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Mister   /mˈɪstər/   Listen
Mister

noun
1.
A form of address for a man.  Synonyms: Mr, Mr..






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Mister" Quotes from Famous Books



... drop the mister from my name," drawled the young westerner. "Joe tells me you have a mine up here. My father has one, too—the Mary Jennie, ...
— Joe The Hotel Boy • Horatio Alger Jr.

... "Mornin', mister," said he. "You'll be all right in here—there's nobody about just now, and if my missis or any o' t' servant lasses sees yer, they'll tak' yer for a brewer's traveller, or summat o' that sort. Come to ...
— The Talleyrand Maxim • J. S. Fletcher

... taste the last o' the cakes me neighbor sent up. Here, you William, keep out o' that! It's for Miss Amy, dear heart. Four weeks an' longer she's been up before light, trudgin' away as gay as a mavis, with never a word that she's bothered. Alanna, Mister ...
— Reels and Spindles - A Story of Mill Life • Evelyn Raymond

... that that don't seem so queer to me as it used to? It seems all right fur pertickler friends to call me Jim, but clo'es is what puts the Mister into a man. I felt it comin' when I looked into the glass. Says I to myself: 'Jim, that's Mr. Fenton as is now afore ye. Look at 'im sharp, so that, if so be ye ever seen 'im agin' ye'll know 'im.' ...
— Sevenoaks • J. G. Holland

... rooms; and they are from England, both, as I think by their names. If you ask me to pronounce those names, my tongue hesitates; if you ask me to spell them, here they are, letter by letter, first and second in their order as they come. First, a high-born stranger (by title Mister) who introduces himself in eight letters, A, r, m, a, d, a, l, e—and comes ill in his own carriage. Second, a high-born stranger (by title Mister also), who introduces himself in four letters—N, e, a, l—and comes ill in the diligence. His excellency of the eight ...
— Armadale • Wilkie Collins

... time, mister!" he called to Dave. "Mamma's a bright one, give her a minute so she gits herself ...
— The Wrong Twin • Harry Leon Wilson

... Mister Tom—growin' up. So's my pretty. I hate to see it, but ye can't fool Natur'—no, sir! Natur' says to these young things: 'Advance!' an' they've jest got to march, I reckon," and Aunt Alvirah sighed, too. Then her little, bird-like eyes twinkled ...
— Ruth Fielding in Moving Pictures - Or Helping The Dormitory Fund • Alice Emerson

... pump and hose, collecting at the same time an audience of brats who assisted me by shouting, "What ya goin a do, mister?" "What's at thing for, mister?" "You goin a water Mrs Dinkman's frontyard, mister?" "Do your teeth awwis look so funny, mister? My grampa takes his teeth out at night and puts'm in a glass of water. Do you take out your teeth at night, mister?" "You goin a put that stuff on our garden too, ...
— Greener Than You Think • Ward Moore

... "It's no use, Mister Bacchus," said she, addressing the old man, who looked rather the worse for wear, "it's no use to be flinging yer imperence in my face. I'se worked my time; I'se cooked many a grand dinner, and eat 'em too. You'se ...
— Aunt Phillis's Cabin - Or, Southern Life As It Is • Mary H. Eastman

... went on to say in the same breath; 'I'm very well indeed, myself, I'm much obliged to you. My name is Toots,—Mister Toots.' ...
— Dombey and Son • Charles Dickens

... the tobacco rows beyond the manured land so's to be sure and not lose any manure, why the stuff won't grow six inches high and it just turns yellow and seems to dry up, no matter if it rains every day. Say, Mister, would you mind telling me if ...
— The Story of the Soil • Cyril G. Hopkins

... well-worn ruse succeeded, for Mr. Dilger ran out after him and laid an unwashed claw upon his coat-sleeve. "Don't go, mister," he said; "I like to do business if I can; though, 'pon my word and honour, a sovereign for a work o' art like that! Well, just for luck and bein' my birthday, ...
— The Brass Bottle • F. Anstey

... outside, and two or three men came in to do the last offices. Glory had turned her face away, but behind her the women were still talking. "Wait a minute, mister! ... What a lovely ring! ... I wish I had a keepsake to remember her by." "Well, and why ...
— The Christian - A Story • Hall Caine

... "Dervishes, Mister Headingly!" said he, speaking excellent English, but separating his syllables as d Frenchman will. "There are no Dervishes. They ...
— The Tragedy of The Korosko • Arthur Conan Doyle

