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Pr

noun
1.
A soft yellowish-white trivalent metallic element of the rare earth group; can be recovered from bastnasite or monazite by an ion-exchange process.  Synonyms: atomic number 59, praseodymium.
2.
A self-governing commonwealth associated with the United States occupying the island of Puerto Rico.  Synonyms: Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Porto Rico, Puerto Rico.
3.
A promotion intended to create goodwill for a person or institution.  Synonym: public relations.



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"Pr" Quotes from Famous Books



... purring rustle of leaves, stopped me instantly as I climbed the beech ridge, one late afternoon, to see what wood folk I might surprise feeding on the rich mast. Pr-r-r-r-ush, pr-r-r-r-ush! a curious combination of the rustling of squirrels' feet and the soft, crackling purr of an eagle's wings, growing nearer, clearer every instant. I slipped quietly behind the nearest tree to watch ...
— Wood Folk at School • William J. Long

... said the leader, half aloud; "they've got scent of us somehow: pr'aps they've some men inside to help them, ...
— Nearly Lost but Dearly Won • Theodore P. Wilson

... to the whole Teutonic race! Iceland is for the Teutons what Greece and Rome are for the south of Europe, and she accomplished her mission with no less efficiency and success. Cato the Elder used to end all his speeches with these words: "Prterea censeo Carthaginem esse delendam." In these days, when so many worship at the shrine of Romanism, we think it perfectly just to adopt Cato's sentence in this form: ...
— The Younger Edda - Also called Snorre's Edda, or The Prose Edda • Snorre

... William, urging the imperial title, Kaiser, or German Emperor, uses these words: "I have proposed to the German princes to join me in urging Your Majesty to assume the title, German Emperor, in connection with the exercise of the prdial rights of the Federation." But it was Bismarck's masterpiece of politics, equal to his stroke of Holstein, that sent to the King of Bavaria the proper diplomatic advices, to be acted upon by the South German princes and returned to the supposedly ...
— Blood and Iron - Origin of German Empire As Revealed by Character of Its - Founder, Bismarck • John Hubert Greusel

... title and the largest possessions in the two kingdoms, was about to bestow her hand upon a young gentleman of high birth and fashion, who had distinguished himself in the service of His M——-y the K—- of Pr——. I won't say who was the author of these paragraphs; or how two pictures, one representing myself under the title of 'The Prussian Irishman,' and the other Lady Lyndon as 'The Countess of Ephesus,' actually appeared in ...
— Barry Lyndon • William Makepeace Thackeray

... E. Pr. EDGAR PRESTAGE. Special Lecturer in Portuguese Literature in the University of Manchester. Commendador, Portuguese Order of S. Thiago. Corresponding Member of Lisbon Royal Academy of Sciences ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 7, Slice 1 - Prependix • Various

... protested Theron, though with considerable tolerance for her error in his tone. "But you ought to tell me something about this Dr. Ledsmar. He spoke of being an old friend of the pr—of Father Forbes." ...
— The Damnation of Theron Ware • Harold Frederic

... kinsman!" said Stephen, thus suddenly appealed to, "calm thyself, I pr'ythee. Noble Sir Walter, he is young—young, and hasty—he means ...
— Rienzi • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... create; Sometimes imperial robes I wear, Anon in beggar's rags appear; A giant now, and straight an elf, I'm every one, but ne'er myself; Ne'er sad I mourn, ne'er glad rejoice, I move my lips, but want a voice; I ne'er was born, nor e'er can die, Then, pr'ythee, tell me what ...
— Poems (Volume II.) • Jonathan Swift

... of the composer rings unmistakably through its measures, but it is freer from the formularies which have since become stereotyped, and there are a greater number of echoes of the tunefulness which belongs to the older period between which and the present the opera marks a transition. Abb Prvost's story, familiar to all readers of French romance, had served at least four opera composers before Signor Puccini. In 1830 Halvy brought forward a three-act ballet dealing with the story; Balfe wrote a French opera with ...
— Chapters of Opera • Henry Edward Krehbiel

... "I pr'ythee, sweetheart, then tell to me, O tell me, whether you know The bailiff's daughter of Islington?" "She is dead, sir, ...
— Old Ballads • Various

... soner allured by loue, than driuen by beating, to atteyne good learning: wherein I was the bolder to say my minde, bicause M. Secretarie curteslie prouoked me thereunto: or else, in such companie, and namelie in his prsence, my wonte is, to be more willing, to vse mine eares, ...
— The Schoolmaster • Roger Ascham

... there, to drink our morning, Sir W. Pen and I to a friend's lodging of his (Col. Pr. Swell), and at noon he and I dined together alone at the Legg in King Street, and so by coach to Chelsy to my Lord Privy Seal's about business of Sir William's, in which we had a fair admittance to talk with my Lord, and had his answer, ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... About the same season, pope Gregorie perceiuing that married prests did choose rather to run into the danger of his cursse, than to forsake their wiues, meaning to bridle them by an other prouiso, gaue commandment by his bull published abroad, that none should heare the masse of ...
— Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland (2 of 6): England (1 of 12) - William the Conqueror • Raphael Holinshed

