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Ma   /mɑ/   Listen
Ma

noun
1.
Informal terms for a mother.  Synonyms: mama, mamma, mammy, mom, momma, mommy, mum, mummy.
2.
A master's degree in arts and sciences.  Synonyms: AM, Artium Magister, Master of Arts.
3.
One thousandth of an ampere.  Synonym: milliampere.
4.
A state in New England; one of the original 13 colonies.  Synonyms: Bay State, Massachusetts, Old Colony.



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"Ma" Quotes from Famous Books



... Ma conscience! the words the chiel used was eneugh tae mak' the hair stand straight on your heid. I wonder he wasna struck ...
— The Mystery of Cloomber • Arthur Conan Doyle

... of the powder, but let him think of "Aum;" but speak it not on pain of death; let absolute "muckta" be known to him; let him study the secret "mantras," and ponder on the mysteries of "Vach;" let him also say each day in his prayer "Aum ma-ni pad-me hum." ...
— Montezuma's Castle and Other Weird Tales • Charles B. Cory

... balcon a travailler au frais, Lorsque je vis passer sous les arbres d'aupres Un jeune homme bien fait qui, rencontrant ma vue...." ...
— A Mummer's Tale • Anatole France

... her cheek actually pink, and the water in her eyes. Sampson saw she was ruffled, and appealed to Julia—of all people. "There now, Miss Julia," said he, ruefully; "she is in a rage because I won't humbug her. Poplus voolt decipee. I tell you, ma'am, it is not a midical case. Give me disease and I'll cure 't. Stop, I'll tell ye what do: let her take and swallow the Barkton Docks' prescriptions, and Butcher Best's, and canting Kinyon's, and after those four tinkers there'll ...
— Hard Cash • Charles Reade

... The little lame boy looked very happy but, again, he did not seem to know what to say. "Thank you, ma'am," he brought out finally. "And ...
— Maida's Little Shop • Inez Haynes Irwin

... mother wash for you, ma'am? She did—and you never had better washin' done! Are we common people?—we are, and we're not ashamed. We're doin' fine, thank you—all the children are at school but me, and I've gone thro' the public school and Normal too. The crops are good—we have thirty head of cattle and six horses, ...
— Purple Springs • Nellie L. McClung

... m'applaudissez pas; ce n'est pas moi qui vous parle; c'est l'histoire qui parle par ma bouche.—Revue Historique, xli. 278. ...
— A Lecture on the Study of History • Lord Acton

... "That's her way, ma'am. Off and on—on and off. But she takes mostly to the knitting. And it ain't anything to wonder at, I say, that she drops off reading. I'm sure I can't hold my eyes open five minutes over the newspaper. And books would be worse, when you come ...
— When Ghost Meets Ghost • William Frend De Morgan

... it as well as mortal hands can do it ma'am" he said with a tremor in his hoarse husky voice. "You're the first woman as has spoken a kind word to me since—since—I buried the one that 'ud have made my life ...
— The Doctor's Daughter • "Vera"

... wee thing was little hurt; I straikit it a wee for sport, Ne'er thinkin they wad fash me for't; But, Deil-ma-care! Somebody tells the poacher-court The ...
— Poems And Songs Of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... for righting injuries or settling grievances is almost non-existent, the Ilongot has a strong sense of injury and of wrongful acts. He will say with the strongest feeling and disgust that certain actions are "forbidden" (ma kul). ...
— The Negrito and Allied Types in the Philippines and The Ilongot or Ibilao of Luzon • David P. Barrows

... "Ma, or congiunto a giovinetta sposa, E lieto omai de' figli, era invilito Negli affetti di padre ...
— The Essays of Montaigne, Complete • Michel de Montaigne

... the front door, crocheting a lamp-mat when I saw her last," said "Bill." "She's older'n she was, Miss Posie. But everything in the house looked jest the same. Your ma asked me to set down. 'Don't touch that willow rocker, William,' says she. 'It ain't been moved since Posie left; and that's the apron she was hemmin', layin' over the arm of it, jist as she flung it. I'm in hopes,' she goes on, 'that Posie'll ...
— The Voice of the City • O. Henry

... got to have it, reason or no reason. A common ordinary bone with meat on it is just a meal. Praise I've earned is nothing wonderful. But praise I don't deserve is stolen fruit, and that's the sweetest. Now, if I was to come to your party I'd get no praise, ma'am. I'd be doing right by you, but they'd say I didn't know my place, and by and by they'd prove it to me sharp and sneery. I'll be a coward to stop away, but—'Sensible man,' they'll say. 'Knows when he isn't wanted.' You see, ma'am, ...
— Guns of the Gods • Talbot Mundy

... you," said Roger Trew, lifting up the hen hornbill; but the bird fought so desperately that he was glad to put her down again. "We must tie your legs and put your nose in a bag, ma'am," said Roger, "or you will be ...
— In the Eastern Seas • W.H.G. Kingston

