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MAK   /mæk/   Listen
MAK

noun
1.
A terrorist organization founded by Osama bin Laden in the 1980s to provide money and recruit fighters around the world; enlisted and transported thousands of men to Afghanistan to fight the Russians; a split in the group led bin Laden and the extremist faction of MAK to form al-Qaeda.  Synonym: Maktab al-Khidmat.






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"MAK" Quotes from Famous Books



... to mak' the tea?' demanded he of the shabby coat, shifting his ferocious gaze from me ...
— Wuthering Heights • Emily Bronte

... courteously but firmly turned back. Everybody was anxious to make it as nice as possible for us, and one of the bright boys was brought forward to tell us in English, so as to be more convincing. He smiled deprecatingly, and said: "Verreh bad. Verreh sorreh. Oui mus' mak our office, not?" So we turned and went back to town. They had told us that nobody could go beyond the barricade without an order from the Commandant de Place at Louvain. On the way back we decided that we could at least try, so we hunted through the town until we found the headquarters ...
— A Journal From Our Legation in Belgium • Hugh Gibson

... and beikit me about, Then tuik ane drink my spreitis to confort, And armit me weill fra the cold thairout; To cut the winter nicht, and mak it schort, I tuik ane quhair, and left all ...
— The Balladists - Famous Scots Series • John Geddie

... Mulvaney looked acrost at me, an' though I could mak nowt o' what he was after, I ...
— Soldiers Three • Rudyard Kipling

... yours is the wite. There's no life for her now except what you mak'; she canna see beyond you. Go on thinking yoursel' a wonder if you like, but mind this: if you were to cast her off frae you now, she would die ...
— Tommy and Grizel • J.M. Barrie

... will stop ze talk or I brak hees head wit' ze paddle in my han'!" came the voice of Bateese close to his shoulder. "Do I mak' ze word ...
— The Flaming Forest • James Oliver Curwood

... all Thy servants Guide, Mild is the yoke Thou mak'st us bear, Leading us gently by ...
— The Hymns of Prudentius • Aurelius Clemens Prudentius

... huge moths: to these we are quite accustomed. But although I have never seen a live snake in this country myself, still one hears such unpleasant stories about them that it is just as well to what the Scotch call "mak siccar" with a candle before beginning a constitutional in ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science - Vol. XVII, No. 102. June, 1876. • Various

... no so bad," the skipper replied, cautiously. "But I'm sayin' that it takes more than the christenin' to mak' a ship. In the nature o' things, Miss Frazier, if ye follow me, she's just irons and rivets and plates put into the form of a ship. She has to ...
— McClure's Magazine, March, 1896, Vol. VI., No. 4. • Various

... that soort. He'll look as proud as ever. He'll mak it seem as though we were th' murderers, ...
— The Day of Judgment • Joseph Hocking

... look, when I got a glimpse o' my face in the glass, and saw it was as red as crimson. But I was mair than ever put about when the tea was brought in, and the creatur says to me, 'Mr. Stuart, will you assist the leddies?' 'Confound him,' thought I, 'has he brought me here to mak' a fule o'me!' I did attempt to hand round the tea and toast, when, wi' downright confusion, I let a cup fall on Miss Murray's gown. I could have died wi' shame. 'Never mind—never mind, sir!' said she; 'there is no harm done;' and she spoke sae proper and sae kindly, I was in ...
— Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, XXII • various

... Stenie, my man; ye play unco weel, but ye mak a most infernal din," cried Uncle Jem, with his hands over his ears, for this accomplishment was new to him, and "took him all aback," ...
— Eight Cousins • Louisa M. Alcott

... rush out, en grab up a fishin'-line w'at bin hangin' in de back po'ch, en mak fer de gyardin, en w'en he git dar, dar wuz Brer Rabbit tromplin' 'roun' on de strawbe'y-bed en mashin' down de termartusses. W'en Brer Rabbit see Mr. Man, he squot behime a collud leaf, but 't wa'n't no use. Mr. Man done seed him, en 'fo' you kin count 'lev'm, he done got ole Brer Rabbit tie ...
— Nights With Uncle Remus - Myths and Legends of the Old Plantation • Joel Chandler Harris

... he, when he heard and had pondered on the request. "Hum! ha! we'll see about it t'morrow. But if he's innocent, you know, we shan't mak'n guilty." ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... "Whom mak'st thou now a harlot?" / the king's wife answered her. "That do I thee," spake Kriemhild, / "for that thy body fair First was clasped by Siegfried, / knight full dear to me. In sooth 'twas ne'er my brother / won first thy maidenhead ...
— The Nibelungenlied - Translated into Rhymed English Verse in the Metre of the Original • trans. by George Henry Needler

... can mak' a belted knight, A marquis, duke, and a' that, But an honest man's aboon his might— Guid faith, he mauna fa' that! For a' that, and a' that, Their dignities, and a' that, The pith o' sense and pride o' worth Are higher ranks than ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 7 • Various

... love divine To joyless dread, and mak'st the loving heart With hateful thoughts to languish and repine, And feed itself with self-consuming smart; Of all the passions of the mind ...
— Talkers - With Illustrations • John Bate

