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Mo   /moʊ/   Listen
Mo

noun
1.
An indefinitely short time.  Synonyms: bit, minute, moment, second.  "In a mo" , "It only takes a minute" , "In just a bit"
2.
A polyvalent metallic element that resembles chromium and tungsten in its properties; used to strengthen and harden steel.  Synonyms: atomic number 42, molybdenum.
3.
A midwestern state in central United States; a border state during the American Civil War, Missouri was admitted to the Confederacy without actually seceding from the Union.  Synonyms: Missouri, Show Me State.



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"Mo" Quotes from Famous Books



... be beginning there just as I go into exile!" said Mrs. Duncombe. "It seems odd that I should have to go from what I have only just learnt to prize. But you have taught mo a good deal—" ...
— The Three Brides • Charlotte M. Yonge

... the Missouri.} "St. Louis, Mo., February 17, 1868. } "Dear Brother:— . . . I have not yet got the order for the Atlantic division, but it is coming by mail, and when received I must act. I have asked the President to let me make my headquarters ...
— Recollections of Forty Years in the House, Senate and Cabinet - An Autobiography. • John Sherman

... sholy would," said his sister with a gleam of interest; "we ain't a gwine to miss him, wid six mo'! I'll sell ...
— What Two Children Did • Charlotte E. Chittenden

... "Gol darn the saucy cuss! It's mighty queer, but she isn't here; so . . . she must be on one of us. You'll pardon me if I make so free, but—there's just one thing to do: If you'll kindly go for a half a mo' I'll search me garments through." Then all alone on the shiny throne I stripped from head to heel; In vain, in vain; it was very plain that I hadn't got Lucille. So I garbed again, and I told the Prince, and he ...
— Ballads of a Bohemian • Robert W. Service

... afflicted Italy at the time of the irruption of Odoacer, king of the Heruli, is eloquently described, in prose and verse, by a French poet, (Les Mois, tom. ii. p. 174, 205, edit. in 12 mo.) I am ignorant from whence he derives his information; but I am well assured that he relates some facts incompatible with ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 3 • Edward Gibbon

... REAL enjoyment, send ten cents for a copy of the best publication, HUMORIST. Address: Publisher Humorist, St. Louis, Mo. In ordering your reading matter, don't fail to include the Humorist ...
— Wholesale Price List of Newspapers and Periodicals • D. D. Cottrell's Subscription Agency

... name is Mo-wa-the (Flash Of Light) and the name of my son is Tahn-te (Sunlight). We may stay while these seeds grow into grain, and into trees, and bear harvest. But not always may we be with you, for a God of the Sky may ...
— The Flute of the Gods • Marah Ellis Ryan

... two months later that General Lyon fell at Wilson's Creek, Mo. He had been conspicuous for his services to the country before this time. The battle was bitterly contested, and Lyon showed himself a veritable hero in personal courage and gallantry. After three wounds he was ...
— The Life of Abraham Lincoln • Henry Ketcham

... replied, in a voice whose tremulous tones betrayed the full extent of his agony and terrors. "Oh, no!" he exclaimed. "Spare me, whoever you are—spare my life, and if you will come to mo to-morrow, I promise, in the presence of God, to make you independent as long as you live. Oh, spare me, for the sake of the living God—for I am not fit to die. If you kill me now, you will have the perdition of my soul to answer for at the bar of judgment. If you ...
— The Black Baronet; or, The Chronicles Of Ballytrain - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... to the "Chicago Record's History of the World's Fair," "The Historical Fine Art Series," published by H.S. Smith and C.R. Graham, for Historical Publishing Company, Philadelphia, and the "World's Fine Art Series," published by N.D. Thompson Publishing Company, St. Louis, Mo., for descriptions and statistics in regard to the White City ...
— Elsie at the World's Fair • Martha Finley

... sho ke non ze koon, Ta ba nin ga, Ah no go suh nuh guk, Na quash kuh mon; Na guh mo yah nin koo, Pa sho ke non ze koon, Pa sho ke non ze ...
— The Courage of Marge O'Doone • James Oliver Curwood

... topmost branches, instead of standing erect, spread and drooped in all directions; and there were so many poles supporting the lower ones, that they looked like pictures of banian-trees. As an old English manuscript says, "The mo appelen the tree bereth, the more sche boweth ...
— Excursions • Henry D. Thoreau

... continued: "I seed signs this mo'nin' in th' holler on yon side ol' Ball, when I war' huntin' my mule. An' thar's a big roost down by th' spring back of my ...
— That Printer of Udell's • Harold Bell Wright

... er talkin', I ain't gwine ter deny," he would say when complimented upon his popularity with the fair sex, "an' dey ain't nothin' de ladies likes mo' dan a man what's jocalder. Dey loves jokin' an' dey loves to laff. It's de way er de sect. A man what cayn't be jocalder with 'em, ...
— In Connection with the De Willoughby Claim • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... "Sur les bords de la mer Colzoum est la ville de Madian (in orig. Madiyan) plus grande qui Tabouk (Tabk), et le puits ou Mose (sur qui soit le salut!) abreuva le troupeau de Jethro (E1Shu'ayb). On dit que ce puits est (maintenant) sec [Note at foot: Je lis Mu'attilah comme porte le MS. B., et non Mu'azzamah,[EN65] leon donnee par le MS. A.]; et qu'on a lev audessus une construction. L'eau ...
— The Land of Midian, Vol. 1 • Richard Burton