... remains to me, and I am a proficient in that, ma'am,' said Mat, roused by these efforts to deny her the right ...
— Shawl-Straps - A Second Series of Aunt Jo's Scrap-Bag • Louisa M. Alcott

... poor-house. I come acrost his little boy one night on the hill, when I was a trampin' home. He hadn't nothin' on but rags, an' he was as blue an' hungry as a spring bar. The little feller teched me ye know—teched my feelins—an' I jest sot down to comfort 'im. He telled me his ma was dead, and that his pa was at old Buffum's, as crazy as a loon. Well, I stayed to old Buffum's that night, an' went into the poor-house in the mornin', with the doctor. I seen Benedict thar, an' knowed him. He was a lyin' on the straw, an' he hadn't cloes enough ...
— Sevenoaks • J. G. Holland

... "Yes, Ma'am," said Mrs. Meager, "he did take the key with him. Amelia remembers we were a key short at the time he was away." The absence here alluded to was that occasioned by the journey which Mr. Emilius took to Prague, when he heard that evidence of his former marriage ...
— Phineas Redux • Anthony Trollope

... "Oh, ma'am," replied the young woman, "he ran away from his parents, and went and joined a set of thieves and bad characters, and almost broke ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol III • Arthur Mee and J.A. Hammerton, Eds.

... everybody," answered she: "he and all that family; everybody says Such a family never was drawn before. But Mrs. Cholmondeley's favourite is Madame Duval; she acts her from morning to night, and ma-foi's everybody she sees. But though we all want so much to know the author, both Mrs. Cholmondeley and my uncle himself say they should be frightened to death to be in her company, because ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 1 • Madame D'Arblay

... you, ma'am," said Dick quickly, "but I should like some tea, I am so thirsty." And in five minutes Dick was sitting at the round table and telling Mrs. Grey a little bit of his story, while Pat finished a saucerful of sop and then ...
— Dick Lionheart • Mary Rowles Jarvis

... "You keep it, ma'am, an' buy yorese'f somethin' for a p-pretty. I'd jes' b-blow it anyhow. Hope you'll be r-real happy. If this yere young s-scalawag don't treat you h-handsome, Tom an' Dud'll be glad to ride over an' beat him up proper ...
— The Fighting Edge • William MacLeod Raine

... "Yes, ma'am, Mr. Dale has come in, but he has retired. . . . Yes, I told him; but, begging your pardon, ma'am, he was in what I might say was a bit of a temper, and said he wasn't to be disturbed ...
— The Adventures of Jimmie Dale • Frank L. Packard

... servant, ma'am," said the strange man, smiling his crooked smile. "Captain Lingo, by name. A gentleman adventurer of the high seas. Owner of the treasure which you have discovered here in our little retreat. Known here on the Spanish Main as the Scourge of Ships, and loyal servant of his ...
— The Old Tobacco Shop - A True Account of What Befell a Little Boy in Search of Adventure • William Bowen

... "Oh, you see, Ma'am, he's so used to it, he won't go noways without it; feels kind o' lonesome, I 'xpect. It don't hurt him none, nuther; his skin's got so thick an' tough, that he wouldn't know, if you was to put bilin' tar ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 4, No. 23, September, 1859 • Various

... it first. It said, 'Vera Copia. Ma mye, I set on to the burden you gave me, but it failed of breaking my back. I have punished some of the wicked, and have some still to punish. When this is done I shall come to you. Wait for me. I regret your brother's death. He deserved it. The fight was fair. Learn of me from Gaston.—Richard ...
— The Life and Death of Richard Yea-and-Nay • Maurice Hewlett

... ma'am," interrupted Agnes, "wot dreams the queerest things. She's hall for poetry and flowers and sech like. ...
— Sue, A Little Heroine • L. T. Meade

... qu'ai-je a faire? Je n'i quier entrer, mais que j'aie Nicolete, ma tres douce amie que j'aime tant.... Mais en enfer voil jou aler. Car en enfer vont li bel clerc et li bel cevalier, qui sont mort as tournois et as rices guerres, et li bien sergant, et li franc homme.... Avec ciax voil jou aler, mais que j'aie Nicolete, ...
— Landmarks in French Literature • G. Lytton Strachey

... volta gieri biele, Blanch' a rossa com' un flore, Ma ora no. Non son piu biele Consumatis ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... "Ma's sick, a little, and didn't get up to-day. Pa's down to the corral, cussing mad. But I can cook you up ...
— Trailin'! • Max Brand

... somehow seemed a little crestfallen because his kidnapping case proved to be only in his own imagination. "Mrs. Brown described to me the clothes the baby wore, and she said that blanket was given to her by a rich lady who had a little girl named Rosabel. The Browns are poor people, ma'am, and the mother is a hard-working woman, and she's nearly crazed with grief ...
— Patty's Summer Days • Carolyn Wells

