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Live   /laɪv/  /lɪv/   Listen
Live

adjective
1.
Actually being performed at the time of hearing or viewing.  Synonym: unrecorded.  "Brought to you live from Lincoln Center" , "Live entertainment involves performers actually in the physical presence of a live audience"
2.
Exerting force or containing energy.  "Tossed a live cigarette out the window" , "Got a shock from a live wire" , "Live ore is unmined ore" , "A live bomb" , "A live ball is one in play"
3.
Possessing life.  Synonym: alive.  "The nerve is alive" , "Doctors are working hard to keep him alive" , "Burned alive" , "A live canary"
4.
Highly reverberant.
5.
Charged with an explosive.  "A live bomb"
6.
Elastic; rebounds readily.  Synonyms: bouncy, lively, resilient, springy.  "A lively tennis ball" , "As resilient as seasoned hickory" , "Springy turf"
7.
Abounding with life and energy.
8.
In current use or ready for use.
9.
Of current relevance.  "Still a live option"
10.
Charged or energized with electricity.  Synonym: hot.  "A live wire"
11.
Capable of erupting.  Synonym: alive.  "The volcano is very much alive"



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"Live" Quotes from Famous Books



... is an infamous slander! These people never saw your father, they have only been here six years, and this is the eighth since he went away, but this is abominable! We were married in that church, we came at once to live in this house, which was my marriage portion, and my poor Martin has relations and friends here who will not allow ...
— Celebrated Crimes, Complete • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... Bev. No; live, I charge you. We have a little one: though I have left him, You will not leave him. To Lewson's kindness I bequeath him—Is not this Charlotte? We have lived in love, though I have wronged you—Can ...
— The Gamester (1753) • Edward Moore

... All live men with any gusto or headway in them, or passion for work, all employers and employees with any headway or passion for getting together in them are as impatient of having the way they get together their personal relations in business governed from outside, ...
— The Ghost in the White House • Gerald Stanley Lee

... or the communion of man with his Maker through his kind, is not all that man needs in order to live, to grow, to actualize the possibilities of his nature, and to attain to his beatitude, since humanity is neither God nor the material universe, it is yet a necessary and essential condition of his life, his progress, and the completion of his existence. He is born ...
— The American Republic: Its Constitution, Tendencies, and Destiny • A. O. Brownson

... If you live within a hundred and fifty miles of a city, if you possess ordinary common sense and have the ability to write a readable and understandable letter, you may, from September to April of each year, when other farmers ...
— How To Write Special Feature Articles • Willard Grosvenor Bleyer

... kind were sufficient to draw in a parcel of rustics, whom it was an easy matter to impose upon, who had besides too many quarrels among themselves to live without arbiters, and too much avarice and ambition to live long without masters. All offered their necks to the yoke in hopes of securing their liberty; for though they had sense enough to perceive the advantages of a political constitution, they had not experience enough to ...
— A Discourse Upon The Origin And The Foundation Of - The Inequality Among Mankind • Jean Jacques Rousseau

... picturesque pages of the "Gorilla Book" are chiefly the following. The Gorilla is a poor devil ape, not a "hellish dream-creature, half man, half beast." He is not king of the African forest; he fears the Njego or leopard and, as lions will not live in these wet, wooded, and gameless lands, he can hardly have expelled King Leo. He does not choose the "darkest, gloomiest forests," but prefers the thin woods, where he finds wild fruits for himself and family. His ...
— Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... floor. 'I vas fooled.' Well, it seems he did inlaying work, fine cabinet work, and got good pay. He built a house for himself out in some place, and he was fired among the first last winter,—I guess because he didn't live ...
— The Web of Life • Robert Herrick

... kiss'd. "Now blessed be the moment, the messenger be blest! Much honour'd do I hold me in my lady's high behest; And say unto my lady, in this dear night-weed dress'd, To the best armed champion I will not veil my crest; But if I live and bear me well 'tis her turn to take the test." Here, gentles, ends the foremost fytte of the ...
— The Talisman • Sir Walter Scott

... Braganza to the throne of Portugal, they attempted to set up a king for themselves. Their attempt was baffled by Amador Bueno de Ribiero, the very person they intended for their monarch, who, when the people shouted "Long live king Amador," cried out "Long live Joam IV." and, being swift of foot, ran and took refuge in the Benedictine convent; and the same day, as there was no alternative, Joam IV. was proclaimed by ...
— Journal of a Voyage to Brazil - And Residence There During Part of the Years 1821, 1822, 1823 • Maria Graham

... labour to cultivate and improve his abilities in the eye of his Maker, and with the prospect of his approbation; let him attentively reflect on the infinite value of that approbation, and the highest encomiums that men can bestow will vanish into nothing at the comparison. When we live in this manner, we find that we live for a great ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes - Volume V: Miscellaneous Pieces • Samuel Johnson

... she did live right here in Siena, so it must be true that this is her house and that these things ...
— Barbara's Heritage - Young Americans Among the Old Italian Masters • Deristhe L. Hoyt

