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Make   /meɪk/   Listen
Make

verb
(past & past part. made; pres. part. making)
1.
Engage in.  Synonym: do.  "Make an effort" , "Do research" , "Do nothing" , "Make revolution"
2.
Give certain properties to something.  Synonym: get.  "She made us look silly" , "He made a fool of himself at the meeting" , "Don't make this into a big deal" , "This invention will make you a millionaire" , "Make yourself clear"
3.
Make or cause to be or to become.  Synonym: create.  "Create a furor"
4.
Cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner.  Synonyms: cause, get, have, induce, stimulate.  "My children finally got me to buy a computer" , "My wife made me buy a new sofa"
5.
Give rise to; cause to happen or occur, not always intentionally.  Synonyms: cause, do.  "Make a stir" , "Cause an accident"
6.
Create or manufacture a man-made product.  Synonyms: create, produce.  "The company has been making toys for two centuries"
7.
Make, formulate, or derive in the mind.  Synonym: draw.  "Draw a conclusion" , "Draw parallels" , "Make an estimate" , "What do you make of his remarks?"
8.
Compel or make somebody or something to act in a certain way.  "Heat makes you sweat"
9.
Create by artistic means.  Synonym: create.  "Schoenberg created twelve-tone music" , "Picasso created Cubism" , "Auden made verses"
10.
Earn on some commercial or business transaction; earn as salary or wages.  Synonyms: bring in, clear, earn, gain, pull in, realise, realize, take in.  "She earns a lot in her new job" , "This merger brought in lots of money" , "He clears $5,000 each month"
11.
Create or design, often in a certain way.  Synonym: do.  "I did this piece in wood to express my love for the forest"
12.
To compose or represent:.  Synonyms: constitute, form.  "The branches made a roof" , "This makes a fine introduction"
13.
Reach a goal, e.g.,.  Synonyms: get to, progress to, reach.  "We made it!" , "She may not make the grade"
14.
Be or be capable of being changed or made into.  "He will make a fine father"
15.
Make by shaping or bringing together constituents.  "Make a cake" , "Make a wall of stones"
16.
Perform or carry out.  "Make a move" , "Make advances" , "Make a phone call"
17.
Make by combining materials and parts.  Synonyms: build, construct.  "Some eccentric constructed an electric brassiere warmer"
18.
Change from one form into another.  "Make lead into gold" , "Make clay into bricks"
19.
Act in a certain way so as to acquire.  "Make enemies"
20.
Charge with a function; charge to be.  Synonyms: name, nominate.  "She was made president of the club"
21.
Achieve a point or goal.  Synonyms: get, have.  "The Brazilian team got 4 goals" , "She made 29 points that day"
22.
Reach a destination, either real or abstract.  Synonyms: arrive at, attain, gain, hit, reach.  "The water reached the doorstep" , "We barely made it to the finish line" , "I have to hit the MAC machine before the weekend starts"
23.
Institute, enact, or establish.  Synonyms: establish, lay down.
24.
Carry out or commit.  "Commit a faux-pas"
25.
Form by assembling individuals or constituents.
26.
Organize or be responsible for.  Synonyms: give, have, hold, throw.  "Have, throw, or make a party" , "Give a course"
27.
Put in order or neaten.  Synonym: make up.  "Make up a room"
28.
Head into a specified direction.  Synonym: take.  "We made for the mountains"
29.
Have a bowel movement.  Synonyms: ca-ca, crap, defecate, shit, stool, take a crap, take a shit.
30.
Undergo fabrication or creation.
31.
Be suitable for.
32.
Add up to.
33.
Amount to.
34.
Constitute the essence of.
35.
Appear to begin an activity.  "She made as if to say hello to us"
36.
Proceed along a path.  Synonym: work.  "Make one's way into the forest"
37.
Reach in time.
38.
Gather and light the materials for.
39.
Prepare for eating by applying heat.  Synonyms: cook, fix, prepare, ready.  "Can you make me an omelette?" , "Fix breakfast for the guests, please"
40.
Induce to have sex.  Synonyms: score, seduce.  "Did you score last night?" , "Harry made Sally"
41.
Assure the success of.
42.
Represent fictitiously, as in a play, or pretend to be or act like.  Synonyms: make believe, pretend.
43.
Consider as being.
44.
Calculate as being.
45.
Cause to be enjoyable or pleasurable.
46.
Favor the development of.
47.
Develop into.
48.
Behave in a certain way.



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"Make" Quotes from Famous Books



... Wilhelmina. That affectionate heart of yours sometimes travels over time and space in a way to give its owner unnecessary pain. Remember we shall have to proceed with great caution, both in going and returning; and it will require hours to make the detour I have in view. I hope to see you again before sunset, but a delay may carry us into the night. It may even become necessary to defer the final ...
— Wyandotte • James Fenimore Cooper

... dressed up, as to make it extremely difficult to ascertain its real quality: hence, it is best to buy it undressed. It should be soft, and free from specks. It is of various widths, and of almost all prices. A good article, at a medium price, will be found ...
— The Ladies' Work-Table Book • Anonymous

... was perfectly useless; for it so happened that his gallant followers had no other preparation to make than to rise and march, having no baggage to encumber their operations beyond the very slender equipments which they carried on ...
— Gomez Arias - The Moors of the Alpujarras, A Spanish Historical Romance. • Joaquin Telesforo de Trueba y Cosio

... The Prince at first refused the robe offered to him, because the abbot did not make a similar offer to his companion; Godfrey, however, soon settled the affair, ...
— The New Guide to Peterborough Cathedral • George S. Phillips

... approach each other; but if one of them does not move, the party represented thereby is considered to disapprove of the marriage. Each family has to reward its match-maker with a present of woven stuffs. Such go-betweens make a regular livelihood ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo Volume 1 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... story of a hard fight by one battalion in the kind of warfare waged in Europe these days, a story only partially told; a story to make a book. All the praise that the P.P.s, millionaire or labourer, scapegrace or respectable pillar of society, ask is that they are worthy of fighting side by side with Mr. Thomas Atkins, regular. At best, one poor, little, finite mind ...
— My Year of the War • Frederick Palmer