... think that in a' nature there's a mair curiouser cratur than a monkey. I mak this observe frae being witness to an extraordinar' event that took place in Hamilton. Folk may talk as they like about monkeys, and cry them down for being stupid and mischievous, I for ane will no gang that length. Whatever ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, - Issue 275, September 29, 1827 • Various

... immense unease, Dreams, dreams the world of day. Stay, thou adored one, stay, Who on the dark hang'st lamps of gold delight, Gold flames amid the purple pit of night. Stay, stay, Who the cool dawn's most lovely gray Mak'st lovelier with rose of far away. Stay, thou, who buildest wonder of things mean (More truly so they're seen). Stay—nay, fly not, nay—stay; Youth gone, remain thou yet and yet. Though the world spin in darkness and forget The light, ...
— Poems New and Old • John Freeman

... queen of beauty and of grace. The joy of gods and men, that under sky Dost fairest shine, and most adorn thy place, That with thy smiling look dost pacify The raging seas, and mak'st the storms to fly: Thee, goddess, thee the winds, the clouds do fear, And when thou spreadst thy mantle forth on high, The waters play, and pleasant lands appear, And heaven laughs, and all the ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 14, Issue 387, August 28, 1829 • Various

... Bull be bayted openlye before the Mair and his burgesses, peon of forfeitr. of ev'y default vj s. viij d. Also that the Bochers of this Francheis, and al others that kepe slaughter shopes and kill flesche in this Francheis, to sell, mak onys yerly befor the Mair and his burgesses one bull-bayting, at convenient Tyme of the yere, according to the custom of this Francheis befor usyd, upon peyn of fortur of vj s. ...
— Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 475 - Vol. XVII, No. 475. Saturday, February 5, 1831 • Various

... a time The Deil gat stuff to mak' a swine And put it in a corner; But afterward he changed his plan And made it summat like a man, And ca'ed ...
— An Orkney Maid • Amelia Edith Huddleston Barr

... keen eyes fastened on his face, "dat ole boss, you know, he blam-fool. Hees 'fraid noting. Hees try for sweem de Black Dog on de crossing below. De Black Dog hees full over hees bank, an' boil, boil, lak one kettle. De ole boss he say 'Perault, we mak de passage, eh?' 'No,' I say, 'we try noder crossing.' 'How far?' he say. 'Two—tree mile' 'Guess try heem here,' he say, an' no matter how I say heem be blam-fool for try, dat ole boss hees laf small, leele laf an' mak ...
— The Prospector - A Tale of the Crow's Nest Pass • Ralph Connor

... circumstance, the crest of the family of Kirkpatrick is a hand grasping a dagger distilling gouts of blood; the motto, "I mak sikkar." ...
— The Scottish Chiefs • Miss Jane Porter

... him," he said, in his quaint, broken way. "Neche all out. Only squaws, an' pappoose by the camp. Old men—yes. Him all by river. Much squaws by river. Charley not come by river. No good. Charley him look by camp. Him see much teepee, much shack. Oh, yes, plenty. One big—plenty big—shack. Squaws mak go by shack. Him store. Charley know. Yes, Breed man run him store. Charley, him see Breed woman, too. All much plenty busy. So. Charley him ...
— The Triumph of John Kars - A Story of the Yukon • Ridgwell Cullum

... Then he went on. "Squaw him all smile. Him soft. Him mak dam fool of Indian man. Squaw no good—only mak pappoose, feed pappoose. Raise him. All the time squaw mak pappoose. Him not think nothin' more. Just pappoose. Indian man think all things. Him squaw only ...
— The Heart of Unaga • Ridgwell Cullum

... had once seen in the Empire the Great Prince—'The Bounder King'—bring down the house by appearing as 'The MacSlogan of that Ilk,' and singing the celebrated Scotch song, 'There's naething like haggis to mak a mon dry!' and he had ever since preserved in his mind a faithful image of the picturesque and warlike appearance which he presented. Indeed, if the true inwardness of Mr. Markam's mind on the subject of his selection of ...
— Dracula's Guest • Bram Stoker

... stand for sacrifice, The rest aloofe are the Dardanian wiues: With bleared visages come forth to view The issue of th' exploit: Goe Hercules, Liue thou, I liue with much more dismay I view the sight, then thou that mak'st ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... no taggelt. Ask his pardon. Ye must change, or he will no taggelt. Go, in weakness, come in power: mark ye the words. 'Twill make a peal that will be heard in toon and desert, in the swirls o' the mountain, through pikes and valleys, and mak' a waaly man ...
— J. S. Le Fanu's Ghostly Tales, Volume 3 • Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

... breaking into a trot for the rig, and climbing in by her side. "Come Jim, git! Yo' black villen, don' yo' know, dis here's er'mergency case? Yo' sho got to lay yo' laigs to de groun' dis night er yo' goin' to git left sartin! 'Mergency case!" he chuckled. "Dat mak him go, Miss. Funny I ...
— The Calling Of Dan Matthews • Harold Bell Wright

