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Ne   /ni/  /nˌɔrθˈist/  /ˈɛnˈi/  /neɪ/   Listen
Ne

noun
1.
A colorless odorless gaseous element that give a red glow in a vacuum tube; one of the six inert gasses; occurs in the air in small amounts.  Synonyms: atomic number 10, neon.
2.
The compass point midway between north and east; at 45 degrees.  Synonyms: nor'-east, northeast, northeastward.
3.
A midwestern state on the Great Plains.  Synonyms: Cornhusker State, Nebraska.



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"Ne" Quotes from Famous Books



... supellex Ingens, aurea, nobilis, venusta Qua totus studeo Britanniarum Vero reddere gloriam nitori. Sed fortuna meis noverca coeptis Jam felicibus invidet maligna. Quare, ne pereant brevi vel hora Multarum mihi noctium labores Omnes—— CRANMERE, eximium decus piorum! ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... Debutante was Kitty, Frivolous and witty as ever bud that blew. Kitty lacked sobriety, yet she ran society, A leader whom the chaperons indulged a year or two; Corner-men, eligibles, dancing-dolls she knew,— Kitty then was slighted, ne'er again invited; What has she to write ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... four rusty guns, "with ne'er a touch-hole to any on 'em," as Bushy informed us, stands upon a projecting point about a mile from the town of Nassau, the road thither forming a delightful evening promenade, or drive. The fort is old, crumbling, and time-worn, but was once occupied ...
— Due South or Cuba Past and Present • Maturin M. Ballou

... Love brings again stronger than love himself; Thy presence is enough, oh memory! These to reanimate in all their strength, And with imperious sov'reignty they rule And govern each opposing force. May I be happy in this governance And with these bonds, and may that light ne'er cease. ...
— The Heroic Enthusiasts,(1 of 2) (Gli Eroici Furori) - An Ethical Poem • Giordano Bruno

... convassaux, et toute sorte de proces se font encore presentement en Angleterre a toutes sortes d'accuses par leurs Pairs, c'est-a-dire, par des personnes de leur meme etat et de leur meme condition, a la reserve des Bourreaux et des Bouchers, qui, a cause de leur cruaute ne sont point juges. Geoffroi Martel, Comte d'Anjou, fit faire ainsi le proces a Guerin de Craon, qu'il avait fait foi et hommage de la Baronnie de Craon a Conan, duc de Bretange. Geoffroi fit assembler ses Barons, qui, selon l'ancienne forme observee en matiere feodale, ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 18. Saturday, March 2, 1850 • Various

... mare, whose bases and other housings were black, but all besprent with fair lilys of silver sheen. Whereas Sir Percivale bestrode a red horse, with a tawny mane and tail; whose trappings were all to-smirched with mud and mire; and his armour was wondrous rosty to behold, ne could he by any art furbish it again; so that as the sun in his going down shone twixt the bare trunks of the trees, full upon the knights twain, the one did seem all shining with light, and the other all to glow with ruddy fire. Now it came ...
— Phantastes - A Faerie Romance for Men and Women • George MacDonald

... village or house exists directly on the route. One small Naga village is visible from the Namtusseek below Yoomsan, and a detached hut is visible here and there on a high mountain close to, and NE. of Yoomsan. On the Burmese side there is, as I have mentioned before, a village consisting of two houses close to the route. This village has lately been established by some Singphos from Nimbrung, several marches to ...
— Journals of Travels in Assam, Burma, Bhootan, Afghanistan and The - Neighbouring Countries • William Griffith

... for the pining slave, From his wife and children riven; From every vale their bitter wail Goes sounding up to Heaven. Then for the life of that poor wife, And for those children pining; O ne'er give o'er till the chains no more Around their ...
— The Liberty Minstrel • George W. Clark

... was born in Ireland, but crossed over to Scotland in his youth to become the disciple of St. Kentigern. An old legend relates that, as no vessel could be procured for his voyage, ne was miraculously conveyed across the channel upon a large stone, this stone after wards becoming an instrument of healing to the sick who touched it. St. Conval's relics were honoured at Inchinnan on the Clyde. He was patron of the old church of Pollokshaws or {84} ...
— A Calendar of Scottish Saints • Michael Barrett

... Crimee. Un soir de combat, deux blesses gisaient cote a cote sur le champ de bataille. La nuit tomba, et le froid terrible qui sevissait augmenta encore leurs souffrances. Ils essayerent d'echanger quelques paroles, mais ils ne se comprirent pas, car l'un etait un Francais et l'autre etait un Russe. Le sommeil vint enfin clore leurs yeux. Helas! ceux du Francais ne devaient plus ...
— French Conversation and Composition • Harry Vincent Wann

... public debt, the sinking fund might not operate with sufficient effect to prevent a national bankruptcy, he subsequently proposed, that, whenever a loan should be hereafter made, one per cent on the nev stock thus created, besides the dividends, should be raised and applied in the same manner, and under the same regulations as the original L1,000,000. This bill passed the commons without any particular opposition; but in the upper house it was violently ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. - From George III. to Victoria • E. Farr and E. H. Nolan

... remark Puss walked away And left the Kittens to their play. I'm glad to say they ne'er forgot The lesson that they had been taught, And from that day tried hard to be From naughty, idle ways quite free; In fact they now behave so well That I have ...
— Chatterbox, 1905. • Various

... Ay, he said so, to make us fight cheerfully; but when our throats are cut, he may be ransomed and we ne'er ...
— The Philosophy of the Plays of Shakspere Unfolded • Delia Bacon

... Lord shall write it in a scroll That ne'er shall be outworn, When He the nations doth enroll, That this man there was born: Both they who sing and they who dance With sacred songs are there; In thee fresh brooks and soft streams glance, ...
— The Life of John Milton Vol. 3 1643-1649 • David Masson