... to explain the friendship between the two men. The colonel intended to make only a brief call, but he so enjoyed the company of his old friend that he sat a long time in the wagon, smoking and exchanging reminiscences of the war times, which theme must ever be deeply entertaining to those who were actors in that ...
— The Great Cattle Trail • Edward S. Ellis

... course, the judge knew that the banker was being forced to make out the bill of sale. He knew that from the cold determination and alert watchfulness in Sanderson's eyes; he saw it in the ...
— Square Deal Sanderson • Charles Alden Seltzer

... accurately known whether Porteous commanded this second act of violence; but of course the odium of the whole transactions of the fatal day attached to him, and to him alone. He arrived at the guard-house, dismissed his soldiers, and went to make his report to the magistrates concerning the ...
— The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... through the wood until we emerged upon a little beach just on the other side of that headland. Then she drew out from among the bushes a small canoe, in the bottom of which she helped me to place the skipper; after which, with a warning to me to be exceedingly careful and to make no noise, she handed me a paddle, thrust the canoe afloat, and vanished. And—and—well, that's all! And now you may as well pitch me the yarn of your share of the night's doings. If one may venture to judge by appearances ...
— Turned Adrift • Harry Collingwood

... because he could not find sic security as his insatiable appetite required, this shift was devised. The said Mr Allan being in company with the Laird of Bargany, (also a Kennedy,) was, by the Earl and his friends, enticed to leave the safeguard which he had with the Laird, and come to make good cheer with the said Earl. The simplicity of the imprudent man was suddenly abused; and so he passed his time with them certain days, which he did in Maybole with Thomas Kennedie, uncle to the said Earl; after which the said Mr Allan passed, with ...
— Ivanhoe - A Romance • Walter Scott

... between the shafts, and the other two galloping on either side. At the very outset I had a chance to realize the difference between dealing with the Asiatic pure and simple, and the Asiatic disguised as a European. We had been told that it would be necessary to make an early start to cover the first day's stage before dark. I was on hand, and so was Wang, but it was afternoon before we were finally off. Luggage had to be packed and repacked, wheels greased, harness mended, many ...
— A Wayfarer in China - Impressions of a trip across West China and Mongolia • Elizabeth Kendall

... much to explain to him that it was really hard to make him understand, and to bring him up to the point from which ...
— Real Folks • Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney

... to any modification in the structure of the coal-mining industry so long as the participants in that industry continue unwilling or unable to agree upon those modifications themselves. Why and how? (1) First and foremost because until then the State is not master in its own house, and cannot make those experiments in modifying conditions in the industry which I believe to be essential to bring it into a healthy condition instead of being a standing menace to the equilibrium of the State—as it was before the war, and during ...
— Essays in Liberalism - Being the Lectures and Papers Which Were Delivered at the - Liberal Summer School at Oxford, 1922 • Various

... where at the last hour the last reality of sin was to be met and borne. And if the objection is made that after all this only means that death is the most vital point of life, its intensest focus, I should not wish to make any reply. Our Lord's Passion is His sublimest action—an action so potent that all His other actions are sublated in it, and we know everything when we know that He died for ...
— The Atonement and the Modern Mind • James Denney

... wisdom to make the ornament and happiness of life the end and aim of our actions, what can be more advisable than to embrace an art, by which we are enabled to protect our friends; to defend the cause of strangers; and succour the distressed? ...
— A Dialogue Concerning Oratory, Or The Causes Of Corrupt Eloquence • Cornelius Tacitus

... anti-capitalist Socialists. Capitalism must be "divested of its perversions," the privately owned monopolies and their political machines, primarily for the purpose of strengthening it against Socialism. "Individualism should make haste to clean the hull of the old ship for the coming great battle with the opponents of private capital...."[29] The reformers, as a rule, like Professor Ross, consciously stand for a new form of private ...
— Socialism As It Is - A Survey of The World-Wide Revolutionary Movement • William English Walling

... he cares no more for than a felon for the treadmill, then it is rather hard to have such a hole made in it! Day after day, as sure as the sun rises—if he does rise—of weather as abominable as rain and wind can make it!" ...
— Weighed and Wanting • George MacDonald

... evils that result therefrom, which might be very serious indeed, and difficult to remedy, and involve the total destruction and loss of those states: his Majesty ordered, for the more thorough understanding of these details, that they should make this report of the existing causes for not continuing this commerce, and even for prohibiting it. These reasons are ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, V7, 1588-1591 • Emma Helen Blair

... than Lucy, but his fair hair and his clean-shaven face gave him a more youthful look. With his spruce air and well-made clothes, his conversation about hunting and golf, few would have imagined that he arrived regularly at his office at ten in the morning, and was as keen to make a good bargain as any of the men he came in ...
— The Explorer • W. Somerset Maugham

... be merciful this once——." she pleaded breathlessly, but he cut her short with a fierce oath. "If?" he echoed. "Do you make bargains with me? Have you so ...
— The Sheik - A Novel • E. M. Hull

... reads this, thinks I make too serious a matter of so slight a thing. You say, It cannot make much difference whether I come home half an hour earlier or later. But you are mistaken here. It does make a great difference. Think you God can look upon the disobedience of a child as a trifling sin? ...
— The Child at Home - The Principles of Filial Duty, Familiarly Illustrated • John S.C. Abbott

... portmanteau that had been forgotten at the lost luggage office? He could not manage to force the lock, and did not venture to knock hard against the sides of the confessional, for fear of attracting the attention of some beadle or sacristan. Oh! those wretched girls, and how people would make fun of him and write verses about him, and point their fingers at him, if the joke were discovered and got ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume III (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... the men whose only weapons are scythe and sickle. They are the real Fathers of the Pacific. Roving over the interior, the miners leave a land as nearly ruined as human effort can render it. In the wake of these nugget-hunters, future years bring those who make the abandoned hills lovely with scattered homes. They are now hidden by orchards, vineyards, and gardens. Peaceful flocks and herds prove that the Golden Age of California is not to be these wild days of ...
— The Little Lady of Lagunitas • Richard Henry Savage

... seasons formerly unhealthy, the physicians make visitations from house to house. With the aid of powerful microscopes, they examine the minute particles of the perspiration issuing through the pores. The perspiration, being the result of efforts made by the system to throw ...
— Another World - Fragments from the Star City of Montalluyah • Benjamin Lumley (AKA Hermes)