... and the hopelessness of it, and her determination to hold out. Some charitable lady had called upon her. "Mrs. Curtis," the lady had said, "if ever you are ill, I hope you'll be sure and send to me." And Mrs. Curtis had replied: "Well, ma'am, if ever I sends, you may be sure I am ill." "But," she added, "they don't understand. 'Tis when you're on yer feet that help's wanted—not wait till 'tis too late." With regard to her present circumstances—she "didn't mind saying it to me—sometimes she didn't hardly know how ...
— Change in the Village • (AKA George Bourne) George Sturt

... "Ma che!" shouted Assunta scornfully, "she talks American. You couldn't expect them to speak like us over there. They are not ...
— Daphne, An Autumn Pastoral • Margaret Pollock Sherwood

... here, Miss Floy, before you've been in the house a quarter of an hour, you go a-smearing your wet face against the expensive mourning that Mrs. Richards is a-wearing for your ma!" With this remonstrance, young Spitfire, whose real name was Susan Nipper, detached the child from her new friend by a wrench—as if she were a tooth. But she seemed to do it more in the sharp exercise of her official functions, than ...
— Ten Girls from Dickens • Kate Dickinson Sweetser

... "Wasn't the Bay of Naples just perfectly swell—the water, you know, and the land and the sky and everything, so beautiful and everything?" ... "You Raymund, come away from that lifeboat. Why don't you sit down there and behave yourself and have a nice time watching for whales?" ... "No, ma'am, if you're askin' me I must say I didn't care so much for that art gallery stuff—jest a lot of pictures and statues and junk like that, so far as I noticed. In fact the whole thing—Yurupp itself —was considerable of a disappointment ...
— Europe Revised • Irvin S. Cobb

... three herring a' sa't, Bonny lass, gin ze'll take me, tell me now, And I hae brew'n three pickles o' ma't And I cannae cum ilka day to woo. To woo, to woo, to lilt and to woo, And I cannae cum ilka ...
— Lyrics from the Song-Books of the Elizabethan Age • Various

... Samuel's life; for he knew that within old Ephraim's bosom was the heart of a king. Once the boy had heard him in the room beneath his attic, talking with one of the boarders, a widow with a little daughter of whom the old man was fond. "I've had a feeling, ma'am," he was saying, "that somehow you might be in trouble. And I wanted to say that if you can't spare this money, I would rather you kept it; for I don't need it now, and you can send it to me when things are better with you." That ...
— Samuel the Seeker • Upton Sinclair

... you are sure it won't do him any harm. He used to talk to me very confidentially, and I can't help liking him, even if he did get in debt to ma." ...
— Five Hundred Dollars - or, Jacob Marlowe's Secret • Horatio Alger

... supply each with a fish to himself. They were well supplied and satisfied, and at dawn returned to the mountains of Puukapele rejoicing, and the hum of their voices gave rise to the saying, "Wawa ka Menehune i Puukapele, ma Kauai, puoho ka manu o ka loko o Kawainui ma Koolaupoko, Oahu"—the hum of the voices of the Menehunes at Puukapele, Kauai, startled the birds of the pond of ...
— Hawaiian Folk Tales - A Collection of Native Legends • Various

... this is all that Ssu-ma Ch'ien has to tell us in this chapter. But he proceeds to give a biography of his descendant, Sun Pin, born about a hundred years after his famous ancestor's death, and also the outstanding military genius of his time. The historian speaks of him too as Sun Tzu, and in his ...
— The Art of War • Sun Tzu

... Corsican than ever—too Corsican indeed! Basta! I write you this long letter because I am dull. The prefect, alas! is going away. We will send you a message when we start for your mountains, and I shall take the liberty of writing to Signorina Colomba to ask her to give me a bruccio, ma solenne! Meanwhile, give her my love. I use her dagger a great deal to cut the leaves of a novel I brought with me. But the doughty steel revolts against such usage, and tears my book for me, after a most pitiful fashion. ...
— Columba • Prosper Merimee

... have you heard that Boswell is going to publish a life of your friend Dr. Johnson?' 'No, ma'am!' 'I tell you as I heard, I don't know for the truth of it, and I can't tell what he will do. He is so extraordinary a man that perhaps he will devise something extraordinary.' Mme. D'Artlay's Diary, ii. 400. 'Dr. Johnson's ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 1 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... braggadocio Virginia militia, hastily collected to brag and drink the town safe from the pollution of the vile Yankee's invading foot. Ah! V'ginia; as thou art easily pleased to sing of thy sister-in-law, Ma'yland, ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol 6, No 5, November 1864 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... "Well, ma'am," he said, "the dispensations of Providence is indeed mysterious,—that the river should have ...
— John Ward, Preacher • Margaret Deland

... auiallo xochinquauitl itlani nepapan quecholli ma ya in quecholli xicaquiya tlatoaya y toteuh, xicaquiya tlatoaya y quechol amach yeua tonicauh tlapitza amach ...
— Rig Veda Americanus - Sacred Songs Of The Ancient Mexicans, With A Gloss In Nahuatl • Various