... distrusted by the Synagogue, entered into later parts of the Prayer Book. "Attribute of Mercy, reveal thyself for us; make our supplication to fall at the feet of Thy Creator; and on behalf of Thy people beseech for mercy"; thus runs a fine prayer in the Ne'ilah service of the Day of Atonement, and many of the other Selihot prove the persistence of this development of Jewish belief. The theory of Divine attributes was common to Palestine and Alexandria, and plays, as we shall see, an important part in Philo's[196] ...
— Philo-Judaeus of Alexandria • Norman Bentwich

... warnings and ne'er a blow, you had friends in the trade. But you have worn them out. You are a doomed man. ...
— Put Yourself in His Place • Charles Reade

... the fairer Guayaquilians: "Les yeux vifs et ardent, le pied fine et mignon, les teintes chaudes et dorees" distinguish the latter. In the ladies of the high capital there is nothing of this: "Les yeux ne lancent pas de flammes, le pied est sans gentillesse, l'epiderme ne reflete pas les rayons du soleil." The ladies on the coast take all possible pains to preserve the small size of the foot; a large foot is held in horror. Von Tschudi once overheard some ladies extolling in high ...
— The Andes and the Amazon - Across the Continent of South America • James Orton

... be a positive gain to have the road cleared of a mass of rubbish, that has hindered the advance of knowledge. History must be worked at in a scientific spirit, as biology or chemistry is worked at. As M. Seignobos says, "On ne s'arrete plus guere aujourd'hui a discuter, sous sa forme theologique la theorie de la Providence dans l'Histoire. Mais la tendence a expliquer les faits historiques par les causes transcendantes persiste dans des theories plus ...
— Introduction to the Study of History • Charles V. Langlois

... shop across the way Where ne'er is heard a human tread, Where trade is paralyzed and dead, With ne'er a customer a day. The people come, The people go, But never there. They do not know There's such a shop beneath the skies, Because he does not advertise! While I ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume VI. (of X.) • Various

... Land from tyrants and invaders. On that occasion, all sorts and conditions of men were represented, from the religious enthusiast, to the ignorant bigot, and from the rich man who was sacrificing his all in the cause that he believed to be right, to the tramp and ne'er-do-well, who had allied himself with ...
— My Native Land • James Cox

... people towards the Herzegovinian insurrection Dana, R.H. Dancing, disapproved of by Stillman's father Danilo, Prince of Montenegro Danilograd Danish Effendi Darwin, Charles R., his evolutionary hypothesis Davidson, Charles, gives Stillman lessons in art Dead House, The Delacroix, Eugne, artist Delane, Mr., of the London Times Delaroche, Paul Delf, Mr. Deliyanni, Greek premier Delos Dendrinos, Russian consul at Crete Depretis, Agostino Derch, M., French consul at Crete De Ruyter, ...
— The Autobiography of a Journalist, Volume II • William James Stillman

... miller's joy, To wander! What kind of miller must he be, Who ne'er hath yearned to ...
— ZigZag Journeys in Northern Lands; - The Rhine to the Arctic • Hezekiah Butterworth

... (4) Ils ne pouvoient croire qu'un corps de cette beaute fut de quelque chose au visage de Mademoiselle Churchill.'—Memoires de Grammont, vol. ...
— Table-Talk - Essays on Men and Manners • William Hazlitt

... remarks, and treated the affair like a Fourth of July; and there were also groups dark and haughty, like the Stotts, who held a little aloof, and coldly admitted that it was most successful; it lacked je ne sais quoi, but it was in much better taste than they had expected. Is there something in the very nature of a crowd to bring out the inherent vulgarity of the best-bred people, so that some have doubted whether the highest civilization will ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... n'est pas riche, et le style en est vieux: Mais ne voyez-vous pas que cela vaut bien mieux Que ces colifichets dont le bon sens murmure, Et que la passion parle la ...
— Ballads of Romance and Chivalry - Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - First Series • Frank Sidgwick

... in various snatches of song, chanted forth with such good-will and spirit, that the quiet honest folk started from their first sleep and lay trembling in bed till the sound died away in the distance; when, satisfying themselves that it was only some drunken ne'er-do-weel finding his way home, they covered themselves up warm and fell ...
— The Pickwick Papers • Charles Dickens

... son," said the engineer, "dinna airgue a point that ye canna understond. There's guid an' suffeecient reasons for the train. But ye'll ne'er be claimin' that moose-huntin' is a wark o' neecessity ...
— Days Off - And Other Digressions • Henry Van Dyke

... women with a broader spirit of helpfulness, with deeper devotion to their life-work, or with more consecrated determination to succeed in the face of bitter difficulties than among Negro college-bred men. They have, to be sure, their proportion of ne'er-do-weels, their pedants and lettered fools, but they have a surprisingly small proportion of them; they have not that culture of manner which we instinctively associate with university men, forgetting that in reality it is the heritage from ...
— The Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, 1995, Memorial Issue • Various

... shall celebrate our reunion—we shall drink to it publicly. All Dawson shall take note. They have said, 'Courteau is a loafer, a ne'er-do-well, and he permits another to win his wife away from him.' I propose to ...
— The Winds of Chance • Rex Beach

... parents died, years ago. They only had a lease of the place they lived in, and I really cannot tell you anything whatever about them. There was a son, who would, I suppose, succeed to any property his father left; but he was a ne'er-do-well, and was seldom at home, and I have never seen or heard ...
— At the Point of the Bayonet - A Tale of the Mahratta War • G. A. Henty

... of critical interest hardly the least. If the name of the author of Manfred, Cain, Childe Harold, were already lost, as it may be in remote times, the work abides, and its mark on European opinion. 'Je ne considere les gens apres leur mort,' said Voltaire, 'que par leurs ouvrages; tout la reste est aneanti ...
— Critical Miscellanies, Vol. I - Essay 3: Byron • John Morley

