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Ling   /lɪŋ/   Listen
Ling

noun
1.
Water chestnut whose spiny fruit has two rather than 4 prongs.  Synonyms: ling ko, Trapa bicornis.
2.
Common Old World heath represented by many varieties; low evergreen grown widely in the northern hemisphere.  Synonyms: broom, Calluna vulgaris, heather, Scots heather.
3.
Elongated marine food fish of Greenland and northern Europe; often salted and dried.  Synonym: Molva molva.
4.
American hakes.
5.
Elongate freshwater cod of northern Europe and Asia and North America having barbels around its mouth.  Synonyms: burbot, cusk, eelpout, Lota lota.



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"Ling" Quotes from Famous Books



... Scotia's darling seat! All hail thy palaces and tow'rs; Where once, beneath a Monarch's feet, Sat Legislation's sovereign pow'rs: From marking wildly-scatt'red flow'rs, As on the banks of Ayr I stray'd, And singing, lone, the ling'ring hours, I shelter ...
— Poems And Songs Of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... Which calls up green and native fields to view From the rough deep with such identity To the poor exile's fever'd eye, that he Can scarcely be restrained from treading them? That melody {291b} which out of tones and tunes Collects such pastime for the ling'ring sorrow Of the sad mountaineer, when far away From his snow-canopy of cliffs and clouds, That he feeds on the sweet but poisonous thought And dies.—You call this weakness! It is strength, I say—the parent of all honest feeling: He who loves ...
— The Life of Lord Byron • John Galt

... the Great Wall terminates on the coast; and a fourth which trends in a south-westerly direction to Pao-ting Fu and on to T'ai-yuen Fu in Shan-si. The mountain ranges to the north of the province abound with coal, notably at Chai-tang, T'ai-gan-shan, Miao-gan-ling, and Fu-tao in the Si-shan or Western Hills. "At Chai-tang," wrote Baron von Richthofen, "I was surprised to walk over a regular succession of coal-bearing strata, the thickness of which, estimating it step by step as I proceeded gradually from the lowest ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 2 - "Chicago, University of" to "Chiton" • Various

... foxgloves. The grassy path runs on, until on a sudden bend the ground rises, and over a wooden stile opens out the vista of the great Frensham Pond. Could there be a deeper contrast? Behind lies green pasture-land, rush and sedge, oak and alder; before you, the shoulder of a hill purple with ling, the long level of grey and silver water, dancing under the wind away to a far strip of yellow sand flecked with patches of white foam; high above that, burnt and blackened ridges of heather-ground and gorse. Frensham Pond has often been painted, but that ...
— Highways and Byways in Surrey • Eric Parker

... rushed on, following Radowitz, who took a short cut bounding through the deep ling of the moor. Only a few yards till Douglas perceived a man, with a grey, drawn face, who was lying full length on a stretch of grass beside the stream, his head and shoulders propped against a low rock on which a folded coat had been placed as ...
— Lady Connie • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... Brown Trout Rainbow Trout Lake Trout Brook Trout Grayling Pickerel Northern Pike Shad Menhaden Spanish Mackerel Pompano Bluefish Crappie Calico Bass Rock Bass Sunfish Small-mouth Black Bass Large-mouth Black Bass Wall-eyed Pike Weakfish Red Drum Kingfish Tautog Rosefish Tomcod Haddock Ling Cusk Summer Flounder Flatfish Muscallonge Northern Muscallonge Striped Mullet Common Mackerel Bonito Sauger Yellow Perch White Bass Striped Bass White Perch Sea Bass Scup Spotted Weakfish Croaker Bergall Spadefish ...
— New York at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, St. Louis 1904 - Report of the New York State Commission • DeLancey M. Ellis

... say you? [Strikes him again. Hence horrible villain! or I'll spurn thine eyes Like balls before me—I'll unhair thine head— Thou shalt be whipp'd with wire, and stewed in brine Smarting in ling'ring pickle. ...
— Characteristics of Women - Moral, Poetical, and Historical • Anna Jameson

... the new speaker of the House and thanking him especially tonight for extending an invitation to two guests sitting in the gallery with Mrs. Hastert. Lyn Gibson and Wei Ling Chestnut are the widows of the two brave Capitol Hill police officers who gave their lives to defend ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... old aqueduct, and then cast into the stream, 1. dead bodies; 2. mischievous herbs; and 3. quicklime. (says Procopius, l. ii. c. 27) Yet both words are used as synonymous in Galen, Dioscorides, and Lucian, (Hen. Steph. Thesaur. Ling. Graec. tom. iii. ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 4 • Edward Gibbon

... commentary on Sun Tzu, his notes being taken from the T'UNG TIEN, the encyclopedic treatise on the Constitution which was his life- work. They are largely repetitions of Ts'ao Kung and Meng Shih, besides which it is believed that he drew on the ancient commentaries of Wang Ling and others. Owing to the peculiar arrangement of T'UNG TIEN, he has to explain each passage on its merits, apart from the context, and sometimes his own explanation does not agree with that of Ts'ao Kung, whom ...
— The Art of War • Sun Tzu

... centre of a deep bay. The bay of a trawl or seine. Also, the Gadus morrhua, one of the most important of oceanic fishes. The cod is always found on the submerged hills known as banks; as the Dogger Bank, and banks of Newfoundland. (See LING.) ...
— The Sailor's Word-Book • William Henry Smyth

... help them while away the time which lay heavily on their hands. This was about the time of Confucius. It is, however, known to have been the Royal game, restricted to the use of Emperors and their friends of the Mandarin class for two thousand years. To them it was known as Pe-Ling (pronounced Bah-Ling) taking its name from the "bird of a hundred intelligences," the lark-like creature sacred in the Chinese faith which now may be seen reproduced on most Chinese tapestries and embroideries. The penalty paid by one of any other ...
— Pung Chow - The Game of a Hundred Intelligences. Also known as Mah-Diao, Mah-Jong, Mah-Cheuk, Mah-Juck and Pe-Ling • Lew Lysle Harr