... best in the science fiction field. Another thing: don't have any short stories. If you have about 3 or 4 l-o-n-g stories, I'd like it better. I hope your magazine enjoys much success!—Linus Hogenmiller, 502 N. Washington Street, Farmington, Mo. ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, May, 1930 • Various

... nor heard them, could people say that they existed?" "Of course," replied the disbeliever, "many people have seen and heard spirits; but is there any instance of a properly verified appearance?" Mo Tzu then told a long story of how King Hsuan, B.C. 827-781, unjustly put to death a Minister, and how the latter had said to the King, "If there is no consciousness after death, this matter will be ...
— Religions of Ancient China • Herbert A. Giles

... by a soldier attached to headquarters. The only practical history of the war telegraphers in the field. A full account of the mysteries of Signaling by Flags, Torches and Rockets. Thrilling scenes of Battles, Captures and Escapes. Fully illustrated by True Williams. Large 12 mo. Price, $1.00 ...
— The Young Oarsmen of Lakeview • Ralph Bonehill

... to drop old Lyon for Chiselhurst, eh? But an earl, my dear fellow! Hang it all, you know! Poor old Mo had to get back in his hansom all by himself, but he's bought the ...
— Peter Ibbetson • George du Marier et al

... thad magniffyzan sidebode! Quarante-cinque piastres, seulement, messieurs! Les knobs vaut bien cette prix! Gentymen, de knobs is worse de money! Ladies, if you don' stop dat talkin', I will not sell one thing mo'! Et quarante ...
— Dr. Sevier • George W. Cable

... long ago. One day in passing the base of a great rock he scratched with his toe and dug up the bones of a bear's paw. Here, in years past, they had killed and roasted a bear. This was the camp of Ya mo lo ku. His own camp was called Wowomopono Tetna ...
— Hunting with the Bow and Arrow • Saxton Pope

... neber knows what dat ar' chile will be up to next!" exclaimed Dinah with a laugh. "But if he am plannin' to squirt any mo' fire injun water on me I's gwine t' run away, dat's ...
— The Bobbsey Twins at Snow Lodge • Laura Lee Hope

... the "rough palace." The interval during which time the coffin remained there was termed kari-mo-gari, or "temporary mourning." ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... of a span. No siree, yo' cyant. My Lawd, what done possess Massa Neil fer ter 'vite her down hyer? She cyant 'struct an' guide our yo'ng mist'ess. Sho! She ain' know de very fust rudimints ob de qualities' ways an' doin's. Miss Peggy could show her mo' in five minutes dan she ever is know in five years. She ain't,—she ain't,—well I ain't jist 'zackly know how I'se gwine speechify it, but she ain't like we all," and Jerome wagged his head in deprecation and forced his tongue against his teeth in a sound indicating annoyance ...
— Peggy Stewart at School • Gabrielle E. Jackson

... a-plenty, too, A center shot from a pair o' eyes of the winninest sort o' blue, An' I ride the ranges a-sighin' sighs, as cranky as a locoed steer— A durned heap worse than the novel blokes that the narrative gals'd queer. Just hain't no energy left no mo', go 'round like a orphant calf A-thinkin' about that sagehen's eyes that give me the Cupid gaff, An' I'm all skeered up when I hit the thought some other rider might Cut in ahead on a faster hoss an' rope ...
— Songs of the Cattle Trail and Cow Camp • Various

... horo eile! Fhir a' bhata na horo eile! Fhir a' bhata na horo eile! Mo shoraidh slan leat, fhir ...
— The Wind Bloweth • Brian Oswald Donn-Byrne

... owing to the constant disturbance on the border of Mo., the election was postponed from time to time, until the 12th of January. Olathe had been sacked, Shawnee had been burned, and the members of the Black Bob settlement had been robbed and driven from their homes, and it had not been considered safe for any considerable number ...
— The American Indian as Participant in the Civil War • Annie Heloise Abel

... they at last suspected some deception. One day she came in, after having been a long while absent, and fell asleep, with her mouth open. The little ones peeped in slily, and saw on her teeth the remains of the nice white bulbous roots of the mo-na-wing, or adder's tongue violet. They at once knew it was spring, and without disturbing the old one, who only wanted to keep them in till they were full grown, away they scampered, out of the hole, and dispersed ...
— The Myth of Hiawatha, and Other Oral Legends, Mythologic and Allegoric, of the North American Indians • Henry R. Schoolcraft

... rich and comfortable voice of Lily-Anna, the cook, from the dining-room door; "you sholy is pretty. Yas'm—a lady wants to stay pretty when she's married. Yo' don' look much mo'n a bride, ma'am, an' dat's a fac'. Does you want yo' dinnehs brought into de sittin'-room regular till ...
— The Rose Garden Husband • Margaret Widdemer

... having been provided with a proper weapon. Hector answered him - "Deansa gniomh duine 's gheibh thu miabh duine." (Perform a man's work and you will get a man's esteem.) Duncan at once rushed into the strife, exclaiming - "Buille mhor bho chul mo laimhe, 's ceum leatha, am fear nach teich rombam, teicheam roimhe." (A heavy stroke from the back of my hand [arm] and a step to [enforce] it. He who does not get out of my way, let me get out of ...
— History Of The Mackenzies • Alexander Mackenzie

