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Pant   /pænt/   Listen
Pant

noun
1.
The noise made by a short puff of steam (as from an engine).
2.
(usually in the plural) a garment extending from the waist to the knee or ankle, covering each leg separately.  Synonym: trouser.
3.
A short labored intake of breath with the mouth open.  Synonym: gasp.



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"Pant" Quotes from Famous Books



... that, the first of its race, it was not quite equal to the task the magician had imposed upon it, but that its descendants would at length become capable of doing a thousand times as much, with the swinging joy of conscious might, with the pant of the giant, not the groan of the overtasked stripling urging ...
— St. George and St. Michael • George MacDonald

... leaving behind them foamy wakes which loudly broke upon the shore. Before morning, I was at intervals awakened by as many more. A striking spectacle, the passage of a big river steamer in the night; you hear, fast approaching, a labored pant; suddenly, around the bend, or emerging from behind an island, the long white monster glides into view, lanterns gleaming on two lines of deck, her electric searchlight uneasily flitting to and fro, first ...
— Afloat on the Ohio - An Historical Pilgrimage of a Thousand Miles in a Skiff, from Redstone to Cairo • Reuben Gold Thwaites

... severe decree Stands in the channel, and locks up the sea; The port he seeks, obedient to her lord, Hurls back the rebel to his lifted sword. But why this idle toil to paint that day? This time elaborately thrown away? Words all in vain pant after the distress, The height of eloquence would make it less; Heavens! how the good man trembles!— And is there a last day? and must there come A sure, a fix'd, inexorable doom? Ambition swell, and, thy proud sails to show, Take all the winds that vanity can blow; Wealth on a golden ...
— The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 2 • Edward Young

... the sea vast hunting grounds and game worthy of their powder, form an irresistible temptation—old and exclusive societies to be besieged, and contests to be waged compared to which their American experiences are but light skirmishes. As the polo pony is supposed to pant for the fray, so the hearts of social conquerors warm within them at the prospect of more ...
— Worldly Ways and Byways • Eliot Gregory

... have met The fierce black bear in the fray; Ye have trailed the panther night by night, Ye have chased the fox by day! Your prancing chargers pant To dash at the gray wolf's mouth, Your arms are sure of their quarry! ...
— War Poetry of the South • Various

... Lord, this is what I pant after. I would fain have done with wandering, Lord, thou knowest, for the work is thine. I have received the Lord Jesus as thy gift to a lost world, as thy gift to me an individual of that world, as having made peace by the blood of the cross. I account ...
— The Power of Faith - Exemplified In The Life And Writings Of The Late Mrs. Isabella Graham. • Isabella Graham

... fine subjick he work him ovair and ovair feefty, seexty times. Ze chiaro-'scuro is var' fine, and ze depfs of his tone somethings var' deep, vary. Look at ze flaish, sare, you can pinch him, and, sare, you look here, I expose grand secret to you. I take zis pensnife, I scratgis ze pant. Look zare!' ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No 3, September, 1862 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy. • Various

... when it shines clear [he wrote his brother Sam after he had been in the Bad Lands six weeks] strikes the bare sides of the Buttes and comes down on the treeless bottoms hot enough to make a Rattlesnake pant. If you can get in the shade there is most always a breeze. The grand trouble is you can't get in the shade. There's no shade to get into and the great sandy Desert is cool compared with some of the gulches, but as you ride it is not quite so bad. ...
— Roosevelt in the Bad Lands • Hermann Hagedorn

... misrepresentation and lying, born of Prussia and by her spoon-fed pack of martinets, professors, and Churchmen, mingled with Germany's daily bread for a generation, it is she and not we who will reap the whirlwind of that sowing; it is she and not we who must soon pant and tear the breast in the pangs of ...
— Raemaekers' Cartoons - With Accompanying Notes by Well-known English Writers • Louis Raemaekers

... with mourning eyes, Pant o'er again their ghostly ways;— Dread night-paths, where were gleaming days When life was lovelier than ...
— Along the Shore • Rose Hawthorne Lathrop

... by his profession accustomed to diagnose the moods of souls, discerned the laboured pant of one who has been breathed by a long run from mortal terror—who has, as my father would have said, "ridden a race with Black Care clinging to the crupper"—and took Boyd in hand with better results. He agreed to tell all ...
— The Dew of Their Youth • S. R. Crockett

... he could only lean against the wall, and pant for a couple of minutes, putting his hands up to his throat and rolling his head about. Then, with an angry gesture, he turned to the heavy blue curtain which hung behind ...
— The Exploits Of Brigadier Gerard • Arthur Conan Doyle

... LIFE, whereof our nerves are scant, O life, not death, for which we pant; More life, and fuller, ...
— Ten Great Religions - An Essay in Comparative Theology • James Freeman Clarke

... with a nervous bow, entirely at variance with her habitual sang-froid, the girl hurried from the room, her bounding heart causing her to pant as if she had been ...
— Katherine's Sheaves • Mrs. Georgie Sheldon