... From Chow Yang to Lun-Ling-Ting all the land could not provide costlier raiment than Peter found at his bedside when the long, high-keyed cries of the mule men opened his ...
— Peter the Brazen - A Mystery Story of Modern China • George F. Worts

... we may descend gradually, via Thorne, Bush, Furze, Gorst (Chapter I), Ling, etc., until we come finally to Grace, which in some cases represents grass, for we find William atte grase in 1327, while the name Poorgrass, in Mr. Hardy's Far from the Madding Crowd, seems to be certified by the famous French names Malherbe and Malesherbes. But ...
— The Romance of Names • Ernest Weekley

... still inhabited by small yeomen.[40] Passing to a less fortunate region, he explains that the prince de Soubise has a vast property there. The property of a grand 'seigneur' is sure to be a desert.[41] The signs which indicate such properties are 'wastes, landes, deserts, fern, ling.' The neighbourhood of the great residences is well peopled—'with deer, wild boars, and wolves,' 'Oh,' he exclaims, 'if I was the legislator of France for a day, I would make such great lords skip again!' 'Why,' he asked, 'were the people miserable in lower ...
— The English Utilitarians, Volume I. • Leslie Stephen

... that blacksmith from Ling, whom he is actually setting up in business at Knatchett itself—the man is turning out a perfect firebrand!—distributing Socialist leaflets over the whole neighborhood—getting up a quarrel between ...
— The Coryston Family • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... Pelliot (B.E.F.E.O. 1902, p. 148) cites a statement from the Ling Wai Tai Ta that there were two classes of bonzes in Camboja, those who wore yellow robes and married and those who wore red robes and ...
— Hinduism and Buddhism, An Historical Sketch, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Charles Eliot

... lean'd against the Armed Man, The Statue of the Armed Knight: She stood and listen'd to my Harp Amid the ling'ring Light. ...
— Lyrical Ballads, With Other Poems, 1800, Vol. I. • William Wordsworth

... chief, and to the cheated eye Ten thousand shuttles dart along the sky; As swift through aether rise the rushing swarms, Gay dancing to the beam their sun-bright forms; And each thin form, still ling'ring on the sight, Trails, as it shoots, a line of silver light. High pois'd on buoyant wing, the thoughtful queen, In gaze attentive, views the varied scene, And soon her far-fetch'd ken discerns below The light laburnum lift her polish'd brow, Wave her green leafy ...
— Langstroth on the Hive and the Honey-Bee - A Bee Keeper's Manual • L. L. Langstroth

... Occidental reader may recognize, through the translation, the charm of the poetic image, and he may be interested in a technical lyric form hitherto new to him, but beyond this, in his ignorance of Japanese, he cannot go. Here is a lyric by Wang Ch'ang-Ling, a Chinese poet of the ...
— A Study of Poetry • Bliss Perry

... favor of 6th instant by nephew Jack, who with the Col. his trav'ling companion, perform'd an easy journey from you to us, and arriv'd before sunset. I thank you for the beads, the wire, and the beugles, I fancy I shall never execute the plan of the head dress to which you allude—if I should, some of your largest corn ...
— Diary of Anna Green Winslow - A Boston School Girl of 1771 • Anna Green Winslow

... the year's awaking, The fire's among the ling, The beechen hedge is breaking, The curlew's on the wing; Primroses are out, lad, On the high banks of Lee, And the sun stirs the trout, lad, ...
— Poems: New and Old • Henry Newbolt

... Heaven, Shang Ch'ing, is ruled by the second person of the triad, named Ling-pao T'ien-tsun, or Tao Chuen. No information is given as to his origin. He is the custodian of the sacred books. He has existed from the beginning of the world. He calculates time, dividing it into different ...
— Myths and Legends of China • E. T. C. Werner

... three-thousand year-old Peking was too short, for besides investigating conditions, attending our Minister Shurman's reception, visiting the country home of the former Prime Minister Hsuing Hsi-Ling, we would have enjoyed spending more time seeing The Summer Palace, The Jade Fountain and the Temple of Heaven to say nothing of ...
— The Log of the Empire State • Geneve L.A. Shaffer

... sniv'ling, and chiming in Parts, This wining and pining, and breaking of Hearts; All pensive and silent in Corners to sit, Are pretty fine Pastimes for those that want Wit: When this Passion and Fashion doth so far abuse 'em, It were good the State should for Pendulums ...
— Wit and Mirth: or Pills to Purge Melancholy, Vol. 5 of 6 • Various

... seemed as if it would pass over without any general rising, when the orders of the Viceroy of Fuhkien, to which Formosa was dependent until made a separate province a few years ago, fanned the fuel of disaffection to a flame. The popular leader Ling organized the best government he could, and, when Keen Lung offered to negotiate, laid down three conditions as the basis of negotiation. They were that "the mandarin who had ordered the cruel measures of ...
— China • Demetrius Charles Boulger

... the narrow strip of sand and rushes, speckled with stunted, moss-bearded, heather-bedded hawthorns, between the great grim lifeless mountain walls? Did he feel no pleasant creeping of the flesh that day at the sound of his own horse-hoofs, as they swept through the long ling with a sound as soft as the brushing of a woman's tresses, and then rang down on the spongy, black, reverberating soil, chipping the honey-laden fragrant heather blossoms, and tossing them out in a rosy shower? Or, if that were really too slight a thing for the observation of an average sportsman, ...
— Prose Idylls • Charles Kingsley

... short all messages and expressions of gratitude, and leading Eustacie to a small stream, he made her creep along its course, with her feet in the water so as to be sheltered by the boughs that hung over the banks, while he used his ling strides to enable him to double back and enter into conversation with passers-by, quite of the track of the Grange du Temple, but always telling her where he should join her again, and leaving with her the great dog, ...
— The Chaplet of Pearls • Charlotte M. Yonge