... d'une finesse de sauvage assez ingnieuse. Il alla prendre une chatte et ses petits, et les tablit sur le tas de foin pour faire croire qu'il n'avait pas t remu depuis peu. Ensuite, remarquant des traces de sang sur le sentier prs de la maison, il les couvrit de poussire avec soin, et, cela fait, il se recoucha au soleil avec la plus ...
— Quatre contes de Prosper Mrime • F. C. L. Van Steenderen

... first, whose rich words, every one, Are like gold nails in temples to hang trophies on, Whose prose is grand verse, while his verse, the Lord knows, Is some of it pr—No, 'tis not even prose. ...
— Four Famous American Writers: Washington Irving, Edgar Allan Poe, • Sherwin Cody

... you," Winnie said, eagerly, "'cause it goes by 'steps,' and uncle says I take them as pr-i-tty as ...
— Lill's Travels in Santa Claus Land and other Stories • Ellis Towne, Sophie May and Ella Farman

... Oceani maris Neptuno, Edoardi Staffbrdij, noftri apud regem Chriftianifsimum oratoris prudentifsimi fororio, eadem ftudia, eaedem voluntates, iidem ad res magnas terra marque aggrediendas funt & fuerunt ani-morum ftimuli. Cm vero artis nauigatori peritia, prcipuum regni infularis ornamentum, Mathematicarii fcientiaru adminiculis adhibitis, fuu apud nos fplendore poffe cofequi facile per-fpiceres, Thomas Hariotum, iuuenem in illis difciplinis excellente, honeftifsimo falario iamdiu donatum apud te aluifti, cuius fubndio ...
— Thomas Hariot • Henry Stevens

... Perkins, the overseer, from the door, "Mr. Baron pr'sents his compliments en gives ...
— Miss Lou • E. P. Roe

... 1772. The nature of the review is familiar: Goethe calls the book a thistle which he has found on Yorick's grave. "Alles," he says, "hat es dem guten Yorick geraubt, Speer, Helm und Lanze, nur Schade! inwendig steckt der Herr Prceptor S. zu Magdeburg ... Yorick empfand, und dieser setzt sich hin zu empfinden. Yorick wird von seiner Laune ergriffen, und weinte und lachte in einer Minute und durch die Magie der Sympathie lachen ...
— Laurence Sterne in Germany • Harvey Waterman Thayer

... she wanted to prevent Emmy's standing up. We were simply disgusted and horrified. But her husband is awfully gentle with her; She is certainly not pretty and especially the puffiness under her eyes is horrid. They say that many women look like that when they are pr. She was wearing a maternity dress, and that gives the whole show away! Hella says that some women look awfully pretty when they are in an i— c—, but that some look hideous. I do hope I shall be one of the first kind, if ...
— A Young Girl's Diary • An Anonymous Young Girl

... 4 pair white thread stockings which I think will fit you, 1 pr Black Satin Shoes, 1 pr Black Calem Do, the other shall be sent when done, 1 very pretty light Hat, 1 neat airy Summer Cloak ... 2 caps, ...
— Ten American Girls From History • Kate Dickinson Sweetser

... "Je ne co'pr nay,"[A] she said curtly. But then, becoming more approachable—perhaps she hoped for a second gift of money—she began in a whining, plaintive voice: "Ne n'ava nay de pan et tat ...
— The Son of His Mother • Clara Viebig

... "Nay, pr'ythee, friend," replied the Fox, "if you wish me well, do not stand pitying me, but lend me some succour as fast as you can; for pity is but cold comfort when one is up to the chin in water, and within a hair's breadth of ...
— Favourite Fables in Prose and Verse • Various

... carry gentle peace, To silence envious tongues. Be just, and fear not: Let all the ends thou aim'st at be thy country's, Thy God's, and truth's; then if thou fall'st, O Cromwell! Thou fall'st a blessed martyr. Serve the king; and—pr'ythee, lead me in: There take an inventory of all I have, To the last penny; 'tis the king's: my robe, And my integrity to heaven, is all I dare now call mine own. O Cromwell, Cromwell! Had I but served my God with half the zeal I served my king, he ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3 - Sorrow and Consolation • Various

... knew (see Kadsah) "qu'ils mordent les femmes et les liment avec une prcieuse continuit." (Compare my vol. ii. 90; v. 46.) The men also used them as catamites (Horace i. ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... the mountain on the side of which it was, the Alban mountain. The new capital of Ascanius became the centre and principal one of thirty cities that arose in the plain, over all of which it seemed to have authority. Among these were Tusculum, Prneste, Lavinium, and Ardea, places of which subsequent history has much ...
— The Story of Rome From the Earliest Times to the End of the Republic • Arthur Gilman

... comes Emerson first, whose rich words, every one, Are like gold nails in temples to hang trophies on, Whose prose is grand verse, while his verse, the Lord knows, Is some of it pr—— No, 'tis not even prose; I'm speaking of metres; some poems have welled From those rare depths of soul that have ne'er been excelled; They're not epics, but that doesn't matter a pin, In creating, the only hard thing's to begin; A grass-blade's no easier to ...
— Selections From American Poetry • Various

... composition of Father Prmare, for it can scarcely be called a translation, there is neither diction, nor sentiment, nor character; it is a mere tissue of unnatural, or at least very improbable events, fit only for the amusement of children, and not capable of raising one single passion, but ...
— Travels in China, Containing Descriptions, Observations, and Comparisons, Made and Collected in the Course of a Short Residence at the Imperial Palace of Yuen-Min-Yuen, and on a Subsequent Journey thr • John Barrow