... arrived, and I have worn a hole in my left heel which will, I fear, render the next marches painful. Umjoo—the boatman—is now shampooing my legs and feet. This process consists of violent squeezes and pinches which make me inclined to cry out, but I am bearing it bravely without flinching and endeavouring to look happy, and to persuade myself that it is pleasant—now my toes are being pulled with a strength fit to tear them off. Oh! ——. There's ...
— Three Months of My Life • J. F. Foster

... in that wet towel and that strong tea. Lord! the things I used to believe when I was young. They would make an Encyclopaedia of Useless Knowledge. I wonder if the author of the popular novel has ever tried working with a wet towel round his or her head: I have. It is difficult enough to move a yard, balancing a dry towel. A heathen Turk may have it in his blood to do ...
— The Angel and the Author - and Others • Jerome K. Jerome

... considered as almost a characteristic of plants that they possessed no power of movement. This is now known to be an error. In fact, as Darwin has shown, every growing part of a plant is in continual and even constant rotation. The stems of climbing plants make great sweeps, and in other cases, when the motion is not so apparent, it nevertheless really exists. I have already mentioned that many plants change the position of their leaves or flowers, or, as it ...
— The Beauties of Nature - and the Wonders of the World We Live In • Sir John Lubbock

... 3: Just as piety which pertains to the worship of God is a manifestation of faith, in so far as we make profession of faith by worshipping God, so too, piety manifests wisdom. For this reason piety is stated to be wisdom, and so is fear, for the same reason, because if a man fear and worship God, this shows that he has a right ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... thousand of the Chinese were killed, and the rest fled pele-mele across the Yalu. China now began to be seriously alarmed. She despatched to Pyong-yang an envoy named Chen Weiching—known in Japanese history as Chin Ikei—who was instructed not to conclude peace but only to make such overtures as might induce the Japanese to agree to an armistice, thus enabling the Chinese authorities to mobilize a sufficient force. Konishi Yukinaga fell into this trap. He agreed to an armistice of fifty days, ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... tried at Westminster? We who write, if we want the talent, yet have the excuse, that we do it for a poor subsistence; but what can be urged in their defence, who, not having the vocation of poverty to scribble out of mere wantonness, take pains to make themselves ridiculous? Horace was certainly in the right, where he said, 'That no man is satisfied with his own condition.' A poet is not pleased, because he is not rich; and the rich are discontented, because the poets will not admit them of their number. ...
— The Dramatic Works of John Dryden Vol. I. - With a Life of the Author • Sir Walter Scott

... silence. I could hear Mme. la Marquise softly whispering to M. le Vicomte, and I marvelled how wondrously calm— nay, cheerful, she could be. Then suddenly I heard a sound which of a truth did make my heart stop its beating. It was a quaint and prolonged laugh which I once thought I would never hear again on this earth. It came from the corner of the barouche next to where Mme. la Marquise was so tenderly and gaily ...
— The League of the Scarlet Pimpernel • Baroness Orczy

... confirms remains with him as his own. iv. If man believed, as is the truth, that all good and truth are from the Lord, and all evil and falsity from hell, he would not appropriate good to himself and consider it merited, nor appropriate evil to himself and make himself responsible for it. ...
— Angelic Wisdom about Divine Providence • Emanuel Swedenborg

... a banner appealed to the girls, who set to work with the greatest enthusiasm to make one. It was designed by Fiona Campbell, and carried out by a committee of six, chosen for their skill in needlework. It had a cream-coloured ground, on which was a bold pattern, in applique, of ...
— The Leader of the Lower School - A Tale of School Life • Angela Brazil

... day and seein' you wearin' your fingers to the bone to support me, and seein' my child, an' bein' ashamed to look her in the face. Sometimes I think you an' Amabel would be a damned sight better off without me than with me, and I'm done for anyway, and it don't make much difference what ...
— The Portion of Labor • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... the boys never knew of, or only knew by mistaken rumors and distorted glimpses. They had little idea of its politics, or commerce, or religion that was not wrong, and they only concerned themselves with persons and places so far as they expected to make use of them. But as they could make very little use of grown persons or public places, they kept away from them, and the Boy's Town was, for the most part, an affair of water-courses, and fields and woods, and the streets before the houses, ...
— A Boy's Town • W. D. Howells

... Hall and Peter B. Sweeny. Now, what was the result of that? And I will say to this meeting that the sense of alarm that I had that morning lest the movement should mislead the public, was the motive that induced me to lay aside my business, go to the Broadway Bank and make ...
— Lights and Shadows of New York Life - or, the Sights and Sensations of the Great City • James D. McCabe

... will pardon a digression, I will refer to a more important example of an old master born out of due time. One day, in the cathedral at Varallo, I saw a picture painted on linen of which I could make nothing. It was not old and it was not modern. The expression of the Virgin's face was lovely, and there was more individuality than is commonly found in modern Italian work. Modern Italian colour is generally either cold and dirty, or else staring. ...
— Alps and Sanctuaries of Piedmont and the Canton Ticino • Samuel Butler

... may be provoking and discouraging at the time, in the case of two classes of persons; of moderate men who wish to make differences in religious opinion as little as they fairly can be made; and of such as keenly perceive, and are honestly eager to remedy, existing evils—evils, of which divines in this or that foreign country know nothing at all, and which even at home it ...
— Apologia pro Vita Sua • John Henry Newman

... little time to make our preparations for the sortie. The bars of this window were placed so widely apart, that by taking off our coats and waistcoats, we could each squeeze through. We had, then, only to subscribe the ropes of our trunks, and saw off the legs of our chairs, and in a few minutes ...
— Confessions of an Etonian • I. E. M.