... that," said the farmer curtly. "What the country's coming to I don't know, what with motors killing us on the roads and now these here airyplanes making the very air above us poison to breathe. There ought to be a law to stop it, that's what I say. Down, Pompey! What's your name, mister?" ...
— Round the World in Seven Days • Herbert Strang

... would seem to have turned her coat—for the ladies wear coats now, the horrid ugly things!—for the sake of position, and title, and all that. If Lord Dashville had been a poor man, with his own way to make in the world, a plain Mister, there might have been more to be said for it. But to think that I should throw over my poor darling because he will come home without a penny, and perhaps tattoed, but at any rate turned black, for the sake of ...
— Springhaven - A Tale of the Great War • R. D. Blackmore

... "they uv killed him! They uv done killed my little Ab! Oh, Lordy! that mortal hain't a-livin' that he ever done any harm. What did they kill him for?" Then she turned to Woodward: "Oh, Mister, Mister! please tell me what he done. I'm the one that made the liquor, I'm the one. Oh, Lordy! what did ...
— Mingo - And Other Sketches in Black and White • Joel Chandler Harris

... it, Mister Lieutenant,' answered the skipper. 'The blacks, as I say, must take their chance; and it seems to me that if you and your men refuse to come aboard my brig, when I offer to receive you, that your deaths will be at your ...
— The Three Lieutenants • W.H.G. Kingston

... then? The ides of March are come, but not gone! Stay, if you plase, Mister Mordicai, till Lady-day, when it becomes due: in the mean time, I have a handful, or rather an armful, of bank-notes for you, from my ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. 6 • Maria Edgeworth

... last, clasping his hands about his knee, and holding the pipe between his teeth, "have ye seen that new feller up at the orfice. Mister Houston, ...
— The Award of Justice - Told in the Rockies • A. Maynard Barbour

... child say, mister?" said Aunt M'riar; like a woman's curiosity, to know. But those other two, they was curious underneath-like; only ...
— When Ghost Meets Ghost • William Frend De Morgan

... Barnes," echoed the speaker at the end of some sort of practical talk concerning the newsboys' organization and its management. "Mister Harry Barnes"—he squinted at the program—"in ...
— McClure's Magazine, Vol. XXXI, No. 3, July 1908. • Various

... permit, mister. I won't go out there unless 'Shep' goes with me. He can't? Well, good-bye, good-bye, sir. Come on, 'Shep.' You can't stay there all day. Just as much obliged," and the two passed out into the ...
— The Speaker, No. 5: Volume II, Issue 1 - December, 1906. • Various

... you be jealous, Mister Jahnny. There's zomebody a-comen down the groun' Towards the stile. Who is it? Come, get down I must run hwome, upon my word then, now; If I do stay, they'll kick up sich a row. Good ...
— Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect • William Barnes

... the appropriate speech was made, And every duty with distinction paid; Respectful, easy, pleasant, or polite— 'Your honour's servant!' 'Mister Smith, good-night.' ...
— Guy Mannering, or The Astrologer, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... down at the other disapprovingly. "I don't as a general thing find myself guilty of talking in my sleep," he retorted, "and I'm prepared to let anything I say stand till the next throw. We may be some vociferous, out here twixt the Mississippi and the Rockies, but we ain't no infant-in-the-cradle, Mister. We had civilization here when the Pilgrim Fathers' rock wasn't nothing but a pebble to ...
— The Happy Family • Bertha Muzzy Bower

... and one over. Why, Allee, if everybody would just pay like that, we will get through quick, won't we? But I 'xpect lots of 'em will try to make us take only a nickel. Just s'posing we get enough money to buy shoes for the whole family! Wouldn't they be s'prised? Thank you, Mister Conductor, and thank the motorman, too. We would like to know his girl. Does she ever ride on his car and do you s'pose he would bring her over to play with us some day? We'd meet her at the end of the line. Or maybe she is ...
— At the Little Brown House • Ruth Alberta Brown

... pursued the Mexican eagerly. "Save me plenty hot ride." He pulled an envelope from the pocket of his elaborately silver-conchoed chaps. "Rocking-R boss, he tell me take thees to Mister Leench at Shoe-Bar. Eef yo' take heem, I ...
— Shoe-Bar Stratton • Joseph Bushnell Ames

... warriors here once more. We sacrificed for them quite a lot, and if they have any Christianity left in them they will not forget what Capel Kingsend has done and will repay same with interest. Happier still we are to welcome Mister Hughes-Jones to the Big Seat. In the valley of the shadow has Mister Hughes-Jones been. Earnestly we prayed for our dear religious leader. To-morrow at seven we shall hold a prayer meeting for his cure. At seven at night. Will everybody remember? On Monday—to-morrow—at seven ...
— My Neighbors - Stories of the Welsh People • Caradoc Evans

