainly you must not go; I will not trust you out of my sight—you might run away and leave me alone, and then what should ...
— Dawn • H. Rider Haggard

... coated with lime made from oyster-shells and folded up, is used to coil round the areca-nut, the whole forming the buyo (betel), which the natives of these Islands, as in British India, are in the habit of chewing. To the chew a quid of tobacco is sometimes added. A native can go a great number of hours without food if he has his betel; it is said to be stomachical. After many years of habit in chewing this nut and leaf it becomes almost a ...
— The Philippine Islands • John Foreman

... Latin the termination of the first person singular was em. Thus Quintilian, i. 7, 23, says: "Quid? non Cato Censorius dicam et faciam, dicem et faciem scripsit, eundemque in ceteris, qu similiter cadunt, modum tenuit? quod et ex veteribus ejus libris manifestum est, et a Messala in libro de s. littera positum." Neue, Formenlehre, ii. p.348. The introduction ...
— Chips from a German Workshop - Volume IV - Essays chiefly on the Science of Language • Max Muller

... him as usual out on the door-step; here the school-master took a quid of tobacco, and ...
— A Happy Boy • Bjornstjerne Bjornson

... biceps and a thick head. Didn't know when he was whipped. I can see him yet, as he used to look, with his giant shoulders and his swagger as he stepped into the ring. There was no nonsense about him—or his fist; could break a board with that. And how the shouts used to go up; 'the pet!' 'a quid on the pet!' 'ten bob on the stars and stripes!' meaning the costume he wore. Oh, he was a favorite in Camden Town! But one night he failed them; met some friends from the forecastle of a Yankee trader that had dropped down the Thames. Went into the ring ...
— Half A Chance • Frederic S. Isham

... of health, neither ill nor what you may call well: I yawned and felt weary without exercise, and my sleep was merely slumber. This was the time to have taken medicine, but I neglected to do so, though I had just been reading: "O navis, referent in mare te novi fluctus, O quid agis? fortiter occupa portum." I awoke at midnight: a cruel headache, thirst and pain in the small of the back informed me what the case was. Had Chiron himself been present he could not have told me more distinctly that I was going ...
— Wanderings In South America • Charles Waterton

... fellow with a cough to teach him, named Maitre Jobelin Bride, who read unto him Hugutio, Hebrard's "Grecisme," the "Doctrinal," the "Parts," the "Quid Est," the "Supplementum"; Marmoquet "De Moribus in Mensa Servandis"; Seneca "De Quatour Virtutibus Cardinalibus"; Passavantus "Cum Commento" and "Dormi Secure," for the holidays; and some other of such-like stuff, by reading whereof he became as wise as any we have ever ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. VII (of X)—Continental Europe I • Various

... non possem: quare pro multis pauca, pro magnis parua, rependens, concedo, et in perpetuum do praedictae Ecclesiae, avenam et frumentum de Verleio, quae pertinet ad Forestagium. Diligenter autem haeredes exoro, ne Ecclesias terrae suae gravent, sed honorent et protegant. Et si quid eis pro salute animae meae et parentum meorum dedi, vel pro ablatis reddidi, in pace stabiliter tenere faciant: recordantes, quod ipsi morituri sunt: Sicut ...
— Architectural Antiquities of Normandy • John Sell Cotman

... nota, tunc tant['u]m amata, donec idem sacerdos satiatam conversatione mortalium deam templo reddat; mox vehiculum et vestes, et, si credere velis, numen ipsum secreto lacu abluitur. Servi ministrant, quos statim idem lacus haurit. Arcanus hinc terror, sanctaque ignorantia, quid sit ...
— A Handbook of the English Language • Robert Gordon Latham

... considers it a real trial to sit by with his great hands hanging by his side, while his wife talks to her grand acquaintances with a volubility that he never before imagined her possessed of; and he only misses still more the quid that used to keep his own tongue occupied. It is such a relief when the last call is made, and their steps are bent toward their own door. Mrs. Flin goes to her room to divest herself of some of her superfluous finery, and her husband quietly takes the opportunity to don his shaggy coat and ...
— The Elm Tree Tales • F. Irene Burge Smith