... altar, And follows me to the resort of men, And fills my slumber with tumultuous dreams, 135 So when I wake my blood seems liquid fire; And if I strike my damp and dizzy head My hot palm scorches it: her very name, But spoken by a stranger, makes my heart Sicken and pant; and thus unprofitably 140 I clasp the phantom of unfelt delights Till weak imagination half possesses The self-created shadow. Yet much longer Will I not nurse this life of feverous hours: From the unravelled hopes of Giacomo 145 I must work out my own dear purposes. ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... suggested ferociously. I left him there with his blood-thirsty schemes, and started for the station. I had a tendency to look behind me now and then, but I reached the station unnoticed. The afternoon was hot, the train rolled slowly along, stopping to pant at sweltering stations, from whose roofs the heat rose in waves. But I noticed these things objectively, not subjectively, for at the end of the journey was a girl with blue eyes and dark brown hair, hair that could—had I not seen it?—hang loose ...
— The Man in Lower Ten • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... he sang, and their faces glowed and their eyes burned; and the tears came and flowed down their cheeks and their forms began to sway unconsciously to the swing of the song, and their bosoms to heave and pant; and moanings broke out, and deep ejaculations; and when the last verse was reached, and Roland lay dying, all alone, with his face to the field and to his slain, lying there in heaps and winrows, and took off and held up his gauntlet to God with his failing hand, and breathed his beautiful ...
— Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc - Volume 1 (of 2) • Mark Twain

... hyper te ponton pant' ep' etchata chthonos nyktos te pegas ouranou t' anaptychas, ...
— Erechtheus - A Tragedy (New Edition) • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... kind melting Airs, soft snowy Breasts that pant with am'rous Sighs, Eyes lauguishing that steal forth welcome glances; Cheeks rip'ning, ...
— The Fine Lady's Airs (1709) • Thomas Baker

... looked out of the window at me, and went willingly enough when she began to draw me toward the house and up the first flight of stairs, though I could hardly help screaming every time my foot touched the ground. At the top of the first flight I stopped; I could go no further. The woman heard me pant, and pushing the covering from her eyes, she turned my face towards the light and looked at it. I thought she wanted to see if I was strong enough to go on, but that wasn't it at all, for in a minute I heard her say, in a voice so sweet I thought I had never heard the like, 'Yes, ...
— The Chief Legatee • Anna Katharine Green

... it not make hearers without a drop of Erse blood in their veins thrill and glow with a patriotism that complete ignorance of the history of Ireland never interferes with in the least? Do not their hearts pant for the blood of the Saxon on the spot, even though their father's name be Baker and their mother's Smith? ...
— When Ghost Meets Ghost • William Frend De Morgan

... were upon my throat, and I could feel the hot pant of his breath in my face, breath that hissed and whistled between clenched teeth. Desperately I strove to break his hold, to tear his hands asunder, and could not; only the ...
— The Broad Highway • Jeffery Farnol

... and hope and effort which are the breath of its life, that if the whole future were laid bare to us beyond to-day, the interest of all mankind would be bent on the hours that lie between; we should pant after the uncertainties of our one morning and our one afternoon; we should rush fiercely to the Exchange for our last possibility of speculation, of success, of disappointment: we should have a glut of political prophets foretelling ...
— The Lifted Veil • George Eliot

... into the yard, bent on saving her friend. That it was a friend there could be no further question; for, though the creature rushed at her as if about to devour her at a mouthful, it was only to roll ecstatically at her feet, lick her hands, and gaze into her face, trying to pant out the welcome which he could not utter. An older and more prudent person would have waited to make sure before venturing in; but confiding Betty knew little of the danger which she might have run; her heart spoke more quickly than her head, and, not stopping to have ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, July 1878, No. 9 • Various

... a history of two years never surpassed in importance and honour. This is a history which our sons shall pant over and envy. This is a history which pledges us to perseverance. This is ...
— Thomas Davis, Selections from his Prose and Poetry • Thomas Davis

... I did behold As airy as the leaves of gold, Which, erring here, and wandering there, Pleas'd with transgression ev'rywhere: Sometimes 'twould pant, and sigh, and heave, As if to stir it scarce had leave: But, having got it, thereupon 'Twould make a brave expansion. And pounc'd with stars it showed to me Like a celestial canopy. Sometimes 'twould blaze, ...
— The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 • Robert Herrick

... the trees, and away along all the old tracks to the farm, following Jane, who, knowing we were behind her, flew like the wind, without once looking back. We soon lost her, for we often paused to pant and lean against one another for a moment's respite in this strange memorable race. We did not speak, but I looked at Rachel, and she was like a poor lily soiled and crushed by the storm, with her white dress trailing through the dust, and her satin shoes torn on her feet. ...
— The Late Miss Hollingford • Rosa Mulholland

... hortatory kind. I may be charged with wanting to do people "good." Well, if trying to make them happy is trying to do them good, then I confess the charge. There is no doubt whatever that they are not happy now. They hate too many people, they pant and toil after the wrong things; they serve false gods and forget the true ones. That is what we think about it in the country; and I am of ...
— In a Green Shade - A Country Commentary • Maurice Hewlett

... though, that it was n't in the latter part of June, that it happened,—the singular event I am going to tell you about. It had been dreadfully hot all day,—so hot that the very hillsides seemed to pant, like the sides of the poor cattle, in the parched pastures. I thought it extremely lucky that my geography lesson that day was in Greenland. I don't believe I could have been equal to a lesson in Mesopotamia. I remember saying to Bob Linn, at recess, that I wished I was a seal, riding on ...
— Stories of Many Lands • Grace Greenwood