... scallywags of yours ain't got nothin' to give to the building of the chu'ch. Which means they'll need to get busy workin' on it. Guess work never did come welcome to Mister Peter Clancy and Nick. They hate work worse'n washin'—an' that's some. Guess they borrowed your team to do a bit o' haulin', which—kind o' squares ...
— The Law-Breakers • Ridgwell Cullum

... verandah outside our doors, fear to lose sight of their charges for a moment, lest some need of native help should arise. They watch hand and eye like faithful dogs, for their language is unintelligible to us as ours to them, and the only attempt at speech is "Chow-chow, mister!" when the dinner-bell rings, the mystic words accompanied by a realistic pantomime of ...
— Through the Malay Archipelago • Emily Richings

... Blacklock"—he always addressed every man as Mister in his own house, just as "Mrs. B." always called him "Mister Ball," and he called her "Missus Ball" before "company." "Come right into the front parlor. Billy, turn on ...
— Ainslee's, Vol. 15, No. 5, June 1905 • Various

... become an angry pink. "That little Henry Rooter is the worst falsehooder in this town; and I never believed a word he said in his life! Anyway, what affairs is it of yours, I'd like you to please be so kind and obliging for to tell me, Mister ...
— Gentle Julia • Booth Tarkington

... money, Mister Hal, anyhow,' said the old creature. 'You was allus a liberal 'un, you was. But as to what Tom could 'a dun with the carpus, I'm allus heer'd that you may dew anythink with any-think, if you on'y send ...
— Aylwin • Theodore Watts-Dunton

... "Sure as shootin', Mister," replied the boatman. "It's the only place of its kind in five miles. The rock you're hunting for is about a hundred rods ...
— The Great Drought • Sterner St. Paul Meek

... England, Mister Charles," said Tim that evening, "turn up their noses at the thought of living in tents, but what do they know of them? The military tent is an uncomfortable thing, and as for the gipsy tent, a dacent pig wouldn't look at it. Now this is like a palace, with its carpet under foot, ...
— With Clive in India - Or, The Beginnings of an Empire • G. A. Henty

... among the mighty of the state and city, Mister Mayor, in order to impress upon you by word of mouth that your invitation to the reception at our home this evening isn't merely an invitation extended to the chief executive of the city. It's for Stewart Morrison himself," ran ...
— All-Wool Morrison • Holman Day

... turned red. "This entire building is as Secure as any edifice in the Free World, mister. And it's empty. We're the only living people inside here at this hour. I'm not taking ...
— The Next Logical Step • Benjamin William Bova

... chicken; for to dell you the honest fagd, I am all pote famished, for I laid me down on mine billow in bed the lastd nightd widout mine supper, at the instance of mine physician, for which I am not altogeddere inglined to extend mine fastd no longer.' Then, laughing: 'Berhaps, Mister Golley Cibbers, you may like to pote this to the vote? But I shall not segond the motion, nor shall I holdt up mine hand, as I will, by bermission, embloy it some dime in a better office. So, if you blease, do me the kindness for to gut me ...
— The Great German Composers • George T. Ferris

... theirs to a peculiar degree because they were a young race. And to illustrate their situation he told of meeting old Aunt Caroline one evening striding along with a basket on her head. He said, "Where are you going, Aunt Caroline?" And she replied: "Lor' bless yer, Mister Washin'ton, I dun bin where I's er goin'." "And so," he concluded, "some of the races of the earth have dun bin where dey was er goin'!" but fortunately the Negro race ...
— Booker T. Washington - Builder of a Civilization • Emmett J. Scott and Lyman Beecher Stowe

... Jesus on the heavenly railroad, and that He paid the fare for everybody, and that the train stopped at every station to take people on board; but my ma don't sing to me any more. Nobody sings to me now; and I thought I'd take the cars and go to ma. Mister, do you sing to your little girl about the railroad that goes to heaven? You have a ...
— Children's Edition of Touching Incidents and Remarkable Answers to Prayer • S. B. Shaw