... with Mr. Bonnithorne, and then turned to his sons. "Come, you two lads have not been gude friends latterly, and that's a sair grief baith to your mother and me. You're not made in the same mold seemingly. But you must mak' up your fratch, my lads, for your auld ...
— A Son of Hagar - A Romance of Our Time • Sir Hall Caine

... piece of wood is carved in the likeness of the lady and laid in her place, the husband and friends being deceived into believing it to be herself. A man returning home at night overhears the supernatural beings at work. He listens and catches the words: "Mak' it red cheekit an' red lippit like the smith o' Bonnykelly's wife." Mastering the situation he runs off to the smith's house, and sains the new mother and her babe. And he is only just in time, for hardly has he finished than a great thud ...
— The Science of Fairy Tales - An Inquiry into Fairy Mythology • Edwin Sidney Hartland

... "Weel, Misther, we've been vara pleasant toogather, and ar'll spak' my moind tiv'ee. Dinnot let the weedur send her lattle boy to yan o' our school-measthers, while there's a harse to hoold in a' Lunnun, or a gootther to lie asleep in. Ar wouldn't mak' ill words amang my neeburs, and ar speak tiv'ee quiet loike. But I'm dom'd if ar can gang to bed and not tellee, for weedur's sak', to keep the lattle boy from a' sike scoondrels while there's a harse to hoold in a' ...
— The Life And Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby • Charles Dickens

... the reins. 'Yur a boald 'un to tell the missus theer to hur feeace as how ya wur 'tossicatit whan yur owt ta been duing yur larful business. Aa've doon wi' yer. Aa aims to please ma coostomers, an' aa caan't abide sek wark. Yur like an oald kneyfe, I can mak' nowt o' ...
— Robert Elsmere • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... called upon to erect a building in England upon the long-lease system, so common with Anglican proprietors, but quite new to our Scottish friend. When he found the proposal was to build upon the tenure of 999 years, he quietly suggested, "Culd ye no mak it a thousand? 999 years'll be ...
— Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character • Edward Bannerman Ramsay

... you mak' sic an enairmous profit aff yer potatoes? Yer price is lower than ony ither in the toon and ye mak' extra reductions ...
— Toaster's Handbook - Jokes, Stories, and Quotations • Peggy Edmund & Harold W. Williams, compilers

... from a distance, was struck with amazement, and exclaimed, 'Methinks, Marthokson, he resembles Gol Mak Morn protecting his followers from Fingal;' thus comparing him to one the most brilliant champions a Highland imagination could conceive. At last, three men, named M'Androsser, rushed forward, resolved ...
— A Book of Golden Deeds • Charlotte M. Yonge

... it's true, Was made for neither me nor you; It's just a place to warstle through, As job confessed o't; And aye the best that we'll can do Is mak the best o't. ...
— Underwoods • Robert Louis Stevenson

... times?" "Divulish ill," replied he. "Th' little maisters are runnin' a bit, some three, some four days. T'other are stopt o' together, welly. . . . It's thin pikein' for poor folk just neaw. But th' shopkeepers an' th' ale-heawses are in for it as ill as ony mak. There'll be crashin' amung some on 'em afore lung." After this, I spent a few minutes in the market-place, which was "slacker" than usual, as might be expected, for, as the Scotch proverb says, "Sillerless folk ...
— Home-Life of the Lancashire Factory Folk during the Cotton Famine • Edwin Waugh

... to yoursel'! This is the Deacon's house; you and me shouldna be here by rights; and if we are, it's the least we can do to behave dacent. (This is no' the way ye'll mak' me like ye.) ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, Volume XV • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Hamiltons), come to Striveling, the number of iii or iiii c men, in hors bak, guydit be ane George Bell, their hacbutteris being all horsed, enterit in Striveling, be fyve houris in the morning (whair thair was never one to mak watche), crying this slogane, 'God and the quene! ane Hamiltoun think on the bishop of St. Androis, all is owres;' and so a certaine come to everie grit manis ludgene, and apprehendit the Lordis Mortoun and Glencarne; but Mortounis hous they set on fyre, wha randerit him to the laird ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish border (3rd ed) (1 of 3) • Walter Scott

... him persaving. Off mete, and drynk, and othyr thing, That mycht thuim eyss, thai had plente. Sa wrocht he thorow sutelte, That all the lele men off that land, That with his fadyr war duelland, This gud man gert cum, ane and ane, And mak him manrent cuir ilkane; And he him selff fyrst homage maid. Dowglas in part gret glaidschip haid, That the gud men off his cuntre Wald swagate till him bundyn be. He speryt the conwyne off the land, And quha the castell had in hand. And thai him tauld all halily; And syne ...
— Waverley Volume XII • Sir Walter Scott

... weel; but it was Lieutenant Lichtbody, o' his Majesty's Heavy Dragoons, that cam' aff at the waurst. He made for the stane dyke, the sven-fite march dyke that rins up the hill, ye ken. Weel, he made as if he wad mak' ower it, but Boreland'a big Heelant bull had heard the routin' o' his friend Carlaverock Jock, an' was there wi' his horns spread like a man keppin' yowes [catching sheep]. Aye, my certes!" here the old lady paused, overcome by the humour of her recollections, laughing in her glee a delightfully ...
— The Lilac Sunbonnet • S.R. Crockett