... shown by his forbearing to speak, [1] as well as by speaking, the whole truth. Haply he waited for a preparation of the human heart to receive start- ling announcements. This wisdom, which character- ized his sayings, did not prophesy his death, and thereby [5] ...
— Miscellaneous Writings, 1883-1896 • Mary Baker Eddy

... no man of reason fears; For certainly we must, As we are born, return to dust; 'Tis the last point of many ling-ring years; But whither then we go, Whither, we fain would know; But human understanding cannot ...
— Clarissa, Or The History Of A Young Lady, Volume 8 • Samuel Richardson

... and some with dull beaks—were before him, squabbling and sparring over the bread on the lawn. A robin dropped a little chain of melancholy silvery notes, and a great titmouse bugled clearly, "Ting-ling! Ting-ling! Ting-ling!" Some one opened a window of the house giving on to the lawn, and the last house-fly blundered out into the cold air; and a company of gnats—surely the most hardy of insects—was dancing in the pale sunlight by the ...
— The Way of the Wild • F. St. Mars

... lady came to that lonely bower, And threw her robes aside; She tore her ling [long] yellow hair, And knelt at ...
— The Book-Hunter - A New Edition, with a Memoir of the Author • John Hill Burton

... literally not one couplet in the publication before us which would be reckoned poetry, or even sense, were it found in the corner of a newspaper or upon the window of an inn. Must we then be doomed to hear such a mixture of raving and driv'ling, extolled as the work of a 'wild and original' genius, simply because Mr Coleridge has now and then written fine verses, and a brother poet chooses, in his milder mood, to laud him from courtesy or from interest? And are such panegyrics to be echoed by the mean tools ...
— Early Reviews of English Poets • John Louis Haney

... Henshaw were expected home the first of September. By the thirty-first of August the old Beacon Street homestead facing the Public Garden was in spick-and-span order, with Dong Ling in the basement hovering over a well-stocked larder, and Pete searching the rest of the house for a chair awry, or a bit ...
— Miss Billy Married • Eleanor H. Porter

... sapper, and presently his face reappears, with "Headquarters to speak to you, sir." What the captain said to Headquarters is not to be repeated by the profane: the captain knows his mind, and speaks it. As soon as that was over, ting-a-ling again. ...
— From Capetown to Ladysmith - An Unfinished Record of the South African War • G. W. Steevens

... either hand the hast'ning angel caught Our ling'ring parents, and to th' eastern gate Led them direct, and down the cliff as fast To the subjected plain; then disappear'd. They looking back, all th' eastern side beheld Of Paradise, so late their happy seat, Wav'd over by that flaming brand, the gate With dreadful ...
— Lectures on the English Poets - Delivered at the Surrey Institution • William Hazlitt

... into a bare room, which was, you may say, crouched under a pent of turves and ling, and stank very vilely. The floor was of beaten clay, like the walls; for furniture it had a table and bench. Sooty cobwebs dripped from the joists, and great spiders ran nimbly over them; there were no beds, but on a heap of rotting skins in one corner two ...
— The Forest Lovers • Maurice Hewlett

... herself down on the ling by the side of the road in despair. Her only hope was to die, and she believed she was dying. She could not think; she could believe anything. Surely life was a horrible dream, and God would mercifully awaken her from ...
— Ruth • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... you? No, no, no! Stand farther off! You pulse and glow; you are too vital; your presence hurts ... Freshness of hill-swards, wind and trodden ling, I should have known that Goneril stands here. It is yet dawn, but you have been afoot Afar and long: where could you climb ...
— Georgian Poetry 1913-15 • Edited by E. M. (Sir Edward Howard Marsh)

... See the discussion of this word in Gummerus, p. 62 foll. Varro defines them as those "qui suas operas in servitutem dant pro pecunia quam debebant" (de Ling. Lat. vii. 105), i.e. they give their labour ...
— Social life at Rome in the Age of Cicero • W. Warde Fowler

... were not aware that our identity was known, or our visit expected. He then explained that he had been instructed by the magistrate of Dyou-min-shan to go out and look for us, and escort us into the town. He also mentioned in this connection the name of Ling Darin—a name that we had heard spoken of almost with veneration ever since leaving Urumtsi. Who this personage was we were unable to find out beyond that he was an influential mandarin in the city of Su-chou, now only a day's ...
— Across Asia on a Bicycle • Thomas Gaskell Allen and William Lewis Sachtleben

... head quicklie towards y^e watergate, on which Patteson, laughing as he lay on his back, points upward with his peacock's feather, and cries, "Overhead, mistress! see, there he goes. Sure, you lookt not to see Master Heron making towards us between y^e posts and flower-pots, eating a dried ling?" laughing as wildly as though he were verily ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Vol. 3, July, 1851 • Various

... mind to Isbel since I was at court. Our old ling and our Isbels o' the country are nothing like your old ling and your Isbels o' the court. The brains of my Cupid's knocked out; and I begin to love, as an old man ...
— All's Well That Ends Well • William Shakespeare [Collins edition]

... of caribou still wander on the hills, and far more are killed every year by wolves than by men. Great numbers of moose still roam the lowlands. The rivers still teem with salmon and grayling and the lakes with whitefish, ling, and lush. Unless the outrage of canneries should be permitted at the mouths of the Yukon—and that would threaten the chief subsistence of all the Indians of the interior—there seems no danger of permanent failure of the salmon run, though, of course, it varies greatly from year to year. ...
— Ten Thousand Miles with a Dog Sled - A Narrative of Winter Travel in Interior Alaska • Hudson Stuck

... Are awkward when you try to flatter; Your portion, taking Britain round, Was just one annual hundred pound; Now not so much as in remainder, Since Cibber[3] brought in an attainder; For ever fix'd by right divine (A monarch's right) on Grub Street line. Poor starv'ling bard, how small thy gains! How unproportion'd to thy pains! And here a simile comes pat in: Though chickens take a month to fatten, The guests in less than half an hour Will more than half a score devour. So, after toiling twenty days To earn a stock of pence and praise, Thy labours, ...
— The Poems of Jonathan Swift, D.D., Volume I (of 2) • Jonathan Swift