... her! She desired her father would give Jeanie a' the gear—her ain (i.e. Effie's) mother's and a'—She had made a deed, giving up her right, and it was in Mr. Novit's hand—Warld's gear was henceforward the least of her care, nor was it likely to be muckle her mister—She hoped this would make it easy for her sister to settle;" and immediately after this expression, she wished Butler himself all good things, in return for his kindness to her. "For herself," she said, "she kend her lot would ...
— The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... told her he wasn't to be found anywhere. She looked down the well and behind the fire-boards in the fireplaces. They called and called till they were out of breath. Finally she thought of looking in the big dark pantry where she kept her fruit. There stood Mister Tom. He had opened a jar of blackberry jam, and was just going for it with both hands. The jam was all over his face and hair and little gingham apron, and even up his wrists. He was the funniest ...
— The Little Colonel • Annie Fellows Johnston

... circumstances." No one had ever realised the crass stupidity of that remarkable young person—dense and impenetrable as a London fog—until her first introduction in these Readings, with "Please, Mister Sawyer, Missis Raddle wants to speak to you!"—the dull, dead-level of her voice ending in the last monosyllable with a series of inflections almost amounting to a chromatic passage. Mr. Justice Stareleigh, again!—nobody ...
— Charles Dickens as a Reader • Charles Kent

... do!" Potter cut him off, and paced the floor, virulently brooding. "And so Talbot Potter's company is to be made up of actors engaged to suit the personal whims of L. Smith Packer's father, old Mister Packer of Baptist ...
— Harlequin and Columbine • Booth Tarkington

... Jeff as he assisted her in packing the huge hamper that occupied the center of the dining-room table, "is Mister Dave sure 'pinted to be jedge of the criminal court—he ain't a-joking ...
— Andrew the Glad • Maria Thompson Daviess

... to all at home," said La Sauvage, "and my compliments to your missus, if you are married, mister. . . . That was ...
— Poor Relations • Honore de Balzac

... haspirates rucked, and made Mister CAT ULLUS chi-ike, He was probably jest such a rattler as poets and prigs never like, When a chap knows 'is book, piles the ochre, perhaps becomes pal to a Prince, Lor! it's wonderful 'ow a dropped haitch or two ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 101, December 26, 1891 • Various

... "Here, mister!" panted Issy. "Jest hand this letter to Beriah Higgins when he takes the mail bag at East Harniss, won't you? It's mighty ...
— The Depot Master • Joseph C. Lincoln

... education may be modern, on the whole; but it hasn't neglected the classics completely! Gentlemen forward!" she said, with a sudden cry, which sent Mrs. Bates's fingers back to the keyboard; "gentlemen forward to Mister Tucker!" Mrs. Bates pounded loudly, and Jane pirouetted ...
— With the Procession • Henry B. Fuller

... "Don't know him, mister," said Colonel Two, who happened to be the owner of the hut. "Besides ef, as is most likely, he's growed long hair an' a beard since he left the States, his own mother wouldn't know him from George ...
— Romance of California Life • John Habberton

... Registered at the Hotel and Swelled Up properly when addressed as "Mister" by the Clerk, he wanted to know if there was a Lively Show in Town. The Clerk told him to follow the Street until he came to all the Electric Lights, and there he would find a Ballet. Uncle Brewster found the Place, and looked in through the Hole at an Assistant Treasurer, who was Pale ...
— More Fables • George Ade

... to support the great hotel. Among the names were those of princes, earls, countesses, and baronets; and when the people of the house heard from R——-'s nurse that I too was a man of office, and held the title of Honorable in my own country, they greatly regretted that I entered myself as plain "Mister" in the book. We found this hotel very comfortable, and might doubtless have made it luxurious, had we chosen to go to five times the expense of similar luxuries in America; but we merely ordered comfortable things, and so came off at no ...
— Passages From the English Notebooks, Complete • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... yelled, as he clubbed his whip to strike. "Oh! it's you is it, Mister," he changed his tone when he saw who it was. "By thunder! I thought I was ...
— Frontier Boys in Frisco • Wyn Roosevelt

... "'Ere, mister! gi' me a 'and wi' this 'ere luggage," cried the cabman, finding the box he was getting down too much for him. "Yah wouldn't see me break my back, an' my poor 'orse standin' there a lookin' on—would ...
— Mary Marston • George MacDonald

... as have a' that wan Eternal memory frae man, Since e'er the weary worl' began - Mister or Madam, Keats or Scots Burns, the ...
— New Poems • Robert Louis Stevenson

... his old head and sighed. "I used to go very often to the French Theatre. You remember 'L'Aiglon?' Can I chat with you a bit? This silence is simply killing me. Four months of silence! Don't you think, mister writer, of what a sweet, what a wonderful word 'revenge' is? If you write—do write about it! Revenge for having cleaned the streets, for having been thrown out of every Embassy, every Legation, every Consulate—whose three sons are sleeping there, ...
— Rescuing the Czar - Two authentic Diaries arranged and translated • James P. Smythe