... ma'am, come in!" said the little Black Ant, "Here is shelter and light for us all! And if you could play us a nice little tune, We might fancy we were at ...
— Mouser Cats' Story • Amy Prentice

... the marriage without waiting further for the dispensation. So I understand Charles's words to Ferralz (Aug. 24, 1572): "J'ai aussi sceu par vostre dicte memoire, que par l'avis de mon cousin le cardinal de Ferrare, vous avez retenu le diamant que je vous avois envoye pour le donner de ma part au cardinal Alexandrin, puisque mon dict cousin et mes autres ministres trouvent que le don seroit inutile et perdu." Mackintosh, iii., App. C., ...
— History of the Rise of the Huguenots - Volume 2 • Henry Baird

... "Ah taisez-vous donc ma chere!" cried Aurora, flopping her ears with her hands, and running round the room shaking her long curls furiously. "Vous me faites absolument fremir! Excuse my French, but I am certain you are the eldest daughter ...
— The Fairy Godmothers and Other Tales • Mrs. Alfred Gatty

... poorhouse breed— not at all. You're too pretty dressed and you're too well fed. I know what they be there, for I have been there myself. Yes, ma'am! Jabez Potter came after me to the poor farm. I was sickly, too. There's them that said he went to Doctor Davison first to find out if I was goin' to git well before he come arter me; but Jabez ain't never treated me noways but kind. ...
— Ruth Fielding of the Red Mill • Alice B. Emerson

... 'Why, ma'am,' said Brown, doggedly—'I knew that master is old, and no fit companion for such a lively young woman as you be, ...
— City Crimes - or Life in New York and Boston • Greenhorn

... swept his hat from his head and bowed to her. "Why, I reckon you have, ma'am," he said. "Didn't ...
— The Range Boss • Charles Alden Seltzer

... and velvet and carrying a chignon sufficient to pull her cerebellum out of joint; the dandy buttoned up to show his figure, and heavily dosed with scent; the less developed young swell, who is always "talking about his pa and his ma," and has only just begun to have his hair parted down the middle; the broken down middle-aged man who was once in a good position, but who years since went all in a piece to pot; the snuff-loving old woman who curtsies before fine folk, who has always a long tale to tell about her sorrows, ...
— Our Churches and Chapels • Atticus

... won't put up with any such a climate. If we were obliged to do it, I wouldn't mind it; but we are not obliged to, and so I don't see the use of it. Sometimes its real pitiful the way the childern pine for Parry —don't look so sad, Bridget, 'ma chere'—poor child, she can't hear Parry mentioned ...
— The Gilded Age, Complete • Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner

... a fine emotional time. She was mistress of a home—their home together. She shopped and was called "Ma'am" by respectful, good-looking shopmen; she designed meals and copied out papers of notes with a rich sense of helpfulness. And ever and again she would stop writing and sit dreaming. And for four bright week-days she went to and fro to accompany and meet Lewisham ...
— Love and Mr. Lewisham • H. G. Wells

... c'est la, dans cette rue obscure, Assis sur une borne, au fond d'un carrefour, Les deux mains sur mon coeur, et serrant ma blessure, Et sentant y saigner un invincible amour; C'est la, dans cette nuit d'horreur et de detresse, Au milieu des transports d'un peuple furieux Qui semblait en passant crier a ma jeunesse: "Toi qui pleures ce soir, n'as-ta pas ri comme eux?" C'est la, devant ...
— Legends, Tales and Poems • Gustavo Adolfo Becquer

... quivering and her eyes were filling with gathering tears. With a little quaver in her voice she struggled hard to give a mirthful conclusion to the affair. "I accept the position, ma'am," she faltered, making a courtesy, then rushed into her friend's arms and sobbed: "Oh, Mara, Mara, you have lifted such a burden from my heart! I have had many troubles, but somehow it seemed that I couldn't bear this one, though I tried hard to keep the pain to myself—papa ...
— The Earth Trembled • E.P. Roe

... should like to see you taking hold of a bear. Why, didn't you know bears were stronger than men? But only see how dark it grows; we sha'n't see ma to-night, I'm afraid. ...
— The Teacher • Jacob Abbott

... the cry came again. This time Philip caught in it a note that he had not detected before. It was not a challenge but the long-drawn ma-too-ee of an Eskimo who answers the ...
— The Golden Snare • James Oliver Curwood

... said, "Oh yes, ma'am," and she gave me a good stare, while Mrs. Makely went to the kitchen window and made me observe that it let in the outside air, though the court that it opened into was so dark that one had to keep the electrics going in the kitchen night and day. "Of course, it's an expense," she ...
— Through the Eye of the Needle - A Romance • W. D. Howells