... to answer, but tell her I have to cut a stick to mend my whip-handle. I think I will cut a stick and rake some earth over the skeleton to cover it, and come another day with a shovel and dig a new grave. The dogs lie down and pant, and she looks through me with her big eyes like she ...
— The Skeleton On Round Island - From "Mackinac And Lake Stories", 1899 • Mary Hartwell Catherwood

... water be obtained, unless drawn at a great distance. But the saint, who continually thirsted after God, the living fountain, compassionated the grievance of his hostess and of the multitude then newly born unto Christ, and, the rather that they might the more ardently pant toward the fountain of life, thought he fit to show its virtue. Therefore on the morrow he went unto a certain place, and in the presence of many standing around he prayed, and touched the earth with the staff of Jesus, ...
— The Most Ancient Lives of Saint Patrick - Including the Life by Jocelin, Hitherto Unpublished in America, and His Extant Writings • Various

... estate he came, Alack, fair lady, 't was the same! And many a lovely, love-lorn dame Would pitiful pant and pine. These doleful dames Felt forceful flames, The old, the grey, The young and gay, Both dark and fair Would rend their hair, And sigh and weep And seldom sleep; And dames long wed From spouses fled ...
— The Geste of Duke Jocelyn • Jeffery Farnol

... to pant for breath, and his heart pounded horribly and his eyes tried to go out of focus, but Joe Kenmore strained in his acceleration-chair and managed to laugh ...
— Space Tug • Murray Leinster

... to nymph the state-infection flies, Swells in her breast, and sparkles in her eyes. O'erwhelm'd by politics lie malice, pride, Envy, and twenty other faults beside. 230 No more their little fluttering hearts confess A passion for applause, or rage for dress; No more they pant for public raree-shows, Or lose one thought on monkeys or on beaux: Coquettes no more pursue the jilting plan, And lustful prudes forget to rail at man: The darling theme Cecilia's self will choose, Nor thinks of scandal ...
— Poetical Works • Charles Churchill

... Within, what carpet like its crunching sand, what music merry as its crackling logs, what perfume like its kitchen's dainty breath, what weather genial as its hearty warmth! Blessings on the old house, how sturdily it stood! How did the vexed wind chafe and roar about its stalwart roof; how did it pant and strive with its wide chimneys, which still poured forth from their hospitable throats, great clouds of smoke, and puffed defiance in its face; how, above all, did it drive and rattle at the casement, emulous to extinguish ...
— Barnaby Rudge • Charles Dickens

... his sword was an oracle! "Let us consult the Oracle," he would say, and put the handle against his ear, and shake his head wisely. "And this day is allowed Rutilianus to live," he would say, and, tucking up his cloak, he would puff and pant and fight well. Oh, there were jests in plenty on the Wall to take the ...
— Puck of Pook's Hill • Rudyard Kipling

... the spot. But he had no time given him to recover. Silver, agile as a monkey, even without leg or crutch, was on the top of him next moment, and had twice buried his knife up to the hilt in that defenseless body. From my place of ambush I could hear him pant aloud ...
— Treasure Island • Robert Louis Stevenson

... their souls out, turning a windlass outside the gates—ach, that terrible invention of his!" groaned old Conrad. "My poor sons are faint with fatigue, mein herr. You should see them perspire,—and hear them pant for breath." ...
— A Fool and His Money • George Barr McCutcheon

... they talked merrily while the half-broken horses bucked about among the trees. And so a cavalry escort was with us for a mile, till we got to a mighty hill strewn with moss agates, and everybody had to jump out and pant in that thin air. But how intoxicating it was! The old lady from Chicago ducked like an emancipated hen as she scuttled about the road, cramming pieces of rock into her reticule. She sent me fifty yards down to the hill-side ...
— American Notes • Rudyard Kipling

... bal'last emp'ty crit'ic cot'ton bant'ling gen'try dig'it com'ic can'to mer'it flim'sy drop'sy ras'cal men'tal flip'pant flor'id las'so sher'iff frig'id frol'ic an'tic ten'dril in'fant gos'pel sad'ness vel'lum in'gress gos'sip sal'ver vel'vet in'mate hor'rid sand'y nec'tar in'quest jol'ly mag'got ves'try ...
— McGuffey's Eclectic Spelling Book • W. H. McGuffey

... last letter. She has not rallied yet. She is very ill. I believe, if you were to see her, your impression would be that there is no hope. A more hollow, wasted, pallid aspect I have not beheld. The deep tight cough continues; the breathing after the least exertion is a rapid pant; and these symptoms are accompanied by pains in the chest and side. Her pulse, the only time she allowed it to be felt, was found to beat 115 per minute. In this state she resolutely refuses to see a doctor; she will give no explanation ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... hoarded wealth and all the fruits of civilization if they exist for only a few, and if the majority of the human race always remains the Tantalus who reaches in vain for these fruits! Worse than Tantalus—for he at least had not produced the fruits for which his parched lips were condemned to pant in vain! This, the mightiest advance of culture which history could know, would justify the helpful intervention of the State if anything would. The State furthermore can furnish this possibility in the easiest manner through ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. X. • Kuno Francke