... retainer to the vine, Bacchus' black servant, negro fine; Sorcerer, that mak'st us dote upon Thy begrimed complexion, And, for thy pernicious sake, More and greater oaths to break Than reclaimed lovers take 'Gainst women: thou thy siege dost lay Much too in the female way, While thou suck'st the lab'ring breath Faster than kisses ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... later. Meanwhile, let it be granted that Godfrey knew the secret from Coleman, and that, though, since Godfrey could not speak without self-betrayal—though it was 'no nearer'—still the Jesuits thought well to mak sikker and ...
— The Valet's Tragedy and Other Stories • Andrew Lang

... differentiating one section of the people of Japan from another. To this day the poorer classes in Korea depend for shelter upon pits covered with thatch or strong oil-paper. They call these dwellings um or um-mak, a term corresponding to the Japanese muro. Pit-dwellers are mentioned in old Chinese literature, and the references to the muro in the Records and Chronicles show that the muro of those days had a character similar to that of the ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... bless thee, bairn—my bonnie bairn," She said, an' straikit doon his hair; "O may the widow's God be thine, And mak' thee His peculiar care!" ...
— Gathering Jewels - The Secret of a Beautiful Life: In Memoriam of Mr. & Mrs. James Knowles. Selected from Their Diaries. • James Knowles and Matilda Darroch Knowles

... I'm no deid—that's what maks the diffeeclety o' the situation! Gien I war deid—weel, I kenna what than! I doobt there wad be trible still, though some things micht be lichter. But that's neither here nor there; I maun live; I hae nae ch'ice; I didna mak mysel', an' I'm no gaein' to meddle wi' mysel'! I think mair o' mysel' nor ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... senseless shams Have we been cullied all along at Sam's! Who could have e'er believed, unless in spite Lewis le Grand would turn rank Williamite? Thou that hast look'd so fierce and talk'd so big, In thine old age to dwindle to a Whig! Of Kings distress'd thou art a fine securer. Thou mak'st me swear, that am a known nonjuror. Were Job alive, and banter'd by such shufflers, He'd outrail Oates, and curse both thee and Boufflers For thee I've lost, if I can rightly scan 'em, Two livings, worth full eightscore pounds per annum, Bonae et legalis Angliae Monetae. But now I'm ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 4 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... to the States mysel', ye ken, but I'll confess it's a grand place to mak' money. Ye would be going there, perhaps, ...
— The Nest Builder • Beatrice Forbes-Robertson Hale

... he cried, staggering across the flag into the tent, "ken ye what ye do? The royal banner o' the King o' Scots—to mak' a floor-clout o'! Sirce, sirce, in three weeks I shall be as childless as the Countess ...
— The Black Douglas • S. R. Crockett

... "Hech, mon, wouldna that come nigh to mak' ye greet, to find the beast's red bluid splashed over the leaves, and think o' him staggerin' on thro' the forest, drippin' the heart oot o' him wi' ...
— The Boy Scouts Book of Campfire Stories • Various

... ma'am! I never heard tell o' such a thing; and speakin' o' my master and his family as fules is beyond a'. However, Miss Jasmine, the darlin', she comes to me and she says in her coaxin' way, "Mak' the auld leddy comfy, Magsie;" and I 'd risk mony a ...
— Hollyhock - A Spirit of Mischief • L. T. Meade

... Light, which mak'st the light which makes the day! Which sett'st the eye without, and mind within; Lighten my spirit with one clear heavenly ray, Which now to view itself ...
— England's Antiphon • George MacDonald

... do you do? do you annoying yourself or no? when we go to the Olivses it allways rememberse us you. Nelly and my aunt went away. And when the organ come and play the Soldaten it mak us think of Nelly. It is so sad I allmoste went away. I make my baths; and then we go to Franzensbad; will you come ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 23 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... over his head, you may say without ground under his feet. As long as he can work at the loom he can earn some sort o poor, miserable livin'. But it's many a day since I've been able to get that sort o' job. Now I tries to put a bite into my mouth with this here basket-mak-in'. I sits at it late into the night, and by the time I tumbles into bed I've earned three-halfpence. I puts it to you as knows things, if a man can live on that, when everything's so dear? Nine shillin' goes in one lump for house tax, three shillin' ...
— The Dramatic Works of Gerhart Hauptmann - Volume I • Gerhart Hauptmann

... ready to the fight. The painful hind by thee to field is sent; Slow oxen early in the yoke are pent. Thou coz'nest boys of sleep, and dost betray them To pedants that with cruel lashes pay them. Thou mak'st the surety to the lawyer run, That with one word hath nigh himself undone. 20 The lawyer and the client hate thy view, Both whom thou raisest up to toil anew. By thy means women of their rest are barred, Thou settst their labouring hands to spin and card. All[206] could ...
— The Works of Christopher Marlowe, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Christopher Marlowe