... not divine disposal, wisest Men 210 Have err'd, and by bad Women been deceiv'd; And shall again, pretend they ne're so wise. Deject not then so overmuch thy self, Who hast of sorrow thy full load besides; Yet truth to say, I oft have heard men wonder Why thou shouldst wed Philistian women rather Then of thine own Tribe fairer, or as fair, ...
— The Poetical Works of John Milton • John Milton

... resided a white man. He did not, however, make his appearance during our visit, and I imagine he must have been one of those individuals called 'beach-combers,' referred to in so many of the books that treat of the South Sea Islands,—a sort of ne'er-do-well Englishman or American, rather afraid of meeting any of his own countrymen, but very clever at making a bargain between a ship's crew and the natives, with considerable ...
— A Voyage in the 'Sunbeam' • Annie Allnut Brassey

... we love, Doth work like madness in the brain. And thus it chanced, as I divine, With Roland and Sir Leoline. Each spake words of high disdain And insult to his heart's best brother They parted—ne'er to meet again! But never either found another To free the hollow heart from paining— They stood aloof the scars remaining, Like cliffs which had been rent asunder; A dreary sea now flows between; But neither heat, nor frost, nor thunder, Shall wholly ...
— Appreciations, with an Essay on Style • Walter Horatio Pater

... Delian coast, I voyaged, leader of a warrior-host, But ah, how changed I from thence my sorrow flows; O fatal voyage, source of all my woes;) Raptured I stood, and as this hour amazed, With reverence at the lofty wonder gazed: Raptured I stand! for earth ne'er knew to bear A plant so stately, or a nymph so fair. Awed from access, I lift my suppliant hands; For Misery, O queen! before thee stands. Twice ten tempestuous nights I roll'd, resign'd To roaring blows, and the warring wind; Heaven bade the deep to spare; ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer, translated by Alexander Pope

... in the play I had to say my "four words," which turned out to be six words: On ne peut etre plus joli. Though I was frightened out of my wits, I managed not to disgrace myself; but I doubt if any one heard one of the six words I said. The Empress sent me a little bunch of violets, which ...
— In the Courts of Memory 1858-1875. • L. de Hegermann-Lindencrone

... my spouse, a mother's prayers, I too Would blend with hers. O yield, Our only child, Possession sweet of woman's holy field— Affection's glebe—a virgin soil denied When wedlock makes those one whose hearts can ne'er ...
— Rowena & Harold - A Romance in Rhyme of an Olden Time, of Hastyngs and Normanhurst • Wm. Stephen Pryer

... not develop new ideas. It was a literary duel, each leader aiming to restate himself in the most telling, popular way. For once that superficial definition of art applied: "What oft was thought but ne'er so well expressed." Nevertheless the debates contained an incident that helped to make history. Though Douglas was at war with the Administration, it was not certain that the quarrel might not be made up. There was no other leader who would be so formidable at the head ...
— Lincoln • Nathaniel Wright Stephenson

... broke an awful cry from the King's lips; I heard and hurrying fought the evil knight, As did the King, parrying blow on blow, And at the last the King fell wounded sore By that same Spear that once was holy health. This is the fatal wound that burns his side,— This wound it is that ne'er ...
— Parsifal - A Drama by Wagner • Retold by Oliver Huckel

... la Peur, Je suis l'Amour, tremblez, respectez le voleur! Et toi, femme de Dieu, ne crains pas d'etre mere; Car si to le deviens, Dieu seal sera le pere. S'iL est dit cependant que tu veux le barren, Parle; je suis tout pret, ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... devil the most of life, O, but the rue grows bonny wi' thyme, But I ne'er was in hell till I met wi' my wife, And the thyme it is withered and ...
— Nancy Stair - A Novel • Elinor Macartney Lane

... ridge there fed The sheep that ne'er a shepherd know Save the shrill wind of morn, Five "Oves Ammon" of the snow; I saw the big ram lift his head, Twin-mooned ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, February 11, 1914 • Various

... I murmur that the rod Was so heavy, O my God? I forgot the cursed tree, I forgot Gethsemane, I forgot the grief and pain— May I ne'er ...
— Canadian Wild Flowers • Helen M. Johnson

... "Ne'er sweeter noise was heard by living man Than made this merry, gentle nightingale. Her sound went with the river as it ran Out through the fresh and flourished lusty vale; O merle, quoth she, O fool, leave off thy tale, For in thy song good teaching there is none, For both are lost,—the time ...
— Among My Books • James Russell Lowell

... prie, Mademoiselle Antoinette, Prenez Channing et ne m'attendez pas. Je vous rejoindrai dans un instant. J'ai quelque chose de tres important a dier a ...
— The Man in Lonely Land • Kate Langley Bosher

... aspectabilis constructione ut recte Philosophemur duo sunt imprimis observanda: Unum ut attendentes ad infinitam Dei potentiam & bonitatem ne vereamur nimis ampla & pulchra & absoluta ejus opera imaginari: sed e contra caveamus, ne si quos forte limites nobis non certo cognitos, in ipsis supponamus, non satis magnifice ...
— Democritus Platonissans • Henry More

... chances to one that he has never even been to Venice or thought of Veronese. He has not always been so successful; as when in his "Work" he earned Degas's acute comment: "A crowd is made with five persons, not with fifty." ("Il y a cinquante figures, mais je ne vois pas la foule; on fait une foule avec cinq, et non pas avec cinquante.") But he has always been someone. Compare with him L'Hermitte, a painter who illustrates sometimes the possibility of being an artificial realist. His "Vintage" at the Metropolitan Museum, ...
— French Art - Classic and Contemporary Painting and Sculpture • W. C. Brownell