... kind of funny that I should be in the rag-room among all the common girls, anyhow; but father said I'd got to begin work, and he guessed what wouldn't hurt you wouldn't hurt me. But for the thought that you were here I wouldn't have come at all, no matter what pa said. Ma don't think it genteel. I don't see what made you come; don't ...
— Katie Robertson - A Girls Story of Factory Life • Margaret E. Winslow

... murmured, and Rebecca called her ma'm, though they were conspirators plotting the eternal conspiracy of hush ...
— Jacob's Room • Virginia Woolf

... countess cooks like this," he observed, "I'd sure love to board with a duke." Later, while the dishes were being washed and when his visitor had shown no intention of explaining her presence in further detail, he said, whimsically: "See here, ma'am, our young friend has been watching you like he was afraid you'd disappear before he gets an eyeful, and it's plain to be seen that he's devoured by curiosity. As for me, I'm totally lacking in that miserable trait, and I abhor ...
— The Winds of Chance • Rex Beach

... stopping a little on this side of the fashion. On the other hand, Mrs. Ladbrook was standing in skull-cap and front, with her turban in her hand, curtsying and smiling blandly and saying, "After you, ma'am," to another lady in similar circumstances, who had politely offered ...
— Silas Marner - The Weaver of Raveloe • George Eliot

... Daudet, J'ai vu ca moi!—and it will pass as everything passes. That is not the least sad part, though now you will hardly believe it. You see, I don't lie to you; I tell you quite plainly that it is no good. Some men are made so—vois tu, ma cherie!—to see only one woman, an inaccessible one, when they seem to see many, and he would be like that. Only it is a pity. And yet who would have foreseen it—that he should charm you, Mary? He so tired and old and use—for ...
— A Comedy of Masks - A Novel • Ernest Dowson and Arthur Moore

... Lola, bursting into the nursery, where Freddy, rather a tyrant in his affections, had insisted on her singing him to sleep, "Ma says you have got to dine down to-night, and ...
— Bluebell - A Novel • Mrs. George Croft Huddleston

... strange attendant. He threw his hands up into the air, burst into a harsh clatter of words, and then, hurling himself down upon the ground beside the mummy, he threw his arms round her, and kissed her repeatedly upon the lips and brow. "Ma petite!" he groaned in French. "Ma pauvre petite!" His voice broke with emotion, and his innumerable wrinkles quivered and writhed, but the student observed in the lamplight that his shining eyes were still as dry and tearless as two beads of steel. For some minutes he lay, with a ...
— The Captain of the Pole-Star and Other Tales • Arthur Conan Doyle

... totally unfit to hear the fine chorus of voices, among which Mustafa's, the soprano, came ringing out) was composing himself to listen, Pepe grabbed him with a 'Music's over; andiamo (let's go). Did you hear Mustafa? Bella voce, tra-la-leeeee! Mustafa's a contadino; I know his pa and ma; they changed him when only five years old. Thought he was a Turk, didn't you? He sings in the Sistine chapel. Pretty man, fat; positively not a sign of ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 3, No. 1 January 1863 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... doin' a reg'lar man's job. An' I reckon that not even that feller Eddy's son, that there chap they call the 'Wizard of Menlo Park,' I reckon he couldn't 'lectrocute nothin' no better'n these here boys, Bill an' Gus, has lighted this here domycile. An'—oh, you kin laugh, Ma Hooper, b'jinks, but I reckon you're as proud o' these here young Eddy's son's sons as I be. Now, Mister Bill an' Mister Gus, you kin bet all these folks'd like to have a few words. Now, as they say ...
— Radio Boys Cronies • Wayne Whipple and S. F. Aaron

... comes the Sun," but that after a term he would return to them, in that year of their calendar of the name Ce Acatl, One Reed, which returns every fifty-two years. He went forth with many followers, some of whom he left in each city he visited. At length he reached the town of Ma Tlapallan. Here he announced that he should soon die, and directed his followers to burn his body and all his treasures with him. They obeyed his orders, and for four days burned his corpse, after which they gathered its ashes and placed ...
— American Hero-Myths - A Study in the Native Religions of the Western Continent • Daniel G. Brinton

... Then tell your papa that I don't believe in anything of the kind, but will come to see his new medium. Only he must let me know when. Good afternoon, ma toute belle. ...
— Redemption and Two Other Plays • Leo Tolstoy et al

... she wept; "we have, ma'am. Father, he's always been steady, an' up early an' late. P'r'aps it's the Lord's 'and, as you say, ma'am, but we've been decent people an' never missed church when we could 'elp it—father ...
— The Shuttle • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... Kirsty to her horse, 'tak example by yer betters! Jist luik hoo he stan's!—The laird has a true eye for a horse, ma'am,' she went on, 'but he always says you ...
— Heather and Snow • George MacDonald

... earnest, ma toute belle?" said Elizabeth- Charlotte of Orleans. "Are you serious when you relinquish your golden hours of untrammelled existence, to become my maid ...
— Prince Eugene and His Times • L. Muhlbach