... you mean?" I was sayin' right off, me, "Some woman was mak' de speech, Or girl on de Hooraw Circus, doin' high kick an' screech?" "Non—non," he is spikin'—"Excuse me, dat's be Madam All-ba-nee Was leevin' down here on de contree, two mile ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume I. (of X.) • Various

... even three, but most would sooner have none at all. Whereupon enters Daw, a third shepherd, complaining of portents 'With mervels mo and mo.' 'Was never syn noe floode sich floodys seyn'; even 'I se shrewys pepe'—apparently a portentous omen. At this point Mak comes on the scene. He is a notorious bad character of the neighbourhood, who boasts himself 'a yoman, I tell you, of the king,' and complains that his wife eats him out of house and home. The shepherds suspect him ...
— Pastoral Poetry and Pastoral Drama - A Literary Inquiry, with Special Reference to the Pre-Restoration - Stage in England • Walter W. Greg

... exulting army which now hoped that, after this colossal success, the days of ceaseless marching and fighting would soon end. As a contrast to this natural outburst of joy and hope we may note the provident Moltke, who was always resolved to 'mak siker.' His general order, issued at once, suspending hostilities during the night, declared that they would begin again in the morning should the negotiations produce no result. In that case, he said, the signal for battle would be the reopening of fire by the batteries ...
— Germany from the Earliest Period Vol. 4 • Wolfgang Menzel, Trans. Mrs. George Horrocks

... I look in de mos' likely spot for gold, an' don' fin' him. Wal, I mak' change. I don' look in no more creek-bottom; I'm goin' hit de ...
— The Winds of Chance • Rex Beach

... 'Mak her tie it,' said the woman, showing an antiquated pair of strings. 'If she loses it she needna coom cryin for anudder. She'd lose her yead ...
— The History of David Grieve • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... is a grassy hill on which once stood Tarset Castle, a stronghold of that Red Comyn whom Bruce slew in the little chapel at Dumfries, and of whose death Bruce's friend Kirkpatrick said he would "mak' siccar"! ...
— Northumberland Yesterday and To-day • Jean F. Terry

... grief in my deep sighs still speaks, Yet thou dost hope when I despair; My heart for thy unkindness breaks; Thou say'st thou can'st my harms repair, And when I hope thou mak'st me hope in vain; Yet for redress thou let'st me ...
— Lyrics from the Song-Books of the Elizabethan Age • Various

... oldah 'uns wud sneak out at night an'tak de hosses an' tak a leetle ride. An' man it wud bin jes' too bad if ol' Marse John ketched 'em: dat wuz shure heaps o' fun fer de kids. I 'member hearin' wunce de ol' folks talkin' 'bout de way one Marse dun sum black boys dat dun sumthin' wrong. He jes' mak 'em bite off de heads o' baccer wurms; mysef I'd ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves: The Ohio Narratives • Works Projects Administration

... wrong an' I turn to zee woods. Den I see you rush out an' I hear you shoot as you run. I see dat big man struggle with you, I see him keeled by anoder who go down, aussi, and when zee man with zee ax mak' for you I begin to shoot. I am in zee wood, an' zee divils they do not see me, an' I pick off un, deux, trois! Dey are dere still, after dey others grow afraid an' run like caribou with zee wolves at dere heels. It ees fine sport, an' I shoot as dey ran, an' presently I am left alone. I ...
— A Mating in the Wilds • Ottwell Binns

... thy bow of pearl apart, And thy crystal-shining quiver: Give unto the flying hart Space to breathe how short soever; Thou that mak'st a day of night, ...
— MacMillan's Reading Books - Book V • Anonymous

... ye not have enough truck wi' the wenches already that ye mak' me lie eching and pechin' and listening for the death-watch on sic a nicht,"—and at that Jean giggled hysterically and crept closer to Tam, and the old dame turned on her like ...
— The McBrides - A Romance of Arran • John Sillars

... no reply, and it came to him that she expected it. "Damned if I will!" he said, as he started home. "If she wants to come here, and force herself on me, she can, but she canna mak' me." ...
— At the Foot of the Rainbow • Gene Stratton-Porter

... nearer-hand hame to mak your appeal to, man?" said he. "Because an ye hae-na, I dread you an' me may be unco weel acquaintit by ...
— The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner • James Hogg

... hound is to the hunting game, His hawk to fetch the wild-fowl hame, His lady's ta'en another mate, So we may mak ...
— A History of English Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century • Henry A. Beers

... tak her hame, and mak her fain, My ain kind-hearted lammie; We 'll gi'e her meat, we 'll gi'e her claise, We 'll be her comfort a' her days." The wee thing gi'es her hand and says— "There! gang and ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel , Volume I. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... Thou mak'st me eat whilst others starve, And sing while others do lament: Such untome Thy blessings are, As if I ...
— The Perfect Wagnerite - A Commentary on the Niblung's Ring • George Bernard Shaw