... maintenir dans son obeissance, que vraisemblablement j'etablirois un roi pour les gouverner, et que peut-etre ce serait le partage d'un de mes petits-fils qui voudroit regner independamment." April 7/17 1698. "Les royaumes de Naples et de Sicile ne peuvent se regarder comme un partage dont mon fils puisse se contenter pour lui tenir lieu de tous ses droits. Les exemples du passe n'ont que trop appris combien ces etats content a la France le peu ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 5 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... "Phonetic" changes, that is, changes in the articulation of words, regardless of the meaning they bear. This is illustrated simply by the word "name" which, in the eighteenth century was pronounced ne'm. " Analogic" changes, that is, changes in the articulation of words under the influence of words somewhat similar in meaning. The word "flash," for example, became what it is because of the sound of words associated in meaning, ...
— Human Traits and their Social Significance • Irwin Edman

... curiosity. Great was their astonishment to behold the portrait of another than Rosalie. The younger man was much affected; he groaned aloud and covered his face with his hands. Not so the old general. 'Tenez,' said he, wiping the barrel of his weapon on his glove, 'c'est dommage! je ne contais pas la-dessus; mais, que voulez-vous? Peste! ce ...
— Kate Coventry - An Autobiography • G. J. Whyte-Melville

... Lackpenny, "Thou liest, O accursed son of a cuckold!" Whereupon the Cook cried out and laying hold of his debtor's collar, said, "O Moslems, this fellow is my first customer[FN14] this day and he hath eaten my food and given me naught." So the folk gathered about them and blamed the Ne'er-do-well and said to him, "Give him the price of that which thou hast eaten." Quoth he, "I gave him a dirham before I entered the shop;" and quoth the Cook, "Be everything I sell this day forbidden to me, if he gave me so much as the name of a coin! ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... thee, fair planet—for I will ne'er believe that thou canst take a perverse pleasure in distorting the brains of us, poor mortals. Lunatics! moonstruck! Calumny invented, and folly took up, these names. I would hope better things from thy ...
— The Works of Charles Lamb in Four Volumes, Volume 4 • Charles Lamb

... etait pareillement ordonne que, lorsque ces poulains que le Roi faisait elever et nourrir seraient parvenus a leur troisieme annee, on les distribuer ait a d'autres particuliers, et toujours aux memes conditions. [335] Comme on le voit, ces conditions ne pouvaient etre plus avantageuses aux particuliers, ni au pays en general; aussi Colbert, qui avait tant a coeur de voir fleurir la colonie, ecrivait a M. Talon, le 11 fevrier 1671. "Je tiendrai la main ...
— Picturesque Quebec • James MacPherson Le Moine

... Provost,' exhorted the Burgh Chamberlain, astonished at the Provost's hesitancy, 'but ne'er a North Tyne Robson.' ...
— Border Ghost Stories • Howard Pease

... rind. Above the dirt and squalor the street cries still rang out from covered wagons which crawled ceaslessly back and forth from the country to the Old Market. "Wa-ter-mil-lion. Wa-ter-mil-l-i-o-n! Hyer's yo' Wa-ter-mil-lion fresh f'om de vi-ne!" And as I shut my eyes against the dirt, and my nostrils against the odours, I saw always in my imagination the enchanted garden, with its cool sweet magnolias and laburnums, and its great ...
— The Romance of a Plain Man • Ellen Glasgow

... words is then beyond your ability? It appears you cannot speak two words with proper emphasis!" [Footnote: In a letter to Madarae Denis, Voltaire wrote: "Tout le monde me reproche que le roi a fait dos vers pour d'Arnaud, des vers qui ne sont pas ce qu'il a fait de micux; mais songez qu'a quatre cent lieues de Paris il est bien difficile de savoir si un homme qu'on lui recommende a du merite ou non; de plus c'est toujours des vers, et bien ou mal ...
— Berlin and Sans-Souci • Louise Muhlbach

... Sculptorum Georgii Vasarii demum auctas et suis imaginibus exornatas, Statuta Equitum Melitensium in Italicam linguam translata, Receptariumque Novum pro Aromatariis, aliaque opera tum Latina, tum Italica, saneque utilia et necessaria, imprimi facere intendat, dubitetque ne hujusmodi opera postmodum ab aliis sine ejus licentia et in ejus grave praejudicium imprimantur; nos propterea, illius indemnitati consulere volentes, motu simili et ex certa scientia, eidem Philippo concedimus et indulgemus ne praedicta opera, dummodo prius ab Inquisitore ...
— Lives of the Most Eminent Painters Sculptors and Architects - Volume 1, Cimabue to Agnolo Gaddi • Giorgio Vasari

... Contrived to punish fancy in: Men that are men in thee can feel no pain, And all thy insignificants disdain; Contempt, that false new word for shame, Is, without crime, an empty name; A shadow to amuse mankind, But ne'er to fright the wise or well-fixed mind. Virtue despises human scorn! . . . Even learned Selden saw A prospect of thee through the law. He had thy lofty pinnacles in view, But so much honour never was thy due. The first ...
— Bygone Punishments • William Andrews

... leave to play in a very small yard, which in most schools or academies, in the city of London, is the ne plus ultra of their playground in their hours of recreation. But Mr. G— has another garden at the end of the town, where he sometimes takes ...
— Travels in England in 1782 • Charles P. Moritz

... we never loved so kindly Had we never loved sae blindly, Never met—or never parted, We had ne'er been broken-hearted. ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol X • Various

... heart once broken bleeds no more, And a deep sound sleep it hath, Where the stir of pain ne'er travels o'er The ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume IV. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... of you," the Duchess replied with excellent coolness, "choose extraordinary conditions for the discussion of delicate matters. There are decidedly too many things on which we don't feel alike. You're all inconceivable just now. Je ne peux pourtant pas la mettre a la porte, cette cherie"—whom she covered again with the gay solicitude that seemed to have in it a vibration of private entreaty: "Don't understand, my own ...
— The Awkward Age • Henry James