... Acquisitiveness. The tendency of such a faculty must be toward a lawless defiance of everything sacred, a passionate, impulsive self-will and selfishness, resulting in lawless profligacy. Profligacy would, therefore, be the name for its predominance (Pr.), while executive independence and energy for selfish purposes would be its more ...
— Buchanan's Journal of Man, December 1887 - Volume 1, Number 11 • Various

... table. She was scraggy helplessness, staring in sorrowful vacancy. But Gourlay eyed her with disgust. Why, by Heaven, even now her petticoat was gaping behind, worse than the sloven's at the Red Lion. She was a pr-r-retty wife for John Gourlay! The sight of her feebleness would have roused pity in some: Gourlay it moved to a steady and seething rage. As she stood helpless before him he stung her with crude, ...
— The House with the Green Shutters • George Douglas Brown

... ministers to the questions pr-pounded to them by the Honored Magistrates, Octobr 20, 1669. To ye 1st Quest whether a plurality of witnesses be necessary, legally to evidence one and ye same ...
— The Witchcraft Delusion In Colonial Connecticut (1647-1697) • John M. Taylor

... pr'ythee, take thy fingers from my throat; For though I am not splenitive and rash Yet have I something in me dangerous Which let thy ...
— The Man Shakespeare • Frank Harris

... in the mean time was diverting herself with his astonishment, suddenly opened the curtains of her bed; and, bending her head forward, My dear lord, said she, with a tender air, what do you there? Pr'ythee come to bed again; you have been out of it a long time. I was strangely surprised, when I awaked, at not finding you by me. Bedreddin's countenance changed when he perceived that the lady who spoke to him was the charming person he had lain with before; he therefore ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Volume 1 • Anonymous

... render: Which, as I heard, excelled in stroke every sword that he carried to the strife, even the strongest (sword). For 'onne' he reads 'one,' rel. pr. ...
— Beowulf - An Anglo-Saxon Epic Poem • The Heyne-Socin

... fuit ad desideratum nimis diu divini vatis Danici incomparabile opus. Arcta etenim, qu nos et Britannos intercessit amicitia, me allexit, ut, clementissime annuentibus Augustissimis patri patribus CHRISTIANO VII. et FREDERICO VI. iter in Britanniam anno seculi prteriti LXXXVI. ad thesauros bibliothecarum Albionensium perscrutandos facerem.... Acuratoribus, Musi Britannici, aliarumque Bibliothecarum, potestas mihi data [est] inspiciendi, tractandi, et exscribendi omnia, qu rebus Danicis lucem affere possent manuscripta. ...
— The Translations of Beowulf - A Critical Biography • Chauncey Brewster Tinker

... hair of the head and hair of the feet," a gloss to HSKYRH. For "hair of the feet" we have an interesting equivalent in Babylonian su-hur (and s-hu-ur) spi (CT XII, 41, 23-24 c-d). Cf. also Boissier, Documents Assyriens relatifs aux Prsages, p. 258, 4-5. The Babylonian phrase is like the Hebrew one to be interpreted as a euphemism for the hair around the male or female organ. To be sure, the change from H to K in HSKYRH constitutes an objection, but not a serious one in the case ...
— An Old Babylonian Version of the Gilgamesh Epic • Anonymous

... afternoon's repose, In easy chair had just began to doze, When, in a voice that sleep's soft slumbers broke, His oily helpmate thus her wishes spoke: "Why, spouse, for shame! my stars, what's this about? You's ever sleeping; come, we'll all go out; At that there garden, pr'ythee, do not stare! We'll take a mouthful of the country air; In the yew bower an hour or two we'll kill; There you may smoke, and drink what punch you will. Sophy and Billy each shall walk with me, And you must carry little Emily. Veny is sick, and pants, and ...
— The Works of William Hogarth: In a Series of Engravings - With Descriptions, and a Comment on Their Moral Tendency • John Trusler

... understood that the pattern was refused by the War Office some years ago; it would be interesting to know on what grounds. They are very simple, and have some features which are obvious improvements on the 15-pr. ...
— In the Ranks of the C.I.V. • Erskine Childers

... fuss that arrangement do save! Here!—" to the porter who stood checking the articles deposited—"this goes into hold wi' the rest. Contents, rum, an' don't you forget it, my son; leastways, pr'aps I'd better say, ...
— Hocken and Hunken • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... feature of the Lex Aquilia is ... that it granted an action in damages for the unlawful killing of ... the slave of another man." Inst., 413, pr; ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 5, 1920 • Various

... Iesu preserue quene Elizabeth, [that] noble pr[i]cis worthy Iesu continue her helth long for to endure 960 Iesu indue her w vertue grace & honour Iesu maintaine the lords of [the] co[u]sel to execute good remedi euer Iesu spede and helpe al them gods honour to further Iesu ...
— The Interlude of Wealth and Health • Anonymous