... safe him—I mus' give him free." He tapped his breast. "It is hereto mak' him free." ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... throng! Then by the gentle curving of his bow Maketh every mellow note in cadence flow, To recompense the world of all its wrong. Although the earth is full of cares and throes That tempt the crimson stream of life to cloy, Thou mak'st glad hearts and trip'st "fantastic toes," And fillest weary souls with mirth and joy— The soul-entrancing cadence of thy strings Proclaims thee ...
— The Sylvan Cabin - A Centenary Ode on the Birth of Lincoln and Other Verse • Edward Smyth Jones

... anos lai yabil yax ulcob Espanolesob uai Cusamil tu yox mal, Fernando de Cortes y Espoblaco Lara. A 28 de Febrero cuchi ca uliob Cusamilob u yax mal ahohelilob hahal u cibel than. Lai yabil cuchcob tu Chic[h]en tah mak opile ti tun yax oheltabi u Chic[h]een Ytza tumen noh Espanolesob D^n Fran^co de Montejo Adelantado, u halach uinicob ca [c]anob tu ...
— The Maya Chronicles - Brinton's Library Of Aboriginal American Literature, Number 1 • Various

... had better carry the gowd to Miss Mac-Ivor, in case of mortality, or accidents of war. It might tak the form of a MORTIS CAUSA donation in the young leddie's favour, and wad cost but the scrape of a pen to mak ...
— Waverley • Sir Walter Scott

... stirrest up a grief thou canst not fathom. Thou Christian Bishop, thou Lord Chancellor Of England! no more rein upon thine anger Than any child! Thou mak'st me much ashamed That I was for ...
— Queen Mary and Harold • Alfred Lord Tennyson

... earliest minister of the Almighty, Which gladden'd, on their mountain tops, the hearts Of the Chaldean shepherds, till they pour'd Themselves in orisons! Thou material God! And representative of the Unknown— Who chose thee for his shadow! Thou chief star! Centre of many stars! which mak'st our earth Endurable, and temperest the hues And hearts of all who walk within thy rays! Sire of the seasons! Monarch of the climes, And those who dwell in them! for, near or far, Our inborn spirits have a tint of thee, Even as our outward aspects;—thou dost rise, ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. IV - With His Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... "Fowks tell a mak o' tales about witches, barguests, an' sike-like," Owd Dont began, "but I tak no count o' all their clash; I reckon nowt o' tales without they belang my awn family. But what I's gannin to tell you ...
— More Tales of the Ridings • Frederic Moorman

... can mak a belted knight, A marquis, duke, an' a' that; But an honest man's aboon [Footnote: above] his might— Gude faith, he maunna fa' [Footnote: must not claim (to make the honest man)] that! For a' that, an' a' that, Their dignities, an' a' that, The pith o' sense, an' pride o' ...
— Public Speaking • Irvah Lester Winter

... be here, and it'll soon be over again. It's but a blink noo," she said to herself, "but if the morn is like this day, we'll mak' the best o' it. I'se hae the bairns up to the Stanin' Stanes. The wind there will blaw awa' what's left o' the kink-hoast among them. They'll be a' keen eneuch to get there for the sake o' the ploy, and if they're weel eneuch for the like o' that, their mithers ...
— Allison Bain - By a Way she knew not • Margaret Murray Robertson

... ( the fruitful) was the son of 'Abd al-Hamd and intendant of the tribute of Egypt under Harun al-Rashid, but neither Lord nor Sultan. Lane (iii. 669) quotes three couplets in his honour by Abu Nows from p. 119 of "Elmacini (Al-Makn) Historia Saracenica." ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 9 • Richard F. Burton

... a' taken in his loordship, and be a Roossian spy to the bottom of him after all. They mak' munselves up into all manner of disguisements, specially beards. I've seed the Roossians with ...
— Two Years Ago, Volume II. • Charles Kingsley

... Mr. Penrose,' said the old woman. 'I want a dry grave, wi' a posy growin' on th' top. I somehaa like posies on graves; they mak' me think ...
— Lancashire Idylls (1898) • Marshall Mather

... the spirit, the essence: Me for utt'rance alone mak'st demand on— Oft my power's deficient, and madly Thy crude thoughts I haste ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. XVII, No. 99, March, 1876 • Various

... my business, but I think thee'rt a fool. If a lass like Alice Lister took up wi' me, I would not throw myself away on Polly Powell. Thou'lt ne'er mak' much on 'er. She'll lead thee a dog's life, Tom, and tak' all ...
— Tommy • Joseph Hocking

... mak sicker"—or sure: and, so saying, hurried back into the church, and slew not only the wounded man, but his uncle, Sir Robert Comyn, who tried to defend him. The "bloody dirk" and the words "mak sicker" were adopted as crest ...
— Cameos from English History, from Rollo to Edward II • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... the sickest bird That ever sat on brier; And I wad mak' my testament, Gudeman, if ye ...
— Children's Rhymes, Children's Games, Children's Songs, Children's Stories - A Book for Bairns and Big Folk • Robert Ford