... proper to hew stone and remove earth, and they fell to their work on the next day with more eagerness than vigour. They were presently exhausted by their efforts, and sat down to pant upon the grass. The prince, for a moment, appeared to be discouraged. "Sir," said his companion, "practice will enable us to continue our labour for a longer time; mark, however, how far we have ...
— Dr. Johnson's Works: Life, Poems, and Tales, Volume 1 - The Works Of Samuel Johnson, Ll.D., In Nine Volumes • Samuel Johnson

... dry summers pant for the first rain, So thou art thirsty for a happy home And for a life remote, like hermit's prayer, A corner ...
— Life Immovable - First Part • Kostes Palamas

... Flatter'd with hopes to glut our greedy rage; Unknown, assaulting whom we blindly meet, And strew with Grecian carcasses the street. Thus while their straggling parties we defeat, Some to the shore and safer ships retreat; And some, oppress'd with more ignoble fear, Remount the hollow horse, and pant in secret there. ...
— The Aeneid • Virgil

... into a chamber, said to her, "O lovely morsel for a King, who art shut up in this skin! O candle of love, who art enclosed within this hairy lanthorn! Wherefore all this trifling? Do you wish to see me pine and pant, and die by inches? I am wasting away; without hope, and tormented by thy beauty. And you see clearly the proof, for I am shrunk two-thirds in size, like wine boiled down, and am nothing but skin and bone, for the fever is double-stitched to my veins. So lift up the curtain ...
— Stories from Pentamerone • Giambattista Basile

... oh! why desert us? Did not all beneath the heaven, All that dwell in earth's four quarters, Pant, with eye and heart uplifted, As for heav'n-sent rain in summer, For thy rule of flow'ry fragrance, For thy plenilune of empire? Now on lone Mayumi's hillock, Firm on everlasting columns, Pilest thou a lofty palace, Whence no more, when day is breaking, ...
— Japanese Literature - Including Selections from Genji Monogatari and Classical - Poetry and Drama of Japan • Various

... pursued. One, two, three hundred yards were covered. Jack's heart sank. The skiff had gained terribly. Manned by six powerful oarsmen, she was cutting down the distance between them with frightful rapidity. In the sampan the Shan was still pulling with undiminished energy, but Jim Dent was beginning to pant. Buck seized the paddle from his grip and took a turn. But the skiff continued to ...
— Jack Haydon's Quest • John Finnemore

... grudgingly. "Yes, of course it will. I know that as well as you do, Nita Reese. Just the same she's never any good in Gest and Pant, ...
— Betty Wales Senior • Margaret Warde

... see a SANT, My large neighbours make me pant, For they push so coarsely; Or the evergreens of STONE, Then they nip my funnybone; And I lose ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 104, April 29, 1893 • Various

... they might have struck his wife in an ordinary way, now seemed to be her chief comfort. She would come to him, put her paw in his hand and look at him with sparkling eyes shining with joy and gratitude, would pant with eagerness, jump at him ...
— Lady Into Fox • David Garnett

... kindness in my time, but owe them no grudge; on the contrary, much gratitude for the delight of their fantastic outline on the calm blue sky, when they had no work to do but to open their iron mouths and pant ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume I (of 3) • John Ruskin

... acute angle for several hundred miles—my companion said yards, but I know better; it was miles—I threw myself prone upon the softer surfaces of a large granite slab, feeling that I could go no farther. I also wished to have plenty of room in which to pant. He could beat me climbing, but at panting I had him licked to a whisper. He was a person without sympathy. In his bosom the milk of human kindness had clabbered and turned to a brick-cheese. He stood there and laughed. ...
— Cobb's Bill-of-Fare • Irvin Shrewsbury Cobb

... set forward, and began to go up the hill, and up the hill they went; but before they got to the top, Christiana began to pant; and said, I dare say, this is a breathing hill. No marvel if they that love their ease more than their souls, choose to themselves a smoother way.[113] Then said Mercy, I must sit down; also the least of the children began to cry. Come, come, said Great-heart, sit not down ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... and the sun was blazing down over the cliffs and forest. It grew very hot in the alcove. No breath of wind reached them there, and they began to pant ...
— The Texan Star - The Story of a Great Fight for Liberty • Joseph A. Altsheler

... of the awful sea called the Past dash over me, I almost die of strangulation. I pant and gasp for breath, and shudder and tremble in my terror. My spree on this occasion was not yet over; my appetite was burning and raging, and notwithstanding my almost miraculous escape from a drunken death, I watched my opportunity, like a man bent on self-destruction, and ...
— Fifteen Years in Hell • Luther Benson

... pangs endure in peace, Nor yet for freedom pant,— He cuts the bane you cleave to ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 110, December, 1866 - A Magazine of Literature, Science, Art, and Politics • Various

... were yelping on his trail. He came on in a lame uneven trot, making straight for the tree. When he reached the tree he crouched, or rather fell, on the ground within a yard of Jonathan and his dog. He quivered and twitched; his nostrils flared; at every pant drops of blood flecked the snow; his great dark eyes had a strained and awful look, almost human ...
— Betty Zane • Zane Grey