... him, ma mie?" a ripple of mockery on the current of her voice, "and he a man such as any girl in France might be proud to wed. Well, well, you are not to be constrained, you say." And the Marquise's laugh was menacing and unpleasant. "Be not so sure, mademoiselle. Be not so sure of that. It may well ...
— St. Martin's Summer • Rafael Sabatini

... the autumn, ma'am, we may find you a little hunting," his lordship promised them. "Plenty of foxes; a rough country, though; but what's that to an Irishwoman?" He caught the quickening of Miss Armytage's eye. "The prospect interests ...
— The Snare • Rafael Sabatini

... "Ma quando il sol gli aridi campi fiede Con raggi assai fervente, a in alto sorge, Ecco apparir Gerusalem si vede! Ecco additar Gerusalem si scorge! Ecco da mille voci unitamente, Gerusalemme salutar si ...
— Palestine or the Holy Land - From the Earliest Period to the Present Time • Michael Russell

... who brought you here to-night. Not much to look at, madam, but promising, very promising. But I doubt if even he can discover the young lady you mean, with no other aid than is given by this parasol. New York is a big place, ma'am, a big place. Do you know how Sweetwater came to find you? Through your virtues, ma'am; through your neat and methodical habits. Had you been of a careless turn of mind and not given to mending your ...
— The Circular Study • Anna Katharine Green

... jour marque pour le repos, L'hote laborieux des modestes hameaux, Sur sa table moins humble, ait, par ma bienfaisance, Quelques-uns de ces ...
— A History of English Romanticism in the Nineteenth Century • Henry A. Beers

... "Oh, do now, ma'am!" pleaded the big fellow, simply. "If you knew how much good it does me, you would. Why, it's been like heaven to me to get into such a home as this for a ...
— A Modern Instance • William Dean Howells

... with a welcoming smile and a lift of the strange crooked eyebrows, and to Miss Scrotton, who, eager and illuminated, was beside her: "Ah, ma cherie," she said, resting her hand affectionately on her shoulder. Mrs. Forrester had her other hand, and, so standing between her two friends, she bowed gravely and graciously to Lady Campion, to Miss Harding, to Mrs. Harding—who, in the stress of ...
— Tante • Anne Douglas Sedgwick

... under her mode of treatment by an indiscriminate galloping boil, has frequently come under her personal observation. If you tell her that such meat must stand for six hours in a heat just below the boiling point, she will probably answer, "Yes, ma'am," and go on her own way. Or she will let it stand till it burns to the bottom of the kettle—a most common termination of ...
— The American Woman's Home • Catherine E. Beecher and Harriet Beecher Stowe

... Wait—'Ma willina sol wooda sta in socha framas zees.' Ah, appropriat! but could I hope zat you were true to zose ...
— The Dodge Club - or, Italy in 1859 • James De Mille

... and I say it's a jolly fine thing when they will peep through the door at old devils like us! But let the water stop overboard now, I say! The more one scours an old barge the more damage comes to light! So, give us something to drink now, and then the cards, ma'am!" ...
— Pelle the Conqueror, Complete • Martin Andersen Nexo

... "Yes, ma'am, Captain Moss— Roger's uncle, at your service," replied he, taking off his cap and bowing low. "I thought you'd remember me. Your husband as was once sailed to ...
— True to Himself • Edward Stratemeyer

... (une pucelle) was a girl of humble birth, who earned her livelihood by manual work and was generally a servant. Thus the leaden pumps used in kitchens were usually called pucelles. The term was doubtless vulgar, but it had no evil meaning. In spite of Clopinel's naughty saying: "Je legue ma pucelle a mon cure," it was used to describe a respectable girl of ...
— The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2) • Anatole France

... there looking so wise and so friendly that the Boy began to talk to her at his ease. And after a while the Boy said, "Ma'am, do you think I could ever ...
— The Boy Who Knew What The Birds Said • Padraic Colum

... lay them low so early in the morning. Another when they're on the street, which they repeat each time they meet for "luck"—for that's the way to greet a fisher in the morning. And when they are on the river's brink again they drink without a wink—to fight ma- laria they think it proper in the morn- ing. They tip a flask with true delight when there's a bite; if fishing's light they "smile" the more till jolly tight, all fishing they are scorning. An- other nip as they depart: one at the mart and one to part, but none when ...
— Prairie Farmer, Vol. 56: No. 4, January 26, 1884 - A Weekly Journal for the Farm, Orchard and Fireside • Various

... shops, commonly called "stores,"—who were fond of walking by the Institute, when they were off duty, for the sake of exchanging a word or a glance with any one of the young ladies they might happen to know, if any such were stirring abroad: crude young men, mostly, with a great many "Sirs" and "Ma'ams" in their speech, and with that style of address sometimes acquired in the retail business, as if the salesman were recommending himself to a customer,—"First-rate family article, Ma'am; warranted to wear a lifetime; just one yard and three ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 32, June, 1860 • Various