... not to keep it back, but to exhibit it publicly that it may be tested and appreciated. They want to prove: very good, let them prove; and the critical philosophy lays its arms at their feet as the victors. Quid statis? Nolint. Atqui licet esse beatis. As they then do not in fact choose to do so, probably because they cannot, we must take up these arms again in order to seek in the mortal use of reason, and to base on this, the notions of God, ...
— The Critique of Practical Reason • Immanuel Kant

... portal, and the three steps which lead down to the flagged entrance hall seem to mark a century apiece. I call it an entrance hall, but it is rather a small adytum, spanned by a pointed arch carrying the legend Stemmata Quid Faciunt. The modern exterior is, in fact, but a shell. All within dates from Henry VI.; and Mr. Robertson (but this is only a theory) would explain the sunken level of the ground-floor rooms by the action of earthworms, which have gradually lifted the surface of Dean's Yard outside. ...
— From a Cornish Window - A New Edition • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... son genie, secondant son ardeur de courtisan, pourroit bien, en pretendant servir les tendances vagues de piete de son maitre, embarquer celui-ci dans les plus graves difficultes en provoquant l'opposition des vieux protestans reunis aux rationalistes allemands. 'Quid foditis vobis cisternas dissipatas?' O mon ami! Comment s'arreter a quelques abus plus apparens peut-etre que reels, que l'Eglise supporte ca et la sans les autoriser, et ne pas reconnoitre cette admirable unite de doctrine, cette continuite de la Tradition, ...
— Memoirs of James Robert Hope-Scott, Volume 2 • Robert Ornsby

... himself: "Durum hoc fortasse videatur, neque ego in ullam partem disputo." "This may appear harsh, nor do I give any opinion on the subject." And it is the same orator who exclaims in the same oration, "Facinus est cruciare civem Romanum; scelus verberare; prope parricidium necare: quid dicam in crucem tollere?" "It is a crime to imprison a Roman citizen; wickedness to scourge; next to parricide to put to death, what shall I call it ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 1 • Edward Gibbon

... hoc loco referre quid acciderit Davidi quondam episcopo Traiectensi, Ducis Philippi cognomento Boni filio. Vir erat apprime doctus reique theologicae peritus, quod in nobilibus et illius praesertim dicionis episcopis profana dicione onustis 5 perrarum ...
— Selections from Erasmus - Principally from his Epistles • Erasmus Roterodamus

... quilt quid quill equip quit quell quite quiz quire quail queer quote quest quick squire squirt queen quince quake squint squaw quack squirm square quaint squeak squeal quench ...
— The Beacon Second Reader • James H. Fassett

... "Camomile flowers; a little camomile, not a great deal; some people chew rhubarb, but a little camomile in the tea is not perceptible. Don't make faces, Mr. Sheffield; a little, I say; a little of everything is best—ne quid nimis. Avoid all extremes. So it is with sugar. Mr. Reding, you are putting too much into your tea. I lay down this rule: sugar should not be a substantive ingredient in tea, but an adjective; that is, tea has a natural roughness; sugar ...
— Loss and Gain - The Story of a Convert • John Henry Newman

... "In prima institutione naturA| non quseritur miraculum, sed quid natura rerum habeat." And it is certain that both St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Basil held the same view. And they further held that the animating principle of life once implanted in nature, held good for all time. ...
— Life: Its True Genesis • R. W. Wright

... fools as to let us do that, sir?" caustically demanded the gunner, chewing hard upon his quid, in ...
— A Middy of the King - A Romance of the Old British Navy • Harry Collingwood

... Abbe Pernot, making a slight grimace; "I am not much of a reader, and my little stock is sufficient for my needs. You remember what is said in the Imitation: 'Si scires totam Bibliam exterius et omnium philosophorum dicta, quid totum prodesset sine caritate Dei et gratia?' Besides, it gives me a headache to read too steadily. I require exercise in the open air. Do you hunt ...
— A Woodland Queen, Complete • Andre Theuriet

... mate, sir, as sure as I cut this quid. Not as yarns like that affect me; but, you see, some skulls is thick as plate-armour, and some is thin as egg-shells: and when the thin 'uns gets afloat with corpses, why, it's a chest of shiners to a handspike as they cracks—now, ...
— The Iron Pirate - A Plain Tale of Strange Happenings on the Sea • Max Pemberton