... dolor, groan and pant, Count Roland sounds his Olifant: The crimson stream shoots from his lips; The blood from bursten temple drips; But far, O, far the echoes ring, And, in the defiles, reach the king; Reach Naymes, and the French array: 'Tis Roland's horn,' the ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume IV. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... Overturn, to, or upset Kooroobashoong. Outside Fooca. ———-, of bread (lit. skin) Ka. Paddle of a canoe Wayacoo. Paint, to Ooroo[90] sheenoostang. Palanquin chair Kagoo. Palm of the hand (lit. belly of the hand) Tee noo watta[91]. Pant, to Eetchee hootoong. Panting Eetchee. Paper of any kind Kabee. Path Yamana meetchee. Paupaw apple Wangshooee. Pawns at chess Toomoo. Pencil Hoodee. Perspiration Ac'kkaddee[92]. Pepper pod Quada coosha. Pick up ...
— Account of a Voyage of Discovery - to the West Coast of Corea, and the Great Loo-Choo Island • Captain Basil Hall

... chance Maggie should bring me a son, He shall fight for his king, as his father has done; I 'll hang up my sword with an old soldier's pride— O! may he be worthy to wear 't on his side. I pant for the breeze of my loved native place; I long for the smile of each welcoming face; I 'll aff to the Highlands as fast 's I can reel, And feast ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... (for the dam was not more than three feet in height), when his trained and cunning ear caught a soft swirling sound in the water on the other side of the barrier. Instantly he stiffened to a statue, just as he was, his mouth open so that not a pant of his quickened breath might be audible. The next moment the head of a beaver appeared over the edge of the dam, not ten feet away, and stared him straight ...
— The House in the Water - A Book of Animal Stories • Charles G. D. Roberts

... practice we run during three years or so, and to this all the time you are exhorting, directing us—whether you mean it or not, though we suspect that you cannot help yourselves.' Yes; and, as labouring swimmers will turn their eyes even to a little boat in the offing, I hear you pant 'This man at all events—always so insistent that good literature teaches What Is rather than What Knows—will bring word that we may float on our backs, bathe, enjoy these waters and be refreshed, instead of striving through them competitive for a goal. He must condemn literary ...
— On The Art of Reading • Arthur Quiller-Couch

... from want of water, continued to pant so fearfully, that it was nearly half an hour before they ventured to mount, that they might return to the caravan. In the mean time the heavens had become wholly obscured by the clouds, and there was every prospect of a heavy shower; at ...
— The Mission; or Scenes in Africa • Captain Frederick Marryat

... her, so that she could not meet them. A great shiver went through her. She began to pant a little. "I—don't understand," she said. "You know nothing—but ...
— The Keeper of the Door • Ethel M. Dell

... headlines are set forth in letters three inches in height. It is as though the editors of these sheets are determined to exhaust your attention. They are not content to tell you that this or that inapposite event has taken place. They pant, they shriek, they yell. Their method represents the beating of a thousand big drums, the blare of unnumbered trumpets, the shouted blasphemies of a million raucous throats. And if, with all this noise dinning in your ear, you are ...
— American Sketches - 1908 • Charles Whibley

... work and it made Bert pant for breath, for the snow was still up to his waist. But both kept on, and in the end they stood on the edge of the sand pit, opposite to the side which ...
— The Bobbsey Twins - Or, Merry Days Indoors and Out • Laura Lee Hope

... have now been long away, I suppose your curiosity may pant for some news of your old friends. Miss Williams and I live much as we did. Miss Cotterel[1093] still continues to cling to Mrs. Porter, and Charlotte[1094] is now big of the fourth child. Mr. Reynolds gets six thousands a year[1095]. Levet is lately married, ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... and waxen. An inexplicable fear came upon him, not at the sight of the corpse, for he had been in Indian massacres and had rescued bodies mutilated beyond recognition; but from some moral dread that, strangely enough, quickened and deepened with the far-off pant of the advancing steamboat. Scarcely knowing why, he dragged the body hurriedly ashore, concealing it in the reeds, as if he were disposing of the evidence of his own crime. Then, to his preposterous ...
— Selected Stories • Bret Harte

... project teems. Fixed in his peaceful purpose he abides With none takes counsel and in none confides; But slowly weaves about the foe a net Which leaves them wholly at his mercy, yet He strikes no fateful blow; he takes no life, And holds in check his men, who pant ...
— Custer, and Other Poems. • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... dropping bombs," she so far forgot herself as to pant out, "and buildings crashing and pavements and people smashed! Westminster and the Palaces rocking, and fat ...
— The Head of the House of Coombe • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... spoken, only the pant and struggle of hard-drawn breaths. Not until he stood on his feet again, with a bleeding-faced fellow rising with dazed eyes, and another clambering up unsteadily, with both hands pressed against his head, did the captors give voice. And their voice was a yell of triumph that ...
— The Rangeland Avenger • Max Brand

... to blow my nose on. You may know, Alf, that all the good-dressers here at Carlton—and I pride myself I'm amongst 'em—have their suits pressed once a week to make 'em set right, but she said my pant-legs looked like they was lined with pasteboard, and that my high collar looked like a cuff upside down. Of course, I couldn't get mad, for she was joking all through, and laughin' pleasant-like. ...
— Dixie Hart • Will N. Harben