... three or four pheasants and heard several more, so that there probably is good sport to be had amongst these rugged hills. After halting for tiffin under a fine archway of Indian architecture we arrived at Pa-Ta-Ling (eight lofty peaks), where we obtained a good view ...
— Life and sport in China - Second Edition • Oliver G. Ready

... a silvery ting-a-ling was heard, and never was bell more promptly responded to. Had it been a fire alarm the rooms could not have ...
— Caps and Capers - A Story of Boarding-School Life • Gabrielle E. Jackson

... heathers make a yellow dye, but the one chiefly used is the Ling, Calluna vulgaris. The tips are gathered just before flowering. They are boiled in water for about half-an-hour. The wool, previously mordanted with alum or chrome according to the shade of yellow wanted, is put ...
— Vegetable Dyes - Being a Book of Recipes and Other Information Useful to the Dyer • Ethel M. Mairet

... can do nowt wi' Jimmy. 'E'll goa 'is own road. 'Is feyther an' 'e they wuss always quar'ling, yo med say. Yet when t' owd gentleman was taaken bad, Jimmy, 'e couldn' do too mooch for 'im. 'E was set on pullin' 's feyther round. And when 'e found 'e couldn't keep t' owd gentleman, 'e gets it on 'is mind like—broodin'. And 'e's got ...
— The Three Sisters • May Sinclair

... arrived at a quick pace on Idsted's beautiful heath, all tufts of ling, the red blossoms of which looked lovely in the light of the setting sun. We sat ourselves down on the hill where Baudissin and his staff had stood. Then Baagoee read aloud Hammerich's description of the battle of ...
— Recollections Of My Childhood And Youth • George Brandes

... front door-bell gave a malicious ting-a-ling. Mrs. Allan, an old friend who lived several miles out of town, had just a few minutes before train time; she was sure there was no one in the world she wanted to see so much as Mrs. Murray, and Mrs. Murray was just as sure that she herself wanted to see nobody just then, but ...
— Divers Women • Pansy and Mrs. C.M. Livingston

... unmoor! unmoor Hark to the hoarse, but welcome sound, Startling the seaman's sweetest slumbers. The groaning capstan's labouring round, The cheerful fife's enliv'ning numbers;. And ling'ring idlers join the brawl, And merry ship-boys swell the ...
— The Red Rover • James Fenimore Cooper

... and before long chanced on one that somebody in the front part of the train recognized and began to sing. In ten minutes after that he was playing accompaniments for a full train chorus and the seared zebra and impala bolted to right and left, pursued by Tarara-boom-de-ay, Ting-a-ling-a-ling, and other non-Homeric dirges that in those days ...
— The Ivory Trail • Talbot Mundy

... We have received advice that from Canada there departed this last month a ship called Furtherance with above forty thousand of that fish which is little inferior to ling for the supply of the Colony in Virginia and that fish is worth not ...
— The Bounty of the Chesapeake - Fishing in Colonial Virginia • James Wharton

... calculated to make him popular, and he was not. He was a sort of butt for the free and easy men who lived in their cabs and cabooses, obeyed their "orders," and owned nothing but their overalls and their shiny Sunday clothes. He was good-tempered, though. Took all their gibes and "dev'ling" quietly, and for the most part silently. So, few actually disliked him. Dick Rail, the engineer of his crew, was one of those few. Dick "dee-spised" him. Dick was big, brawny, coarse: coarse in looks, coarse in ...
— "Run To Seed" - 1891 • Thomas Nelson Page

... the Plateau of PAMIR (the name which Marco gives it and which it still retains), and to the existence of the lake (or lakes) upon its surface. The Chinese pilgrims Hwui Seng and Sung Yun, who passed this way A.D. 518, inform us that these high lands of the Tsung Ling were commonly said to be midway between heaven and earth. The more celebrated Hiuen Tsang, who came this way nearly 120 years later (about 644) on his return to China, "after crossing the mountains for 700 li, arrived at the valley of ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo Volume 1 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... bauldest stood aback, Wi' a gape an' a glow'r till their lugs did crack, As the shapeless phantom mum'ling spak, Hae ...
— Spare Hours • John Brown

... baby name of an old man now about 60 years old; it was the name of his great-grandfather (1). Numbers 5 A, 5 B, 5 C, and 5 D are the sons of Mang-i-lot' (4), all of whom died before receiving a second name. The child Kom-ling' (5 a) was given the name of his paternal grandfather (3). Ta-kay'-yeng (5 B) bears the name of his maternal great-grandfather. Teng-ab' (5 C) and Ka-weng' (5 D) both bear the names of uncles, brothers of the boy's mother. ...
— The Bontoc Igorot • Albert Ernest Jenks

... ol' master would ring de bell for us to git up by an yo could hear dat bell ringin all over de plantation. I can hear hit now. Hit would go ting-a-ling, ting-a-ling and I can see 'em now stirrin in Carolina. I git so lonesome when I thinks bout times we used to have. Twas better ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves: Volume II, Arkansas Narratives, Part 2 • Works Projects Administration

... hardly to be called noise, keeps us perpetual company, and our eyes must ever be open for beautiful little living things. Now a green and gold lizard flashes across a bit of grey rock, now a dragon-fly disports its sapphire wings amid the yellowing ferns or purple ling, butterflies, white, blue, and black and orange, flit hither and thither, whilst little beetles, blue as enamel beads, enliven ...
— East of Paris - Sketches in the Gatinais, Bourbonnais, and Champagne • Matilda Betham-Edwards

... him from his throne, Grov'ling in fire the rebel lies: "How art thou sunk in darkness down, "Son of the morning, ...
— Hymns and Spiritual Songs • Isaac Watts

... dumb forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er resign'd, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing ling'ring look behind? ...
— Familiar Quotations • John Bartlett

... did he fling A hard-boiled egg at Eustace Ling, Forgetting how an egg can sting The person who ...
— More Cricket Songs • Norman Gale