... former of these: "Quid est tarn furiosum vel tragicum quam verborum sonitus inanis, nulla subjecta sententia neque scientia." What can be so proper for tragedy as a set of big sounding words, so contrived together as to convey no meaning? which I shall one day or other prove to be the sublime of Longinus. Ovid declareth ...
— Miscellanies, Volume 2 (from Works, Volume 12) • Henry Fielding

... himself Martini—was just such another," commented Tommy. "Come pay time, Saturday afternoon, you just couldn't get at him—simply wasn't any way. I was a bit too good for him once, though," remembered Tommy, with a touch of pride in her voice; "got half a quid out of him that time. It ...
— Tommy and Co. • Jerome K. Jerome

... "He can go out at any time. They don't know he's in here. If we'd known you'd anybody with you we'd have come another time. Your man said you were alone—quite alone, he said—and, well, we thought the fifty quid had squared him." ...
— The Four Faces - A Mystery • William le Queux

... was always glad of an opportunity of speaking Latin, used to ask Tonfield, of Coley in Berkshire, jetsam officer of her day, when he brought her one of these papers cast up by the sea, "Quid mihi scribit Neptunus?" (What does Neptune ...
— The Man Who Laughs • Victor Hugo

... Quid debeas, 0 Roma, Neronibus, Testis Metaurum flumen, et Hasdrubal Devictus, et pulcher fugatis Ille dies ...
— The Fifteen Decisive Battles of The World From Marathon to Waterloo • Sir Edward Creasy, M.A.

... hurled death and agonizing wounds into the ranks of their opponents! And yet the very same men, when chance gave them the opportunity, would readily exchange, in their own peculiar way, all the amenities of social life, extending to one another a draw of the pipe, a quid or glass; obtaining and exchanging information from one and the other of their respective services, as to pay, rations, etc., the victors with delicacy abstaining from any mention of the victorious day. Though the vanquished would allude ...
— Laura Secord, the heroine of 1812. - A Drama. And Other Poems. • Sarah Anne Curzon

... in numero putare, cujus in exercitu veneant centuriatus atque venierint? Quid hunc hominem magnum aut amplum de republica cogitare, qui pecuniam ex aerario depromtam ad bellum administrandum, aut propter cupiditatem provinciae magistratibus diviserit aut propter avaritiam Romae in quaestu reliquerit? Vestra admurmuratio facit, Quirites, ut agnoscere ...
— Caesar: A Sketch • James Anthony Froude

... passis, ne mulieris formositatem adspiceret: postea illum magica percussit arte, at mortuum efferebat inde cum fletibus et vagitibus, et me per timorem expulit ad ostium magni fluminis, velivoli, porro in nave, in qua te peperi, vix post dies huc Athenas vecta sum. At tu, O Tisisthenes, ne quid quorum mando nauci fac: necesse enim est mulierem exquirere si qua Vite mysterium impetres et vindicare, quautum in te est, patrem tuum Callieratem in regine morte. Sin timore sue aliqua causa rem reliquis infectam, ...
— She • H. Rider Haggard

... fortunatusque laborum Egregiusque animi qui ne quid tale videret Procubuit moriens et humum semel ore momordit Fors et uirtus miscentur in vnum. Non ego natura nec sum tam callidus vsu. aeuo rarissima nostro simplicitas Viderit vtilitas ego cepta fideliter edam. Prosperum et foelix scelus, virtus vocatur Tibi res antiquas laudis et artis Inuidiam ...
— Bacon is Shake-Speare • Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence

... rejoin:—"Good; if you are minded to go, get you gone; if not, stay where you are." The priest, therefore, seeing that she was not disposed to give him what he wanted, as he was fain, to wit, on his own terms, but was bent upon having a quid pro quo, changed his tone; and:—"Lo, now," quoth he, "thou doubtest I will not bring thee the money; so to set thy mind at rest, I will leave thee this cloak—thou seest 'tis good sky-blue silk—in pledge." ...
— The Decameron, Vol. II. • Giovanni Boccaccio

... all Peterkin said, as he put an enormous quid of tobacco in his mouth, and walked away, thinking to himself, 'Twould take an all-fired while to scrape them tar and feathers off of me, I'm so big, and I b'lieve the feller meant it. Them high bucks wouldn't like no better fun than to make a spectacle of me; so I guess ...
— Tracy Park • Mary Jane Holmes