... it. In his ears was a trampling rush, the thunder of the hoofs of the cattle, in career from every quarter of the wide plains to the brow of the hill above him! He fled straight for the castle, scarcely with breath enough to pant. ...
— Harper's Young People, December 16, 1879 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... Hurrah! the jetted lightnings are hissing high and low— A hailing fount of fire is struck at every quashing blow; The leathern mail rebounds the hail, the rattling cinders strow The ground around: at every bound the sweltering fountains flow And thick and loud the swinking crowd at every stroke pant "Ho!" ...
— The Universal Reciter - 81 Choice Pieces of Rare Poetical Gems • Various

... Monarch or a mushroom dies, Awhile extinct the organic matter lies; But, as a few short hours or years revolve, Alchemic powers the changing mass dissolve; Born to new life unnumber'd insects pant, New buds surround the microscopic plant; Whose embryon senses, and unwearied frames, Feel finer goads, and blush with purer flames; 390 Renascent joys from irritation spring, Stretch the long root, or ...
— The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society - A Poem, with Philosophical Notes • Erasmus Darwin

... to strain and pant, and she herself to grow giddy with heat and weariness, when she saw through the trees an old farmhouse with latticed windows and a great external chimney, standing in a square of cultivated ground; and in a moment more the path they ...
— By What Authority? • Robert Hugh Benson

... his heart, then, at sixty-eight, as they had been at thirteen. If the Doctor, with a large birch, had appeared bodily to him, even at the age of threescore and eight, and had said in awful voice, "Boy, take down your pant—"? Well, well, Miss Sedley was exceedingly alarmed at this act ...
— Vanity Fair • William Makepeace Thackeray

... chicken, and could bear a drubbing as well as any boxing champion in the universe, lay still only to watch his opportunity; and now, perceiving his antagonist to pant with his labours, he exerted his utmost force at once, and with such success that he overturned him, and became his superior; when, fixing one of his knees in his breast, he cried out in an exulting voice, "It is my turn now;" and, after a few minutes' ...
— Joseph Andrews Vol. 1 • Henry Fielding

... pant after independence is the greatest slander on the Province." Sparks, in a note entitled "American Independence," in the second volume of the Writings of Washington, remarks: "It is not easy to determine ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 1 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Egerton Ryerson

... now, and as soon as we found we couldn't have a drink, we was more than thirty-five times as thirsty as we was a quarter of a minute before. Why, in a little while we wanted to hold our mouths open and pant like a dog. ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... to have been derived from the Welsh Pont y Go. "The Smith's Bridge;" or Pant y Go, "The Smith's Valley." Perhaps a Smith dwelt by the Side of a River, or near a Bridge. Dr. Robertson says, History of America, Vol. II. p. 126, that the Indians were very ignorant of the use of Metals; Artificers in Metals were scarce, and on that account a Name might ...
— An Enquiry into the Truth of the Tradition, Concerning the - Discovery of America, by Prince Madog ab Owen Gwynedd, about the Year, 1170 • John Williams

... bear; On the hill he will not tire, Swifter as it waxes higher; In the marsh he will not slacken, On the plain be overtaken; In the wave he will not sink, Nor pause at the brook's side to drink; In the race he will not pant, In the combat he'll not faint; On the stones he will not stumble, 560 Time nor toil shall make him humble; In the stall he will not stiffen, But be winged as a Griffin, Only flying with his feet: And will not such a voyage be sweet? ...
— The Works of Lord Byron - Poetry, Volume V. • Lord Byron

... was close upon us, and then I uttered a strange cry, and, bearing hard upon the tiller, threw the boat right up into the wind, the sail easing as we formed a curve in the water, our speed checked, and then we lay nose to wind, with the boat seeming to quiver and pant after her heavy run. ...
— Blue Jackets - The Log of the Teaser • George Manville Fenn

... to the squire and at once made friends with him. Ettles, whose cheek was the colour of the oak-apples in spring, was more respectful: he stood till the squire motioned him to sit down. The dogs rolled on the sward, but, though in the shadow, they could not extend themselves sufficiently nor pant fast enough. Yonder the breeze that came up over the forest on its way to the downs blew through the group of trees on the knoll, cooling the deer ...
— Field and Hedgerow • Richard Jefferies

... arrival he might really follow to see what had become of me. I turned sick with the fear of it, and resolved on the truth. But Gaspard's last gullet-gripe had robbed me of the power to speak. I could only pant and choke. As I struggled painfully for wind, the door was flung open before a tall young man in black. Through the haze that hung before my vision I saw the soldier seize him as he crossed the threshold. Through the noise of waters ...
— Helmet of Navarre • Bertha Runkle

... master kept him running—evidently on purpose to try his powers, as a jockey might test the qualities of a new horse, and, strong though he was, the poor youth began at last to feel greatly distressed, and to pant a good deal. Still his pride and a determination not to be beaten ...
— Blue Lights - Hot Work in the Soudan • R.M. Ballantyne