... memory ling'ring yet of when Each bounding pulse beat faster with its joy; A something that allured, and won, and then With waking fled, ...
— Debris - Selections from Poems • Madge Morris

... and lost in thought, the desert glade Measuring I roam with ling'ring steps and slow; And still a watchful glance around me throw, Anxious to shun the print of human tread: No other means I find, no surer aid From the world's prying eye to hide my woe: So well my wild disorder'd gestures show, And love lorn looks, the fire within ...
— The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch • Petrarch

... old ling, and tusk, are reckoned the best salt fish. Old ling and backlio, must be laid in water for ten or twelve hours, then taken out, and scaled very clean; wash the fish, and let it lay out of water till ...
— The Cook and Housekeeper's Complete and Universal Dictionary; Including a System of Modern Cookery, in all Its Various Branches, • Mary Eaton

... at Paris has lately been occupied with the case of a Chinese gentleman, whose personal charms and literary powers make him worthy to be the compatriot of Ah-Sin, that astute Celestial. Tin-tun- ling is the name—we wish we could say, with Thackeray's F. B., "the highly respectable name"—of the Chinese who has just been acquitted on a charge of bigamy. In China, it is said that the more distinguished a ...
— Lost Leaders • Andrew Lang

... down with him to the great greasing & detriment of his new sackcloth bib and tucker. And still Christmas Day was at his elbow, plying him with the wassail-bowl, till he roared, & hiccupp'd, & protested there was no faith in dried ling, a sour, windy, acrimonious, censorious hy-po-crit-crit-critical mess & no dish for a gentleman. Then he dipt his fist into the middle of the great custard that stood before his left-hand neighbour, & daubed his hungry beard all over with it, till you would have taken him for the Last Day in December ...
— A Masque of Days - From the Last Essays of Elia: Newly Dressed & Decorated • Walter Crane

... and myself went in, and while we were sitting in the parlour, Mrs. Jones had occasion to call a servant. I noticed that, when she rung the bell, she did so with a quick jerk; and I could perceive a tone of authority in the ting-a-ling of the bell, the sound of which was distinctly heard. Nearly two minutes passed before the servant made her appearance, in which time the bell received a more vigorous jerk. At last she entered, looking flushed ...
— Home Scenes, and Home Influence - A Series of Tales and Sketches • T. S. Arthur

... hill, and picked her way along the rough bohireen which led upwards along the course of the stream. After awhile even this track disappeared. The stream tumbled noisily over rocks and stones, the bog-stained water glowing auburn-coloured in the sunlight. The ling and heather were springy under her feet, and the air was sweet with the scent of the bog-myrtle. She spied round her for a rock which cast a shade upon the kind of heathery bed she had set her heart to find. Her eyes ...
— Hyacinth - 1906 • George A. Birmingham

... And, lifting up the curtains, saw her there, Asleep beneath the 'broidered covering. "Tis certain that she lives," he said. "Perchance It is her lot to live at night, and die At dawn." Then came he nearer yet, and gazed Upon her beauty. Ling'ring tears he saw Bedewed her lashes long, and all his heart Was sad. Her face was beautiful. Her locks Framed * with curls most gracefully. He took Her in his arms and cried, with kisses warm: "Why hast thou suffered, apple of my eye?" He wept abundantly, and said: "My gold, My ruby, ...
— Malayan Literature • Various Authors

... evasion such? One knot he well deserves, which might do much. The flood, flame, swine, the lion, and the snake, Those fivefold monsters, modern authors make: The snake reigns most; snakes, Pliny says, are bred When the brain's perish'd in a human head. Ye grov'ling, trodden, whipt, stript, turncoat things, Made up of venom, volumes, stains, and stings! Thrown from the tree of knowledge, like you, curst To scribble in the dust, was snake the first. What if the figure should in fact ...
— The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 2 • Edward Young

... side of the moor, out Farnington way. The railway runs past there now, over the very place the cottage stood on, I believe; but no one so much as dreamt o' railways, time I talk on. Not a road was near, and all around there was nothin' but the moors stretching away for miles, all purple ling and heather, with not a living soul nearer than Wharton, and that was a good twelve miles away. It was pretty lonely for mother, o' course, during the day; but she was a brave woman, and when dad come home at night, never a word would she let on to tell him how right down scared she ...
— Fifty-Two Stories For Girls • Various

... deerhide, and a sword at his side, fastened by a belt of the like skin, guarded and clasped with silver. His features were delicate, though sunburnt, and his eyes were riveted on the distance, where the path had disappeared amid the luxuriant spires of ling. ...
— More Bywords • Charlotte M. Yonge

... Buckhaven man rarely communicates with natives of Newhaven, except at the pier, where he brings in his cod and ling from the deep sea, flings them out like stones, and sells them to the fishwives; then up ...
— Christie Johnstone • Charles Reade

... my car's condition briefly to the two engineers. Mr. Pyecroft clung to our guest, who stared with affrighted eyes at the palpitating Octopod; and the free wind of high Sussex whimpered across the ling. ...
— Traffics and Discoveries • Rudyard Kipling

... bark canoe we glide, And watch the shades of evening glance along the mountain side. Anon we hear resounding the wizard loon's wild cry, And mark the distant peak whereon the ling'ring echoes die. ...
— The Habitant and Other French-Canadian Poems • William Henry Drummond

... definite information. One Chinaman, however, assured me that his brother had actually seen the transmigration from fox to woman take place. The man's name I have forgotten, but I will call him Ching Kang. Well, Ching Kang was one day threading his way through a lovely valley of the Tapa-ling mountains, when he came upon a silver (i.e. white) fox crouching on the bank of a stream in such a peculiar attitude that Ching Kang's attention was at once arrested. Thinking that the animal was ill, and delighted at the prospect of lending it aid, for silver foxes ...
— Byways of Ghost-Land • Elliott O'Donnell