... that he would not take any "chances," that the Apaches were "out" on the war-path, but that they never attacked in the dark. This lent more interest to the trip, though it was interesting enough to me simply to see the nature of the country where we had decided to make our home. We got through all right. Next morning I hired a horse and reached ...
— Ranching, Sport and Travel • Thomas Carson

... from the East would account for many things. First, it would make plain to him why she had smiled several times during their talks, over things in which he had been able to see no humor. Then it would answer the question that had formed in his mind concerning the fluency of her speech. Western girls that he had met had not attained that ease and poise ...
— The Two-Gun Man • Charles Alden Seltzer

... room forty feet long, with Mrs. Merridew at the further end of it. Does anybody wonder that I got home at half past twelve instead of half past ten? How thoroughly heartless that person must be! And how earnestly I hope I may never make that ...
— The Moonstone • Wilkie Collins

... "if thou hast any further questions to ask, I know not who can answer thee, for I never heard tell of any one who could relate what will happen in the other ages of the world. Make, therefore, the best use thou canst of what ...
— The Elder Eddas of Saemund Sigfusson; and the Younger Eddas of Snorre Sturleson • Saemund Sigfusson and Snorre Sturleson

... ingenious and free spirit, eager and constant in reproof, without fear controlling the world's abuses. One whom no servile hope of gain, or frosty apprehension of danger, can make to be a parasite, either to time, ...
— Every Man Out Of His Humour • Ben Jonson

... sir, any thing which you or your family can think of; which it is in our power to grant, will make us most happy; but to sully the blood ...
— Newton Forster - The Merchant Service • Captain Frederick Marryat

... provision for its defenders to fire from it unless they mounted to the top. The Sirdar and staff fell back, and the guns and Maxims went forward a little. Maxwell's men then dealt with the enemy, and the Sirdar, still led by Slatin Pasha, whom the dervishes called "Saladin," turned back to try and make his way through the breaches in the north wall. Troops were sent in to clear the compound of dervishes, most of whom surrendered at once. But exit upon the south side was barred by interior walls and gates. Then the Sirdar essayed going along by the river's margin between the wall, the Nile, and ...
— Khartoum Campaign, 1898 - or the Re-Conquest of the Soudan • Bennet Burleigh

... cryptic utterance Damaris, at the time, could—to quote her own phrase—"make no sense!"—Nor could she make sense of it, now, when counting her blessings, she rested, in happy idleness, upon the faded scarlet ...
— Deadham Hard • Lucas Malet

... us; besides which, as the place was a long way off, we should certainly not meet with them on our contemplated excursion. Though my uncle at first offered some objections to the proposal, he ultimately gave his daughters permission to make ...
— In the Wilds of Florida - A Tale of Warfare and Hunting • W.H.G. Kingston

... other part of my history which could contain anything like incident enough to make it interesting in print, is a period I spent in London some few years after the time of which I have now been writing. But I am getting too old to regard the commencement of another history with composure. The labour of thinking into sequences, even the bodily labour of writing, grows more and ...
— The Seaboard Parish Vol. 3 • George MacDonald

... was plenty of work to be done, for as soon as the captain had seen to the two wounded men, who were able to talk now feebly, but without a trace of delirium, he began to make his plans, talking the matters over with the major and the mate; while the men, pending instructions, cut off all the cocoa-nut leaves to lay to dry, and gathered plenty of fuel for the cooking fire, whose place Small decided ought to be in a nook among some rocks, where it would ...
— Mother Carey's Chicken - Her Voyage to the Unknown Isle • George Manville Fenn

... moon, stars very quickly with his word. He made the sun of part of the earth, from the world, and the moon of a little part from the sun, and the stars of a very little part from the moon. He did not make anything with His hands, but ...
— Anecdotes & Incidents of the Deaf and Dumb • W. R. Roe

... it may not be inopportune to make a break in the record of Cardan's life and work, and to treat in retrospect of that portion of his time which he spent in the composition of his treatises on Arithmetic and Algebra. Ever since 1535 ...
— Jerome Cardan - A Biographical Study • William George Waters

... Then, after—with its many attendant ceremonies—we had drunk our bowls of kava, and were smoking and chatting, Asi asked Marchmont to let him examine his gun and rifle (Marchmont had a Soper rifle and one of Manton's best make of guns; I had my Winchester and a fairly good gun). The moment Asi saw the Soper rifle his eyes lit up, and he produced another from one of the house beams overhead, and said regretfully that he had no cartridges left, and was using a Snider ...
— The Call Of The South - 1908 • Louis Becke

... particulars, until the improved methods of manufacture established in other parts of the kingdom, particularly in Sussex, had been adopted here. As early probably as the commencement of the reign of Elizabeth, these improvements came into use in this locality, and superseded the old "make." It was for its iron-mines, even more than for its timber, that this Forest excited the jealousy of the Spaniards, who designed to suppress the former by destroying the charcoal fuel with ...
— The Forest of Dean - An Historical and Descriptive Account • H. G. Nicholls

... of vengeance is in my heart, and the year of my redeemed is come. And I looked, and there was none to help; and I wondered that there was none to uphold: therefore mine own arm brought salvation unto me; and my fury, it upheld me. And I will tread down the people in mine anger, and make them drunk in my fury, and I will bring down their strength to the earth," ...
— A Brief Commentary on the Apocalypse • Sylvester Bliss

... Beauport, sacred to me because of her who dwelt therein—how long ago, how long! Of all the pictures that flash before my mind when I think on those times, one is most with me: that of the fine guest-room in the Manor House, where I see moving the benign maid whose life and deeds alone can make this story worth telling. And with one scene therein, and it the most momentous in all my days, I shall ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... through hills of sand. Of bridges, other than mere culverts, there are but three in the whole length of the road, the only large one being that over the Amu-Daria. This is a hastily built, rickety affair of timber, put up only as a make-shift, and at the mercy of the stream if a serious ...
— Historic Tales, Vol. 8 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... found himself obliged to make numerous small speeches in answer to the numerous individual congratulations of his friends; but these were as nothing to the one great accumulated onus of an oration which he had long known that he should have to sustain after ...
— Doctor Thorne • Anthony Trollope

... dost overestimate the peril. The Hebrew will not betray us, and who else will know of it? I shall make a journey into Goshen, find Mesu and bid him meet thee at a certain place. There thou shalt come at a certain time with the treasure, and the feat is done. But if we fail—" she flung her head back and bewitched him with a heavy eye—"will it be hard ...
— The Yoke - A Romance of the Days when the Lord Redeemed the Children - of Israel from the Bondage of Egypt • Elizabeth Miller

