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La   /lɑ/   Listen
La

noun
1.
A white soft metallic element that tarnishes readily; occurs in rare earth minerals and is usually classified as a rare earth.  Synonyms: atomic number 57, lanthanum.
2.
A state in southern United States on the Gulf of Mexico; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War.  Synonyms: Louisiana, Pelican State.
3.
The syllable naming the sixth (submediant) note of a major or minor scale in solmization.  Synonym: lah.



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"La" Quotes from Famous Books



... the duke's latest protege. The theatre was crowded to overflowing, and the ducal couple with their suite were early in the court boxes. Although no special announcement had been made, the evening was evidently looked upon as a festival occasion, and every one was attired a la grande toilette, the ladies vieing with one another in the richness and brilliancy ...
— The Northern Light • E. Werner

... and creoles alike, and the Riffraffs marched quite as often to the stirring measures of "La Marseillaise" as to "The ...
— Solomon Crow's Christmas Pockets and Other Tales • Ruth McEnery Stuart

... worthy of note is the man called by Las Casas the best pilot of his day, Juan de la Cosa. He had been with Columbus on his first voyage, as owner and pilot of the Santa Maria, and also on his second, and may have had good grounds for believing himself as good a navigator as the Admiral, while as a cosmographer he was ...
— Amerigo Vespucci • Frederick A. Ober

... "Era si cattivo il concetto, che di lui avevasi in Roma, cioe che fosse stato autore di tutte le torbolenze d'Inghilterra, che era necessario dasse primo segni ben grandi del suo pentimento. Ed in tal caso sarebbe stato ajutato; sebene saria paruto che nelle sue passate resoluzioni se la fosse sempre intesa con Roma."—From the MS. abstract of the Barberini papers made by the canon Nicoletti soon after ...
— The History of England from the First Invasion by the Romans - to the Accession of King George the Fifth - Volume 8 • John Lingard and Hilaire Belloc

... his mother, "que faites-vous la?—Les jeunes messieurs anglais sont plus spirituels que les jeunes messieurs suisses, n'est ce ...
— The Unclassed • George Gissing

... been his humble slaves, and ask leave to congratulate him on his health and sturdy years. At such times, if the visitors looked interesting enough, or he remembered them well, he would deign to come to the tent-fly and, standing there a la Napoleon at Lodi or Grant in the Wilderness, be for the first time in his relations with them ...
— Twelve Men • Theodore Dreiser

... Paris, she was compelled to wait for one day on account of some want of connection in the trains for Marseilles. Gualtier acted as cicerone, and accompanied her in a carriage through the chief streets, through the Place de la Concorde, the Champs Elysees, and the Bois de Boulogne. She was sufficiently herself to experience delight in spite of her impatience, and to feel the wonder and admiration which the first sight of that gay and splendid capital always excites. But ...
— The Cryptogram - A Novel • James De Mille

... by Hochkirk, Leipzig, Weissenfels, and Rossbach. Hurrying homeward, they were obliged to decline another invitation from the Duchess at Weimar; and, making for Guntershausen, performed the fatiguing journey from there to Aix-la-Chapelle in one day, i.e. travelling often in slow trains from 4 A.M. to 7 P.M., a foolish feat even for the eupeptic. Carlyle visited the cathedral, but has left a very poor account of the impression produced on him by the simple slab sufficiently inscribed, "Carolo Magno." "Next morning ...
— Thomas Carlyle - Biography • John Nichol

... :manularity: /man'yoo-la'ri-tee/ /n./ [prob. fr. techspeak 'manual' 'granularity'] A notional measure of the manual labor required for some task, particularly one of the sort that automation is supposed to eliminate. "Composing ...
— The Jargon File, Version 4.0.0

... soit que Don Antonio Piementel de Prado, Envoye Extraordinaire de sa Majeste le Roi d'Espagne a sa Majeste la Reine de Suede, soit maintenant sur son retour de ce lieu a Neufport en Flandres, dont son Excellence est Gouverneur; et qu'il ait juge a propos d'envoyer partie de son train et bagage par mer de Hambourg a Dunquerque, ou public autre ...
— A Journal of the Swedish Embassy in the Years 1653 and 1654, Vol II. • Bulstrode Whitelocke

... his eagerness in check, but other men were waiting for his place, and he went out and crossed the street to the hotel where there was light to read by. As he entered it a girl bustling about a long table in the big stove-warmed room turned with la little smile. ...
— Winston of the Prairie • Harold Bindloss