... for interruption, sir, but what; the lady says is true; we just couldn't keep away. I saw the Chink—beg pardon, sir, I mean Ling-a-Ling the laundryman, burning joss-sticks in front of 'im,"—pointing of stub finger towards shameless dog—"one night when the dawg was asleep. Jus' worship, please, sir, on all parts. And Mrs. Pudge what didn't oughter 'ave been down ...
— The Hawk of Egypt • Joan Conquest

... the head of our sonneteers and lyric poets; and Sidney, Lyly, Greene, and Hooker in the van of our prose literature. The history of Meres's work, a dissertation from which is here extracted, is curious. In or about 1596, Nicholas Ling and John Bodenham conceived the idea of publishing a series of volumes containing proverbs, maxims, and sententious reflections on religion, morals, and life generally. Accordingly in 1597 appeared a small volume containing various apothegms, ...
— An English Garner - Critical Essays & Literary Fragments • Edited by Professor Arber and Thomas Seccombe

... and the sapphire; and, as jewellers go, his honesty was great. Now there was a Merchant Prince who had come to Thangobrind and had offered his daughter's soul for the diamond that is larger than the human head and was to be found on the lap of the spider-idol, Hlo-hlo, in his temple of Moung-ga-ling; for he had heard that Thangobrind was a thief to ...
— The Book of Wonder • Edward J. M. D. Plunkett, Lord Dunsany

... now," Gavinia told Tommy in the kitchen, "that for fear o' starting her I never whistle at my work without telling her I'm to do't, and if I fall on the stair, my first thought is to jump up and cry, 'It was just me tum'ling.' And now I believe this brute'll ...
— Sentimental Tommy - The Story of His Boyhood • J. M. Barrie

... distinguish the terms which are somewhat loosely used in speaking of the different kinds of fishing carried on in Shetland. The home or summer fishing, when that term is used in its widest sense, includes all the fishing for ling, cod, tusk, [Page 4 rpt.] and seath prosecuted in open boats, whether of six oars, or of a smaller size such as are still used for the seath fishery at Sumburgh. The 'haaf fishery' is, in the greater part of Shetland, synonymous with the home or summer fishery, being distinguished ...
— Second Shetland Truck System Report • William Guthrie

... "But come, Sooz'n, da'ling," said Quashy, starting as if he had just recollected something, "you said you was gwine to tell me suffin as would make my hair stan' on end. It'll be awrful strong if it doos dat, for my wool am stiff, an' de ...
— The Rover of the Andes - A Tale of Adventure on South America • R.M. Ballantyne

... favour guarded round and graced; On eagle's wings my rage shall urge her flight, And hurl thee headlong from thy topmast height; Then, like thy fate, superior will I sit, And view thee fall'n, and grov'ling at my feet; See thy last breath with indignation go, And tread thee sinking ...
— Jane Shore - A Tragedy • Nicholas Rowe

... perhaps looks for great extolling, being counted the beefe of the Sea, and standing every fish day (as a cold supporter) at my Lord Maiors table; yet it is nothing but a long Cod: whereof the greater sised is called Organe Ling, and the other Codling, because it is no longer then a Cod, and yet hath the taste of Ling: whilst it is new it is called GREEN-FISH; when it is salted it is called Ling, perhaps of lying, because the longer it lyeth ... ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... tinker, he two irons took, With solder, rosin, and the Christian's Book! Equipped in this way 'mongst his friends he went, And happy hours in work and trav'ling spent. Of mending tins he had enough to do; And got good board, and decent wages, too. Ere long he visited more distant farms, And found his calling not devoid of charms. On Nature's varied face he still could gaze, And each new scene ...
— The Emigrant Mechanic and Other Tales In Verse - Together With Numerous Songs Upon Canadian Subjects • Thomas Cowherd

... sketch of the objects of the biologist. A fact struck one in his explanation of the rates of elimination. Two of the offspring of two parents alone survive, speaking broadly; this the same of the human species or the 'ling,' with 24,000,000 eggs in the roe of each female! He talked much of evolution, adaptation, &c. Mendelism became the most debated point of the discussion; the transmission of characters has a wonderful fascination for the human mind. There was also a point striking ...
— Scott's Last Expedition Volume I • Captain R. F. Scott

... the chairs down in a row Each behind the other, so; Chu-chu! Chu-chu! there they are, Passenger and baggage-car, Chu-chu-chu! the Morris chair Is the engine puffing there, Chu-chu! Chu-chu! Ting-a-ling! Don't you hear its big bell ring? All aboard! Jump on! if you Want to take this train. Chu-chu!! Off we start now, rushing fast Through the fields and valleys, past Noisy cities, over bridges, Hills and plains and mountain ridges, ...
— Child Songs of Cheer • Evaleen Stein

... a while, swinging his legs: "Somebody's watching and waiting for me!" munching his luncheon between verses; and, as nobody came, he bawled louder and louder the refrain: "Somebody's darling, darling, dah-ling!" until a hoarse voice from behind the rock ...
— The Gay Rebellion • Robert W. Chambers

... foe,' said he; 'will ye take the mate from a friend?' 'A gift for a gift,' said Kamal straight; 'a limb for the risk of a limb. Thy father has sent his son to me, I'll send my son to him!' With that he whistled his only son, who dropped from a mountain-crest— He trod the ling like a buck in spring and he looked like a lance in rest. 'Now here is thy master,' Kamal said, 'who leads a troop of the Guides, And thou must ride at his left side as shield to shoulder rides. Till Death or I cut loose the tie, at camp and board ...
— Lyra Heroica - A Book of Verse for Boys • Various

... Peninsular Malaysia—National Front, a confederation of 14 political parties dominated by United Malays National Organization Baru (UMNO Baru), Mahathir bin Mohamad; Malaysian Chinese Association (MCA), Ling Liong Sik; Gerakan Rakyat Malaysia, Datuk Lim Keng Yaik; Malaysian Indian ...
— The 1990 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... very neat. I'll deign to let thee wash my feet;— Such work becomes one in thy place,— To drudge for me is no disgrace." The spirit of the brook was stirred, But still her voice had not been heard, Had not a zephyr, ling'ring round, In friendly mood, caught up the sound, And flying round the monarch's head, Breathed in his ear the words she said. The streamlet, with a deep drawn sigh, In silv'ry tones, made this reply: "Illustrious oak, pray deign to hear, ...
— The Snow-Drop • Sarah S. Mower