... extremes. A refined intellect will not consent, with the women of Persia, to dwell in the harem; nor subscribe to the Hindoo doctrine, that "the female who can read or write, is disqualified for domestic life, and is the heir of misfortunes." Neither will such a one aspire to the baubles of office, pant to join in harangues to the crowd, or to compete with man ...
— The Young Maiden • A. B. (Artemas Bowers) Muzzey

... next lamp, Mr. Smithers sees plainly enough that the end is near. The fugitive touches the ground with only the balls of his feet, as if each step were torture, and expels his breath with unceasing violence. He does not gasp or pant,—he groans. ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 32, June, 1860 • Various

... stream and field and hill and ocean, A quickening life from the Earth's heart has burst, As it has ever done, with change and motion, From the great morning of the world when first God dawned on chaos. In its steam immersed, 5 The lamps of heaven flash with a softer light; All baser things pant with life's sacred thirst, Diffuse themselves, and spend in love's delight The beauty and the joy of ...
— Adonais • Shelley

... condemns it too. But there are fine passages;—and, after all, what is a work—any—or every work—but a desert with fountains, and, perhaps, a grove or two, every day's journey? To be sure, in Madame, what we often mistake, and 'pant for,' as the 'cooling stream,' turns out to be the 'mirage' (critice verbiage); but we do, at last, get to something like the temple of Jove Ammon, and then the waste we have passed is only remembered ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. II - With His Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... hear your name; they will not hear me speak. I repeat, it is past all hope, all chance of moving them. They hate—hate you, hate me for thinking of you. I had no choice; I wrote at once and followed my letter; I ran through the streets; I pant for want of breath, not want of courage. I prove I have it, Alvan; I have done all I ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... could never pant For all that beauty sighs to grant With half the fervor hate bestows Upon the last embrace of foes, When, grappling in the fight, they fold Those arms that ne'er shall lose ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 8, No. 48, October, 1861 • Various

... their backs. At that moment they divide, and the next we are standing on a desert island, a sea of billowing backs flowing round on either side in a half-mile current of crazy buffaloes. The herd is fully five minutes in passing us. We watch them as they come, and as the last laggers pant by the mound we look westward and see the stampeders halting. We soon understand the cause. They have come up with the main herd. Yes, there, in full sight of us, is the buffalo army, extending its deep line as far as the western horizon. The whole earth is black with them. From ...
— The Western World - Picturesque Sketches of Nature and Natural History in North - and South America • W.H.G. Kingston

... of flowers and plants, The bride of heaven, world's treasure, child of stars! For whom love sighs, and I myself, the sun, do pant, Because her crown is golden, and her leaves are velvet, Her foot and stylus emerald, her ...
— The Development of the Feeling for Nature in the Middle Ages and - Modern Times • Alfred Biese

... the staff in my hands! for I go to the Fenians, thou cleric, to chant The warsongs that roused them of old; they will rise, making clouds with their breath. Innumerable, singing, exultant; and hell underneath them shall pant, And demons be broken in pieces, and ...
— The Crest-Wave of Evolution • Kenneth Morris

... Gyaros, Andros, Tenos, all refuse, With Peparethos, in bright olives rich, To aid the Gnossian fleet. Thence to the left Steering, OEnopia's regions Minos sought; OEnopia call'd of old, AEgina now, By AEaecus, his mother's honor'd name. In crowds the people rush, and pant to view So highly fam'd a prince: to meet him go First Telamon, then Peleus next in age, And Phocas third and last, Ev'n AEaecus With years opprest, steps tardy forth, and asks The visit's cause. The hundred-city'd king Deep sighs, ...
— The Metamorphoses of Publius Ovidus Naso in English blank verse Vols. I & II • Ovid

... monarch, who, as I have read, marching at the head of a vast army, through a wide extended desert, which afforded neither river nor spring, for the first time, found himself (in common with his soldiers) overtaken by a craving thirst, which made him pant after a cup of water. And when, after diligent search, one of his soldiers found a little dirty puddle, and carried him some of the filthy water in his nasty helmet, the monarch greedily swallowing it, cried out, that in all his life he never ...
— Pamela (Vol. II.) • Samuel Richardson

... Amy quoted. "Poor Cigarette," she added, descending to prose again, and tapping Cigarette's nose with the butt of her riding-crop. "How he did heave and pant when he caught up with us! And ...
— Peak and Prairie - From a Colorado Sketch-book • Anna Fuller

... gone out before day break, she was seized with the fancy to see Rodolphe at once. She would go quickly to La Huchette, stay there an hour, and be back again at Yonville while everyone was still asleep. This idea made her pant with desire, and she soon found herself in the middle of the field, walking with rapid steps, without looking ...
— Madame Bovary • Gustave Flaubert

... up, expressed the utmost amazement, and this gradually, under the lion glance, became more and more of dismay, quailing, collapsing visibly under the passionless gravity of that look. Even the tall form seemed to shrink, the eyes dilated, the brows drew closer together, and the chest seemed to pant, as the relic was held forth. There was a dead silence throughout the court as the King ceased to speak; only he continued to bend that searching gaze ...
— The Caged Lion • Charlotte M. Yonge

... hills, for pretty girls to pant, And glow with richer roses; The wind itself, to toss askant The curls that ...
— Fringilla: Some Tales In Verse • Richard Doddridge Blackmore