... thing it is that men want to work and like to live! Suppose for a moment that the out-of-work, hungry, unlucky creatures, numbering one hundred thousand in New York City, should suddenly change ...
— Editorials from the Hearst Newspapers • Arthur Brisbane

... the thrifty German population, by whom it was mainly inhabited, it has become scarcely inferior to any other part of the State in agricultural wealth. But the father of Stephen Buhrer was not destined to live to see this prosperity. He died in the year 1829, leaving his widow and two young children, Stephen and Catharine, dependent on themselves to make their ...
— Cleveland Past and Present - Its Representative Men, etc. • Maurice Joblin

... no less apposite remark that truth is stranger than fiction, and the longer we live, the more are we convinced of the force of ...
— Narratives of Shipwrecks of the Royal Navy; between 1793 and 1849 • William O. S. Gilly

... the Icelandic Chronicles respecting the natives, that their canoes are made of skins; that they are very expert with their bows and arrows; that on their coasts they fish for whales, and in the interior live by hunting; that their merchandize consists of whalebone and furs; that they are fond of iron, and instruments made of it; and that they were small in stature, all coincide with what we know to be characterestic of the inhabitants ...
— Robert Kerr's General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 18 • William Stevenson

... with such tender and alluring eyes. In spirit he prostrated himself before it, while he cursed the damnable cruelty that had prevented him from marrying her. Through that act of adoration he was enabled to live through his alien and separated days. It kept him, as he phrased it, "going," which meant that, wherever his rebellious feet might carry him, he continued to breathe, through ...
— The Helpmate • May Sinclair

... silent on the part of Mrs. Dodd and Julia; but Mr. Hardie, who saw in this a good omen, Heaven recognising his penitence, burst out: "She knows me; she speaks; she will live. How good God is! Yes, my darling child, it is your own father. You will be brave and get well, for ...
— Hard Cash • Charles Reade

... Somebodies—vastly important Somebodies indeed, for the most part; so much so that by common consent mankind had created for them a special world within the world and set it apart for their exclusive shelter and delectation, for them to live in and have their being untroubled and uncontaminated ...
— Nobody • Louis Joseph Vance

... would happen to Mary," she said. "It seemed unnatural for her to be wearing herself out teaching little negroes who ought to have been working for her. But the world has hardly been a fit place to live in since the war, and when I follow her, as I must before long, I shall ...
— The Wife of his Youth and Other Stories of the Color Line, and - Selected Essays • Charles Waddell Chesnutt

... natives down the river, and advised them by no means to go amongst them, but return by the way they had come. He said to them with much emphasis, "If you go down the river, you will surely fall into their hands and be murdered." "Go we must," said Richard Lander, "if we live or die by it, and that also on the morrow." He was then asked if he would send a messenger with them, for that he might ensure their safety, coming from so powerful a person as the chief of Kacunda. But he replied directly, "No, if I were to do such a thing, the ...
— Lander's Travels - The Travels of Richard Lander into the Interior of Africa • Robert Huish

... habit had been only recently acquired, since the change was noticed only about the time he went to live at New Inn; and, since the change in the writing is at first intermittent and then continuous, we may infer that the opium-smoking was at first occasional and later became a ...
— The Mystery of 31 New Inn • R. Austin Freeman

... Mysie Happer first made Sir Piercie Shafton sensible of the reserved manner in which she proposed to live with him. She announced him as her master, and, waiting upon him with the reverent demeanour of an actual domestic, permitted not the least approach to familiarity, not even such as the knight might with the utmost ...
— The Monastery • Sir Walter Scott

... I'm in the delightful position of not minding in the least what any one calls me. I haven't a mission; I don't want to preach; I have simply arrived at a state of mind; I have got Europe off my back. You have no idea how it simplifies things, and how jolly it makes me feel. Now I can live; now I can talk. If we wretched Americans could only say once for all, "Oh, Europe be hanged!" we should attend much better to our proper business. We have simply to live our life, and the rest will look after itself. You will ...
— The Point of View • Henry James

... destruction of all sick and infected herds. However this may be, the success of such an undertaking would largely depend on the nature of the cause. If a strictly parasitic organism, like the contagion of pleuropneumonia, it might be completely extirpated in this way. If, however, the germs or bacteria may live and multiply outside of the bovine body, in the soil, water, or in some other animal, extirpation ...
— Special Report on Diseases of Cattle • U.S. Department of Agriculture

... soon as we begin to fire off our guns against the enemy—Lord, my dear sir, if they could only find out, you know, where to get at you—you would never live to enjoy your ten thousand a-year! They'd either poison or kidnap you—get you out of the way, unless you keep out of their way: and if you will but consent to keep snug at Tag-rag's for a while, who'd suspect where you was? We could easily arrange ...
— Ten Thousand a-Year. Volume 1. • Samuel Warren

... good-by to mother's petting; you will live in your trunk. The time will come when that poor hotel trunk (so called to distinguish it from the trunk that goes to the theatre, when you are travelling or en route), with its dents and scars, will be the only friendly object to greet you in your desolate ...
— Stage Confidences • Clara Morris

... "Live in your paradise and be happy. Would that I could give you hopes that your lease will be a ...
— As We Sweep Through The Deep • Gordon Stables