... has value, in that the poison is used in certain affections of the heart. For details, I would refer you to the Denny Laboratories of St. Louis, Mo., which ...
— Average Jones • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... which that Bretons speken great honour, All was this land fulfilled of faerie; The Elf queen, with her joly company, Danced full oft in many a grene mead. This was the old opinion, as I rede— I speake of many hundred years ago, But now can no man see no elves mo. For now the great charity and prayers Of limitours,[39] and other holy freres, That searchen every land and every stream, As thick as motes in the sunne-beam, Blessing halls, chambers, kitchenes, and boures, Cities and burghes, ...
— Letters On Demonology And Witchcraft • Sir Walter Scott

... says he sees in a dream how I'm b'ar-hung an' breeze-shaken over hell; an', sah, he simply scare dis niggah to where I jest lay down in d' pew an' howl. After I'se done lamented till my heart's broke, I passes in my resignation, an' now I'se gone an' done attach myse'f to d' Mefodis'. Thar's a deal mo' sunshine among d' Mefodis' folks, an' d' game's a mighty sight easier. All you does is get sprunkled, an' thar you be, in wid ...
— Wolfville Days • Alfred Henry Lewis

... up! If them boobs see me, I'll have to show 'em all over the plant! That's a gang of them Snooks' Tourists, seein' the world for fourteen eighty-five a-piece, breakfast at hotel on third mornin' out and bus from train included! Most of them is wisenheimers from Succotash Crossin', Mo.; and they're out to see that they don't get cheated. They're gonna see everything like it says on the ticket, and some of 'em is ready to sue Snooks because they got somethin' in their eye from lookin' out the train window and missed eight telegraph ...
— Kid Scanlan • H. C. Witwer

... you, Mister Oberseer Man! Oh, I fool you, my ole Marster! Cotch de mockin'bird co'tin' in de locus', Cotch de bullfrog gruntin' in de ma'sh, Cotch de black snake trabellin' 'long his road, But you ain' gwine see dis niggah enny mo'! ...
— Lewis Rand • Mary Johnston

... in the water itself or on the banks, spring out upon the unwary and drown them. To warn people against these dangerous elementals, a stone or pillar called "The Fat-pee," on which the name of the future Buddha or Pam-mo-o-mee-to-foo is inscribed, is set up near the place where they are supposed to lurk, and when the hauntings become very frequent the evil spirit is exorcised. The ceremony of exorcism consists in the decapitation ...
— Byways of Ghost-Land • Elliott O'Donnell

... turned, amazed to see it troubled so, Like sudden brooks increased with molten snow, The billows fierce that tossed to and fro, The whirlpools sucked down to their bosoms low; But on he went to search for wonders mo, Through the thick trees there high and broad which grow, And in that forest huge and desert wide, The more he sought, more wonders still ...
— Jerusalem Delivered • Torquato Tasso

... big as a dollar now. They couldn't buy a little bit. They like never get nough money to buy a barrel of flour. It was so high. Seem like she say I was walking when they got a barrel of flour. So many colored folks died right after freedom. They caught consumption. My mother said they was exposed mo than they been used to and mixing up in living quarters too much what caused it. My father voted a Republican ticket. I ain't voted much since I come to Arkansas. I been here 32 years. My farm failed over in Tennessee. I was out lookin' round for farmin' land, lookin' round for good work. I farmed ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - Volume II. Arkansas Narratives. Part I • Work Projects Administration

... be gwine back to do little ship, sah, so Ah done waited fo' you'," explained the negro in the boat. "Any mo' ob yo' pahty ...
— The Submarine Boys and the Spies - Dodging the Sharks of the Deep • Victor G. Durham

... hungry, and she could not resist the impulse to enter a cheap restaurant. She did not know how cheap it was. It was as good as the best restaurant in Nimrim, Mo. ...
— We Can't Have Everything • Rupert Hughes

... which rather puzzled him, Grom gave over his investigating, and turned to a tall, slim youth with a great mop of chestnut hair who at this moment came running up to him. It was A-ya's young brother, Mo, Grom's favorite follower and hunting mate; and he had come at speed, being very swift of foot, in answer to Grom's signal. Breathing quickly, he stood at Grom's side, and looked down with wonder and dislike upon the ...
— In the Morning of Time • Charles G. D. Roberts

... theah Towanda cyclone," recommenced Seth, "that little Kansas town the cyclone got mad at and made way with, theah must have been a hundred knives or mo' flyin' around loose. They cut hogs half in two. You would have thought a butchah had done it. And the chickens were carved ready to be put on the table. It was wonderful ...
— The Way of the Wind • Zoe Anderson Norris

... that it grieves mo most deeply," said the officer—"most exquisitely. I know all this—all, and so does Captain Ducrot; but there is no mistake, ...
— The Lily and the Cross - A Tale of Acadia • James De Mille

... The recent ento-mo-logical discoveries of Professor George Marvin have set the scientific world in a flurry. . . . Professor Marvin is now unanimously conceded to be the greatest entomologist living. He knows his Hex-a-poda and Myri-a-poda as the most of us know our alphabet. . . . The humble home of ...
— The Tangled Threads • Eleanor H. Porter