... could—does yet, where enough of it remains. Far as eye reaches the dun heather covers hill and plain with its sombre pall. Like gloomy sentinels, furry cattails nod in the bog where the blue gentian peeps timidly into murky pools; the only human habitation in sight some heath boer's ling-thatched hut, flanked by rows of peat stacks in vain endeavor to stay the sweep of the pitiless west wind. On the barrows where the vikings sleep their long sleep, the plover pipes its melancholy lay; between steep banks ...
— Hero Tales of the Far North • Jacob A. Riis

... Ling—at the Boree Paddick, about four mile out there? Well, I worked on his horse-paddick las' night, an' he follered me up this mornin', an' talked summons. But I ain't very fiery-tempered, the way things is jis' now; an' I got at the soft side o' the (adj.) ...
— Such is Life • Joseph Furphy

... out with a chip while she was splitting kin'ling-wood when she was a child. She fixed it up somehow with a glass one, and it gave her the oddest expression you ever saw. The false one would stand perfectly still while the other one was rolling around, so that 'bout half the time you couldn't tell whether she was studying ...
— Elbow-Room - A Novel Without a Plot • Charles Heber Clark (AKA Max Adeler)

... catife dayes, expired now and past: My carren corps intered here, is fast in grounde: In waltring waues of swel- ling Sea, by surges cast, My name if thou desire, The Gods ...
— The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1 • William Painter

... stay in! They were in pretty good order, to do their mother justice, and she in great delight at the sight of her visiters. There was no room for silence here—or at least no silence in the room, for Mrs. Ling was never at a loss for words. And there was no need of much circumlocution in presenting the turkey,—nothing but pleasure could come of it, let it enter on which foot it would; and the train of potatoes, and tea, and bread, and other things, fairly made Mrs. ...
— Say and Seal, Volume II • Susan Warner

... proposed banquet for the Devil was a loin of pork and a poll of ling, with a pipe of ...
— Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... re-arranged. They recommended that a grant of 25 pounds should be made for the rearrangement of the books, and that Mr. Langton [the Librarian] be employed for that purpose." {15b} In the discussion that ensued Mr. Ling said some of the books "were lying on the floor, damaged by dust and cobwebs, and an extremely valuable manuscript of Wickliffe's Bible was in a bad state." {15c} Mr. Brightwell suggested that the City Library would be a capital foundation for the Free Library, and ...
— Three Centuries of a City Library • George A. Stephen

... activity. On this account it is pretty evident, that by virtus Sallust could never mean the [Greek aretae], 'virtue or moral worth,' but that he had in his eye the well-known interpretation of Varro, who considers it ut viri vis (De Ling. Lat. iv.), as denoting the useful energy which ennobles a man, and should chiefly distinguish him among his fellow-creatures. In order to be convinced of the justice of this rendering, we need only turn to another passage of our author, in ...
— Conspiracy of Catiline and The Jurgurthine War • Sallust

... of the day, in winter, in the summer, early in the morning, or in the evening—gymnastic training on the system of the Swedish anatomist Ling or of the German Turners would form a portion of the curriculum, for which ...
— The Philosophy of Teaching - The Teacher, The Pupil, The School • Nathaniel Sands

... where I stood of yore In the Sabbath light at an old church door, And, ling'ring a moment, I turn to view The green hills leaning against the blue As erewhile they stood in the golden calm Of morning's sunlight and breath of balm, With clustering verdure, and blossoming trees, And gush of bird song and hum of bees, And glancing shadows that came and ...
— Poems of the Heart and Home • Mrs. J.C. Yule (Pamela S. Vining)

... her youth to rise and demand Western methods and Western enterprise in place of the obsolete traditions and customs of their ancestors. To show his belief in the new spirit that was breaking over his country, he educated his daughter along with his sons. She was given as tutor Ling-Wing-pu, a famous poet of his province, who doubtless taught her the imagery and beauty of expression which ...
— My Lady of the Chinese Courtyard • Elizabeth Cooper

... bravery with which no lowland meadow can compare. The first season of bloom is in early June, when the chalices or the cloud-berry and the nodding plumes of the cottongrass spring from an emerald carpet of bilberry and ling. These two flowers are pure white, and the raiment of the moors is that of a bride prepared to meet her bridegroom, the sun. By July the white has passed, and the moors have assumed once more a sombre hue. But August follows, and once again they burst ...
— Tales of the Ridings • F. W. Moorman

... trow that he would swoon for fright Upon the purple ling To know that in a decent light I'd undertake the death, at sight, Of ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 152, June 27, 1917 - 1917 Almanack • Various

... pattern bit left to show what the greater part of this land was like for long ages after it had risen out of the sea; when there was little or nothing on the flat upper moors save heaths, and ling, and club-mosses, and soft gorse, and needle-whin, and creeping willows; and furze and fern upon the brows; and in the bottoms oak and ash, beech and alder, hazel and mountain ash, holly and thorn, with here and there an aspen or a buckthorn (berry-bearing alder as you call it), and everywhere—where ...
— Madam How and Lady Why - or, First Lessons in Earth Lore for Children • Charles Kingsley

... grandson of Duke Ling, the husband of Nan-tzu. His father had been driven from the country for plotting to kill Nan-tzu. When Duke Ling died, he was succeeded by his grandson, who opposed by force his father's attempts to seize ...
— The Sayings Of Confucius • Confucius

... hammering through cheerless seas, and the lines were heavy with great ling fish, it was pleasure to match his young supple thews with those of the strongest men. And it was pleasure, when hungry and weary, to turn shoreward, and feel the smell of the peat smoke on the south-west wind, bringing the cottage hearth, and the welcome meal, and the ...
— A Daughter of Fife • Amelia Edith Barr