... of which I was the innocent victim. Repeatedly have I written the mayor of the town of Abbevilliers, to the general commanding the French military forces, and to the President of the Republic of France, demanding the desired information; but—believe it or not, Mister President—to date I have had not ...
— Fibble, D. D. • Irvin Shrewsbury Cobb

... proud goat when you beat me, but let me tell you, you only got it temporarily. Train! I'm going to train till I'm as hard all the way through, and clean all the way through, as that chain is. And some day, Mister David Grief, somewhere, somehow, I'm going to be in such shape that I'll lick you as you licked me. I'm going to pulp your face till your ...
— A Son Of The Sun • Jack London

... I looked back again my plate was gone, goose and all. So I jist cast my eyes down to t'other end of the table, and sure enough I seed a white man walking off with my plate. I says, 'Hello, mister, bring back my plate.' He fetched it back in a hurry, as you may think. And when he set it down before me, how do you think it was? Licked as clean as my hand. If it wasn't, I wish I ...
— David Crockett: His Life and Adventures • John S. C. Abbott

... cried. "There's your tall, slender man with black hair turning gray in places. Ever in New York, Mister?" he added. ...
— Boy Scouts in the Canal Zone - The Plot Against Uncle Sam • G. Harvey Ralphson

... make a yellow gown. A pair of lace boots with lengthy heels on them and brassy eyes. A hat is suited for a wedding-day. A fine tooth comb. To be sent with three barrels of porter in Jimmy Farrell's creel cart on the evening of the coming Fair to Mister Michael James Flaherty. With the best compliments of this ...
— The Playboy of the Western World • J. M. Synge

... "this may have been a shed once, but it's more like a sieve now. There's more leaks to the roof than there is boards, enough sight. However, any port in a storm, and we've got the storm, sartin. All right, Mister What's-your-name, we'll wait." ...
— Thankful's Inheritance • Joseph C. Lincoln

... and spring Upon the Swift Elusive String, Thus you learn to catch the wary Mister Mouse ...
— The Kitten's Garden of Verses • Oliver Herford

... mister," the girl said. "They told me reduce, too, but they don't talk real good, and I think I'm supposed to seduce you so you'll tell 'em something, and then they'll let me go. I guess. I hope. What is it they wantcha to ...
— High Dragon Bump • Don Thompson

... Mister Tom?" she asked. "Truly, you look as colicky as Amos Dodge—an' they do say he lived ...
— Ruth Fielding in Moving Pictures - Or Helping The Dormitory Fund • Alice Emerson

... "Mister Red-headed Man, I'm so glad your heart is young enough for Dickens. I love him too—enough to read him standing at a book counter in a busy shop. And do you know, I like the squareness of your jaw, and the way your eyes crinkle ...
— Dawn O'Hara, The Girl Who Laughed • Edna Ferber

... the veranda drinking lemonade I do believe and swatting flies and Bob was laughing and talking along with everyone else. Well, he was in a rocker just like this one and I gave him the fly swatter because he was laughing at me and I said, 'O.K., mister, you go ahead and try to hit one if you're so smart.' And he gave a great big swing, laughing, and that rocker went right over the edge of the veranda!" She laughed her breathless laugh till she had ...
— The Last Straw • William J. Smith

... boy be cockered up much by Mister Dale; and the Papisher went and sat with him and his mother a whole hour t'other day; and that boy is as deep as a well; and I seed him lurking about the place, and hiding hisself under the tree the day the stocks was put up—and that ere boy is ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Vol. 2, No. 8, January, 1851 • Various

... his wings, When Snail would patch his house, When moths have marred the overcoat Of tender Mister Mouse, ...
— The Second Book of Modern Verse • Jessie B. Rittenhouse

... Rev. Martin Sherlock, an Irish Clergyman, 'who published in 1781 his own travels under the title of Letters of an English Traveller translated from the French.' Croker's Boswell, p. 770. Mason writes of him as 'Mister, or Monsieur, or Signor Sherlock, for I am told he is both [sic] French, English, and Italian in print.' Walpole's Letters, viii. 202. I think, however, that Dr. Thomas Campbell is meant. His Philosophical Survey of the South of Ireland Boswell calls ...
— Life Of Johnson, Volume 4 (of 6) • Boswell

... 'twas no moon, for she asked another woman that had an almanac, as she did whenever a boy was born to her, because of the saying, 'No moon, no man,' which made her afeard every man-child she had. Do ye really think it serious, Mister Fairway, that ...
— The Return of the Native • Thomas Hardy