... have been called to the attention of the Commission by Mr. Frank E. Richey, attorney and counselor at law, Oriol Building, Sixth and Locust streets, St. Louis, Mo., who accompanies his statements with copies of the contract and specifications referred to and many statements which he believes corroborate the ...
— Final Report of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission • Louisiana Purchase Exposition Commission

... check'er dis'tant fo'cus atom ed'it din'gy glo'ry ash'es lev'el diz'zy lo'cust cap'tor meth'od fin'ish mo'ment car'rot splen'did gim'let po'tent cav'il ves'per spir'it co'gent ehap'ter west'ern tim'id do'tage chat'tel bed'lam pig'gin no'ted fath'om des'pot tin'sel stor'age gal'lon ren'der tip'pet sto'ry ...
— McGuffey's Eclectic Spelling Book • W. H. McGuffey

... for use while crossing the plains, when a fire for cooking might not be found practicable. These things were all purchased in Chicago, together with the fourteen wagons necessary to carry them across the plains. Then all were shipped by rail to St. Joseph, Mo., where the oxen were to be purchased. The entire outfit when loaded on ...
— A Gold Hunter's Experience • Chalkley J. Hambleton

... way you feel 'bout um, 'taint no use fer ter pester wid um. It done got so now dat folks don't b'lieve nothin' but what dey kin see, an' mo' dan half un um won't b'lieve what dey see less'n dey kin feel un it too. But dat ain't de way wid dem what's ol' 'nough fer ter know. Ef I'd 'a' tol' you 'bout de fishes swimmin' ag'in fallin' water, you wouldn't ...
— Types of Children's Literature • Edited by Walter Barnes

... great admirer of Mark Twain was visiting in Hannibal, Mo. He asked the darkey who was driving him about if he knew where Huckleberry Finn lived. "No sah, I never heard of the gemmen." Then he said "Then perhaps you knew Tom Sawyer?" "No, sah, I never met the gemmen." "But surely ...
— More Toasts • Marion Dix Mosher

... their systems of worship by means of plumed and painted prayer-sticks; to have organized their medicine societies; and then to have disappeared toward his home in Shi-pae-pu-li-ma (from shi-pi-amist, vapor; u-linsurrounding; and i-mo-nasitting place of—"The mist-enveloped city"), and to have vanished beneath the world, whence he is said to have departed for the home of the Sun. He is still the conscious auditor of the prayers of his ...
— Zuni Fetiches • Frank Hamilton Cushing

... was thrown next day from his au-to-mo-bile, And although rather lonesome it did make his widow feel, It made her glad to know that she had paid that prem-i-um, And oftentimes in after years these ...
— Tobogganing On Parnassus • Franklin P. Adams

... Whose crystal streams minister like to those That here of love to her, make their repose. Sweet is her aid, (as one may well infer) 'Cause 'tis the breathings of the comforter. The pomegranates at all her gates do grow, Mandrakes and vines, with other dainties mo;[3] Her gardens yield the chief, the richest spice, Surpassing them of Adam's paradise: Here be sweet ointments, and the best of gums; Here runs the milk, here drops the honey-combs. Here are perfumes most pleasant to the sense, Here grows the goodly trees of frankincense; Her ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... 7728, cf. 7729), furnishes, if I rightly understand, another proof of the relation existing between the Semitic cults and that of the Persian gods. It speaks of a "de[orum?] sacerdos creatus a Pal[myr]enis, do[mo] Macedonia, et adven[tor] huius templi." This rather obscure text becomes clear when compared with Apul., Metam., XI, 26. After the hero had been initiated into the mysteries of Isis in Greece, he was received at Rome in the great temple of the Campus Martius, "fani quidem advena, ...
— The Oriental Religions in Roman Paganism • Franz Cumont

... widow's good graces; there were others who averred that his treatment of a brute beast like a human being was sinful and unchristian. "He couldn't have done more for a regularly baptized child," said the postmistress. "And what mo' would a regularly baptized child have wanted?" returned Mrs. MacGlowrie, with the drawling Southern intonation she fell back ...
— Trent's Trust and Other Stories • Bret Harte

... of a human embryo, four months old, natural size, from the back. (From Kolliker.) h large hemispheres, v quadrigemina, c cerebellum, mo medulla oblongata: ...
— The Evolution of Man, V.2 • Ernst Haeckel

... hand in the scrimmage myself!" laughed Old Tilly, munching a fat cake. "I say, wasn't Kent foolish to go scooting off like that? Might as well have begun easy. I move we ride nights and mornings mostly, and loaf noons. There's a moon, 'silver mo-oo-on'—" ...
— Three Young Knights • Annie Hamilton Donnell

... Pastoral. 16. A Description of Beauty. 17. To the Angel Spirit of Sir Philip Sidney. 18. A Defence of Rhime. All these pieces are published together in two volumes, 12 mo. under the title of the poetical ...
— The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753) - Volume I. • Theophilus Cibber

... two chiefs, who were brothers; the elder was called Vwen-ti-s-mo, and the younger Ma-tc-to. They had a desperate quarrel at Shumopavi, and their people divided into two factions, according as they inclined to one or other of the contestants. After a long period of contention Ma-tc-to and his followers withdrew ...
— A Study of Pueblo Architecture: Tusayan and Cibola • Victor Mindeleff and Cosmos Mindeleff