... his quid of tobacco reflectively and spat at a crack in the sidewalk. "No," he replied, "I'll admit he ain't started scrappin' it yet, but I happen to know he's sold the rollin'- stock an' rails to the Freshwater Lumber Company, so I reckon they'll be scrappin' that railroad ...
— The Valley of the Giants • Peter B. Kyne

... I shall not lose much in the end. Ted will buy the horses, and all the gear from me. I think I can jew him into giving me something for them, even if it is only thirty quid." ...
— Tom Gerrard - 1904 • Louis Becke

... still prime minister of Greece. His policy was to go loyally to the assistance of Servia, as required by the treaty between the two countries; to defend New Greece against Bulgaria, to whom, however, he was ready to make some concessions on the basis of a quid pro quo; and to join and co-operate actively with the Entente Powers on the assurance of receiving territorial compensation in Asia Minor. King Constantine, on the other hand, seems to have held that the war of the Great Powers in the Balkans practically ...
— The Balkan Wars: 1912-1913 - Third Edition • Jacob Gould Schurman

... Watson Gilder Laus Veneris Louise Chandler Moulton Adonais Will Wallace Harney Face to Face Frances Cochrane Ashore Laurence Hope Khristna and His Flute Laurence Hope Impenitentia Ultima Ernest Dowson Non Sum Quails Eram Bonae sub Regno Cynarae Ernest Dowson Quid non Speremus, Amantes? Ernest Dowson "So Sweet Love Seemed" Robert Bridges An Old Tune Andrew Lang Refuge William Winter Midsummer Ella Wheeler Wilcox Ashes of Roses Elaine Goodale Sympathy Althea Gyles The Look Sara Teasdale "When My Beloved Sleeping ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 3 (of 4) • Various

... the moleskin trousers and the shapeless hat laughed, lounged indeterminately for a minute, rolled his quid in his cheek, spat, wiped his bearded mouth with the back of a sunburnt hand, and laughed again. 'There's room enough for both ...
— Despair's Last Journey • David Christie Murray

... habebunt verba fidem si Graeco fonte cadent, parce detorta. quid autem Caecilio Plautoque dabit Romanus ademptum 55 Vergilio Varioque? ego cur, acquirere pauca si possum, invideor, cum lingua Catonis et Enni sermonem patrium ditaverit et nova rerum signatum praesente nota producere nomen. ut ...
— Reflections on Dr. Swift's Letter to Harley (1712) and The British Academy (1712) • John Oldmixon

... laws. But the old chap seemed mighty stupid about every thing, and talked just as if he didn't know any thing about nothing. 'A nigger's a nigger in South Carolina,' said he dryly, and inquired for a quid of tobacco, which I handed him, and he took one big enough for six. Said I, 'Mister, do you call a man a nigger what's a Portugee and a'n't black?' 'It depends on how he was born,' says he. 'Well, but ye can't make a white man a nigger nohow, whether ...
— Manuel Pereira • F. C. Adams

... were something it would have been called something. What thing is there—that is a thing—that has not got what a pudding has? a name," and he laughed till his sides shook, and drawing a pouch from his pocket, took thence a quid of tobacco, and put it into his cheek, at the same time playfully offering another to the outraged Seraphine, who petulently dashed it from his fingers, and affected to bridle ...
— The Advocate • Charles Heavysege

... indeed only half an artist. We were obliged to draw and combine strokes, from which eyes and noses, lips and ears, nay, at last, whole faces and heads, were to arise; but of natural or artistic forms there was no thought. We were tormented a long while with this /quid pro quo/ of the human figure; and when the so-called Passions of Le Brun were given us to copy, it was supposed at last that we had made great progress. But even these caricatures did not improve us. Then we went off to landscapes, foliage, and ...
— Autobiography • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

... Ithuel, turning his quid from one cheek into the other, "I some conclude you've no great acquaintance with Captain Rule, a'ter all. He is not apt to enter into any agreements at all. What he wants done, he orders; and what he orders, ...
— The Wing-and-Wing - Le Feu-Follet • J. Fenimore Cooper

... ruminated over a fresh quid of tobacco. "Charlie! Mebby Bob, he stakes himself to a different name now and then. There ain't any Charlie, except Charlie Werner; she wouldn't ...
— The Quirt • B.M. Bower