... your letters, sir, Leadley and I would have come to think of you as—as just one of the master's ways, Mister Andrew." ...
— Fate Knocks at the Door - A Novel • Will Levington Comfort

... some friends of hers on the island. There wuz a smart young English clergyman goin' with us and a Scotchman, both good lookin' and good actin'. The Scotchman wuz Sir Duncan Ramsey and didn't act any more sot up than if he wuz a plain mister. He paid considerable attention to Dorothy, too, but Miss Meechim said that she didn't worry about Dorothy at all since I would chaperone her, and Robert wuz going to protect her from any possible ...
— Around the World with Josiah Allen's Wife • Marietta Holley

... Landecker's store, de Mr. Landecker dat marry Miss Mamie Propst, and I begs him to give me a cigar. I lights dat cigar and puts out after her. I ketches up wid her just as she was comin' out of Mr. Sailing Wolfe's Jew store. I brush up 'ginst her and say: 'Excuse me lady.' Her say: 'I grants your pardon, Mister. I 'spects smoke got in your eyes and you didn't see me.' I say: 'Well, de smoke is out of my eyes now and they will never have sight for any other gal but you as long as I live.' Black as she was, her got red in de face and say: 'Who ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves • Works Projects Administration

... sir, but if you thinks you're goin' to be let to scrub that ar plank, sir, you're mistaken. I'm skipper here, and I'll do that jest to show you how we thinks of your politeness, mister. Hand ...
— A Dream of the North Sea • James Runciman

... "Look here, mister," said Ben, impatiently; "you know well enough what I mean. You took a letter with money in it out of my pocket. Just hand it back, and I ...
— Ben, the Luggage Boy; - or, Among the Wharves • Horatio Alger

... always used to take the wheel going through the rapids. One day when the boat was plunging and wallowing along the boiling current, and Jack's utmost vigilance was being exercised to keep her in the narrow channel, a boy pulled his coat-tail and hailed him with: Say, Mister Captain! I wish you would just stop your boat a minute—I've lost an ...
— Luke Walton • Horatio Alger

... trust ye, Mister Stone," she said simply, and the sincerity of the lustrous eyes as they met his confirmed her words. "Afore you-all's time in the revenue service, raiders done kilt my daddy. I kain't never fergive them men, but they's out o' ...
— Heart of the Blue Ridge • Waldron Baily

... queer dolly named Punch, Who has a remarkable hunch. The tip of his nose Is red as a rose, And that's how you know Mister Punch. ...
— More Dollies • Richard Hunter

... herself from her mother's arms and rushed out of the room after him. "Mister! Wait!" she called. "Don't do anything to mama. I'll come and do the work faithfully," said Foresta trying ...
— The Hindered Hand - or, The Reign of the Repressionist • Sutton E. Griggs

... 'I ain't got nothin' in my pockets but a knife. It's 'im wot's got the money, mister, not me;' and the ...
— The Wolf Patrol - A Tale of Baden-Powell's Boy Scouts • John Finnemore

... number for my teams. The teamsters obeyed by driving up, and when they had dismounted and were about to unhitch from the wagons, one of the wood-haulers at the stable door said: “You can save yourself the trouble, mister, of unhitching them mules, for you ain't a going to put them in this stable; and the first man that attempts ...
— The Great Salt Lake Trail • Colonel Henry Inman

... "Mister, Jimmie was going to play a trick on the elephant. He was going to give him a bad apple just to see what a funny ...
— Nero, the Circus Lion - His Many Adventures • Richard Barnum

... him with the surprise and horror of a youth shot mortally. He could not find his tongue for a moment. Ultimately he gasped : "But, Mister Editor "—Coleman interrupted him tigerishly. " You heard what I said? Get out." The man bowed his head and went slowly ...
— Active Service • Stephen Crane

... I see no reason why There should be war, good Mister Spy So, faith! we'll be allies; And if we must have fights and frays, We'll shoot ...
— The English Spy • Bernard Blackmantle

... 'dear' me, Mister!" ejaculated Jess, with every appearance of anger. "If I'm not as ...
— The Girls of Central High on Lake Luna - or, The Crew That Won • Gertrude W. Morrison

... only could get me out of this scrape! I'll die if I stay here! They kick me and beat me terribly! Please take me away, mister!" ...
— The Outdoor Chums on the Gulf • Captain Quincy Allen