... not wish to doubt the wisdom of the August One, but I think she made a mistake in her choice of a bride for Chih-mo. She chose Tai-lo, the daughter of the Prefect of Chih-Ii. The arrangements were nearly made, the dowry even was discussed, but when the astrologer cast their horoscopes to see if they could pass their life in peace together, it was found that the ruler of Chih-mo's life was a ...
— My Lady of the Chinese Courtyard • Elizabeth Cooper

... shet o' the most uv it; hit wasn't no time for to sell, he say, so he 'fotch it back agin, 'lowin' to wait tell fall. Talks 'bout goin' to Mozouri—lots uv 'ems talkin' that-away down thar, Ole Higgins say. Cain't make a livin' here no mo', sich times as these. Si Higgins he's ben over to Kaintuck n' married a high-toned gal thar, outen the fust families, an' he's come back to the Forks with jist a hell's-mint o' whoop-jamboree ...
— The Gilded Age, Part 1. • Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) and Charles Dudley Warner

... for the benefit of his health. He is one of the most distinguished members of the perlitikel partis, called Anti-Monopolists. I admire a man wot praktices wot he preaches. Now, this Mr. McNamee has never been known to contribute a cent to surportin our grate ralerode mo-noperlists, altho he has travilled all over the United States by rale. Beside that, he wouldn't axcept any accommodashuns short of a green-line sleeper. Wen I arst him y he didn't ware his gold watch-chain and silk hat, like all other pollytishuns, he sed his partie was endevourin ...
— The Bad Boy At Home - And His Experiences In Trying To Become An Editor - 1885 • Walter T. Gray

... the rifle upon the table, and began to overhaul his gear. Waseche watched him for a few moments, and blew a cloud of blue smoke ceilingward: "Seems like yo' jest nach'lly cain't set by an' take things easy," he said; "heah's yo', with mo' money than yo' kin eveh spend, gittin' ready to hike out an' live like a Siwash in the bush when yo' c'd go outside fer the winteh, an' live in some swell hotel an' nothin' to do but r'ar back in one of them big leatheh chairs with yo' ...
— Connie Morgan in the Fur Country • James B. Hendryx

... other ancients; likewise two Latin lexicons, which looked extravagant until you observed how each did but supplement the other's deficiencies, and this so imperfectly that their owner was still liable to search in vain for words between MO and NA. ...
— Strangers at Lisconnel • Barlow Jane

... howdy. I hope yo' health is tollible. I thes thought I'd like t' see the young 'squire. Air he in? Hit air thes a leetle bisness matter twixt him an' me, thes a leetle matter uv mo' er less intrust' t' ...
— The Arena - Volume 4, No. 19, June, 1891 • Various

... had, however; for the cloak gave a sudden bound forward, and presently he found himself high in the air, in the very middle of that band of aerial travelers, who had mo magic cloak to travel on—nothing except their wings. Yet there they were, making their fearless way ...
— The Little Lame Prince - And: The Invisible Prince; Prince Cherry; The Prince With The Nose - The Frog-Prince; Clever Alice • Miss Mulock—Pseudonym of Maria Dinah Craik

... When he wasn't no mo' 'n three year old we commenced a-takin him round to church wherever they held meetin's,—'Piscopals, Methodists or Presbyterians,—so's he could see an' hear for hisself. I ca'yed him to a baptizin' over to Chinquepin ...
— Short Stories for English Courses • Various (Rosa M. R. Mikels ed.)

... tells Washington that he had heard from a trusted informant that Monroe had said to several Frenchmen that "he had no doubt but that, if they would do what was proper here, he and his friends would turn out Washington." On July 2, 1796, the Cabinet ministers, Pickering, Wolcott, and Mo-Henry, wrote to the President their joint opinion that the interests of the United States required Monroe's recall, and slanderously connected him with anonymous letters from France written by M. Montflorence. The recall, dated August 22, 1796, reached Monroe early in November. ...
— The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete - With Index to Volumes I - IV • Thomas Paine

... said Solomon, crawling along rather stiffly; "ben tied up in a knot all day, an feel so stiff dat I don't know as I'll git untied agin fur ebber mo. Was jest makin my will, any way, as you ...
— Lost in the Fog • James De Mille

... among the emigrants a considerable number of persons from Pike County, Missouri. Some of these had the sign, "From Pike Co., Mo.," painted on their wagon covers. Others, when asked whence they came, promptly answered, "From Pike County, Missouri, by gosh, sir;" often said with a shrug implying that the speaker arrogated to himself much superiority by reason of the fact stated. The display ...
— Crossing the Plains, Days of '57 - A Narrative of Early Emigrant Tavel to California by the Ox-team Method • William Audley Maxwell

... with all their larnin', fine clothes an' fine ways ain't to be depended on. I wouldn't trus' one of 'em with a jay bird lessen I wanted to git shed of it. Don't you let me hear no mo' o' your goin' over the mountains ...
— The Boy from Hollow Hut - A Story of the Kentucky Mountains • Isla May Mullins

... heels, ole Mrs. Satan," cried one.—"You ain't no better'n a free nigger!" said another.—"Yo' wheel done skotch for good, ole skeer-face! hyar! hyar! You better not come foolin' 'long o' Mas' Ned's niggers no mo'!" ...
— Lippincott's Magazine Of Popular Literature And Science, April 1875, Vol. XV., No. 88 • Various

... (kaleva, hero, and la, the place of). The land of heroes; the name of the epic poem of Finland. Kal'e-va'tar (Kalewa'tar). Daughter of Kaleva. Kal-e'vo. The same as Kaleva. Ka'lew. Often used for Kaleva. Kal'ma. The god of death. Kam'mo. The father of Kimmo. Kan'ka-hat'ta-ret. The goddesses of weaving. Ka'pe. A synonym of Ilmatar, the mother of Wainamoinen. Ka'po. A synonym of Osmotar. Ka-re'len. A province of Finland. Kar-ja'la, (karya'la). The seat of the waterfall, Kaatrakoski. Kat'e-ja'tar (kataya'tar). The daughter of the ...
— The Kalevala (complete) • John Martin Crawford, trans.