... uo vo wo xo yo zo G ap bp cp dp ep fp gp hp ip jp kp lp mp np op pp qp rp sp tp up vp wp xp yp zp H aq bq cq dq eq fq gq hq iq jq kq lq mq nq oq pq qq rq sq tq uq vq wq xq yq zq I ar br cr dr er fr gr hr ir jr kr lr mr nr or pr qr rr sr tr ur vr wr xr yr zr J as bs cs ds es fs gs hs is js ks ls ms ns os ps qs rs ss ts us vs ws xs ys zs K at bt ct dt et ft gt ht it jt kt lt mt nt ot pt qt rt st tt ut vt wt xt yt zt L au bu cu du eu fu gu hu iu ju ku lu mu nu ou pu ...
— The Treasure-Train • Arthur B. Reeve

... dans la maison, s'assit prs de la table, et dit: "Ma femme, j'ai faim. Je propose de dner. Pendant le dner nous parlerons ensemble de la ...
— Contes et lgendes - 1re Partie • H. A. Guerber

... Nellie, be sensible; Pr'ythee, give heed To counsel a victim advances; Your eyes, I acknowledge, will make our hearts bleed, Pierced through by love's magical lances. But better that fate Than in darkness to wait; Unsought ...
— Point Lace and Diamonds • George A. Baker, Jr.

... said the interpreter. Then he plunged. "We br-rought it. We have a mine on what you call Pr-rocyron Three. The human ship landed, because it was disabled. It discovered our ship and our mine there. We wished to keep the mine secret. Because the humans had found out our secret, we br-rought them here. And ...
— A Matter of Importance • William Fitzgerald Jenkins

... not these displacements are to be referred in reality to the effect of gravitation. The results of observation have been collected together, and discussed in detail from the standpoint of the question which has been engaging our attention here, in a paper by E. Freundlich entitled "Zur Prfung der allgemeinen Relativit¨aut;ts-Theorie" (Die Naturwissenschaften, 1919, No. 35, p. 520: Julius ...
— Relativity: The Special and General Theory • Albert Einstein

... those I had brought from Bussorah. I had no reason to doubt it, because I was certain there was not one to be had in Bagdad, nor in any of the gardens in the vicinity. I called to him, and said, "Good slave, pr'ythee tell me where thou hadst this apple?" "It is a present" (said he, smiling) "from my mistress. I went to see her to-day, and found her out of order. I saw three apples lying by her, and asked her where she had them. She told me the good man, her husband, had made a fortnight's ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments vol. 1 • Anon.

... ihn, sein Erzieher ward er. Er gab ihm Tchtigkeit, herrliche Degenschaft, 5 Den Thron hier in Franken; so brauch' er ihn lange! Das teilte er dann sofort mit Karlmann, Seinem Bruder, die Flle der Wonnen. Als das alles geendet ward, wollte Gott ihn prfen, Ob er Mhsal so jung dulden knnte. 10 Er liess heidnische Mnner ber See kommen, Das Volk der Franken ihrer Snden zu mahnen. Einige wrden bald verloren, einige erkoren. Zchtigung duldete, wer frher misgelebet. Wer dann ein Dieb war, und von dannen sich ...
— An anthology of German literature • Calvin Thomas

... consent, friend Dux, pr'ythee inform me how much of this pleasant liquor may be taken without inebriating, ...
— Jacob Faithful • Captain Frederick Marryat

... pr. and a 4-inch howitzer fired at intervals of five minutes from 8 till 4; most of them within 500 or 600 yards—a very tiresome procedure; much of it is on registered roads. In the morning I walked out to Le Touret to the wagon lines, got Bonfire, and rode to the ...
— In Flanders Fields and Other Poems - With an Essay in Character, by Sir Andrew Macphail • John McCrae

... Catelet the Germans were driven from their positions east of the canal, which were occupied by the Third Army. On the 8th the final phase in the battle for Cambrai began. The chief fighting was on the line secured on the 3rd. An American division captured Brancourt and Prmont, and British divisions Serain, Villers-Outreaux, and Malincourt north-east of Le Catelet. New Zealanders south of Cambrai look Lesdain and Esnes, and three British divisions Serainvillers, Forenville, and Niergnies, penetrating the southern outskirts of Cambrai, while to the north ...
— A Short History of the Great War • A.F. Pollard

... the eyes of the women by means of his whiskers and his trumpet. Him did Peter the Headstrong cause to be brought into his presence, and eyeing him for a moment from head to foot, with a countenance that would have appalled anything else than a sounder of brass—"Pr'ythee, who and what art thou?" said he. "Sire," replied the other, in no wise dismayed, "for my name, it is Antony Van Corlear—for my parentage, I am the son of my mother—for my profession, I am champion and garrison of this great city of New Amsterdam." "I doubt ...
— Knickerbocker's History of New York, Complete • Washington Irving

... delivered to Thomas Knox on the 28th of June, and were conveyed "to Castle Island pr. Order of Court." The Board of War voted the "34 Negroes delivered" rations. Lieut.-Col. Paul Revere was instructed to "issue to the Negroes at Castle Island—1 lb. of Beef, 1 lb. of Rice pr. day." The following ...
— History of the Negro Race in America From 1619 to 1880. Vol 1 - Negroes as Slaves, as Soldiers, and as Citizens • George W. Williams