... were thick-set, bearded and pock-marked peasants from the governments of Kostroma and Novgorod and among them, was a dark little Jew, Hershel Mak, who alone thought and planned for the rest of them. All these country people taken right from the plough were unable to grasp how it all happened, and were not even sure whether anything had happened at all. They could not tell whether there was a battle or not, whether it was good or ...
— The Shield • Various

... Auerbach, Albalag und seine Uebersetzung des Maksid al-Gazzalis, Breslau, 1906, p. vii f.; Guttmann, Die Stellung des Simon ben Zemach Duran in der Geschichte der jdischen Religionsphilosophie in Monatschrift fr Geschichte und Wissenschaft des Judenthums, vol. LVII (1913), p. ...
— A History of Mediaeval Jewish Philosophy • Isaac Husik

... 'I shall mak' mysel' clear, your Majesty. Have we no heard that Argyle is cutten off? And why was he cutten off? Because he hadna due faith in the workings o' the Almighty, and must needs reject the help o' the children o' light in favour ...
— Micah Clarke - His Statement as made to his three Grandchildren Joseph, - Gervas and Reuben During the Hard Winter of 1734 • Arthur Conan Doyle

... bold, for thou hast known me long Almost these twenty yeeres, and halfe those yeeres Hast bin my bed-fellow; long time before This unseene thing, this thing of naught indeed, Or Atome cald my Lordshippe shind in me, And yet thou mak'st thy selfe as little bould To take such kindnes, as becomes the Age And truth of our indissolable love, As our acquaintance sprong but yesterday; Such is thy gentle, and ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. III • Various

... LeNoir, "Dat beeg Macdonald I mak heem run like one leetle sheep, one tam at de long Sault, bah! No good!" LeNoir's contempt for Macdonald was genuine and complete. For two years he had tried to meet the boss Macdonald, but his ...
— The Man From Glengarry - A Tale Of The Ottawa • Ralph Connor

... puttin' in our days havin' fun. I've got to give all that sorter thing up now, cos I've accepted a persisshun in a onherabel perfesshun, and wen I get to be a man, and reech the top rung of the ladder, I'm goin' to mak' New ...
— The Bad Boy At Home - And His Experiences In Trying To Become An Editor - 1885 • Walter T. Gray

... it i' th' coil hoil last neet, For fear it dropt aat o' mi fob, Coss aw knew, if shoo happened to see 't, At mi frolic wod prove a done job. But aw'll gladden mi een wi' its face, To mak sure at its safe in its nick;— But aw'm blest if ther's owt left i' th' place! Why, its hook'd it as sure as aw'm wick. Whear its gooan to's a puzzle to me, An' who's taen it aw connot mak aat, For it connot be th' wife, ...
— Yorkshire Ditties, Second Series - To which is added The Cream of Wit and Humour - from his Popular Writings • John Hartley

... spoken, but I would beg to say that ye are wrang. Folk that ance get a liking for dainties tak ill wi' plainer fare again; and, moreover, sir, in a' my experience, I never kenned dainty bits and hardihood to go hand in hand; but, on the contrary, luxuries mak men effeminate, and discontented into ...
— Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Volume 2 - Historical, Traditional, and Imaginative • Alexander Leighton

... was too happy to feel the sting. "I will fix it!" she said stoutly. "I will mak' it like an outside house. It will be as nice than the priest's parlour in the Settlement!" She clasped her hands against her breast in the intensity of her eagerness. "Jus' you wait, 'Erbe't! Some day I will have white curtains in the window! and a piece of carpet on the floor! and a holy ...
— Two on the Trail - A Story of the Far Northwest • Hulbert Footner

... sayin'—they'n had a deeal o' trouble about music this year or two back, up at th' owd chapel. Th' singers fell out wi' th' players. They mostly dun do. An' th' players did everything they could to plague th' singers. They're so like. But yo' may have a like aim, Nanny, what mak' o' harmony they'd get out o' sich wark as that. An' then, when Joss o' Piper's geet his wage raise't—five shillin' a year—Dick o' Liddy's said he'd ha' moor too, or else he'd sing no moor at that shop. He're noan beawn to be snape't wi' a tootlin' whipper-snapper like Joss,—a bit of a ...
— Th' Barrel Organ • Edwin Waugh

... RALPHO, thou always harp'st upon. When thou at any thing would'st rail, 1075 Thou mak'st Presbytery the scale To take the height on't, and explain To what degree it is prophane Whats'ever will not with (thy what d'ye call) Thy light jump right, thou call'st synodical; 1080 As if Presbytery were the standard To size whats'ever's to he slander'd. Dost not remember how this day, Thou ...
— Hudibras • Samuel Butler

... "Thou almost mak'st me waver in my faith, To hold opinion with Pythagoras, That souls of animals infuse themselves Into the trunks of men; thy currish spirit Governed a wolf; who hanged for human slaughter Infused his soul in thee; for thy desires Are ...
— Bulfinch's Mythology • Thomas Bulfinch

... am not at the castle I shall be at this spot. Good-bye, Frank." He took her in his arms and kissed her,—of course as a brother; and then he clambered up, got on his pony, and rode away. "I dinna ken just what to mak' o' him," said Gowran to his wife. "May be he is her coosin; but coosins are nae that sib that a weedow is to be hailed aboot jist ane as though she were ony quean at a fair." From which it may be inferred ...
— The Eustace Diamonds • Anthony Trollope