... moral or scrupulous, and the church-members will tell you 'not yet,' with a smile, if you ask whether he belongs to them. But he leads them all in enterprise, and his ambition and consequent prosperity make his example a very useful one on the plantation. Half the men on the island fenced in gardens last autumn, behind their houses, in which they now raise vegetables for themselves and the Hilton Head markets. ...
— Letters from Port Royal - Written at the Time of the Civil War (1862-1868) • Various

... could not and stand a loss. That how it was not to be expected, ma'am, that he should lose by it, his ways being, as you might say and utter no falsehood, paved with gold; but that how it was much to be regretted that something handsome hadn't been got up to make it worth his while; for it was such and only such that knowed the heighth to which the bread and butchers' meat had rose, and it was such and only such that both could and would bring that ...
— Little Dorrit • Charles Dickens

... dealing with matter, only in a far more rarefied and far more elastic form than ordinary matter, but nevertheless matter just as air is considered matter, and, being matter, its very motion imparts to the light waves a power and a force which make them capable of doing work. The kind of work done will be considered later on, when we deal with the dynamical value of light. That we do not feel the power and energy of the light waves is due ...
— Aether and Gravitation • William George Hooper

... wearily up to the solitary spot. The "sweet habitude of being"—not that I fear death, but that I love life as, for instance, Charles Lamb loved it—makes me particularly affect a cheerful burial-place. I know that it is dreadfully unsentimental, but I should like to make my last home in the heart of a crowded city, or, better still, in one of those social homes of the dead, which the Turks, with a philosophy so beautiful and so poetical, make their most cheerful resort. Singularly ...
— The Shirley Letters from California Mines in 1851-52 • Louise Amelia Knapp Smith Clappe

... us cease asking these questions. There is no gain in asking certain questions to gain certain replies. There is no gain in examining certain problems to make the difficulties ...
— Fighting France • Stephane Lauzanne

... reforestation should study his ground to see if naturally, or, with inexpensive aid, the cut-over area will not reseed from the sides and from the cull trees he will leave uncut. If not, he may leave a few merchantable seed bearing trees provided the soil is such as to make them deep-rooted and wind-firm. Groups are better than single trees because less likely to be blown down and easier to protect from the slashing fire. More should be left toward the windward edge. But before tieing up any considerable sum in merchantable ...
— Practical Forestry in the Pacific Northwest • Edward Tyson Allen

... the graceful curve of the back is not the curve of a straight-backed chair. Straight-backed chairs are instruments of torture, and are more likely to make a girl crooked than to make her straight. Sir Astley Cooper ridiculed straight-backed chairs, and well he might. It is always well for a mother to try, for some considerable time, such ridiculous inventions upon herself ...
— Advice to a Mother on the Management of her Children • Pye Henry Chavasse

... since Christianity became national among us) are thought fit to be suspended, God knows for what reason, or from what provocations; I say, from that very assembly, who, during the intervals of convocations, should rather be supposed to be guardians of the rights and properties of the Clergy, than to make the ...
— The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, Vol. III.: Swift's Writings on Religion and the Church, Vol. I. • Jonathan Swift

... term, I am sure I shall be glad to take it." He evidently dreaded the rebuke that would be implied in a failure to be renominated; yet it seemed unbecoming to him, in the critical condition of the country, to make any personal effort to that end. To these considerations were added his extreme weariness and longing for release from his oppressive burdens. He was also, as Mr. Welles records in his Diary, "greatly importuned ...
— The Every-day Life of Abraham Lincoln • Francis Fisher Browne

... slipped down into the water and swam over to the big green lily-pad of Grandfather Frog. Then he hit the water a smart blow with his tail. Grandfather Frog's big goggly eyes flew open, and he was just about to make a frightened plunge into the Smiling Pool ...
— The Adventures of Grandfather Frog • Thornton W. Burgess

... went off to make the tea her uncle sought his room and sponge, but did not neglect to take Pocket with him. Pocket was for going higher up to his own room; but Baumgartner said that would only make more work, in a tone precluding ...
— The Camera Fiend • E.W. Hornung

... advanced, and we had hopes of getting to them at last. My young cousins bore the journey wonderfully well. When we came to difficult places, her brothers and I helped Kate along, making a seat for her with our joined hands. We could thus make but slow progress, and she entreated us to allow her to walk, declaring that she was not at all fatigued; while Timbo or Jack carried Bella on their back, and with long sticks in their hands trudged on merrily. We caught sight of several wild animals. ...
— In the Wilds of Africa • W.H.G. Kingston

... girls, too, for the matter of that, were greatly interested in the elegant steam yacht, and they took great pleasure in visiting every part of the vessel from bow to stern. Captain Barforth did all in his power to make all on board the Rainbow feel at home and whenever the boys visited the engine room they were met with ...
— The Rover Boys on Treasure Isle - or The Strange Cruise of the Steam Yacht. • Edward Stratemeyer (AKA Arthur M. Winfield)

... pity: oh, Octavio, pity my youth, and intercede for my stay yet a little longer: yourself makes one of the illustrious number of the grave, the wise and mighty Council, your uncle and relations make up another considerable part of it, and you are too dear to all, to find a refusal of your just and compassionate application. Oh! What fault have I committed against you, that I should not find a safety here; as well as those charged with the same crime with me, though of less quality? Many ...
— Love-Letters Between a Nobleman and His Sister • Aphra Behn

... have said much more, had not Mr. Pickwick's head disappeared with great swiftness, in consequence of a false step on Sam's shoulder which brought him suddenly to the ground. He was up again in an instant however; and bidding Mr. Winkle make haste and get the interview over, ran out into the lane to keep watch, with all the courage and ardour of youth. Mr. Winkle himself, inspired by the occasion, was on the wall in a moment, merely pausing to request Sam to be ...
— The Pickwick Papers • Charles Dickens

... remember, that these cruel instruments are laid upon the table of their hearts, whether they see them there or no. 'The sin of Judah is written with a pen of iron, and with the point of a diamond—upon the table of their heart' (Jer 17:1). A pen of iron will make letters upon a table made of stone, and the point of a diamond will make letters upon glass. Wherefore in this saying, God informs us that if we shall forbear to read these lines to our conversion, God will one day read them against us ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... that he should make a rush and get out of his trouble in some way. "To tell you the truth, Kennedy, I don't think she wants to see ...
— Phineas Finn - The Irish Member • Anthony Trollope