... the giant Alp, Where roses list the bulbul's late, or snow-wreaths crown the scalp; I'd pause to hear soft Venice streams plash back to boatman's oar, Or hearken to the Western flood in wild and falling roar; I'd tread the vast of mountain range, or spot serene and flower'd, I ne'er could see too many of the wonders God has shower'd; Yet though I stood on fairest earth, beneath the bluest heaven, Could I forget our summer sky, ...
— Successful Recitations • Various

... their Calvinistic opponents. When Timann of Bremen, who sided with Westphal, opposed Hardenberg, a secret, but decided Calvinist, Melanchthon admonished the latter not to rush into a conflict with his colleagues, but to dissimulate. He says in a letter of April 23, 1556: "Te autem oro, ne properes ad certamen cum collegis. Oro etiam, ut multa dissimules." (C. R. 8, 736.) Another letter (May 9, 1557), in which he advises Hardenberg how to proceed against his opponents, begins as follows: "Reverend Sir and Dear Brother. As you see, not only the ...
— Historical Introductions to the Symbolical Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church • Friedrich Bente

... his charming smile. "I can safely assume that if you didn't want something, you wouldn't be here. Good Lord, if a man so much as bows to me in the street without asking a favour, I begin to think that he is either a half-wit or a ne'er-do-well." ...
— One Man in His Time • Ellen Glasgow

... came near him, Ne'er again throughout his lifetime; For she turned away, and, diving, 140 Vanished from the water's surface Down among the rocks so varied, In a ...
— Kalevala, Volume I (of 2) - The Land of the Heroes • Anonymous

... Hawn, had married a Honeycutt in a time of peace, and, when the war opened again, was regarded as a deserter, and had been forced to move over the spur to the Honeycutt side. The girl's father, Steve Hawn, a ne'erdo-well and the son of a ne'er-do-well, had for his inheritance wild lands, steep, supposedly worthless, and near the head of the Honeycutt cove. Little Jason's father, when he quarrelled with his kin, could afford to buy only cheap land on the Honeycutt ...
— The Heart Of The Hills • John Fox, Jr.

... days would have welcomed Cal Whitson, the official village souse, to his home as readily as he would have admitted the ne'er-do-well Link Ferris to that sanctuary. But of late he had noted the growing improvement in Link's fortunes, as evidenced by his larger store trade, his invariable cash payments and the frequent money orders which went in his name ...
— His Dog • Albert Payson Terhune

... in some of them. Knowing so little, a more soaring wit than mine might fly to the explanation that "Shakespeare" was the "nom de plume" of Bacon or his unknown equivalent, and that he preferred to "let sleeping dogs lie," or, as Mr. Greenwood might quote the Latin tag, said ne moveas Camarinam. ...
— Shakespeare, Bacon and the Great Unknown • Andrew Lang

... earth, Before the matchless goddess, who appeared With no less freshness of immortal youth Than when first risen from foam of Paphian seas. He heard delicious strains of melody, Such as his highest muse had ne'er attained, Float in the air, while in the distance rang, Harsh and discordant, jarring with those tones, The gallop of his frightened horse's hoofs, Clattering in sudden freedom down the pass. A voice that made all ...
— The Poems of Emma Lazarus - Vol. I (of II.), Narrative, Lyric, and Dramatic • Emma Lazarus

... to its latest ember, The sunset fire that lights thee to thy bier, Flaming and failing not, albeit so near Dun-robed October waits, and grey November. And though, at sight of thee, a chill change passes Through wood and wold, on leaves and flowers and grasses, Thy beauty wanes not; thou hast ne'er grown old; Death-crowned as Cleopatra, lovely lying Even to the end; magnificently dying In pomp of purple ...
— The Healthy Life, Vol. V, Nos. 24-28 - The Independent Health Magazine • Various

... hitherto, for her temperate and normal habits and, as it happened, known by sight to the local parish priest, who, horrified at the transformation of the feathered monster and mindful of the Papal Bull NE NIMIS NOCEANT NOBIS which enjoins upon Christians the duty of destroying all unnatural productions however generated, incontinently ordered it to be put out of the way. But the destruction of this androgyne proved an arduous task. It was reported that the creature fought for its life with the energy ...
— South Wind • Norman Douglas

... lovely maid! in equal scale Weigh well thy shepherd's truth and love, Which ne'er but with his breath can fail, Which neither frowns nor ...
— Wit and Wisdom of Don Quixote • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

... sapphire ring made by St. Dunstan. Dunstan was an industrious art spirit, being reported by William of Malmsbury as "taking great delight in music, painting, and engraving." In the "Ancren Riwle," a book of directions for the cloistered life of women, nuns are forbidden to wear "ne ring ne brooche," and to deny themselves other ...
— Arts and Crafts in the Middle Ages • Julia De Wolf Addison

... bars. After the war he returned to his home in Virginia to find it in ruins, his slaves freed and his fields mortgaged. He had pulled himself together for another start, and had practiced law in the little town where his family had lived for generations. Of his two sons, one was a ne'er-do-well. He was one of those brilliant fellows of whom much is expected that never develops. He had a taste for low company, married beneath him, and, after a career that was a continual mortification ...
— Wyoming, a Story of the Outdoor West • William MacLeod Raine

... shoulderes of large trede And smallish in the girdlestede: He seemed like a purtreiture, So noble was he of his stature, So faire, so jolly, and so fetise With limmes wrought at point devise, Deliver smart, and of great might; Ne saw thou never man so light Of berd unneth had he nothing, For it was in the firste spring, Full young he was and merry of thought, And in samette with birdes wrought And with golde beaten full fetously His bodie was clad full richely. Wrought was his robe ...
— History of English Humour, Vol. 1 (of 2) - With an Introduction upon Ancient Humour • Alfred Guy Kingan L'Estrange