... Anastomosis (an-as-to-mo'sis). The surgical or pathological formation of a passage between any two normally distinct spaces ...
— Mother's Remedies - Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remedies from Mothers - of the United States and Canada • T. J. Ritter

... a Yankee, for I am a Yankee myself. His name was Ira Norris. He had been given an office in Platte county, Mo., and must needs be a partisan for the peculiar institution. I gave my friend Norris to understand that I would try to attend to my ...
— Personal Recollections of Pardee Butler • Pardee Butler

... ain't a bite. I'll bring you mo' 'an one, La Folle," he had boasted pompously as he ...
— The Awakening and Selected Short Stories • Kate Chopin

... Eradicate, opening a ragged coat, and reaching for something. "I got yo' telephone right yeah." he went on. "De agent at de station see me dribin' ober dis way, an' he done ast he t' deliber it. He said as how he ain't got no messenger boy now, 'cause de one he done hab went on a strike fo' five cents mo' a day. So I done took de telephone," and with that the colored man pulled out a ...
— Tom Swift and his Wireless Message • Victor Appleton

... a cyclone years ago, the wind picked up loaded freight cars and carried them away off the track. It wrenched an iron bridge from its foundations, twisted it together and hurled it away. When a cyclone later visited St. Louis, Mo., it cut off telegraph poles a foot in diameter as if they had been pipe stems. It cut off enormous trees close to the root, it cut off the corner of brick buildings where it passed as though they had been cut by a knife; nothing could stand before it; and so, nothing can stand before ...
— The Person and Work of The Holy Spirit • R. A. Torrey

... dey'll be half of it lef'. When de ham juice begins to git sunburned you makes some ham gravy. Ah spec' ham gravy's de fondest thing Ah is of. I says 'Howdy, ham gravy!' an' afteh me an' de vittles gits acquainted, mah appetite won't need grub no mo'n a fish needs shoes." ...
— Lady Luck • Hugh Wiley

... girl, in her little metallic voice. "I like you. You like me. You give one dollah; I take you see Chinese man smokes mo' 'n all oddeh mens. He velly ...
— The Port of Adventure • Charles Norris Williamson and Alice Muriel Williamson

... also quite a sugar-rat! Why, dear, gracious lady, he must put in at least twenty pieces of sugar into one cup of coffee, or he never could empty a sugar-basin as he does! I must beg you to give mo the key of the chest, that I may fill it again. God grant that all this ...
— The Home • Fredrika Bremer

... something of early remembrance :—There is the stile at which I can recollect a cross child's-maid upbraiding me with my infirmity, as she lifted me coarsely and carelessly over the flinty steps, which my brothers traversed with shout and bound. I remember the suppressed bitterness of the mo-ment, and, conscious of my own inferiority, the feeling of envy with which I regarded the easy movements and elastic steps of my more happily formed brethren. Alas! these goodly barks have all perished on life's wide ...
— Waverley Volume XII • Sir Walter Scott

... not do at all," declared the giant; "for not only are you getting wrinkled, but you are liable to be blown away; altogether. I have just thought of a plan to get you back into the Valley of Mo again, and when you are in your own country your friends may get you out of the scrape the best ...
— The Surprising Adventures of the Magical Monarch of Mo and His People • L. Frank Baum

... mo plentiful. Before the war folks wore fine clothes. They go to their nearest tradin point and sell cotton. They had fine silk clothes and fine knives and forks. They would buy a whole case o cheese at one time and a barrel of molasses. Folks ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - Volume II. Arkansas Narratives. Part I • Work Projects Administration

... doth she dwell, There her father loves her well, Who is king of that countrie. Her a husband hath he found, Paynim lord that serves Mahound! Ne'er with him the maid will go, For she loves a damoiseau, Aucassin, that ye may know, Swears to God that never mo With a lover will she go Save with him she loveth so In ...
— Aucassin and Nicolete • Andrew Lang

... Dynasty" (Life of Hsuu Mo): "A drunken visitor said, 'Clear wine I account a Saint: thick ...
— More Translations from the Chinese • Various

... "St. Louis, Mo.: An epidemic of diphtheria is raging in this city and hundreds of children are dying daily from the effects of its ravages. The deaths in most cases are children of the poorer classes who cannot afford to pay the exorbitant prices lately put upon antitoxin ...
— Born Again • Alfred Lawson