... perceptible, we look first at the new Indian religious organisations. Within the British period, four organised religious movements attract our notice. They are: I. The new Indian Christian Church; II. The Br[a]hma Sam[a]j and the kindred Pr[a]rthan[a] Sam[a]jes; III. The [A]rya Sam[a]j; and IV. The Theosophical Society, which in India now stands for ...
— New Ideas in India During the Nineteenth Century - A Study of Social, Political, and Religious Developments • John Morrison

... a variety of hardships at sea. What d'ye think, now, of his bursting all his sinews, and making his eyes start out of his head, in pulling his ship off a rock, whereby he saved to his owners"——Here he was interrupted by the captain, who exclaimed, "Belay, Tom, belay; pr'ythee, don't veer out such a deal of jaw. Clap a stopper on thy cable and bring thyself up, my lad—what a deal of stuff thou has pumped up concerning bursting and starting, and pulling ships; Laud have mercy upon us!—look ye here, brother—look ye here—mind ...
— The Adventures of Sir Launcelot Greaves • Tobias Smollett

... the first that ever invented the drying of neat's tongues in the chimney; for, before that, people salted them as they do now gammons of bacon; Who begat Bolivorax, Who begat Longis, Who begat Gayoffo, whose ballocks were of poplar, and his pr... of the service or sorb-apple-tree; Who begat Maschefain, Who begat Bruslefer, Who begat Angoulevent, Who begat Galehaut, the inventor of flagons; Who begat Mirelangaut, Who begat Gallaffre, Who begat Falourdin, Who begat Roboast, ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... operating elsewhere. Hey! my dear sir, if we were not involved in the Champs Elysees and at the Bourse which they are going to finish, and in the quartier Saint-Lazare and at Tivoli, we shouldn't be, as that fat Nucingen says, in peaseness at all. What's the Madeleine to us?—a midge of a thing. Pr-r-r! We don't play low, my good fellow," he said, tapping Birotteau on the stomach and catching him round the waist. "Come, let's have our breakfast, and talk," added Claparon, wishing ...
— Rise and Fall of Cesar Birotteau • Honore de Balzac

... a misfortune of which I was the prime victim all the time, and with which my will has nothing to do. The facts are their own commentary, Monsieur le Prsident. I am an honest man, a hard-working man, an upholsterer, living in the same street for the last sixteen years, known, liked, respected and esteemed by all, as my neighbors can testify, even the porter's wife, who is not amiable every day. I am fond ...
— Une Vie, A Piece of String and Other Stories • Guy de Maupassant

... certain Englishmen say gyarden, kyind, and skyey, for garden, kind, and sky. The next change is for ty to become tsh. This we find also in English, where picture or pictyoor is pronounced pictshur, etc. This being the change exhibited in the Gudang form tyutyu (pr. choochoo, or nearly so) we have a remarkable phonetic phenomenon, namely the existence of a compound sound (tsh) wherein s is an element, in a language where s, otherwise than as the element of a compound, ...
— Voyage Of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Vol. 2 (of 2) • John MacGillivray

... I'd say, 'along will come some people and offer you such a price for your name that I reckon you won't be able to resist.' 'No, no, my friend,' he would say. 'For my nam' there shall be only my cigar. I shall mak' the good, fine cigar—until I shall die. And for the sam'—one pr-r-ice.' How'd you come to ...
— Sonnie-Boy's People • James B. Connolly

... the Shoemaker as 10:1. Then there must be the same ratio between the wares, consequently the highest artist will carry off the most valuable wares, thus combining in himself both [Greek: uperochai]. The following are the three cases, given 100 pr. shoes 1 house. ...
— Ethics • Aristotle

... French, English, and German wits of the day, and occasionally distinguished literary specimens of even more "barbarous" countries, should at a literary conference indulge in quotations from Horace or Juvenal by way of passing the time: they would not select the Twelve Tables or the Laws of the Pr'tors as matter for the testing ...
— Ancient China Simplified • Edward Harper Parker

... the best springs; I'll pluck thee berries, I'll fish for thee, and get thee wood enough. I pr'ythee let me bring thee where crabs grow, And I with my long nails will dig thee pig-nuts: Show thee a jay's nest, and instruct thee how To snare the nimble marmozet: I'll bring thee To clust'ring filberds; and sometimes I'll get thee ...
— Characters of Shakespeare's Plays • William Hazlitt

... (give back) redoni. Restore refari, ripari. Restrain haltigi, deteni. Restrict malvastigi, malgrandigi. Result rezulti. Result sekvo, rezultato. Resume (continue) dauxrigi. Rsum (prcis) resumo. Resurrection revivigo—igxo. Retail, to sell by detale vendi. Retail, by pomalgrande, detale. Retail (trade) detala. Retailer revendisto. Retain gardi, teni. Retainer vasalo. Retaliate revengxi. Retaliation ...
— English-Esperanto Dictionary • John Charles O'Connor and Charles Frederic Hayes

... liquoring at the Fashion Bar (Circuit drinking sarsaparilla), Lame Johny, the barkeeper, remarked: "You-uns missed it a lot, not seein' the pr'cesh. She were a ring-tailed tooter for fair, with the damnedest biggest noise-makin' band you ever heard, an' th' p'rformers wearin' more pr'tys than I ever allowed was made. An' say, they've got a gal in th' bunch, rider I reckon, ...
— The Red-Blooded Heroes of the Frontier • Edgar Beecher Bronson