... here I often used to wish some of you young folks would come in of an evenin' and keep me company and join me in readin' the Good Book. It used to be lonely sometimes, but since I've got Mary it ain't so bad. But I hope her bein' here won't make no difference, and now as you've started you'll come just the same as if ...
— The Soldier of the Valley • Nelson Lloyd

... terrible and fierce, there the mercy of God in Christ, when showed to the soul, appears most high and mighty. When Job had passed through his captivity, he had twice as much as he had before. Job xlii. 10. Blessed be God for Jesus Christ our Lord. Many other things I might here make observation of, but I would be brief, and therefore shall at this time omit them; and do pray God that my harms may make others fear to offend, lest they also be made to bear the ...
— Grace Abounding to the Chief of Sinners • John Bunyan

... there who thought he could bottle up Florida as regards news, but she intended to outwit him. Particular attention was being paid so as to preserve the secrecy of the sailing day of Shafter's army. Cipher and code messages bearing on this occurrence were to be strictly interdicted. But that didn't make any difference to her; she could beat that game. So on the day the fleet actually sailed she would send a message to her paper saying, "Send me six more jubilee books." This would indicate that the fleet had really gone. ...
— Danger Signals • John A. Hill and Jasper Ewing Brady

... I was true. But, such my unease That, could I insert a deed back in Time, I'd make her yours, to secure your care; And the scandal bear, And ...
— Wessex Poems and Other Verses • Thomas Hardy

... as a class, are subject to a terrible danger. Great numbers of mothers actually make their daughters drunkards by ever and again dosing them with brandy. This is done in secret, and imagined to be a most excellent thing. For instance, if the bowels get lax, as is the case in certain ...
— Papers on Health • John Kirk

... to me Till I, Thy vessel, overflow for Thee; For sure the streams that make Thy garden grow Are never fed but by an overflow: Not till Thy prophets with Thyself run o'er Are Israel's watercourses ...
— To My Younger Brethren - Chapters on Pastoral Life and Work • Handley C. G. Moule

... generally paid in a much later stage of it. But, at the same time, the rigour and arbitrary proceedings of excise-laws seem hardly compatible with the temper of a free nation. For the frauds that might be committed in this branch of the revenue, unless a strict watch is kept, make it necessary, wherever it is established, to give the officers a power of entring and searching the houses of such as deal in excisable commodities, at any hour of the day, and, in many cases, of the night likewise. And the proceedings in case of transgressions are so summary and sudden, that a ...
— Commentaries on the Laws of England - Book the First • William Blackstone

... history, and little, usually, of their antecedents, the pictures which we might sketch of them would be probably as untruthfully as rashly drawn. Crushed together, too, perforce, against each other, people are apt on board ship to make little hasty confidences, to show unawares little weaknesses, which should be forgotten all round the moment they step on shore and return to something like a normal state of society. The wisest and most humane rule for a traveller toward his ...
— At Last • Charles Kingsley

... France a grand-seneschal formerly figured until the reign of Philip Augustus, when the last holder of the office was not replaced by a successor. It is also under Philip Augustus that local bailiffs first make a definite appearance. In the ordinance of 1190, by which the king, about to set forth on the crusade, arranged for the administration of the kingdom during his absence, they figure as part of a general system. Probably the first royal bailiffs or seneschals were ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 2 - "Baconthorpe" to "Bankruptcy" • Various

... his resolution; and as a mortal combat with Sir Mador was a most fearful enterprise, they agreed to accompany him in the morning to the hermitage in the forest, where he proposed to receive absolution from the hermit, and to make his peace with Heaven before he entered the lists. As they approached the hermitage, they espied a knight riding in the forest, whom they at once recognized as Sir Launcelot. Overjoyed at the meeting, they quickly, ...
— Bulfinch's Mythology • Thomas Bulfinch

... "You don't want to make too many wild accusations," he shouted, his voice shaking. "You don't want to go around accusing people ...
— The Risk Profession • Donald Edwin Westlake

... moments later the flames began to rise from the funeral pile, the crowd began to move, and the than was able to make his way through and reach one of the streets ...
— Celebrated Crimes, Complete • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... republican form" of government and the question of the lawful government of Rhode Island among two competing groups purporting to act as the lawful authority. "It is the province of a court to expound the law, not to make it," declared Chief Justice Taney. "And certainly it is no part of the judicial functions of any court of the United States to prescribe the qualification of voters in a State, * * *; nor has it the right to determine what political privileges the citizens of a State are entitled to, ...
— The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation • Edward Corwin

... see their knauery; this is to make an asse of me, to fright me if they could; but I will not stirre from this place, do what they can. I will walke vp and downe here, and I will sing that they shall heare I am not afraid. The Woosell cocke, so blacke of hew, With Orenge-tawny bill. The Throstle, with ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... crafty and able general resolved, on his nomination, to make war at once upon the Romans, whom he regarded as the deadly foe of his country. His first great exploit was the reduction of Saguntum, an Iberian city on the coast, in alliance with the Romans. It defended itself with desperate energy ...
— Ancient States and Empires • John Lord

... they're following us all the same, and if you were to make a rush off now, very likely you'd run up against one of them, ready to stop you. But I don't know," continued Frank, looking stealthily about; "I've got regular cat's eyes now, with going to the jungle edge of a night to set and watch traps with the men. I don't see any ...
— The Rajah of Dah • George Manville Fenn

... observing that this passage is taken almost literally from the mouth of an old Highland kern, or Ketteran, as they were called. He used to narrate the merry doings of the good old time when he was follower of Rob Roy MacGregor. This leader, on one occasion, thought proper to make a descent upon the lower part of the Loch Lomond district, and summoned all the heritors and farmers to meet at the Kirk of Drymen, to pay him black-mail; i.e., tribute for forbearance and protection. As this invitation was supported by a band of thirty ...
— The Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... king's officers. By so doing these wood rangers (coureurs de bois), as they were called, became outlaws, and if caught, might be flogged and branded with a hot iron. They built trading posts at many places in the West, and often married Indian women, which went a long way to make the Indians ...
— A Brief History of the United States • John Bach McMaster