... at Christine yesterday," she said. "She said, 'Oh, Ma'm'selle, you've got enough for two people here!' 'Oh,' I said, 'then I ought to pay you double'!" Nina laughed. "And I did, too!" she finished. For Nina, without ever being unselfish, was often extremely generous. Ida Tabor ...
— Harriet and the Piper - (Norris Volume XI) • Kathleen Norris

... de moi le desir de retourner dans mon Empire de joie, avant d'avoir acheve l'oeuvre si difficile de la conversion de ces etres. Si une telle pensee, produite par le degout et la mauvaise humeur, s'empare de moi, que ma tete se fende en dix parties, et mon corps, comme cette fleur de lotus, ...
— Diary of a Pedestrian in Cashmere and Thibet • by William Henry Knight

... it be a pity, ma'am," said Holt, earnestly, "would it not be a pity for him to fail when he bore everything so well at first, and when he helped me so that I don't know what I should have done without him? He made me write to Mr Tooke, and so got me out of debt; and a hundred times, I am sure, the thought ...
— The Crofton Boys • Harriet Martineau

... "Matre Dourdens, the counsel for the defence in the trial of Jacques Aubrieux, has been received at the lyse. We are informed that the President of the Republic has refused to reprieve the condemned man and that the execution will take place ...
— The Eight Strokes of the Clock • Maurice Leblanc

... years older than Martin is!" Alix confided further. "She kissed Cherry and said, 'You're just a baby doll, that's what you are!' And he calls me 'Ma'am,' and Cherry 'Sister!' They've got two little children, a boy and a girl. Dad ...
— Sisters • Kathleen Norris

... "Yes, ma'am," said Ware; "this is certainly tough. But I can't see but it was a plumb accident. Who'd have thought he'd be coming along the road ...
— The Rules of the Game • Stewart Edward White

... Ah! merry maid! Oui, monsieur! Yes, sir, very many. I vish dere vas von or two here in de kitchen—ma foi! Dey be all as melancholic ...
— Nightmare Abbey • Thomas Love Peacock

... William Cobbett looked at the squire. "From Rogate we came on to Trotton, where a Mr. Twyford is the squire, and where there is a very fine and ancient church close by the squire's house. I saw the squire looking at some poor devils who were making 'wauste improvements, ma'am,' on the road which passes by the squire's door. He looked uncommonly hard at me. It was a scrutinising sort of look, mixed, as I thought, with a little surprise, if not of jealousy, as much as to say, 'I wonder who the devil you can be?' ...
— Highways & Byways in Sussex • E.V. Lucas

... ma'am dis suade' re spect'a ble shuf' fled dan' ger ous grate' ful wist' ful ly mit' tens outstretched' res' cue un daunt' ...
— De La Salle Fifth Reader • Brothers of the Christian Schools

... Hebrides, calling—"And ye'll no forget Scotland, me lad, when you talk of unity! Do you mind the Forty-Second, and the London Scottish in the trenches of the Aisne? Wha carried the flag of the Empire then? Unity, ma friends, ye'll never break it. It may involve a wee bit sacrifice for Scotland financially speaking. I'll no say no to a reveesion of the monetairy terms, if ye suggest it,—but for unita—Scotland and the Empire, now ...
— Moonbeams From the Larger Lunacy • Stephen Leacock

... "I mean, ma'am," said the cook, jerkily, but keeping her eyes fixed upon Vane, "that Bruff sent word as he's too ill to come this morning; and I can't be expected to go down gardens, digging potatoes and cutting cauliflowers for dinner. It isn't ...
— The Weathercock - Being the Adventures of a Boy with a Bias • George Manville Fenn

... I had quitted M. le Duc d'Orleans, whilst he was walking at Montmartre ma garden with his 'roues' and his harlots, some letters had been brought to him by a post-office clerk, to whom he had spoken in private; that afterwards he, Biron, had been called by the Duke, who showed him a letter from the Marquis de Ruffec to his master, dated ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... outer covering of the body, in the deeper layer (der'ma) of which are located the sweat glands, which secrete sweat (a watery, oily substance containing impurities from the blood) and excrete it through the sweat ducts and their openings (pores) in the ...
— A Handbook of Health • Woods Hutchinson

... ma'am? Have I not the privilege of others, to read my own letters when and where I please? If the contents of this, however, do really relate to the late Deacon Pratt's property, I am quite willing they should be made known. There is nothing on this superscription to tell me to open the packet in ...
— The Sea Lions - The Lost Sealers • James Fenimore Cooper

... "Please, ma'am, Ermengarde and Maggie had a stand-up fight in the middle of the night," interrupted Eric. "Oh, my stars!" he added, sotto voce, "if fight and night ain't a rhyme made unbeknown. Now I ...
— The Children of Wilton Chase • Mrs. L. T. Meade