... well on toward noon when a message reached me from the General to the effect that two batteries of Russian quick-fire field-guns had been discovered on the summit of Nan-kwang-ling—a hill some eight hundred feet high, about a mile to the westward of the Nanshan Heights—and requesting me to signal our ships in the bay to give their whole attention to those two batteries. Unfortunately for us, the tide ...
— Under the Ensign of the Rising Sun - A Story of the Russo-Japanese War • Harry Collingwood

... I heard a bird singing a song quite new to me. He was a thrushlike little fellow, very shy and difficult to see as he sat poised on the tip of a black pine in the deep forest. His note was a clear cling-ling, like the ringing of a steel triangle. Chingaling, chingaling, one called near at hand, and then farther off another answered, ching, ching, chingaling-aling, with immense ...
— The Trail of the Goldseekers - A Record of Travel in Prose and Verse • Hamlin Garland

... murmurs ran, The priest to rev'rence, and the ransom take: Not so Atrides; he, with haughty mien, And bitter speech, the trembling sire address'd: "Old man, I warn thee, that beside our ships I find thee not, or ling'ring now, or back Returning; lest thou prove of small avail Thy golden staff, and fillet of thy God. Her I release not, till her youth be fled; Within my walls, in Argos, far from home, Her lot is cast, domestic ...
— The Iliad • Homer

... arrival in Foo Chow, Mr. Gouverneur was fortunate in securing the services of a Chinese interpreter named Ling Kein, a mandarin of high order, who wore the "blue button," significant of his rank. In addition to this distinction he wore on his hat the peacock feather, an official reward of merit. He was a Chinese of remarkable intelligence, ...
— As I Remember - Recollections of American Society during the Nineteenth Century • Marian Gouverneur

... amount of salted provisions, ling, stock fish, or salt fish was served out every week to the slaves on the plantations as a relish for their vegetables; and a limited, indeed scanty, supply of coarse clothing was annually distributed among them. For other articles ...
— Jack in the Forecastle • John Sherburne Sleeper

... clouds, drifting in broken masses across a sky of deepest blue, and throwing deep shadows here and there across the moor—ever-varying elusive shadows which only accentuated the brilliancy of the sunshine where it fell upon the warm colours of the ling, which was just coming into blossom, for the blooming time of the bell heather ...
— East of the Shadows • Mrs. Hubert Barclay

... sped across the fields to the smithy. It was past five o'clock, and the light was fading. But the waning gold of the sunset as he jumped the wall on to the moor made the whole autumnal earth about him, and the whole side of the Scout, one splendour. Such browns and pinks among the withering ling; such gleaming greens among the bilberry leaf; such reds among the turning ferns; such fiery touches on the mountain ashes overhanging the Red Brook! The western light struck in great shafts into the bosom of the Scout; and over its grand encompassing mass hung ...
— The History of David Grieve • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... emperors, Hoang-Ti, who reigned about the year 2600 B. C., decided to have the art scientifically investigated and its rules formulated. In his day music was practised, but not understood in its natural elements. The emperor therefore ordered Ling-Lun ...
— Woman's Work in Music • Arthur Elson

... was lucky that the little robin had shouted, "Ding-a-ling! ding-a-ling!" for hardly had they reached the top of the hill when the school bell commenced: "Ding, dong! ding, ...
— Little Jack Rabbit and the Squirrel Brothers • David Cory

... as I wandered through the hills seeking my botanical specimens, I found that the chain of forts on the hills of the Quang Tong peninsula south and west of Dalny, were totally unfinished and that the Kuan Ling section of the Port Arthur and Dalny railway was not even adequately protected from capture by a hostile force. The lack of adequate supervision and the general slovenliness prevailing made it easy for me to go about unchallenged. I mixed freely ...
— The Secrets of the German War Office • Dr. Armgaard Karl Graves

... bars they may The saints in glory see; But this will not their grief allay, But to them torment be. 28. Thus they in this infernal cave Will now be holden fast From heavenly freedom, though they crave, Of it they may not taste. 29. The chains that darkness on them hangs Still ratt'ling in their ears, Creates within them heavy pangs, And still augments their fears. 30. Thus hopeless of all remedy, They dyingly do sink Into the jaws of misery, And seas of sorrow drink. 31. For being cop'd[12] on every side With helplessness and grief, Headlong into despair ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... imperial library of the Suy dynasty (A.D. 589-618), the name Fa-hien occurs four times. Towards the end of the last section of it (page 22), after a reference to his travels, his labours in translation at Kin-ling (another name for Nanking), in conjunction with Buddha-bhadra, are described. In the second section, page 15, we find "A Record of Buddhistic Kingdoms;"—with a note, saying that it was the work of the "Sramana, ...
— Record of Buddhistic Kingdoms • Fa-Hien

... generally known that some of the spiders carry their young on their backs for some time after they are hatched. I remember seeing an instance of this one day when on the Moors, grouse-shooting. I saw what seemed to be a very curious insect travelling on the ling (heather), and on stooping down to examine it I found it was a large spider, upon the back of which (in fact, all over it) were clustered some dozens of young ones, about the size of pins' heads; she also seemed to guard them ...
— Essays in Natural History and Agriculture • Thomas Garnett

... darling seat! All hail thy palaces and tow'rs, Where once beneath a monarch's feet Sat Legislation's sov'reign pow'rs! From marking wildly-scatter'd flow'rs, As on the banks of Ayr I stray'd, And singing, lone, the ling'ring hours, I shelter in ...
— The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing his Poems, Songs, and Correspondence. • Robert Burns and Allan Cunningham

... upon the sand! Like pawing steeds impatient of delay; Meanwhile their rider, ling'ring on the land, Dallies with love, and holds farewell at bay A too short span.—How tedious slow is grief! But parting renders ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood



Words linked to "Ling" :   water chestnut plant, genus Molva, water chestnut, codfish, heath, Calluna, cod, genus Calluna, gadoid, gadoid fish, caltrop, Molva, genus Urophycis, hake, Urophycis



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