... you can. Make her think better of all this nonsense. My wife and my sisters could never be rivals; it is ridiculous to suppose such a thing. But, indeed, I believe we should all be much better friends if you were in ...
— Christian's Mistake • Dinah Maria Mulock Craik

... in the camp when the gathering was broken up, each gang taking their own way. What the meeting was about I could not exactly discover; one occasion of it was to make arrangements relative to the different counties in which the subdivisions were to sojourn during the next year, so that they might know where to communicate with each other, and, at the same time, not interfere by being too near; ...
— Japhet, In Search Of A Father • Frederick Marryat

... social equality, intellectual culture, and practical activity of the present. Under these combined influences humanity will start upon a new career, whose achievements in literature, in science, in art, in religion, in practical activities, will make even the vast accumulations of our modern day seem to the future historian insignificant accomplishments, 'a school-boy's tale, the ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 5, November, 1863 • Various

... firmly convinced, as will be seen from the accounts relating to their alcheringa ancestors, that the latter were endowed with powers such as no living man now possesses. They could travel underground or mount into the sky, and could make creeks and water-courses, mountain-ranges, sand-hills, and plains. In very many cases the actual names of these natives are preserved in their traditions, but, so far as we have been able to discover, there is no instance of any one of them being regarded in the light of ...
— The Belief in Immortality and the Worship of the Dead, Volume I (of 3) • Sir James George Frazer

... shackled in any way by the pursuits of others, he preferred the society of ladies, as less apt to force him into subsequent relations. He willingly spent whole evenings in playing blind man's buff with the young people, telling them little stories to make them break into the silvery laughs of youth, sweeter than the song of the nightingale. He was fond of a life in the country, or the life of the chateau. He was ingenious in varying its amusements, in multiplying its enjoyments. He also loved to compose there. Many of his ...
— Life of Chopin • Franz Liszt

... the expiration of the fourth year, and of the third class at the expiration of the sixth year, so that one-third may be chosen every second year; and if vacancies happen by resignation, or otherwise, during the recess of the legislature of any State, the executive thereof may make temporary appointments until the next meeting of the legislature, which ...
— Community Civics and Rural Life • Arthur W. Dunn

... specially civil to his intended victim, and he went off home that evening plotting all the way, but arriving at nothing. He was trying to make bricks without straw. Pinckney did not drink, nor did he gamble, and he was far too good a business man to be had in that way. However, all things come to him who waits, and next morning's post brought him a ray of light in the ...
— The Ghost Girl • H. De Vere Stacpoole

... with which it is pierced are masonry or natural grottoes; and there was the Tiber—already the yellow Tiber—winding through the valley as far as eye could follow. Here we waited for the train, which was ten minutes late, and tried to make up for lost time by leaving our luggage, all duly marked and ready, standing on the track. We soon began to greet familiar sites as we flitted by: the last we made out plainly was Borghetto, a handful of houses, with a ruined castle keeping watch ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 15, - No. 86, February, 1875 • Various

... satiated with gazing at them. And being highly pleased, he said unto king Yudhishthira, 'By good luck it is that I see you safe from woods. By good luck it is that ye have accomplished with difficulty the period of exile, undiscovered by those wicked wights. I make over my entire kingdom to the sons of Pritha, and what else I have. Let the sons of Pandu accept these without the slightest hesitation. And let Dhananjaya, called also Savyasachin, accept the hand of Uttara: for that best of men is fit to be her lord.' Thus addressed, king Yudhishthira the ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 2 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... Jack; "however, as fight we must probably to defend our own lives and those of the two ladies, we may as well make a virtue of necessity. You agree with me, Murray, and so do you. Captain and Mr Hudson? Well, then, Jos, tell Captain Fi Tan that we will fight for him, but that he must give us any recompense we ...
— The Three Midshipmen • W.H.G. Kingston

... condition, and every effort is made to help the applicant plan his life so that he may be able at a later time to enter the college. Of course, it occasionally happens that applicants are found with serious and incurable health defects which make it very improbable that they will ever be in condition to attempt a ...
— College Teaching - Studies in Methods of Teaching in the College • Paul Klapper

... knew nothing of that thing which had just happened in the lonely cabin. Even the grey neck-handkerchief, now knotted loosely about the brown throat, was there to give him the lie.... With shame and anger her cheeks burned until they went as crimson as hot blood could make them. ...
— Six Feet Four • Jackson Gregory

... creaks on the stairs that make it so awfully lonely all of a sudden," argued Flame. "It must be because the dogs snore so.... No mere man could make it so empty." With a precipitous nudge of the memory she dashed to the door and helloed to the fast retreating figure. "Oh, Bertrand! Bertrand!" she called, ...
— Peace on Earth, Good-will to Dogs • Eleanor Hallowell Abbott

... no business of mine," I said to Jon, "but I have seen you look with longing upon the she that was not Langley's wife. Since she does not belong to him, there is nothing to prevent you from having her. Should not that make you happy?" ...
— B-12's Moon Glow • Charles A. Stearns

... species will sometimes outfly and escape the eagle—that is, some eagles, for these bird-kings differ in degrees of swiftness as hounds or horses. So, too, do the kites; and the one in question having, no doubt, full confidence in his wings, thought he would make trial of those of his pursuer—who, being personally unknown to him, might be some individual too fat, or too old, or too young, perhaps, to possess full powers of flight. At all events he had made up his mind to have a "fly" for it—believing that if overtaken he could ...
— The Boy Hunters • Captain Mayne Reid

... He understood the calling of sovereign in a different sense from his father. On one occasion when his father set his younger brother before him as a model of industry in the pursuit of science, he replied that he would make a very good archbishop of Canterbury. For one who was to wear the crown skill in arms and knowledge of seamanship seemed to him indispensable; he made it his most zealous study to acquire both the one and the other. His intention ...
— A History of England Principally in the Seventeenth Century, Volume I (of 6) • Leopold von Ranke