... of that great debate at a presidential levee, Mr. Webster challenged Mr. Hayne to drink a glass of wine with him, saying, "General Hayne, I drink to your health, and hope that you may live a thousand years." Hayne's disposition is shown by his reply: "I shall not live a hundred if you make another such a speech." If he felt there was merit in an individual he was quickest to admit it even when it might be to his own detriment, and when it is remembered that he was one of the first ...
— Hidden Treasures - Why Some Succeed While Others Fail • Harry A. Lewis

... wanted to go to Venice. We got as far as Naples and then 'Liza Sloane's grandson got scarlet fever and Little-Dad went down and stayed with him. I'd love to live in a palace and ...
— Highacres • Jane Abbott

... to live here," said Virgie; "but Mamma got sick. Oh, she got terrible sick—an' one night Daddy came through, and put her in the ground, too. But he ...
— The Littlest Rebel • Edward Peple

... of the procureur-syndic of the district of Saint-Germain, Thermidor 10.)—Delecluze, "Souvenirs de Soixante Annees," p. 10. (The Delecluze family live in Mendon in 1794 and for most of 1795. M. Delecluze, senior, and his son go to Meaux and obtain of a farmer a bag of good flour weighing three hundred and twenty five pounds for about ten louis d'or and fetch it home, taking ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 4 (of 6) - The French Revolution, Volume 3 (of 3) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... we are to be always on our knees," he said; "but that we are to live so near to God, so loving Him, and so feeling our constant dependence upon Him, that our hearts will be very often going up to His throne in silent ...
— Elsie at Nantucket • Martha Finley

... three,—"This is the oldest sect; for some say it hath endured,—from the time of the apostles. It is more general; for there is no country in which this sect is not. Because when all other sects beget horror in the hearers, this of the Leonists hath a great show of piety: they live justly before men, and believe all things rightly concerning God; only they blaspheme the church of Rome and the clergy." While the beast by its horns, instigated by an apostate church, and both by the dragon, was "making havoc of the church," represented ...
— Notes On The Apocalypse • David Steele

... daily life as the arch-fiend of the world; but the Old Nick of the base ball arena presents a character the very opposite in every respect of his devilish namesake—the one being the spirit of evil, and the other the spirit of honor and good nature. Long may he live to honor the position and uphold the reformation in the base ball world which his predecessors so ...
— Spalding's Baseball Guide and Official League Book for 1895 • Edited by Henry Chadwick

... "that I may live to gallop through a few miles of diplomacy at full speed before they consign me to the Opolchina." Turning to Neeland, "The reserve—the old man's home, you know. God forbid!" And he drained his goblet and looked defiantly at ...
— The Dark Star • Robert W. Chambers

... had feared for a long time that her mamma was dying of consumption, but she told no one, because everybody was against her and her mamma. Her mamma never knew that she was dying, and sometimes she used to get so much better that Grizel hoped she would live a long time, but that hope never lasted long. The reason she sat so much with Ballingall was just to find out what doctors did to dying people to make them live a little longer, and she watched his straiking to be able to do it to her mamma when the time came. ...
— Sentimental Tommy - The Story of His Boyhood • J. M. Barrie

... how I can live without ye, no how!" said the faithful creature. "'Pears like it's just taking everything off the place to oncet!" and Mammy gave way to a passion ...
— Uncle Tom's Cabin • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... an' now he's talkin' about buildin' in the spring. I knowed he had money, but he never mentioned buildin' before, an' I always thought it was bekase he 'sposed likely we'd have to move on, some time. 'Pears now as if we can settle, an' live like other folks, after all these years. I knowed ye didn't want me to talk, but I had to tell you! When you ast us to the weddin', and others began comin' round, says I to Josiah, 'Won't she be glad to know that my ...
— Laddie • Gene Stratton Porter

... waters, this which I have but just essayed had done it. It has failed; whereby I do now know that that which I had feared is a truth established; the sign of this failure is, that the most potent spirit known to the magicians of the East, and whose name none may utter and live, has laid his spell upon this well. The mortal does not breathe, nor ever will, who can penetrate the secret of that spell, and without that secret none can break it. The water will flow no more forever, good ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... coast-fashion—a small collection of ten or twenty comprising one village. Over these villages certain headmen, titled Phanze, hold jurisdiction, who take black-mail from travellers with high presumption when they can. Generally speaking, they live upon the coast, and call themselves Diwans, headsmen, and subjects of the Sultan Majid; but they no sooner hear of the march of a caravan than they transpose their position, become sultans in their own right, and levy ...
— The Discovery of the Source of the Nile • John Hanning Speke

... [Error in book: kuesxjo] Litter pajlajxo. Little, a iom. Little (not much, not many) malmulte. Little (small) malgranda. Littleness malgrandeco. Littoral marbordo. Liturgy liturgio. Live vivi. Live (dwell) logxi. Live long! vivu! Lively vigla. Liver hepato. Livery livreo, uniformo. Living viva. Lizard lacerto. Lo! jen. Load sxargxi. Load (weapon) sxargi. Load sxargxo. Loadstone ...
— English-Esperanto Dictionary • John Charles O'Connor and Charles Frederic Hayes