... been traced between the former and the Bodhisattva but in the seventh century the latter was regarded as his abode. Our information about it comes mainly from Hsuean Chuang[25] who describes it when speaking of the Malakuta country and as near the Mo-lo-ya (Malaya) mountain. But apparently he did not visit it and this makes it probable that it was not a religious centre but a mountain in the south of which Buddhists in the north wrote with little precision.[26] There is no evidence that Avalokita ...
— Hinduism And Buddhism, Volume II. (of 3) - An Historical Sketch • Charles Eliot

... a superscript in the original. One carat indicates that the following single letter is superscript. A pair of carats indicates that the enclosed letters are superscript; for example the abbreviations 8^vo^ and 12^mo^ are used for the printer's page sizes octavo and ...
— Poems of Henry Vaughan, Silurist, Volume II • Henry Vaughan

... the whole peninsula); and Southern Greece, which the ancients called Pel-o-pon-ne'sus, or the Island of Pe'lops, which would be an island were it not for the narrow Isthmus of Corinth, which connects it on the north with Central Greece. Its modern name, the Mo-re'a, was bestowed upon it from its resemblance to the leaf of the mulberry. The chief political divisions of Peloponnesus were Corinth and Acha'ia on the north, Ar'golis on the east, Laco'nia and Messe'nia at the southern extremity of the peninsula, E'lis on the west, ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... years and ten ago A prince was born at Florida, Mo.; And though he came incognito, With just the usual yells of woe, The watchful fairies seemed to know Precisely what the row meant; For when he was but five days old, (December fifth as I've been told,) They pattered through the midnight cold, ...
— The Poems of Henry Van Dyke • Henry Van Dyke

... young widow becomes the object of practical persecution by his relatives, who misunderstand her motives entirely. With a nobility of character, as rare as beautiful, she destroys their prejudice, and at last teaches them to love her."—Central Baptist, St. Louis, Mo. ...
— Floyd Grandon's Honor • Amanda Minnie Douglas

... G.L. of Mo. for 1823, p. 5. The report and resolution were on the petitions of two candidates to be initiated, one with only one arm, and the other much ...
— The Principles of Masonic Law - A Treatise on the Constitutional Laws, Usages And Landmarks of - Freemasonry • Albert G. Mackey

... my pony! Here, come in out of the rain till I'm ready. What blasted nuisances you are! That's brandy. Drink some; you want it. Hang on to my stirrup and tell me if I go mo fast." ...
— The Works of Rudyard Kipling One Volume Edition • Rudyard Kipling

... was an Argonaut who crossed the plains in 1849, while he was yet in his teens, and settling in California, made it his permanent home. When he left Independence, Mo., with the train, his parents and one sister were his companions, but all of them were buried on the prairie, and their loss robbed him of the desire ever to return to the East. Hostile Indians, storm, cold, heat, privation, and suffering were ...
— Klondike Nuggets - and How Two Boys Secured Them • E. S. Ellis

... above a quarter of a mile, till they came to the castle; where both parties did, to their mutual grief, become sensible of their mistake. In this skirmish there were several killed on both sides, and Captain Palmer himself dangerously wounded, with many mo wounded in each troop, who did peaceably dwell together afterward for a time, untill their wounds were cured, in Sanquhar castle."—Account of Presbytery ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Vol. II (of 3) • Walter Scott

... the disgraced Hasty, advising him with fine scorn "to get de tiger to chew off his laigs, so's he wouldn't have to walk no mo'." ...
— Polly of the Circus • Margaret Mayo

... Wren and de Thrush go clackety-clack, Dey bofe talk at once an dey bofe talk back, Dey say: "Jim Crow, my but you is black!" 'Taint gwine to rain no mo'. ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf; a Practical Plan of Character Building, Volume I (of 17) - Fun and Thought for Little Folk • Various

... City, Mo.—This invention has for its object to furnish an improved lime kiln, which shall be so constructed as to enable the kiln to be worked from the front, in firing and in drawing the lime and ashes, which will not allow cold or unburnt rock to pass ...
— Scientific American, Volume XXIV., No. 12, March 18, 1871 • Various

... stepmother one reads about in the story-books, who puts her stepdaughter into a pie, and all that kind of thing. I suppose stepfathers have been a very estimable class, by the way, as it is the stepmother who always drops in for it in the story-books. You'll find mo very easy to deal with, Mr. Hawkehurst, always provided that you deal in a fair and ...
— Birds of Prey • M. E. Braddon

... "Not a mo-moment, sir," stuttered Baker. "It was this young lady we were after. We had no intention at all of ...
— The Lost Despatch • Natalie Sumner Lincoln

... his ten fingers, his ten toes, his elbows, and his nose, strikin' every single solitary key on that pianner at the same time. The thing busted and went off into seventeen hundred and fifty-seven thousand five hundred and forty-two hemi-demi-semi-quivers, and I know'd no mo'." ...
— Southern Literature From 1579-1895 • Louise Manly

... returning from California along the Spanish trail, as far as the head of the Santa Clara fork of the Rio Virgen, I crossed only small streams making their way south to the Colorado, or lost in sand, (as the Mo-hah-ve;) while to the left, lofty mountains, their summits white with snow, were often visible, and which must have turned water to the north as well as to the south, and thus constituted, on this part, the southern ...
— The Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains, Oregon and California • Brevet Col. J.C. Fremont

... a mo. and I'll cut round the corner to Sherrard's and see what I can fish up for you. You really look like ...
— The Youngest Girl in the Fifth - A School Story • Angela Brazil