... champion's guarantee, and with thee here a compact make, That in the assemblies thou shalt be no longer bound thy place to take; Rich silver-bitted bridles fair— for such each noble neck demands— And gallant steeds that paw the air, shall all be given into thy hands. For thou, Ferdiah, ...
— Poems • Denis Florence MacCarthy

... Was it only a shilling I gave you? How provoking! I thought it was gold. Well, start! start! and I'll make it a ...
— The Old Countess; or, The Two Proposals • Ann S. Stephens

... leaned upon the staff; he looked round him with a sad, smiling sympathy on all that he beheld; he even asked the name of a plant, and rallied himself gently for an old town bird, ignorant of nature. 'This country life will make me young again,' he sighed. They reached the top of the hill towards the first hour of evening; the sun was descending heaven, the colour had all drawn into the west; the hills were modelled in their least contour by the soft, slanting shine; and the wide moorlands, veined with glens and hazelwoods, ...
— Tales and Fantasies • Robert Louis Stevenson

... she would unload the cheap brandy, and in its place take on board some high-priced French brandy equal in quantity to the British commodity which had been put ashore at the French port. After this, with now a much more valuable cargo, the vessel would put to sea again and make for that British port for which originally she had cleared. And as to the practice of bribery, he himself had several times bought permits from the Excise officers to cover smuggled brandy and tea. On one occasion he had paid an officer fifty guineas ...
— King's Cutters and Smugglers 1700-1855 • E. Keble Chatterton

... told her of the old man's feeble state, and that he would never again make the journey, she turned her face to the wall and wept. Not only for her own soul's help did she wish to see him: she wished to put into his hands the Ortegna jewels. What would become of them? To whom should she transfer the charge? Was there a secular priest ...
— Ramona • Helen Hunt Jackson

... demons and dragons, classic mythology, stories of chivalry, and the thronging ideals of the Renaissance,—all passing in gorgeous procession across an ever-changing and ever-beautiful landscape; (4) a lofty moral purity and seriousness; (5) a delicate idealism, which could make all nature and every common thing beautiful. In contrast with these excellent qualities the reader will probably note the strange appearance of his lines due to his fondness for obsolete words, like eyne (eyes) and shend (shame), and his tendency to coin others, like mercify, ...
— English Literature - Its History and Its Significance for the Life of the English Speaking World • William J. Long

... it resignation?" I exclaimed—"To make a misery of what should have been a gladness? Think of the years and years of wretchedness you might have passed with a man who was a merely selfish fortune-hunter! You would have had to see him grow colder and more callous every day—your ...
— The Life Everlasting: A Reality of Romance • Marie Corelli

... "Make a nice bow, Freshman," said McCarty. "Take your hat off, keep your heels together. Oh, that wasn't a very nice ...
— The Varmint • Owen Johnson

... 'You make me admit some virtues in the practical,' said Lady Dunstane; and had the poor fellow vollied forth a tale of the everlastingness of his passion for Diana, it would have touched her far less than his exact memory of Diana's description of ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... cheeks, and trickled upon her snowy bosom, gleaming like dew amongst lilies. Of what avail was the energy of her character in that land along whose coast stretched the impassable barrier of the sea? Oh! it was enough to make even the haughty Nisida weep, and to produce a terrible impression on a mind hitherto acting only in obedience to its own ...
— Wagner, the Wehr-Wolf • George W. M. Reynolds

... her to bake, and she says she has no time to bake; I want to send over to Rew on the chance of getting strawberries; she says she has no one to send. If you agree with me, Miss Vane, perhaps she will make time; I know by experience that she is always better ...
— Big Game - A Story for Girls • Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey

... industry to locate in Jersey, with the result that an electronics industry has developed alongside the traditional manufacturing of knitwear. All raw material and energy requirements are imported, as well as a large share of Jersey's food needs. Light taxes and death duties make the ...
— The 2004 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... seized was rescued. It was after this incident that Revenue officers of this port—perhaps the most notorious of all the south-east smuggling territory—were ordered that in future when they went forth to make seizures they were to have with them an adequate military force, and to this end they were to make previous arrangements with the commanding-officer of ...
— King's Cutters and Smugglers 1700-1855 • E. Keble Chatterton

... Your peasants have more nobility. Etienne, whom you entrusted with the carrying out of your plan, told me the whole story, and I have sent him safely on his way on your best horse. Follow not his steps, or the Duke of Guise will make you feel his iron hand. You have still a few months to live. I passed the Isle of Demons, and saw your niece's watchfire beckoning me ashore. I return thither at once. If they are still alive I will come back and crave the King ...
— Marguerite De Roberval - A Romance of the Days of Jacques Cartier • T. G. Marquis

... love: "Why do you make yourself so beautiful?" "To please myself. I am the eye, the mirror, and the loveliness; The loved one and the lover ...
— The Garden of Bright Waters - One Hundred and Twenty Asiatic Love Poems • Translated by Edward Powys Mathers

... fully sensible of the consequences of discovery and capture in such a situation. But for a year I have been in the army and have not rendered any material service while receiving a compensation for which I make no return. Yet I am not influenced by the hope of promotion or reward. I wish to be useful, and every kind of service necessary to the public good becomes honorable by being necessary. But," he added, taking his friend's hand affectionately, "I will reflect, and do nothing ...
— Once Upon A Time In Connecticut • Caroline Clifford Newton

... it appeared when we neared the road, the wolf had headed back, scared doubtless by some injudicious noise of our companions, and making a wide ring, had crossed three miles below the spot where Jem was posted. This circuit we were forced to make, as at first sight we fancied he had headed altogether back, and it was four o'clock before we got upon his scent, hot, fresh, and breast-high; running toward the road, that is, due eastward from the covert whence he had bolted in the morning. Nor were our friends inactive; for, guided by the clamors ...
— Warwick Woodlands - Things as they Were There Twenty Years Ago • Henry William Herbert (AKA Frank Forester)

... went to take leave of his master, of Jackeymo, of the fountain, the garden. But, after he had gone through the first of these adieus with Jackeymo,—who, poor man, indulged in all the lively gesticulations of grief which make half the eloquence of his countrymen; and then, absolutely blubbering, hurried away—Leonard himself was so affected that he could not proceed at once to the house, but stood beside the fountain, trying hard to ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 3, No. 2, May, 1851 • Various



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