... (jus) AEgi'na AEscula'pius Ae'thra Aido'neus Alces'tis Althe'a Andro'geos Androm'eda Apol'lo Araech'ne Arca'dia Ar'gos Ar'gus Ariad'ne Ar'temis A'sia Atalan'ta Athe'na Ath'ens At'ropos Bac'chus Bos'phorus Cadme'ia Cad'mus Cal'ydon Cau'casus Ce'crops Cer'cyon Ce'res Chei'ron Clo'tho Coro'nis Cran'ae Crete Cyclo'pes Cy'prus Dae'dalus Dan'ae Daph'ne ...
— Old Greek Stories • James Baldwin

... impression on me, because I knew the lieutenant-general to be a man of very deep designs; and he has even ventured to tell me, that it never would be well with England till I were Mr. Montague, and there were ne'er a lord or peer in the kingdom."[*] So full was Cromwell of these republican projects, that, notwithstanding his habits of profound dissimulation, he could not so carefully guard his expressions, but that sometimes his favorite notions ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part E. - From Charles I. to Cromwell • David Hume

... honnoure, honnoure, whatt ys bie thee hanne? Hailie the robber and the bordelyer, 410 Who kens ne thee, or ys to thee bestanne, And nothynge does thie myckle gastness fere. Faygne woulde I from mie bosomme alle thee tare. Thou there dysperpellest[69] thie levynne-bronde; Whylest mie soulgh's forwyned, thou art the gare; 415 Sleene ys mie comforte bie thie ferie honde; As somme talle ...
— The Rowley Poems • Thomas Chatterton

... Protector, old Noll, was designed. When the King was restored, you then, in a trice, Called me Charly the Second; and, by way of device, Said the old whiskered Turk had Oliver’s face, Though you know to be conquered he ne’er had the disgrace. Three such persons as these on one horse to ride, A Hero, Usurper, and King, all astride:— Such honours were mine; though now forced to retire, Perhaps my next change may be still something higher, From a fruitwoman’s market, I may leap to a spire. As the market is moved, I ...
— Records of Woodhall Spa and Neighbourhood - Historical, Anecdotal, Physiographical, and Archaeological, with Other Matter • J. Conway Walter

... aeroplanes by sight, and one little girl, when I ask her for news, gives me a list of the "obus" that have arrived, and which have "s'eclate," and which have not. One can see that she despises those which "ne s'eclatent pas." One says "Bon soir, pas des obus," as in English one says, ...
— My War Experiences in Two Continents • Sarah Macnaughtan

... it better than I can explain it. I know it by his hair, by his nails, by his whole appearance, by a certain je ne sais quoi; in short, I know it by everything and by nothing. Why look, the poor devil did not even know how to put on his shoes; he has laced his gaiters wrong side outwards." Evidently further doubt was impossible after this evidence, ...
— Monsieur Lecoq • Emile Gaboriau

... other hand, the Nation disowned knowing anything of them but as citizens, and was determined to shut out all such up-start pretensions. The more aristocracy appeared, the more it was despised; there was a visible imbecility and want of intellects in the majority, a sort of je ne sais quoi, that while it affected to be more than citizen, was less than man. It lost ground from contempt more than from hatred; and was rather jeered at as an ass, than dreaded as a lion. This is the general character of aristocracy, or what are called Nobles or Nobility, ...
— The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete - With Index to Volumes I - IV • Thomas Paine

... that all the fellows, even "smirking Tony," liked him and sought his company? He who could pull an oar, throw a ball, leap a bar, ride a horse, or play a game of skill as if he had been born for each particular occupation,—what wonder that the ne'er-do-wells and idlers and scamps and dullards battered at his door continually and begged him to leave his books and come out and "stir ...
— Polly Oliver's Problem • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... life (to the counsel list of one who's purpose-whole,) An if thou be not drunken still and gladden not thy soul. Ay, ne'er will I leave to drink of wine, what while the night on me Darkens, till drowsiness bow down my head upon my bowl. In wine, as the glittering sunbeams bright, my heart's contentment is, That banishes hence, with various joys, all kinds of care ...
— Tales from the Arabic Volumes 1-3 • John Payne

... him ne'er so lightly, into song he broke: Soil so quick-receptive,—not one feather-seed, Not one flower-dust fell but straight its fall awoke Vitalising virtue: song would song succeed Sudden as ...
— The Advance of English Poetry in the Twentieth Century • William Lyon Phelps

... people said that the forbears of Katherine Muckevay had seen better days; that the ancient royal blood of Ireland ran in her veins; that the family name was really Mach-ne-veagh; and that, if every one had his own, Kitty would be wearing a diamond tiara in the highest walks of London importance. In ancient days, the Kings of Ulster used to steal a bride at times from the fair-haired ...
— The Preacher of Cedar Mountain - A Tale of the Open Country • Ernest Thompson Seton

... we ne'er had met sae kindly, If we ne'er had loved sae blindly, Never loved, and never parted, We had ne'er ...
— A Study of Poetry • Bliss Perry

... first Bible actually dated (which also was printed at Mainz by Peter Schoeffer in the year 1462) imitates a much freer hand, simpler, rounder, and less spiky, and therefore far pleasanter and easier to read. On the whole the type of this book may be considered the ne-plus-ultra of Gothic type, especially as regards the lower-case letters; and type very similar was used during the next fifteen or twenty years not only by Schoeffer, but by printers in Strasburg, Basle, Paris, ...
— The Art and Craft of Printing • William Morris

... he?" cried Joe. "I was afeard of that. And he's getting on the blind side of your skipper. This Cap'n Jonathan Wellsby is brave enough and a rare seaman, but he ne'er dealt with a smooth rogue like Ned Rackham. He stays sober to plot for his own advantage. He will serve Blackbeard only till he can trip him by the heels. Now listen well, Jack, seasick though ye be. You will have to warn your ...
— Blackbeard: Buccaneer • Ralph D. Paine

... poesie Ne vante plus en ses ecrits Les lauriers du Daphne d'Asie Et les beaux jardins de Cypris, Les promenoirs et le bocage Du Tempe frais et ombrage, Qui parut lors qu'un marescage En la ...
— Recollections of My Youth • Ernest Renan