... connection, the numerous Latin words that the introduction of Christianity (A.D. 597) brought into the vocabulary of O.E.: abbudisse, mynster, bisceop, L:den, prost, stel, mancus. ...
— Anglo-Saxon Grammar and Exercise Book - with Inflections, Syntax, Selections for Reading, and Glossary • C. Alphonso Smith

... have been, as to their more manifest immediate effects, beneficial. The establishment of the despotism of the Csars was a great benefit to the entire generation in which it took place. It put a stop to civil war, abated a vast amount of malversation and tyranny by prtors and proconsuls; it fostered many of the graces of life, and intellectual cultivation in all departments not political; it produced monuments of literary genius dazzling to the imaginations of shallow readers of history, ...
— Considerations on Representative Government • John Stuart Mill

... avoid falling into the hands of the enemy, mine went to Nogent-le-Roi, an arrondissment of Dreux. We had a fair number of troopers but almost no horses. The government was making great efforts to collect some at Versailles, where it had created a central cavalry depot commanded by General Prval. ...
— The Memoirs of General the Baron de Marbot, Translated by - Oliver C. Colt • Baron de Marbot

... or two I've lodg'd her privately, till I see further What fortune will do for me. Pr'ythee, friend, If thou wouldst have me fit to hear good counsel, ...
— Venice Preserved - A Tragedy • Thomas Otway

... Ioh. Wierus, totum hoc fictitium putat & fondus imaginarimum, & impossibile putat, idque passim in suis libris praecipue autem de Lamijs, cap. 7. 8. & 23. & de pr[e,]stigijs Daemon[u], lib. 6. c. 27, & c. Hunc refutant erudite. Binfeldo confessionibus maleficorum, & ...
— A Treatise of Witchcraft • Alexander Roberts

... me this morning, 'What news from Lisbon?' and I answered, 'She's exquisitely handsome.' Another desired to know when I had been last at Hampton Court. I replied, 'It will be on Tuesday come se'nnight.' Pr'ythee allow me at least to kiss your hand before that day, that my mind may be ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... "Pr'aps you're looking out for a juke or a bernet, or some regular nobleman, and all that—for I hear you carries all your heads uncommon high—whereby it wouldn't be unagreeable to pull 'em down a bit, and all that. Come, come, don't pout nor be sulky. Be friendly, young 'oman, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 57, No. 351, January 1845 • Various

... Weather. the Comp'y Gave the Capt. a Night Gown, a Spencer Wigg[95] and 4 pair of thread Stock'gs, to the Lieut. a pr. of Buck skin Breeches, the Doctor bot. a Suit of broad Cloth which Cost him 28 ps. of 8/8 which is Carried to his Acct. in the Sloops Leidgers. Six men that had been prisoners Signed Our Articles, Viz. Patterson taken out of the Sloop, and John ...
— Privateering and Piracy in the Colonial Period - Illustrative Documents • Various

... With this may be compared McAlpine's "uamh, n.f., a cave, den; n.m., a chief of savages, terrible fellow ... 'cha'n'eil ann ach uamh dhuine,' 'he is only a savage of a fellow.'" Islay has also another word to denote a Hebridean savage. This is ciuthach, "pr. kewach, described in the Long Island as naked wild men living in caves" (J.F. Campbell, Tales, iii. 55, n.). One of these "kewachs" figures in the story of Diarmaid and Grainne, and one version ...
— Fians, Fairies and Picts • David MacRitchie

... "Well, what o' that? Pr'aps it's half hid among the stones. I dunno: but there allus is one where they make a shaft along ...
— Menhardoc • George Manville Fenn

... accidents belong to it; but especially to decline the nouns and conjugate the verbs according to the Examples in his Rudiments; and this doing will enable him to know the end and use of his Accidence. As for the Rules of Genders of Nouns, and the Prter-perfect-tenses and Supines of Verbs, and those of Concordance and Construction in the latter part of the Accidence, I would not have a child much troubled with them, till by the help of this Book he can perfectly practise so much ...
— The Orbis Pictus • John Amos Comenius

... & Merchant of this Town Mr Charles Miller—The Makers are Men of approvd Skill and fidelity in their Business and will warrant their Work by affixing their names thereon—The original Cost of the Axes will be 40/ & the Hoes 36/ sterling pr Dozen, and I dare say they will be in every respect better than any imported ...
— The Writings of Samuel Adams, vol. III. • Samuel Adams

... laid down six shillings one by one with the air of a man undergoing the operation of having so many teeth extracted, and taking up his picture, consoled himself by saying, that "pr'aps his foreman, Bill Jones, vould buy it, as he had the luck of ...
— The Book of Anecdotes and Budget of Fun; • Various

... "That pr'aps you get to know people better if you mend all their accidents and things. I'm awfully fond of people, they're so intrusting, I'd rather know ...
— The Ffolliots of Redmarley • L. Allen Harker

... eleven, an' pitch dark, a Jack which his name is Strahan—a Scotchman, by what they say—went off all alone by himself, to have a sort of private peep at that there fort. He was pretty well filled up wi' grog, or pr'aps he wouldn't ha' been quite so venturesome. Well, he waded up to his chin in a ditch o' mud what goes round the fort, with his pistols above his head. When he gets over, bang goes one pistol, an' he sets up a shout: 'One ...
— In Clive's Command - A Story of the Fight for India • Herbert Strang