... height; To hear each others' whispered speech; Eating the Lotos, day by day, To watch the crisping ripples on the beach, And tender curving lines of creamy spray: To lend our hearts and spirits wholly To the influence of mild-minded melancholy; To muse and brood and live again in memory, With those old faces of our infancy Heaped over with a mound of grass, Two handfuls of white dust, shut in an ...
— Bulfinch's Mythology • Thomas Bulfinch

... drive. It pays. They are all here yet. In the beginning we starved together, had to eat corn with the cows, but the winter tailoring pulled us through. Now I want to give it up. I want to buy the next farm. With our 34 acres, it will make 60, and we can live like men, and let those that need the tailoring get it. I wouldn't exchange this farm for the best property ...
— Children of the Tenements • Jacob A. Riis

... am here once more. Thou hast robbed me of a meaner prey. Now exorcise THYSELF from my power! Thy life has left thee, to live in the heart of a daughter of the charnel and the worm. In that life I come to thee with my inexorable tread. Thou art returned to the Threshold,—thou, whose steps have trodden the verges of the Infinite! And as the goblin ...
— Zanoni • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... and the man who belonged to no household was a wanderer and a vagabond on the face of the earth. Through invasion or war or other accidents a man who had been the honoured member of a well-found home might live to see that home broken up or pass into strange hands, and he might be thus like a plant uprooted when he was too old to get planted in a fresh connexion. His only chance of any share in social life was to wander from house to house, getting perhaps a brief lodging ...
— Anglo-Saxon Literature • John Earle

... more unwise or unjust than the exactions of the creditors. Men must live; if not paid, they perforce pay themselves; and thus, of every hundred piastres, hardly thirty find their way into the treasury. Ten times worse was the condition of the miserable Fellhn, who were selling for three or four napoleons the bullocks worth fifteen per head. Thus they would tide ...
— The Land of Midian, Vol. 1 • Richard Burton

... Day-dreaming never produces the kind of dream that comes true, and mental speculating is about as useless as indulging in Western mining stock. Well-laid plans are all right, but ideals that you can't even hope to live up to have no place in life's calendar. Dabbling with the unattainable is calculated to sour us on the world and turn the milk of human kindness into buttermilk. It may be likened to the predicament in which old Tantalus was placed in the lake, where the water receded ...
— Confessions of a Neurasthenic • William Taylor Marrs

... desire to be blessed, to act rightly, and to live rightly, without at the same time wishing to be, act, and to live - in ...
— Ethica Ordine Geometrico Demonstrata - Part I: Concerning God • Benedict de Spinoza

... true that, no matter with what method he begins, a playwright may end by having a successful playlet, the clearer way to understanding is for us to suppose that you have your plot and are striving to fit it with live people—therefore I shall assume that such is the case. For if the reverse were the case and the characters were all ready to fit with a plot, the question would be primarily not of ...
— Writing for Vaudeville • Brett Page

... these antithetical purposes. The most unpopular tax was unquestionably the excise. If this were cut out and the estimated appropriation for the reduction of the debt were made, the Government would be unable to live within its income. The only alternative was to reduce expenditures. It was at this point that Jefferson's "chaste reformation" of the government was to begin. Under the Federalist regime, in anticipation of war with France, ...
— Union and Democracy • Allen Johnson

... seen many times a very big fox track, and they do not go where they do not live. Even in winter they ...
— Rolf In The Woods • Ernest Thompson Seton

... a flower-garden, where the passion seems to be to make flowers grow in stars, and hearts, and crescents. What has woman to expect where such are the laws; where such are the expectations from her? What am I to hope? I, who seem to be set apart—to feel nothing like the rest—to live in a different world—to dream of foreign things—to burn with a hope which to them is frenzy, and speak a language which they neither understand nor like! What can I be, in such a world? Nothing, nothing! ...
— Charlemont • W. Gilmore Simms

... are too lazy to start tack or sheet until they have finished their meal. Bless you, you have no idea what lazy rascals the Portuguese are; their laziness is absolutely phenomenal; they are positively too lazy to live long, and so most of them die early. More over, I expect her skipper is still below poring over his charts and trying to make up what he is pleased to call his mind what spot to steer for in order ...
— The Pirate Slaver - A Story of the West African Coast • Harry Collingwood

... emaciated bodies of the Spaniards who had slept upon it. A few articles of Spanish uniforms, tattered and torn, were strewn about. In the cracks of the walls were hordes of vermin. Filth was present everywhere in its most germ-bearing form. In the center of the room were a few live coals and over them a quart cup about one-third full of boiling rice—probably the entire meal for the six doomed prisoners whose home had been for weeks that ...
— Bamboo Tales • Ira L. Reeves

... uncommon good fellow; and hang me if ever I distrust an Irishman again as long as I live!" ...
— The Lieutenant and Commander - Being Autobigraphical Sketches of His Own Career, from - Fragments of Voyages and Travels • Basil Hall