... never tell," continued the driver, shifting his quid. "Now, I've took folks up there goin' on ten year now, an' some I've took up looked considerable more healthy than I be when I took 'em up. Comin' back, howsumever, it was different. One young feller rode up with me in the ...
— At the Sign of the Jack O'Lantern • Myrtle Reed

... can see the bird fly, the goat climb. Few of thy spies, indeed, have ever returned with life; their heads have been left at the foot of the hill, with the scroll in their lips,—'Dic ad inferos—quid in superis novisti.' Tell to the shades below what thou hast seen ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... would chew a little, but he conquered this dirty habit, too. "On one occasion," Bray said, "when at a prayer- meeting at Hicks Mill, I heard the Lord say to me, 'Worship me with clean lips.' So, when we got up from our knees, I took the quid out of my mouth and 'whipped 'en' [threw ...
— The Varieties of Religious Experience • William James

... would send a Billingsgate contractor, who is a plaguy sight more posted up about fisheries than any member of parliament, or a clever colonist (not a party man), and they know more than both the others put together; and I dreaded if they sent either, there would be a quid pro quo, as Josiah says, to be given, afore we got the fisheries, if we ever got them, at all. 'So,' sais I, out of a bit of fun, for I can't help taken a rise out of folks no how I can fix it, 'send us ...
— Nature and Human Nature • Thomas Chandler Haliburton

... for ten sovereigns, sir," said the cabby. "The streets is as slippery as glass, and as crowded as herrin's in a barrel. I'll do it in three-quarters for a quid, ...
— Weapons of Mystery • Joseph Hocking

... in unlikeness, that lies at the root of all discoveries; it is the prose imagination, common-sense at fourth proof. All this is no reason why the world should like it, however; and we fancy that the Question, Ridentem dicere verum quid vetat? was plaintively put in the primitive tongue by one of the world's gray fathers to another without producing the slightest conviction. Of course, there must be some reason for this suspicion of wit, as there is for most of the world's deep-rooted prejudices. There is a kind ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 7, Issue 42, April, 1861 • Various

... of women the sexual appetite is completely absent. For these, coitus is a disagreeable, often disgusting, or at any rate an indifferent act. What is more singular, at least for masculine comprehension, and what gives rise to the most frequent "quid pro quos," is the fact that such women, absolutely cold as regards sexual sensations, are often great coquettes, over-exciting the sexual appetites of man, and have often a great desire for love and caresses. This is more ...
— The Sexual Question - A Scientific, psychological, hygienic and sociological study • August Forel

... work tam timide and underhand with open and outward edicts, besides excuses at Rome and at Venice by your ambassadors, you, I say, which have Regem expertem otii, laboris amantem, cujus gens bellicosa jampridem assueta est caedibus tam exterioris quam vestri sanguinis, quid faciemus gens otiosa et paci assueta, quibus imperat Regina, et ipsa pacis atque quietis amantissima." Smith to Walsingham, Aug. 22, 1572, ...
— History of the Rise of the Huguenots - Volume 2 • Henry Baird

... in summo ut vides colle hortulorum consitos, si forte quid audes probare, scire debes hos hero herique ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 193, July 9, 1853 • Various

... other savage races the natives of Western Australia are very fond of singing and dancing: to a sulky old native his song is what a quid of tobacco is to a sailor; is he angry, he sings; is he glad, he sings; is he hungry, he sings; if he is full, provided he is not so full as to be in a state of stupor, he sings more lustily than ever; and it is the peculiar character ...
— Journals Of Two Expeditions Of Discovery In North-West And Western Australia, Vol. 2 (of 2) • George Grey

... coca considered in the days of the Incas, that divine honours were paid to it, and it was especially the property of the sovereign. Even at the present day the miners of Peru throw a quid of coca against the hard veins of ore, under the belief that they are thereby more easily worked. The natives also sometimes put coca in the mouth of the dying man, believing that if he can taste the fragrant leaf it is a sure ...
— The Western World - Picturesque Sketches of Nature and Natural History in North - and South America • W.H.G. Kingston

... a moment by these noble words, and the venerable and majestic mien of the blind old clergyman. It would not do, however, to give up his mission so; and after coughing, turning his quid, and spitting ...
— Cudjo's Cave • J. T. Trowbridge



Words linked to "Quid" :   retainer, pound, bit, bite, consideration, British monetary unit, morsel, penny



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