... Annette, stay not talking,' said Emily in a voice of agony—'Go, pr'ythee, go, and ...
— The Mysteries of Udolpho • Ann Radcliffe

... with an action. He told the messenger that he would certainly kiss her if she stirred a step in it! On this, the message being brought, she called for her hood and scarf, and told her husband, who interposed, "that she should see if there was any fellow alive that had the impudence!"—"Pr'ythee, my dear, don't be so rash," replied the good man; "you don't know what a man may do in ...
— The Jest Book - The Choicest Anecdotes and Sayings • Mark Lemon

... to Deforges, entitled Vers sur l'arrestation du Prtendant d'Angleterre, en 1749. It commences with ...
— Books Fatal to Their Authors • P. H. Ditchfield

... fault—but thine: Our outward sense[pr] Is but of gradual grasp—and as it is That what we have of feeling most intense Outstrips our faint expression; even so this Outshining and o'erwhelming edifice Fools our fond gaze, and greatest of the great ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... of the transepts 128 feet. 110 feet intervene between the floor and the vaulted roof of the nave and choir, and the pillars are 79 feet high. The great western window, and the end windows of the N. and S. transepts, contain superb glass set in light flamboyant tracery. Adjoining is the Prfecture, formerly the Episcopal Palace, built in the 13th cent. Near the Cathedral is the hospital and the church of St. Germain, with a curious crypt of the 9th cent., but restored in the 17th. Apply to the concierge at the gate beside ...
— The South of France—East Half • Charles Bertram Black

... de Dublin ou de Limerick, vous le diraient mieux que moi, cher lecteur, si vous alliez le leur demander, un sixpense d'argent 'a la main.-Il n'est pas une jeune fille catholique 'a laquelle on ne Fait appris pendant les jours de pr'eparation 'a la communion sainte, pas un berger des bords de la Blackwater qui ne le puisse redire ...
— The Countess Cathleen • William Butler Yeats

... love your God, because I see that he takes care of lovers: But, my dear Englishman, I pr'ythee let it be our last of absence; I cannot bear another parting from thee, nor promise thee to live three other years, if thou again ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Volume 5 (of 18) - Amboyna; The state of Innocence; Aureng-Zebe; All for Love • John Dryden

... all to whom these pr[e]ts shall come greeting; know yee that we, William Bradford, Gov^r of Plimoth, in N.E. in America, Isaak Allerton, Myles Standish, William Brewster, & Ed: Winslow, of Plimoth aforesaid, marchants, ...
— Bradford's History of 'Plimoth Plantation' • William Bradford

... quondam in academia Cantabrigiensi musarum alumnus; postea actor scenicus; deinde poeta dramaticus tragicus, paucis inferior Scripsit plurimas tragedias, sc. Tamerlane.-Tragedie of Dido Queen of Carthage. Pr. Come gentle Ganymed. Hanc perfecit edidit Tho. Nash Lond. 1594. 4^to.—Petrarius in praefatione ad Secundam partem Herois et Leandri multa in Marlovii commendationem adfert; hoc etiam facit Tho. Nash in Carmine Elegiaco Tragidiae ...
— The Tragedy of Dido Queene of Carthage • Christopher Marlowe

... pr—I mean, this is, utterly groundless, Miss Hawkins." But the gentleman seemed somewhat ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... rest for these ten days—that's the thing!—You must write to him; and pr'ythee coax him, Jack, and send him what he writes for, and give him all his way—there will be no bearing him else. And get the lady buried as fast as you can; and don't ...
— Clarissa Harlowe, Volume 9 (of 9) - The History Of A Young Lady • Samuel Richardson

... down to get things for Muffin and Polly Ann, he said how s'prised he was and how nice it was now that he knew, and wasn't she pr-roud? And he fancied that Hodgson was kinder and softer. She told him the name of her son. It was Charley, and she and Teddy talked a great deal about Charley, and Teddy sent him some chocolate, and Hodgson ...
— The Tin Soldier • Temple Bailey

... "Pr'ythee, my dear Peter," says she, "set your heart at rest about that. I can only try; if no good is to be done, you shall soon know it, and must rest contented under the disappointment."—I told her if I was there, I could take all the things out of the chests, and then melt some ...
— Life And Adventures Of Peter Wilkins, Vol. I. (of II.) • Robert Paltock

... [Sidenote: Pr. 1:2-6] That men may learn wisdom and instruction, May understand intelligent discourses, May receive instruction in wise conduct, In justice, judgment and equity; That discretion may be given to ...
— The Makers and Teachers of Judaism • Charles Foster Kent

... obscure sort of book that might have been written by a merely devout but untrained monk for his own use, but a work of importance executed for no less a personage than the celebrated Countess Matilda. The scribe was Donizo, a monk of the Benedictine Abbey of Canossa. It is of the early or pr-Carolingian type, rather inclined to Byzantine, but with the big hands and aimless expression of all semi-barbaric work. Yet it has a certain delicacy and carefulness. In Rome itself during the ninth century barbarism was at its very lowest point. Only ...
— Illuminated Manuscripts • John W. Bradley