... by the bridle on his lips: there is no way by which the burden may be lightened; but we need not suffer from the bridle if we do not champ at it. To yield reverence to another, to hold ourselves and our lives at his disposal, is not slavery; often, it is the noblest state in which a man can live in this world. There is, indeed, a reverence which is servile, that is to say, irrational or selfish: but there is also noble reverence, that is to say, reasonable and loving; and a man is never so noble as when he is reverent in this kind; nay, even if the feeling pass the bounds ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume II (of 3) • John Ruskin

... Canizares, your Excellency will see, in detail, all that was found advantageous, and the news obtained gives knowledge of all that that vast port contains and the facilities that is has to invernate[40] vessels. The docility and gentle manners of the heathen that live in its vicinity inspire hopes in the utility of the plan, on which I had previously ...
— The March of Portola - and, The Log of the San Carlos and Original Documents - Translated and Annotated • Zoeth S. Eldredge and E. J. Molera

... life. If those we press and strain against our hearts could never die, perhaps that love would wither from the earth. Maybe this common fate treads from out the paths between our hearts the weeds of selfishness and hate, and I had rather live and love where death is king, than have eternal life where love is not. Another life is naught, unless we know and love again the ones who ...
— A Study of Poetry • Bliss Perry

... right here to us, and you'll never be sorry. So long as Sam keeps thin and I fat enough to draw the public you never need say that you're homeless, for nothing would please us better than to have you come to live ...
— Toby Tyler • James Otis

... themselves; if you remember that more would have submitted but for the fact that no master has any use for a servant with forty head of cattle, or a hundred or more sheep; and if you further bear in mind that many landowners are anxious to live at peace with, and to keep your people as tenants, but that they are debarred from doing so by your Government which threatens them with a fine of 100 Pounds or six months' imprisonment, you would, I think, likewise find it very ...
— Native Life in South Africa, Before and Since • Solomon Tshekisho Plaatje

... applies with much force to its pronunciation. This law requires this usage to be, first, reputable, or the practice of intelligent and educated persons; second, national, as opposed to provincial or foreign; third, present, or the usage of the generation in which we live. ...
— A Manual of Pronunciation - For Practical Use in Schools and Families • Otis Ashmore

... Letty, although she crept about for a while in deep disgrace, and brooded upon death—that interesting impossibility, so dear to youth—married, if you please! when she was twenty, somebody called North,—and went away to live. When Alfred came back, seven years later, he got married, too. He married a Miss Barkley. He used to go away on long voyages, so perhaps he wasn't really fond of her. We tried to think so, ...
— An Encore • Margaret Deland

... he had made that morning, the Wildcat realized, with his seventh sandwich, that life isn't so bad if you manage to live through it. When he began the afternoon shift his ancient philosophy had returned, and to the clatter of the activity about him he contributed his rambling voice. Presently the words of his song recruited a few converts from the gang about ...
— Lady Luck • Hugh Wiley

... driven Leonard to lie on his bed, Aubrey persuaded his sister to come to see his greatest prize; a quaint old local naturalist, a seafaring man, with a cottage crammed with pans of live wonders of the deep in water, and shelves of extinct ones, 'done up in stane pies,' not a creature, by sea or land, that had haunted Coombe for a few million of ages, seemed to have escaped him. Such ...
— The Trial - or, More Links of the Daisy Chain • Charlotte M. Yonge

... may live without poetry, music, and art; We may live without conscience, & live without heart; We may live without friends; we may live without books; But civilised man cannot live without cooks. Lucile by Owen Meredith (Earl ...
— The Suffrage Cook Book • L. O. Kleber

... door. Perhaps it was the cruelties practised by Swedish troops in Denmark that preyed upon the mind of Jens Kofoed when he sent the parson to prepare them for death then and there; but better counsel prevailed. They were allowed to live. The whole war cost only two lives, the governor's and that of a sentinel at the castle, who refused to surrender. The mate of the Spes and two of her crew contrived to escape after they had been taken to Copenhagen, and from them Karl ...
— Hero Tales of the Far North • Jacob A. Riis

... landed gentry—a gentry otherwise landed since. But not the Paliser clan. The original Paliser was very wealthy. All told he had a thousand dollars. Montagu Paliser, the murdered man's father, had stated casually, as though offering unimportant information, that, by Gad, sir, you can't live like a gentleman on less than a thousand dollars a day. That was years and years ago. Afterward he doubled his estimate. Subsequently, he quadrupled it. It made no hole in him either. In spite of ...
— The Paliser case • Edgar Saltus

... convinced of his veracity. He ordered a very rich vest to be given him, according to the custom observed towards those who are admitted to audience. After which he said to him, "Ganem, I will have you live in my court." "Commander of the true believers," answered the young merchant, "a slave has no will but his master's, on whom his life and fortune depend." The caliph was highly pleased with Ganem's ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Complete • Anonymous

... to live his day such as he is; it had been more agreeable, and certainly more easy, to have drawn an amiable character. It had been easy to varnish over his faults, to make him do more and express less, but he never was intended as an example, ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... to a steady glow. Bob fished out one of the chair rungs, jammed the cool end firmly in one of the open cracks between the timbers of the room, turned his back, and deliberately pressed the band around his elbows against the live coal. ...
— The Rules of the Game • Stewart Edward White