... change hath come! The sky is dark without a cloud! The shouts of wrath and joy are dumb, And proud knees unto earth are bowed. A change is on the hill of Death, The helmed watchers pant for breath, And turn with wild and maniac eyes From the dark scene ...
— The Complete Works of Whittier - The Standard Library Edition with a linked Index • John Greenleaf Whittier

... sure, the haste and hurry Made the seedling sweat and pant; But almost before it knew it It ...
— The Complete Poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar • Paul Laurence Dunbar

... She began to pant. He stooped and raised her. She clung to him with all her waning strength. "Stumpy! Stumpy! You will ...
— Greatheart • Ethel M. Dell

... see it, too. In the deep shadow of the tree there was a deeper shadow yet, black, inchoate, vague—a crouching form full of savage vigor and menace. It was no higher than a horse, but the dim outline suggested vast bulk and strength. That hissing pant, as regular and full-volumed as the exhaust of an engine, spoke of a monstrous organism. Once, as it moved, I thought I saw the glint of two terrible, greenish eyes. There was an uneasy rustling, as if ...
— The Lost World • Arthur Conan Doyle

... What are friends? What are elections? What is our country, compared to the smiles of a prime minister; and the titles he can bestow? Nothing now was wanting to the honor of the house of Bray! It might in time I own pant after a Dukedom; and a Duke of Bray might as justly be stiled princely and most puissant as many another Duke. But at present it was ...
— The Adventures of Hugh Trevor • Thomas Holcroft

... sat listening to some cries which made their black companion begin to pant and glare at the cabin-hatch; and Mark himself felt as if he could have enjoyed lashing with wires the backs of the scoundrels who treated their black fellows worse than they ...
— The Black Bar • George Manville Fenn

... opened ... but no, no' a sign: an' a wheen tailor buddies wha cashed their advance notes huntin' high an' low! I seen yin o' them ower by M'Lean Street wi' a nicht polis wi 'm t' see he didna get a heid pit on 'm!—'sss! A pant! So I cam' doon here, an' I hiv been lookin' for sailormen sin' ten o'clock. Man, they'll no' gang in thae wind-jammers, wi' sae mony new steamers speirin' hauns, an' new boats giein' twa ten fur th' run ...
— The Brassbounder - A Tale of the Sea • David W. Bone

... then turns to steel, like his limbs. His eyes glare; his tongue fears to pant; it slips out at one side of his teeth and they close on it. Then slowly, slowly, he goes down, noiseless as a cat, and crouches on the long covert, ...
— A Perilous Secret • Charles Reade

... the landscape quivering lies, The cattle pant beneath the tree; Through parching air and purple skies The earth looks up, in vain, for thee; For thee—for thee it looks in vain, Oh, gentle, gentle ...
— Home Geography For Primary Grades • C. C. Long

... turn, or wheresoe'er I tread, This giddy world still rattles round my head! I pant for silence e'en in this retreat— Good Heaven! what ...
— Poetical Works of Johnson, Parnell, Gray, and Smollett - With Memoirs, Critical Dissertations, and Explanatory Notes • Samuel Johnson, Thomas Parnell, Thomas Gray, and Tobias Smollett

... found a worn pair of trousers which he threw to the girl. A sweater, too shrunken and misshapen for him to wear again, came next. Dismayed, she inspected the battered loot; then was inspired to quick alterations. Pant-legs cut off well above the baggy knees made passable shorts; the sweater bulged a trifle at the shoulders, it fit adequately elsewhere—and something ...
— Master of the Moondog • Stanley Mullen

... This vital weight upon the struggling heart, Which sinks with sorrow, or beats quick with pain, Or joy that ends in agony or faintness— 170 In all the days of past and future—for In life there is no present—we can number How few—how less than few—wherein the soul Forbears to pant for death, and yet draws back As from a stream in winter, though the chill[ba] Be but a moment's. I have one resource Still in my science—I can call the dead, And ask them what it is we dread to be: The sternest answer ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 4 • Lord Byron

... will not make pretense to pant And puff as some light-footed messenger. In sooth my soul beneath its pack of thought Made many a halt and turned and turned again; For conscience plied her spur and curb by turns. "Why hurry headlong to thy fate, poor fool?" ...
— The Oedipus Trilogy • Sophocles

... and detergent: and hence, in cold phlegmatic habits, they quicken the circulation, dissolve tenacious juices, open obstructions of the excretory glands, and promote the fluid secretions. The writers on the Materia Medica in general have entertained a very high opinion of the virtues of this pant. Boerhaave is full of its praises; particularly of the essential oil, and the distilled water cohobated or redistilled several times from fresh parcels of the herb: after somewhat extravagantly commending other waters prepared in this manner, he adds, with regard ...
— The Botanist's Companion, Vol. II • William Salisbury

... Colonel said, quietly, "Let them go, and God be our helper, Amen." There was the noise in the darkness of trampling and scraping on the cliff-top for a second; the sound as of men straining hard together, and then with a pant it ceased all at once, and the men held their breath to hear. One second of utter silence; then one prolonged, deep, resounding splash sending up a great mass of white foam as the brass-pieces together plunged into the dark water ...
— The Burial of the Guns • Thomas Nelson Page



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