... any ravenes fether it shone for blake. A wreth of gold arm-gret, of huge weight, Upon his hed sate ful of stones bright, Of fine rubins and of diamants. About his char ther wenten white alauns Twenty and mo, as great as any stere, To hunten at the leon or the dere, And folwed him, with mosel fast ybound, Colered with gold, and torettes filed round. A hundred lordes had he in his route, Armed full wel with ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 57, No. 356, June, 1845 • Various

... you doing?" said Gunson. "Hey?" cried the little fellow, trotting up. "Doing! Want mo' bacon—make blead. ...
— To The West • George Manville Fenn

... mo." The big trader held out his arm to bar the way. "Don't push on yore reins, McRae. I'm makin' you a proposition. Me, I'm lookin' for a wife, an' this here breed girl of yours suits me. Give her to me an' I'll ...
— Man Size • William MacLeod Raine

... Adam and Eve, with the, And all my fryends that herein be; In Paradyse come forth with me, In blysse for to dwell. The fende of hell that is your foe, He shall be wrappyd and woundyn in woo; Fro wo to welth now shall ye go, With myrth ever mo to melle." ...
— The Parish Clerk (1907) • Peter Hampson Ditchfield

... L'Hetman, which derived a passing success from the patriotic fervour of its sentiments. For the exhibition of 1878 he wrote a hymn, Vive la France, which was set to music by Gounod. In 1880 his drama in verse, La Mobite, which had been accepted by the Thtre Franais, was forbidden by the censor on religious grounds. In 1882 M. Droulde founded the Ligue des patriotes, with the object of furthering France's "revanche" against Germany. He was one of the first advocates ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 2 - "Demijohn" to "Destructor" • Various

... savannah. The word steppe, or step, is Russian, and not Tartarian. In the Turco-Tartar dialect a heath is called tala or tschol. The word gobi, which Europeans have corrupted into cobi, signifies in the Mongol tongue a naked desert. It is equivalent to the scha-mo or khan-hai of the Chinese. A steppe, or plain covered with herbs, is in Mongol, kudah; in Chinese, kouana.) It is from the effect of winds that have passed over the deserts situated to the east, that the little basin of ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America V2 • Alexander von Humboldt

... readin' to read my bible and scratch my name. I went to school one mo'ning and didn't git along wid de teacher so I didn't go ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves. - Texas Narratives, Part 2 • Works Projects Administration

... ain't no such man." But dere it stood, wid its sleeves gently flappin' in de wind. Ovah 8 feet tall, it wuz, an' all dressed in white. I yells at it, "Whut does yo' want?" but it didn't say nuthin'. I yells some mo' but it jus' stands there, not movin' a finger. Grabbin' de gun, I takes careful aim an' cracks down on 'em, but still he don't move. Henry, thinkin' maybe I wuz too scared to shoot straight, say: "Nigger, gib me dat gun!" I gibs Henry de gun but it don't take but one shot to convince ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Interviews with Former Slaves, Arkansas Narratives, Part 4 • Works Projects Administration

... capped the climax with "It's not in the mo-o-o-ode now, that song!" with a delicate assumption of languor which made his comrades explode in suppressed convulsions of mirth. Finally they supplied the ...
— Russian Rambles • Isabel F. Hapgood

... onliest daughters, died befo' de surrender. Miss Susie slipped one day wid de scissors in her hand, and when she did dem scissors tuck and stuck in one her eyes and put it plum' smack out and she never did see out'n it no mo'. Dat made it so sad, and everybody cried wid her but it never done ...
— Slave Narratives Vol. XIV. South Carolina, Part 2 • Works Projects Administration

... motion. "Why should she not sing?" she asked in her thick, sweet voice. She had never learned the difference between the pronouns. "She's be'n gatherin' yarbs in the wood, an' th' sun is warm," she blinked at it rapidly, "an' the winter it is pas', Marse Natty, no mo' winter!" ...
— Hillsboro People • Dorothy Canfield

... natchally took to de woods. I went into Richmond huntin' de ol' Missus, but, Lawd, Massa Jack, I nebber foun' nuthin' ob her in dat crowd. Den an' officer man done got me, an' put me diggin' in de trenches. Ef dat's what wah am, I sho' don' want no mo' wah. Den after dat I jest natchally drifted. I reckon I libbed 'bout eberywhar yo' ebber heard ob, fo' dar want no use ob me goin' back to de East Sho'. Somebody said dat de West am de right place fo' a nigger, an' so I done ...
— Keith of the Border • Randall Parrish

... 1871, i. 370.) At pp. 57-78 of the 'Monthly Review' for July, 1757 (upon which Goldsmith was at this date employed), is a summary, 'from our correspondent at Paris,' of the official record of the Damiens' Trial, 4 vols. 12 mo.; and his deed and tragedy make a graphic chapter in the remarkable 'Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous', by George Augustus Sala, ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Oliver Goldsmith • Oliver Goldsmith

... IN SALISBURY.—The town records of Salisbury, Mass., under date of 3, 1st mo. 1647: "it was ordered yt Richard North shall have fivetie shillings for ringing the bell tow yeares & a half past & twenty shillings to ring it one yeare more, beginning att Aprill next ensueing." A year previous it was "voated ...
— The New England Magazine Volume 1, No. 3, March, 1886 - Bay State Monthly Volume 4, No. 3, March, 1886 • Various



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