... the bears' open places, rise rocks on which various sorts of chamois and goats live happily. They can climb far above our heads and look down on us, or leap from rock to rock as if they were in their native haunts. I often wonder what they think of the bears running about below them! Sometimes ...
— The Children's Book of London • Geraldine Edith Mitton

... that it is not with ease That the houses of natives are built, For the stems are six score of our feet, maybe more, And you'd think they must live on a stilt. ...
— Mother Truth's Melodies - Common Sense For Children • Mrs. E. P. Miller

... choyce, and praisd the same, And kist and clipt her for her louing speech, Not deeming that it tended to their shame, It pleasd her well, & wisht that he would seech A further suit; and then made this request, Let me live still with ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... says the Satirist, it were a dead thing, which some upholsterer had put together! It could do no good, at present, to speak much about this; but it is a pity for every one of us if we do not know it, live ever in the knowledge of it. Really a most mournful pity;—a failure to live at all, if ...
— English Critical Essays - Nineteenth Century • Various

... the domination of the preachers had been weakened by the new settlement of the Kirk; as the country was now set on commercial enterprises, which England everywhere thwarted, it was plain that the two kingdoms could not live together on the existing terms. Union there must be, or conquest, as under Cromwell; yet an English war of conquest was impossible, because it was impossible for Scotland to resist. Never would the country renew, as in the old ...
— A Short History of Scotland • Andrew Lang

... canned, with now and then, on Christmas, St. Patrick's Day, Yom Kippur and Hallowe'en, a few grains of canned corn. If you want fresh vegetables, therefore, it's up to you to grow them. Unfortunate people who live in big cities are able to grow them in cute little window boxes, and thus cut down the high cost of living. Why shouldn't you, with a steel helmet for a flower pot, be able ...
— The Stars & Stripes, Vol 1, No 1, February 8, 1918, - The American Soldiers' Newspaper of World War I, 1918-1919 • American Expeditionary Forces

... collecting the eggs, and preparing the oil, occupies three weeks. It is at this period only that the missionaries have any communication with the coast and the civilized neighbouring countries. The Franciscan monks who live south of the cataracts, come to the harvest of eggs less to procure oil, than to see, as they say, white faces; and to learn whether the king inhabits the Escurial or San Ildefonso, whether convents are still suppressed ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America V2 • Alexander von Humboldt

... is like," returned Ian musingly. "It sometimes occurs to me that we think and speak far too little of heaven, which is a strange thing, considering that we all hope to go there in the long-run, and expect to live ...
— The Red Man's Revenge - A Tale of The Red River Flood • R.M. Ballantyne

... neither of them is to blame,' he thought. 'How were either of them to know that I was not drowned?... And then poor little Nell had only ten shillings a week to live upon ...
— Ridan The Devil And Other Stories - 1899 • Louis Becke

... who wouldst wear the name Of Poet midst thy brethren of mankind, And clothe in words of flame Thoughts that shall live within the general mind, Deem not the framing of a deathless lay The pastime of a drowsy summer day. But gather all ...
— The World's Best Poetry — Volume 10 • Various

... they have been kept in confinement from an ancient period in China. Mr. Blyth (8/50. The 'Indian Field' 1858 page 255.) suspects, from the analogous variation of other fishes, that golden- coloured fish do not occur in a state of nature. These fishes frequently live under the most unnatural conditions, and their variability in colour, size, and in some important points of structure is very great. M. Sauvigny has described and given coloured drawings of no less than eighty-nine varieties. (8/51. Yarrell 'British Fishes' volume 1 page 319.) Many ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication - Volume I • Charles Darwin

... a day, eh?" grinned Hippy. "That is what I call the proper thing. I shall have to readjust myself so as to know how to live on four meals a day, but I am so hungry now that you ...
— Grace Harlowe's Overland Riders on the Great American Desert • Jessie Graham Flower

... deep into her theme, her eyes flashing her conviction. "A socio-economic system reacts like a living organism. It attempts to live on, indefinitely, agonizingly, no matter how antiquated it might have become. The Roman politico-economic system continued for centuries after it should have been replaced. Such reformers as the Gracchus brothers were assassinated or ...
— Mercenary • Dallas McCord Reynolds

... has been attested by Justin and also by other contemporary writers.[419] But there is no evidence of this propaganda having acquired any great importance. Celsus also knows Christians who desire to live as Jews according to the Mosaic law (V. 61), but he mentions them only once, and otherwise takes no notice of them in his delineation of, and attack on, Christianity. We may perhaps infer that he knew of them only from hearsay, ...
— History of Dogma, Volume 1 (of 7) • Adolph Harnack

... respect. There can be no alternative—no quibbling. At least until he has redeemed himself, if redemption is still possible, the thought of him, his presence, his misdoings, must not and shall not contaminate the atmosphere in which you live and move." ...
— The Lieutenant-Governor • Guy Wetmore Carryl