... a pamphlet entitled "Memoire sur la decouverte du magnetisme animal", of which Doctor Cocke gives the following summary (his chief claim was that he had discovered a principle which would cure ...
— Complete Hypnotism: Mesmerism, Mind-Reading and Spiritualism • A. Alpheus

... flame of vengeance hurl them upward in the fog. Shattered glass and toppling masonry. In gay Paree he hides, Egan of Paris, unsought by any save by me. Making his day's stations, the dingy printingcase, his three taverns, the Montmartre lair he sleeps short night in, rue de la Goutte-d'Or, damascened with flyblown faces of the gone. Loveless, landless, wifeless. She is quite nicey comfy without her outcast man, madame in rue Git-le-Coeur, canary and two buck lodgers. Peachy cheeks, a zebra skirt, frisky ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... a ring!" and the proposition for a combat a la fistiana was received with joy by every ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... passion and emotion expressed by pantomime. After her marriage, my mother remained but a few years on the stage, to which she bequeathed, as specimens of her ability as a dramatic writer, the charming English version of "La jeune Femme colere," called "The Day after the Wedding;" the little burlesque of "Personation," of which her own exquisitely humorous performance, aided by her admirably pure French accent, has never been equaled; and a play in five acts called "Smiles and Tears," taken ...
— Records of a Girlhood • Frances Anne Kemble

... formerly belonged to La Monnoie are now recognizable by the anagram of his name. A Delio nomen, and also by some very curious notes on the fly-leaves and margins written in ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 4, Saturday, November 24, 1849 • Various

... was a skillful soldier, complained that he had been forced, by the orders of his superior officer and against his own judgment, into a position from which he could not escape. General La Fayette, however, doubtless had at least an equal share in bringing about the result, for it was his skillful maneuvering of an inferior force that held Cornwallis checked so that Washington was enabled to bring his troops ...
— School History of North Carolina • John W. Moore

... Snow to move out to take up a position with his right south of Solesmes, his left resting on the Cambrai-Le Cateau Road south of La Chaprie. In this position the Division rendered great help to the effective retirement of the 2nd and 1st Corps ...
— Sir John French - An Authentic Biography • Cecil Chisholm

... Bordeaux had added to his suite when going to the Council at Constance quite a good-looking little priest of Touraine whose ways and manner of speech was so charming that he passed for a son of La Soldee and the Governor. The Archbishop of Tours had willingly given him to his confrere for his journey to that town, because it was usual for archbishops to make each other presents, they well knowing ...
— Droll Stories, Volume 1 • Honore de Balzac

... (de la Meurthe), since Vice-President of the Republic, who had known Charles-Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte from his childhood, exclaimed: "He is an honest man, he will keep ...
— Napoleon the Little • Victor Hugo

... heathen savage for all you got on your back—get into some duds this instant!" Cavendish was on his knees again beside Yancy, and Polly, by a determined effort, rid herself of the children. "Why, he's a grand-looking man, ain't he?" she cried. "La, ...
— The Prodigal Judge • Vaughan Kester

... been captured a week before by a French corvette; and that he was on his way to Saint Domingo. He looked a little downcast on losing his command, but shrugged his shoulders, and observed that it was "la fortune de la guerre." I requested him and five of his white crew to accompany me on board my ship. He replied that he was ready, and begged that he might be allowed to carry his traps ...
— Paddy Finn • W. H. G. Kingston

... Charles Armand, Marquis de la Rouerie, was a French officer of note when he entered our army as colonel in 1777, and was ordered to raise a corps of Frenchmen not exceeding 200 men. He served in Jersey and Pennsylvania in 1777, and ...
— Life And Times Of Washington, Volume 2 • John Frederick Schroeder and Benson John Lossing

... "La! la! la!" said Lucullus, who could not pretend to mean, "Ha! ha! ha!" "Your master's one fault is that he is too fond of giving parties. I've warned him that it was expensive. Now, look here, Flaminius, you know this is no time to lend money without security, so suppose ...
— Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare • E. Nesbit

... rushed away from the Place de la Greve and made for the various barricades in order to watch ...
— The Scarlet Pimpernel • Baroness Orczy