... patient while they all came rolling in, Mister Lawson, Mister Dyson, and the others of their kin, With their dreadful, dismal stories of the Overlander's camp, How his fire is always smoky, and his boots are always damp; And they paint it so terrific ...
— Saltbush Bill, J.P., and Other Verses • A. B. Paterson

... me think of how Jedge Chinn lavishes that Berkshire shoat on blacksmith Bill Hatfield. Confessin' that aforetime he's a nullification pig on Mink Run, he sets yere at this barbecue an' without color of shame declar's himse'f a union pup. Mister Cha'rman, all I can say is, it shore beats ...
— Wolfville Days • Alfred Henry Lewis

... like it better. How's the weather, Mister Cloudy?" He snickered at his own joke, whereupon the aborigine turned upon him slowly, and said, ...
— Going Some • Rex Beach

... it, ma'am. Insolent I be, and a little freedom o' speech about it is no more than your rights. Insolent I've behaved, and if you'll take and ask the Governor to punish me for it, 'tisn't more than I deserve. He'll do it, be sure. As Mister Pope told you just now, the Governor's a gentleman; he wouldn't play such a trick, not if you was to offer him the world and the kingdoms thereof; and he'll be teasy as fire when he hears about it. But I warn you, ladies and gentlemen, all, don't you take the law into your own hands over ...
— Major Vigoureux • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... "Half-past two about, mister. Yer'll need to bring her in close ashore and give the Fiddle-sand a wide berth while the ...
— Follow My leader - The Boys of Templeton • Talbot Baines Reed

... Smith, in a drawling voice, as he pushed the two whiskies across to the waiting half-breeds. "Been here half an hour. Jest pass right through, mister. Maybe you'll find ...
— The Story of the Foss River Ranch • Ridgwell Cullum

... tight craft of your own,—somewhat scrubbed, no doubt, with rough usage, but sound,—so it's time for you to look out for rudder, compass, and charts, and it seems to me that thems to be found with young Mister Allfrey, so you'd better go an' git him to become skipper o' your ship without delay. You see, sir, havin' said that to myself, I've took my own advice, so if you'll take command of me, sir, you may steer me where you please, ...
— Digging for Gold - Adventures in California • R.M. Ballantyne

... you poor whey-faced drab, you dare to say the word door to me, a respectable woman, as Mister Tripes here knows me well, and have a score against me behind that there wery door as you disgraces, and as it's you as ought to be t'other side, you ought; for it's out of the streets as you come, well I knows, an' say another word, and I'll take that there bonnet off of your head, and chuck ...
— M. or N. "Similia similibus curantur." • G.J. Whyte-Melville

... too the Fox hand wether in Lunnun as indered me of goen two Q. wherefor hif yew plese i ham reddy to cum to re-ersal two nite, in ten minnits hif yew wil lett the kal-boy hof yewer theeter bring me wud—if you kant reed mi riten ax Mister Kroften Kroker wich his a Hanty queerun like yewerself honly hee as bin longer hatit yewers ...
— A Walk from London to Fulham • Thomas Crofton Croker

... the time 'n' trouble to lay his head square 'n' even across the rail, 'n' you know 's well 's I do 't no rooster killed cornerways ain't never goin' to bring no nickel apiece for his corners. No, Mister Sam Duruy,' I says, 'your lively horse's taught me a lesson,' I says, ''n' hereafter I don't lend no money on so much 's a egg without I see a good curb-bit bought 'n' put in its mouth first,' I says; 'n' then I walked off, 'n' the end o' it all is 't if Cousin Marion's ...
— Susan Clegg and Her Friend Mrs. Lathrop • Anne Warner

... his triumph nothing less than perfect. And it occurred to him now that there was particular gratification in having present this morning His Royal Highness. "Mister Prince," he said, "I'm awful ...
— The Rich Little Poor Boy • Eleanor Gates

... him, spitted his carcass, and began turning him slowly over a bed of coals. "Mister Grundy, I am master of the Wahoo. I fail to remember asking for your piratical advice. Dr. Pietro, I trust you will have no objections if I ask Mr. Peters to investigate your section ...
— Let'em Breathe Space • Lester del Rey

... over that there ditch you'll be on Mister Goarly's land and that's all about it" Bean as he said this put a strongly ironical emphasis on the term of respect and then turned ...
— The American Senator • Anthony Trollope

... mister! If you don't like this railroad you can get off and walk. I am president of this road and its sole owner. I am also board of directors, treasurer, secretary, general manager, superintendent, paymaster, trackmaster, general passenger agent, general freight agent, master mechanic, ticket ...
— Toasts - and Forms of Public Address for Those Who Wish to Say - the Right Thing in the Right Way • William Pittenger