... away this erring mind, the mortal material body loses all appearance of life or action, and this so- called mind then calls itself dead; but the hu- 187:30 man mind still holds in belief a body, through which it acts and which appears to the human mind to live, - a body like the one it had before death. This body 188:1 is put off only as the mortal, erring mind yields to God, immortal Mind, and man ...
— Science and Health With Key to the Scriptures • Mary Baker Eddy

... have to leave her tiny home; it would not be possible for her to live there longer. Whether she had to leave on account of the harvesters or the bird catchers, it was the same thing, just a ...
— Nobody's Girl - (En Famille) • Hector Malot

... the definitely expressed sentiment of every woman in the street. The mother would have to bear social blame, a certain social ostracism, if she failed to comply with that requirement. It is not comfortable to outrage the conventions of those among whom we live, and, if our social life be a narrow one, it is still more difficult. The visitor may choke a little when she sees the lessened supply of food and the scanty clothing provided for the remaining children in order that one may be conventionally mourned, but ...
— Democracy and Social Ethics • Jane Addams

... mastered, man's efficiency for food- and shelter-getting being increased a thousandfold over the efficiency of the caveman, then why is it that millions of modern men live more miserably than lived the caveman? This is the question the revolutionist asks, and he asks it of the managing class, the capitalist class. The capitalist class does not answer it. The capitalist class cannot ...
— Revolution and Other Essays • Jack London

... and the trees and the sunshine? Peter lies in his room here, day in and day out, and never has a moment's comfort or pleasure. I don't know a soul; I haven't a friend or a neighbor. But we're not complaining." Mrs. Knight put added feeling into her words. "We don't want you to live the way we've had to live; we want you to be rich and to have things. After all we've done; after all poor ...
— The Auction Block • Rex Beach

... be played by any number of persons not exceeding ten; the best game, however, is when four or live take part, as then about half the cards are in play. In this game the cards run in different order to the ordinary course, vary in the two colours, and further, change in the ...
— Round Games with Cards • W. H. Peel

... little chin with you to-morrow," said Dewing. "Not about cards. Business. I'm sick of cards, myself. I'll never be able to live 'em down—especially with this pleasing nickname of mine. I want to talk trade. About your ranch: you've still got your wells and water-holes? I was thinking of buying them of you and going in for the straight and narrow. I might even stock up and throw in with you—but ...
— Copper Streak Trail • Eugene Manlove Rhodes

... was toppling over and the leaves were withering. The rats had taken it off just below the ground. I couldn't find a root anywhere, but it was callused. I cut it back and planted it again. It must have roots now for it is still green. Otherwise it wouldn't live this long. ...
— Northern Nut Growers Report of the Proceedings at the Twenty-First Annual Meeting • Northern Nut Growers Association

... very difficult to say, but it seems as though there is an increasing unevenness in the distribution of wealth, an increase in the number of persons who live at the expense of the laboring class. Mass labor, effective though it be, makes it easier to divert the proceeds of labor from the laborers. The evidence of this is seen in the increase in number and the prosperity of those pursuits which purvey to luxury, as the automobile industry ...
— Disease and Its Causes • William Thomas Councilman

... resources. The abstract religion provided for the agnostic faithful by Herbert Spencer does not, it is true, afford any nourishment to the religious nature. He would have men look for a deep spring of life in the negative idea of mystery, the apotheosis of ignorance, while religious faith to live at all must lay hold upon reality. But there does spring from naturalism a positive religion, whose fundamental motives are those of service, wonder, and renunciation: service of humanity in the present, wonder at the natural truth, and renunciation ...
— The Approach to Philosophy • Ralph Barton Perry

... but a short distance I told Uncle Kit how I came to win the hat, and he said: "I think them St. Louis men are gentlemen, but I don't propose to have any one write up my life. I have got plenty to keep me as long as I live and I do not like notoriety." And just here I would say, that to a man that roughed it out on the plains in those days as we old frontiersmen had to do, they did not feel that a history of their lives would be fit to go before the public, for as Uncle Kit said: "A man on the frontier had ...
— Thirty-One Years on the Plains and In the Mountains • William F. Drannan

... proof is one that necessarily leads the mind to a sound conclusion. Needed and needful are more concrete than necessary, and respect an end to be attained; we speak of a necessary inference; necessary food is what one can not live without, while needful food is that without which he can not enjoy ...
— English Synonyms and Antonyms - With Notes on the Correct Use of Prepositions • James Champlin Fernald

... him that the table might not separate them; "hear me, a man like yourself, erring, because human, who has sinned, suffered—let me speak out of my own experience. Put aside regret; it clogs. Regret nothing; what's done is done past recall. Live out your life, no matter what the struggle. Count this life as yours to make the best of. Live, I say; live, work, make good; it is in any man's power who has received a reprieve like yours. I know whereof I am speaking. I'll go ...
— Flamsted quarries • Mary E. Waller

... afraid that if I stay so close to Father's room I shall multiply every sound into a new terror. But, of course, you will have me waked if there be any cause. I shall be in the bedroom of the little suite next the boudoir off the hall. I had those rooms when first I came to live with Father, and I had no care then.... It will be easier to rest there; and perhaps for a few hours I may forget. I shall be all right in the ...
— The Jewel of Seven Stars • Bram Stoker