... made a good voyage; for by what I found in those two chests I had room to suppose the ship had a great deal of wealth on board; and, if I may guess from the course she steered, she must have been bound from Buenos Ayres, or the Rio de la Plata, in the south part of America, beyond the Brazils to the Havannah, in the Gulf of Mexico, and so perhaps to Spain. She had, no doubt, a great treasure in her, but of no use, at that time, to anybody; and what became of the crew I ...
— Robinson Crusoe • Daniel Defoe

... boy, laughing softly, "that this is England, sir, and that you are not King, but my Lord the Comte de la Seine, who has no power to inflict ...
— The King's Esquires - The Jewel of France • George Manville Fenn

... objects roughly wrapped in fragments of mummy-cloth that had been torn from the body of the queen. These it is needless to describe, for are they not to be seen in the gold room of the Museum, labelled "Bijouterie de la Reine Ma-Me, XVIIIeme Dynastie. Thebes (Smith's Tomb)"? It may be mentioned, however, that the set was incomplete. For instance, there was but one of the great gold ceremonial ear-rings fashioned like a group of pomegranate blooms, and the most beautiful of the necklaces had been torn ...
— Smith and the Pharaohs, and Other Tales • Henry Rider Haggard

... reading-lamp and tried to interest myself in "La Cruelle Enigme." But my wits were restless, and I could not keep my eyes on the page. I flung the book aside and sat down again by the window. The feeling came over me that I was sitting in a box at some play. The ...
— The Moon Endureth—Tales and Fancies • John Buchan

... have still a naughty little spirit of experiment in me which defiles the barbarities of your climate. While as to the convent, it has beckoned so long—let it beckon still! It called first when my fiance died,—God rest his soul,—worn out by the hardships he endured in the war of La Vendee and I put from me forever all thought of marriage. But then my mother, an emigrant here in London, claimed all my care. It called me again when she departed, dear saintly being. But then there were my brother's sons—orphaned ...
— The History of Sir Richard Calmady - A Romance • Lucas Malet

... woman of fascination, a creature indefinable, like poetry. In New York, city and State, she was a reigning belle, caressed by society; she had been named the social queen of South Carolina, under the title of la Sainte Madam Alston. To Theodosia, his only child, whose education he directed, whose opinions he had shaped, whose sympathies were always with him, right or wrong, who after her marriage scarce less than before, looked to him for guidance, as he to ...
— A Dream of Empire - Or, The House of Blennerhassett • William Henry Venable

... produce, from a certain number of acres of this valuable esculent, may be greatly augmented by planting the potatoes whole, at a great distance between each, and hoeing freely between them—See Knight's Papers in Horticultural Transactions, and Payen et Chevalier, Traite de la Pomme de Terre. Paris, ...
— The Church of England Magazine - Volume 10, No. 263, January 9, 1841 • Various

... de Quebec depend d'un coup de main. Les Anglais sont maitres de la riviere: ils n'ont qu'a effectuer une descente sur la rive ou cette Ville, sans fortifications et sans defense, est situee. Les voila en etat de me presenter la bataille; que je ne pourrais plus refuser, et que je ne devrais pas gagner. M. Wolfe, en effet, ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XIX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... La belle France is the woman's country clearly, and it seems a mistake or an anomaly that woman is not at the top and leading in all departments, compelling the other sex to play second fiddle, as she so frequently has done for a brief time in isolated cases ...
— Winter Sunshine • John Burroughs

... Mulehaus: He's the hardest man to identify in the whole kingdom of crooks. Scotland Yard, the Service de la Surete, everybody, says that. I don't mean dime-novel disguises—false whiskers and a limp. I mean the ability to be the character he pretends—the thing that used to make Joe Jefferson, Rip Van Winkle—and not an actor made up to look like him. That's the reason nobody could keep ...
— The Sleuth of St. James's Square • Melville Davisson Post

... he, Gerald Burton, was now showing himself to be in thus spending the short summer night out-of-doors, a la belle etoile, as the French so charmingly put it, instead of in some stuffy, perhaps ...
— The End of Her Honeymoon • Marie Belloc Lowndes

... with a smile. "First love is fool's paradise. But console yourself out of Boccaccio. 'Bocca baciata non perde ventura; anzi rinnuova, come fa la luna.'" ...
— The Emancipated • George Gissing