... may the woful spirit in myn herte Declare o point of all my sorwes smerte To you, my lady, that I love most; But I bequethe the service of my gost To you aboven every creature, Sin that my lif ne may no longer dure. Alas the wo! alas the peines stronge That I for you have suffered, and so longe! Alas the deth! Alas min Emilie! Alas departing of our compagnie! Alas min hertes quene! alas my wif! My hertes ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 57, No. 356, June, 1845 • Various

... of her husband to make what arrangements her daughter should desire. The Director was most complimentary to the young actress and asked what role she would care to choose for her debut. Esperance proclaimed her preference for "Dona Sol" in Hernani or "Camille" in "On ne badine pas ...
— The Idol of Paris • Sarah Bernhardt

... frantick World does burn and sweat! This does the Lion Star, Ambitions rage; This Avarice, the Dog-Stars Thirst asswage; Every where else their fatal Power we see, They make and rule Man's wretched Destiny: They neither set, nor disappear, But tyrannize o'er all the Year; Whil'st we ne'er feel their Flame or Influence here. The Birds that dance from Bough to Bough, And sing above in every Tree, Are not from Fears and Cares more free, Than we who lie, or walk below, And should by right be Singers too. What Princes Quire of Musick can excel That which within ...
— Sylva, Vol. 1 (of 2) - Or A Discourse of Forest Trees • John Evelyn

... ne with a kind but searching glance. My soul seemed to shrink from that scrutiny. My ...
— Confession • W. Gilmore Simms

... and knowledge of the world, but uses both to little purpose, save to laugh at its slaves. He might be any thing he chose, but he is too indolent for exertion, and seems to think le jeu ne vaut pas la chandelle. He is one of the many clever people spoilt by being born to a great fortune and high rank, advantages which exclude the necessity of exercising the ...
— The Idler in France • Marguerite Gardiner

... Ne'mine, Sammy. Ef you don't want Pappy to plough no mo', Pappy jes gwine to take the plough right outen the furrow and put old Beck up. ...
— Southern Lights and Shadows • Edited by William Dean Howells & Henry Mills Alden

... her hands). To hear him! (Chuckling to herself.) Keep on! Keep on! You'll ne'er be sorry for it! Aha, Master Franklin, 'twill take no gazing in the crystal to see that the future of a wise and industrious lad is made of gold. What's that you're carrying as carefully as ...
— Patriotic Plays and Pageants for Young People • Constance D'Arcy Mackay

... his tract on Political Economy he writes: "How shall men love their country if it is nothing more for them than for strangers, and bestows on them only that which it can refuse to none?" It is in the same sense he says, further on, "La patrie ne peut subsister sans ...
— The History of Freedom • John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton

... patrons attentifs et manifestes, d'une invocation directe. Le plus intrepide guerrier alors marchait dans un melange habituel de crainte et de confiance, comme un tout petit enfant. A cette vue, les esprits les plus emancipes d'aujourd'hui ne sauraient s'empecher de crier, en temperant leur sourire par le ...
— Domnei • James Branch Cabell et al

... and incorporated it into its Indian Empire. Burma was administered as a province of India until 1937 when it became a separate, self-governing colony; independence outside of the Commonwealth was attained in 1948. Gen. NE WIN dominated the government from 1962 to 1988, first as military ruler, then as president, and later as political kingmaker. Despite multiparty elections in 1990 that resulted in the main opposition party winning ...
— The 2003 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... ma bairns, what have you made me do?" cried the old nurse pitifully. "The fairy gift is broken, and maybe the Gold of Fairnilee, that my eyes have looked on, will ne'er be seen again." ...
— The Gold Of Fairnilee • Andrew Lang

... there a man with soul so dead, Who never to himself hath said, This is my own, my native land; Whose heart hath ne'er within him burned, As home his footsteps he hath turned From ...
— Toasts - and Forms of Public Address for Those Who Wish to Say - the Right Thing in the Right Way • William Pittenger

... thoughts and profane be still: far hence, far hence from our choirs depart, Who knows not well what the Mystics tell, or is not holy and pure of heart; Who ne'er has the noble revelry learned, or danced the dance of the Muses high; Or shared in the Bacchic rites which old bull-eating Cratinus's words supply; Who vulgar coarse buffoonery loves, though all untimely the jests they make; Or lives not easy and kind with all, or kindling faction ...
— The Frogs • Aristophanes

... the truth he is a sort of ne'er-do-well," the merchant laughed. "I grant that he has not had much chance. His father died when he was a child, and his mother soon married again. There is no doubt that he was badly treated at home, and when he was twelve he ran away. He was taken back and beaten, time after ...
— Saint Bartholomew's Eve - A Tale of the Huguenot WarS • G. A. Henty

... and its cheek-bones gleamed, and its fingers flicked the shore; And it lapped and lay in a weary way, and its hands met to implore; That I gently said: "Poor, restless dead, I would never work you woe; Though the wrong you rue you can ne'er undo, I forgave ...
— Ballads of a Cheechako • Robert W. Service

... peace is theirs; a life true bliss that yields; And various wealth; leisure mid ample fields, Grottoes, and living lakes, and vallies green, And lowing herds; and 'neath a sylvan screen, Delicious slumbers. There the lawn and cave With beasts of chase abound. The young ne'er crave A prouder lot; their patient toil is cheered; Their Gods are worshipped and their sires revered; And there when Justice passed from earth away She left the latest traces of ...
— Flowers and Flower-Gardens • David Lester Richardson

... and had left it only to be carried to the burying-ground on the hill. Of her the old lady often talked, and once when they had carried roses to the unmarked grave he had heard her softly quote: "A sweeter woman ne'er drew breath, than my ...
— The Brass Bound Box • Evelyn Raymond

... of the lark ne'er floats To this region of sunless cloud; Nor hath eagle bird the silence stir'd, With his ...
— Cleveland Past and Present - Its Representative Men, etc. • Maurice Joblin