... fright me!' Said the daughter of the Jew: 'Dearest! how these eyes delight me! Let me love thee, darling, do!' 'Vat is dish?' the bailiff mutter'd, Rushing in with fury wild; 'Ish your muffins so vell butter'd Dat you darsh insult ma shild?' ...
— Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, March 1844 - Volume 23, Number 3 • Various

... midst of life we are in death, ma'am. I am sure it is a warning to me, ma'am, as well as ...
— Love Me Little, Love Me Long • Charles Reade

... is in "Musette," the "Chanson de l'Alouette," the "Chant du Retour," and the "Gaite," and how much freshness in "Lina," and "A ma fille!" But the best pieces of all are "Au dela," "Homunculus," "La Trompeuse," and especially "Frere Jacques," its author's masterpiece. To these may be added the "Marionettes" and the national song, "Helvetie." Serious purpose and intention disguised in gentle gayety ...
— Amiel's Journal • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... How are you, ma'am? Glad to see you, miss!" said Mrs. Gratacap, nodding first to one and then to the other. "Guess we shall get along ...
— Fairy Fingers - A Novel • Anna Cora Mowatt Ritchie

... you please when your pa and ma are home"—she said very decidedly one morning, when Kate and Stevie told her that their mamma never expected them to stand through all the lessons nor to repeat every word as it was in the book—"but when I'm head of the family you've got to do things my way, and I want every ...
— The Children's Portion • Various

... livre, dont on n'a lu que la premire page quand on n'a vu que son pays./ J'en ai feuillet un assez grand nombre, que j'ai trouv galement mauvaises. Cet examen ne m'a point/ t infructueux. Je hassais ma patrie. Toutes les impertinences des peuples divers, parmi lesquels j'ai vcu,/ m'ont rconcili avec elle. Quand je n'aurais tir d'autre bnfice de mes voyages que celui-l, je n'en re/gretterais ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Vol. 7. - Poetry • George Gordon Byron

... ma'am, I was going to say a word about,—about that youngest Howard girl." (She dared not say Ella.) "She's got to go to the poor-house, and it's a pity, she's so handsome. Why couldn't she come here and live? I'll take care of her, and 'twouldn't be ...
— The English Orphans • Mary Jane Holmes

... at Dashfontein, the wife of a Dutch farmer, a Mr. V., on whose property some native families were squatting, got up, one morning, and found the kitchen-maid very disagreeable. The morning coffee had been made right enough, but the maid's "Morre, Nooi" (Good morning, ma'am) was rather sullen and almost bordering on insolence. She did her scullery work as usual, but did not seem to care, that morning, about wasting time inquiring how baby slept, and if Nonnie had got rid of her neuralgia, and so ...
— Native Life in South Africa, Before and Since • Solomon Tshekisho Plaatje

... "In Hangman's Lane, ma'am, where the gibbet used to stand," replied John, who was bringing in the muffins. "It's no nonsense, my lady. Every word as that man says comes true, ...
— Stories of Comedy • Various

... Maggie," she whined, "if the dear lady, your ma, 'ad but listened to me. I told her no good wouldn't come of 'avin' that number of children to her Christmas tree—twice thirteen; an' I said if thirteen was hunlucky, twice thirteen was twice worse; an' ...
— Bessie Bradford's Prize • Joanna H. Mathews

... "O, yes, ma'am; my master would have it so, for he said, sure enough the unlucky bird was always poking herself where she ...
— My Lady Ludlow • Elizabeth Gaskell

... "Not exactly that, ma'am." He gave a sound that might have been caused by a smothered chuckle, or have been meant for a snort of contempt, and going from the table, placed himself upon the hearthrug, where he paused, making a prayer perhaps for patience ...
— Mrs. Day's Daughters • Mary E. Mann

... idea," said Benedetto, as he took two swords from under his cloak. "Choose, and now vogue ma galere." ...
— The Son of Monte-Cristo, Volume II (of 2) • Alexandre Dumas pere

... gran'ma's for a bit My mother's got the copper lit; An' piles of clothes are on the floor, An' steam comes out the wash-house door; An' Mrs. Griggs has come, an' she Is just as cross as she can be. She's had her lunch, and ate a lot; I saw her squeeze the coffee-pot. An' when I helped her ...
— The Verse-Book Of A Homely Woman • Elizabeth Rebecca Ward, AKA Fay Inchfawn



Words linked to "Ma" :   Berkshire Hills, U.S.A., Housatonic River, ampere, mother, Hub of the Universe, A, Pittsfield, Worcester, U.S., Springfield, Charles River, Williamstown, America, the States, New England, Salem, Boston, Housatonic, Cape Cod Canal, US, Plymouth, Cambridge, United States, Cape Cod, Lexington and Concord, amp, Charles, Berkshires, Medford, USA, Bean Town, Lexington, Cape Ann, Beantown, concord, Taconic Mountains, current unit, Gloucester, United States of America, American state



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