... be," he muttered, after traveling several miles in silence, "that they live hundreds of miles off and that I won't have a chance to leave them for weeks or months or—years," he added in a hushed voice, and with an additional heart-throb, "but I shall never be reconciled to live in the wigwams of ...
— Camp-fire and Wigwam • Edward Sylvester Ellis

... without mental reservation that the Southern Morocco Mission accomplishes a great work, and is most successful in its apparent failure. It does not make professing Christians out of Moors, but it teaches the Moors to live finer lives within the limits of their own faith, and if they are kinder and cleaner and more honourable by reason of their intercourse with the "tabibs" and "tabibas," the world gains and Morocco is well served. When the Sultan was in difficulties towards the end of 1902, and the star of Bu Hamara ...
— Morocco • S.L. Bensusan

... of it, yes. But I don't see how you can like it, who virtually live in it and upon it. Why, I would as soon try to live upon cake ...
— Dr. Sevier • George W. Cable

... If I live to be a hundred, and it is not improbable since I am healthy, I shall never forget that little garden at the inn at Bleau. It was a vegetable garden too, which is not in itself romantic. I recall vaguely that there were beds all about ...
— The Firefly Of France • Marion Polk Angellotti

... hanged! There's no such thing! I live on high ground; I'm going to keep a sharp outlook, and if the water begins to shut off Manhattan I'll take my family up the Hudson to the Highlands. I guess old Storm King'll keep his head above. That's where I come ...
— The Second Deluge • Garrett P. Serviss

... sailor's heart sank very low. Mindful of the Witch's warning, he dared touch no morsel of food, yet he knew that hunger would soon bring weakness in its train. Either he must find the emerald at once, or he must abandon all hope of finding it. He could not live long if he touched no food, and if but one morsel touched his lips he ...
— The Firelight Fairy Book • Henry Beston

... obleeged to ye," said Aunt Rachel; "but I don't think I shall live long to go anywheres. The feelin's I have sometimes warn me that I'm not long for ...
— Jack's Ward • Horatio Alger, Jr.

... Charles Cutlip, and I live back there." He waved a hand shoreward. "I suppose you ...
— The Boy Allies with the Victorious Fleets - The Fall of the German Navy • Robert L. Drake

... bay whaling, they might have abundantly supplied themselves with a variety of vegetables, at once an agreeable and wholesome addition to the ordinary diet on board ship. After dinner I went with the Captain to visit an island near, upon which he kept his live stock, such as pigs, sheep, and tortoises; the two latter had been procured from the west side of the island of Madagascar; the sheep were strange looking animals, more like goats than sheep, of all colours, and with fat tails, like the Cape sheep. Their cost ...
— Journals Of Expeditions Of Discovery Into Central • Edward John Eyre

... and in the early fall he knew he hadn't long to live. He wrote out the story and left it in his desk for me to read after he had gone, and as he added to it from time to time, when I got it it ...
— The Breaking Point • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... no interpreter. Phil, your dream is now demanded. Tell it truly, lie and you will live to suffer. Careful, ...
— Buffalo Roost • F. H. Cheley

... accent, "that was jist wot I was comin' to. I knowed part of it from my own pocket, she knowed the rest of it from his lip and the doctors she interviewed. And then she says to me—sez my girl Minty—Pop,' she sez, 'he's got nothing to live for now but his title, and that he never may live to get, so that I think ye kin jist go, Pop, and fairly and squarely, as a honest man, ask his father to let me hev him.' Them's my darter's own words, Sir Robert, and when I tell yer that she's ...
— A Phyllis of the Sierras • Bret Harte

... increased and became formidable. Long lines of ambulance wagons and bullock tongas crept steadily from every quarter to the hospital. Beds were crowded into every corner of the wards. We had no fans. Imagine, you who live in civilisation, what an electric fan may mean. You can see it spinning in the corner of your club or restaurant and think nothing of it. But in that place it meant the difference between life and death. ...
— In Mesopotamia • Martin Swayne

... lonely, I expect, for I began to feel so. When you come to your own door, Tom, home looks cheerless if there is no bright eye to welcome you, and the older a man gets the more he feels that he was not intended to live single. My yearning after something to love and to love me, which is in our nature, was satisfied, first by having Bessy, and then ...
— Poor Jack • Frederick Marryat

... afterward, felt an insane desire to attempt to break away from their captors, to rush at them, to attack if need be with their bare hands, and so invite death in its quickest form. They even hoped that they might escape this way rather than live to be taken ...
— Air Service Boys in the Big Battle • Charles Amory Beach

... note for the doctor and the others who would come and hunt and go through the motions that men must live by. Perhaps ...
— Now We Are Three • Joe L. Hensley

... one anxiety, for while I was so ill I was tortured by the thought that I could not make just restitution to innocent sufferers. Mr. Dunbar, a yet graver apprehension now oppresses me. If I should live, how can I put the rightful owners in immediate possession? What process does the law prescribe for conveying the ...
— At the Mercy of Tiberius • August Evans Wilson



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