... entitled, Notes sur les forces navales de la France. The Prince de Joinville wrote as follows to the Queen: "Le malheureux eclat de ma brochure, le tracas que cela donne au Pere et a la Reine, me font regretter vivement de l'avoir faite. Comme je l'ecris a ton Roi, je ne renvoie que mepris a toutes les interpretations qu'on y donne; ce que peuvent dire ministre et journaux ne me touche en rien, mais il n'y a pas de sacrifices que je ne suis dispose a faire ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Vol 2 (of 3), 1844-1853 • Queen Victoria

... reform, superannuated by his new materialistic world view, was thrown aside, and a gaping void opened in the soul of the writer. This frame of mind is reflected in Lilienblum's self-revelation, "The Sins of Youth" (Hattot ne'urim, 1876), this agonizing cry of one of the many victims of the mental cataclysm of the sixties. The book made a tremendous impression, for the mental tortures depicted in it were typical of the whole age of transition. However, the final ...
— History of the Jews in Russia and Poland. Volume II • S.M. Dubnow

... carry. Other sentinels were similarly deceived. One was more particularly curious than the others. Something in the voice of the passing friend did not please his ear. Running down to the water's edge, he called "Pour quoi est-ce que vous ne parlez plus haut," why don't you speak louder? "Tais toi, nous serons entendu!" Hush, we shall be overheard and discovered, said the cunning highlander, still more softly. It was enough, the boats passed. Within one hour of daylight a landing was effected, and the British army began to scale ...
— The Rise of Canada, from Barbarism to Wealth and Civilisation - Volume 1 • Charles Roger

... my name Shall ne'er in STORY be forgot, But still the more increase in fame, The more the country ...
— 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue • Captain Grose et al.

... conduct fell short of pretension and principle. Estimates of his character differ widely. From the standpoint of Catholic orthodoxy, "C'etait un fort mauvais sujet et un plus mauvais pretre;" and even his captivity, infamous as it was, "ne peut rendre Bonivard interessant" (Notices Genealogiques sur les Famillies Genevoises, par J. A. Galiffe, 1836, iii. 67, sq.); whilst an advocate and champion, the author of the Preface to Les Chroniques de Geneve par Francois de Bonnivard, 1831, tom. i. pt. i. ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 4 • Lord Byron

... ne t'en iras pas! Quoi! quitter leur maison! Et fuir leur destinee! Quoi! tu voudrais trahir jusqu'a ...
— Paris under the Commune • John Leighton

... conceits; the Greek, for fiction; and the Latin, for majesty. Household furniture, and implements of husbandry, were considered improper subjects for the emblem of a device; consequently, that of the Academia della Crusca was set down as decidedly vulgar, it being a sieve, with Il piu bel fior ne coglie (It collects the finest flour of it)—a play on the word crusca (bran), assumed as the title of the Academy, from its having been instituted for the express purpose of purifying (sifting) ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 444 - Volume 18, New Series, July 3, 1852 • Various

... to her sate goodly Shamefastnesse, Ne ever durst, her eyes from ground upreare, Ne ever once did looke up from her desse,[149] As if some blame of evill she did feare That in her cheekes made roses oft appeare: And her against sweet Cherefulnesse was placed, Whose eyes, like twinkling stars in evening cleare, Were deckt with ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume II (of 3) • John Ruskin

... the torpedo touch of Truth, Go not to VENICE—do not blight Your early fancies with the sight Of her true, real, dismal state— Her mansions, foul and desolate,— Her close canals, exhaling wide Such fetid airs as—with those domes Of silent grandeur, by their side, Where step of life ne'er goes or comes, And those black barges plying round With melancholy, plashing sound,— Seem like a city, where the Pest Is holding her last visitation, And all, ere long, will be at rest, The dead, sure rest ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 569 - Volume XX., No. 569. Saturday, October 6, 1832 • Various

... de coelis volitans, Sacras manus agitans, Foves in suppliciis Me, ne extra gregulo Tuo unus ferulo Pereat ...
— The Forest Lovers • Maurice Hewlett

... unaffected by foreign manners or by foreign habits. It is true that Chaucer has the ridiculous phrase, "I n'am but dead" (for "I am quite dead"[4])— which is a literal translation of the well-known French idiom, "Je ne suis que." But, though our tongue has always been and is impervious to foreign idiom, it is probably owing to the great influx of French words which took place chiefly in the thirteenth century that many people have acquired a habit ...
— A Brief History of the English Language and Literature, Vol. 2 (of 2) • John Miller Dow Meiklejohn

... McKinley now in heaven rests, Where he will ne'er regret it; And well he knows, that in all his joys There was a ...
— Twentieth Century Negro Literature - Or, A Cyclopedia of Thought on the Vital Topics Relating - to the American Negro • Various

... of the matter approximates to that given by Tillemont. "Cela peut etre venu de ce qu'on les choisissoit entre les plus agez du Clerge pour les faire Evesques: car on ne voit pas qu'ils ayent este plus persecutez que d'autres."—Mem. pour servir a l'Histoire Ecclesiastique, tom. ii. part ii. p. 40. It would appear from Eusebius (iii. 32), that at the time of the death of Simeon there were still living a number of very old persons who were relatives of ...
— The Ancient Church - Its History, Doctrine, Worship, and Constitution • W.D. [William Dool] Killen



Words linked to "Ne" :   Nebraska, air, US, je ne sais quoi, northeast, middle west, Platte River, USA, chemical element, Platte, noble gas, badlands, U.S., Bad Lands, South Platte River, Midwest, American state, element, South Platte, United States, North Platte, Grand Island, compass point, argonon, Omaha, North Platte River, Republican River, United States of America, the States, point, midwestern United States, America, neon, Lincoln, U.S.A., ne'er-do-well, nor'-east, republican



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