... to meet him in the evening at Mr. (now Sir Robert) Chambers's in the Temple, where he accordingly came, though he continued to be very ill. Chambers, as is common on such occasions, prescribed various remedies to him. JOHNSON. (fretted by pain,) 'Pr'ythee don't tease me. Stay till I am well, and then you shall tell me how to cure myself.' He grew better, and talked with a noble enthusiasm of keeping up the representation of respectable families. His zeal on this subject was a circumstance in his character exceedingly remarkable, when ...
— Life of Johnson - Abridged and Edited, with an Introduction by Charles Grosvenor Osgood • James Boswell

... the French and Italian Languages grammatically and have travelled thro' many Parts of Italy, France and Spain, after 4 years Residence in a Counting House at Leghorn—I will thank you, Revd. Sir, if you will candidly inform me pr Return of Post, whether these two Languages will be useful in your Part and how far Giggleswick is from Settle; also for a particular description of the Place.—For if it be populous, my Wife will carry on her Business, which ...
— A History of Giggleswick School - From its Foundation 1499 to 1912 • Edward Allen Bell

... what they are going to do with 'em," said George Walsh, coming up to her with a mischievous face, and adding in a loud whisper, shielding his mouth with his hand "they're going to make pr " ...
— The Wide, Wide World • Elizabeth Wetherell

... well suited to farcical incident, as in Gammer Gurton's Needle (1552).[6] The classical models or their Italian imitations also produced other and less domestic imitations, as in Gascoigne's translation of Ariosto's I Suppositi (pr. 1566) and Udall's Ralph Roister Doister (1540); a little later, Lyly's Mother Bombie, Munday's Two Italian Gentlemen, and Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors. Indeed such adaptations continued much ...
— The Facts About Shakespeare • William Allan Nielson

... p. 18. isti [pr]iales. Blacman intends a word of the sense of 'parricidiales.' But either he or the printer has ...
— Henry the Sixth - A Reprint of John Blacman's Memoir with Translation and Notes • John Blacman

... lad; you're an ammytoor first mate, an' pr'aps a poet may count for somethin' here. They lead poetical lives and are ...
— Blown to Bits - The Lonely Man of Rakata, the Malay Archipelago • R.M. Ballantyne

... scenes, are not entirely visionary beings. You may smile—but this has happened, nay, often, happens, to me in my walks. I see a big clod before me in the path, and form the intention of avoiding it; when close to it, I step to one side, when pr-r-rt, my toe strikes ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 378, April, 1847 • Various

... of batteries were placed in position behind hedges, or artificially concealed, the barrels of the pieces peeping out from all imaginable lurking places. The Divisional Artillery was situated in the most advanced position, the 18 pr. batteries ranging from within 600 to 1,000 yards of the front line, with the howitzer batteries immediately behind them. On account of our proximity to the enemy, the two brigades had orders to remain silent until the day of the ...
— Three years in France with the Guns: - Being Episodes in the life of a Field Battery • C. A. Rose

... that aoristic bases in s take the datival e, so that we had prk-sh-e by the side of p{r}c-e, we shall have to consider here aoristic bases in s, taking the suffix an, not however with the termination of the dative, but with that of the locative i. Thus we read X. 126, 3, nyish{t}h{h} u na{h} nesh{n}i prshish{t}h{h} u na{h} parsh{n}i ti dvsha{h}, ...
— Chips from a German Workshop - Volume IV - Essays chiefly on the Science of Language • Max Muller

... "I pr-pr-promise!" said Jasper Jay. His bill was chattering so fast that he could hardly talk. And he was so cold that he looked uncommonly blue—even for a ...
— The Tale of Jasper Jay - Tuck-Me-In Tales • Arthur Scott Bailey

... gave him not the time to repent of them that Heaven designed to allow him, [a fine thing for thee, if thou consentest to be knocked of the head; but a cursed one for the manslayer!] and since there may be room to fear that Miss Howe will not give us her help; I pr'ythee now exert thyself to find out my Clarissa Harlowe, that I may make a LOVELACE of her. Set all the city bellmen, and the country criers, for ten miles round the metropolis, at work, with their 'Oye's! and if any man, woman, or child can give tale or tidings.' —Advertise her in all the news-papers; ...
— Clarissa, Volume 7 • Samuel Richardson

... Now Jove! who lookest on, and see'st through all, [5] Your blessing, while thus wretchedly I garb me. Pr'ythee, Euripides, a further boon, It goes, I think, together with these rags: The little Mysian bonnet for my head; "For sooth to-day I must put on the beggar, And be still what I am, and yet not seem so." [6] The audience here may know me who I am, But like poor fools ...
— Lectures on Dramatic Art and Literature • August Wilhelm Schlegel

... belle crature! Comme au chef-d' [oe]uvre de Mozart Elle prte l'accent d'une voix ferme et sre! C'est la grce de la nature, Et c'est le triomphe de l'art! Que mon premier toast soit pour elle! Je bois ...
— The Tales of Hoffmann - Les contes d'Hoffmann • Book By Jules Barbier; Music By J. Offenbach

... said Joe Graddy, turning towards the fallen man, whom Rance and some of the others were examining, and who had showed some symptoms of returning consciousness; "but his wound is a bad one, and if you ain't a murderer yet, pr'aps it won't be long afore ye ...
— Digging for Gold - Adventures in California • R.M. Ballantyne



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