... the past frequently combined the occupations of carpenter and blacksmith, and in such a capacity he is known as Khati. The honorific designations applied to the caste are Karigar, which means skilful, and Mistri, a corruption of the English 'Master' or 'Mister.' In 1911 the Lohars numbered about 180,000 persons in the Central Provinces and Berar. The Lohar is indispensable to the village economy, and the caste is found over the whole rural ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume IV of IV - Kumhar-Yemkala • R.V. Russell

... passed 'em up. He ain't huntin' no brood mares, he's after twenty head of young saddle stock—forgot to mention there was any one with him. Said it was easy to run three-year-olds off their own range single handed if you savvied horses. Called Mister Kester 'Old Pete' an' told of an orgy they had mutual in the ...
— The Texan - A Story of the Cattle Country • James B. Hendryx

... 'Oh, mister, that's the thing. It didn't affect me. It affected everybody but me. The neighbours looked down on me. Even the posters, on the walls, of the woman saying, "Go, my boy," leered at me. I sometimes cried by myself in the dark. You won't have a cup ...
— Echoes of the War • J. M. Barrie

... a ticklish job fitting it when you do find it. Some small item in the business will strike him the wrong way and he will get slow and stiff and arise to the occasion with, 'I feel, Mister Moterator, that it is ...
— The End of the Rainbow • Marian Keith

... Annunciation of our Lady next, 13s. 4d. Goodman Agar was by in my hall at Mortlak. Nov. 25th, the newes that Sir Edward Kelley was slayne. Nov. 26th, Mr. Nicolas Bagwell of Manchester browght me a letter from my brother Arnold. Lent to Mister Laurence Dutton twelve shillings. My wife and children all by water toward Coventry. Dec. 10th, Mr. Lok his Arabik bokes and letter to me by Mr. Berran his sonne. Dec. 23rd, I payd to John Norton, stationer, ten pownds in hand, and was bownd ...
— The Private Diary of Dr. John Dee - And the Catalog of His Library of Manuscripts • John Dee

... such trifling barriers as "Mister" and "Miss." He came towards her with his face stern and determined. "Eleanore," he said, "I have a hansom at the door, and I want you to come down and ...
— Van Bibber and Others • Richard Harding Davis

... were not reconciled and living together, at least. Possibly their being neighbors was merely a coincidence. If so, he might not have come too late. When he next addressed his companion it was in a different tone and without the "Mister." ...
— The Woman-Haters • Joseph C. Lincoln

... had nodded to the tall one): "Well, mister, I'll tell you. It's got so it's mighty damn risky for any Prussian to surrender ...
— The Martial Adventures of Henry and Me • William Allen White

... of the way I yanked that dog down into old Wolfbelly's camp," he said, though there was no tangible reason for lying to them. "Mister!" he added, his eyes still searching the shadows out there in the grove, "we certainly ...
— Good Indian • B. M. Bower

... by lanthorn light Thro' the church-yard as they went, A guinea of gold the sexton shewed That Mister Joseph sent. ...
— Poems, 1799 • Robert Southey

... as we can, Mister David, to make up for the shortness of time we've got to do it in," observed Pat, as he rolled himself up in ...
— Snow Shoes and Canoes - The Early Days of a Fur-Trader in the Hudson Bay Territory • William H. G. Kingston

... of wood with wing-feathers for sails and a piece of tin, stuck into the bottom, for centre-keel;—has told me what standard he is in at school; and one of the first things I hear whenever he comes into the house, is: "Mam! Wher's Mister Ronals?" ...
— A Poor Man's House • Stephen Sydney Reynolds

... her head: "Mister Picklepip," she said, "Do you ever think to wed?" Town of Dae by the sea, No fair lady ever made a Wicked speech like ...
— Shapes of Clay • Ambrose Bierce

... right on the car with us," Sue said. "And we'd have money enough to pay his fare, too," she added, looking at the two pennies in her chubby fist. "Is it three cents for dogs, too, mister?" she asked the conductor. ...
— Bunny Brown and his Sister Sue • Laura Lee Hope

... a family of three ... there was Mister Brown, the man, a huge-built, blotch-faced, retired stone-mason, his meagre little wife, Mrs. Brown, and their grass-widow daughter, Flora.... Flora did but little work, except to lean familiarly and with an air of unspoken intimacy, over the tables of the men, as she slouched ...
— Tramping on Life - An Autobiographical Narrative • Harry Kemp



Words linked to "Mister" :   Mr, title, form of address, title of respect



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