... intil the mind o' Christ, then, mother! I dinna care for my ain min'. I hae nane o' my ain, an' will stick to His. Gien I dinna mak His mine, and stick til't, I'm lost! Noo, mother, I'll set the things, and run ower to the hoose, and lat ...
— The Elect Lady • George MacDonald

... had yet done. He had been turning the subject over thoughtfully in his mind; and seemed to have satisfied himself as to the cause of the failure. Kit Heppel, one of the sinkers, asked him, "Weel, George, what do you mak' o' her? Do you think you could do anything to improve her?" Said George, "I could alter her, man, and make her draw: in a week's time I could send you to ...
— Lives of the Engineers - The Locomotive. George and Robert Stephenson • Samuel Smiles

... wind control, And rule the boisterous deep; Thou mak'st the sleeping billows roll, The ...
— The Psalms of David - Imitated in the Language of The New Testament - And Applied to The Christian State and Worship • Isaac Watts

... belonging to Mak...Mak...I never can say the name," said the Englishman, over his shoulder, pointing his big finger and dirty nail towards ...
— Anna Karenina • Leo Tolstoy

... tree there grows sic fruit, Its virtues a' can tell, man; It raises man aboon the brute, It mak's him ken himsel', man. Gif ance the peasant taste a bit, He's greater than a lord, man, An' wi' a beggar shares a mite O' a' ...
— The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing his Poems, Songs, and Correspondence. • Robert Burns and Allan Cunningham

... spoase I must goo to —- in the marnin. And thee'll stop here the night and mak thyself comfortable. We can gie un a ...
— The Humourous Story of Farmer Bumpkin's Lawsuit • Richard Harris

... 6 O light, which mak'st the light which makes the day! Which sett'st the eye without, and mind within, Lighten my spirit with one clear heavenly ray, Which now to view itself doth ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... by Mr Wedgwood from the Italian MOCCA, a mocking or apish mouth (Dictionary of English Etymology), but in English Gipsy we have not only mui, meaning the face, but the older forms from which the English word was probably taken, such as Mak'h (Paspati), and finally the Hindustani Mook and the Sanskrit Mukha, mouth or face (Shakespeare, Hind. Dic., p. 745). In all cases where a word is so "slangy" as mug, it seems more likely that it should have been derived from ...
— The English Gipsies and Their Language • Charles G. Leland

... is a pillar of the Free Kirk, but she has no prejudice in lodgers, and says so long as she "mak's her rent she doesna care aboot their releegious principles." Miss Diggity-Dalgety is the sole representative of United Presbyterianism in the household, and she is somewhat gloomy in Assembly time. To belong to a dissenting body, and yet to cook early and late for the purpose of fattening one's ...
— Penelope's Progress - Being Such Extracts from the Commonplace Book of Penelope Hamilton As Relate to Her Experiences in Scotland • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... nature for my kingdom, And power to feel it, to enjoy it. Not Cold gaze of winder gav'st thou me alone, But even into her bosom's depth to look, As it might be the bosom of a friend; The grand array of living things thou madest To pass before me, mak'st me know my brothers In silent bush, in ...
— Voices for the Speechless • Abraham Firth

... and who art thou; for thou mak'st us As much to marvel at this grace of thine As must a thing that never yet ...
— Dante's Purgatory • Dante

... life in beautie, forme and hew, As if dead Art 'gainst Nature had conspir'd. Painter, sayes one, thy wife's a pretty woman, I muse such ill-shapt children thou hast got, Yet mak'st such pictures as their likes makes no man, I prethee tell the cause of this thy lot? Quoth he, I paint by day when it is light, And get my children in the ...
— Shakespeare Jest-Books; - Reprints of the Early and Very Rare Jest-Books Supposed - to Have Been Used by Shakespeare • Unknown

... answered with a grin. "Mak no odds to Ostik. He got no wife, no piccanniny. Ostik very good cook. Master find good grub; he ...
— By Sheer Pluck - A Tale of the Ashanti War • G. A. Henty

... into the nursery, only too proud of the mission, and telling nurse to "mak' the young laird brau," she rushed to the kitchen, and demanded of the ...
— Flora Lyndsay - or, Passages in an Eventful Life • Susan Moodie

... or sae where he was. But he just wadna hear them, for he was baith unbelieving an' in haste, an' wauld hae taen the ford for a' they could say, hadna the Highlanders, determined on saving him whether he would or no, gathered round him an' pulled him frae his horse, an' then, to mak' sure o' him, locked him up in the auld kirk. Weel, when the hour had gone by—the fatal hour o' the kelpie—they flung open the door, an' cried to him that he might noo gang on his journey. Ah! but there was nae answer, ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends - Scotland • Anonymous



Words linked to "MAK" :   FTO, Maktab al-Khidmat, terrorist act, terrorist organization, act of terrorism, foreign terrorist organization, terrorist group, terrorism



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