... accommodated very cheaply, and am at the same time within easy reach of many things, the neighborhood of which I can turn to good account. The medical school, for instance, is within ten minutes' walk; the Jardin des Plantes not two hundred steps away; while the Hospital (de la Pitie), where Messieurs Andral and Lisfranc teach, is opposite, and nearer still. To-day or to-morrow I shall deliver my letters, and then set to work in ...
— Louis Agassiz: His Life and Correspondence • Louis Agassiz

... que le bon Dieu les benisse. Ah, Nekhludoff, how do you do? You haven't shown yourself for a long time," he greeted Nekhludoff. "Allez presenter vos devoirs a madame. The Korchagins are here, too. Toutes les jolies femmes de la ville," he said, holding out and somewhat raising his military shoulders for his overcoat, which was being placed on him by his own magnificent lackey in gold-braided uniform. "Au revoir, mon cher." Then he ...
— The Awakening - The Resurrection • Leo Nikoleyevich Tolstoy

... poetic,' said Aunt Truth, 'for they call it la copa de oro, the golden cup. Oh, see them yonder! It is like the Field of the ...
— A Summer in a Canyon: A California Story • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... said Anna. "Do you know, the only woman who came to see me in Petersburg was Betsy Tverskaya? You know her, of course? Au fond, c'est la femme la plus depravee qui existe. She had an intrigue with Tushkevitch, deceiving her husband in the basest way. And she told me that she did not care to know me so long as my position was irregular. Don't imagine I would compare...I know you, darling. ...
— Anna Karenina • Leo Tolstoy

... ennoble art? that we must select? Did the ancients ever exhibit the ugly or the grotesque? Did they ever mingle comedy and tragedy? The example of the ancients, gentlemen! And Aristotle, too, and Boileau, and La ...
— Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books - with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations • Charles W. Eliot

... Master, all the valiant knights Assembled in their island, at that time Besieged by Soliman. This noble youth, Scarce numbering eighteen summers, straightway fled From Alcala, where he pursued his studies, And suddenly arrived at La Valette. "This Cross," he said, "was bought for me; and now To prove I'm worthy of it." He was one Of forty knights who held St. Elmo's Castle, At midday, 'gainst Piali, Ulucciali, And Mustapha, and Hassem; the assault Being thrice repeated. When the castle fell, And all ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... La Poetica d'Aristotele vulgarizzata et sposta, 1570. This view of Castelvetro, who was remarkable for his independence of Aristotle, was fairly common in France. La Mesnardiere, for instance, was ...
— The Preface to Aristotle's Art of Poetry • Andre Dacier

... force of the advance were irresistible. Trenches were blotted out. Towns were taken. The German lines melted away over wide areas. Victory, decisive and permanent, rested on the Allied banners. On the third of the month the British took La Boiselle and four thousand three hundred prisoners. But on the fourth the enemy troops turned and fought like wild animals at bay. This was the day on which Aleck received his wounds. In the morning, as they lay sprawled in a ravine which had been captured the night before, waiting for ...
— The Flag • Homer Greene

... purser couldn't work it out quicker," he cried in his delight. "Here's for you again! We passed the Straits and worked up to the Azores, where we fell in with the La Sabina from the Mauritius with sugar and spices. Twelve hundred pounds she's worth to me, Mary, my darling, and never again shall you soil your pretty fingers or pinch ...
— Rodney Stone • Arthur Conan Doyle

... partial to Debussy. He has an extraordinary atmosphere, and, after one has formed a taste for him, his compositions are alluring, particularly his Homage a Rameau, Jardins sous la pluie and D'un cahier d'esquisses, which I have been playing ...
— Great Pianists on Piano Playing • James Francis Cooke

... a virgin desert. From Winnipeg to the Pacific Ocean there are a few places that might attain to the dignity of an oasis—at Brandon, Portage la Prairie, etc.—but it is generally what I should call worthless; 100 miles to wood and 100 feet to water was the general experience west of the Moose jaw, and the months of June, July, and August are the only three in the ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 484, April 11, 1885 • Various

... saw a thin misty countenance, formed as of the white spray of the salt-sea wave, so sparkling, so shadowy, yet so clear, come between me and the moonbeams, and raise its hand thus.—Oh, mercy—mercy—mercy!" she shrieked, so as to startle the Lady Frances, and then as hastily exclaimed, "La! madam, to think of the like! if it isn't that little muddy, nasty Crisp, who has found me out! I will tell you the rest by and by, madam, only I want to turn this little beast into the shrubbery, that he ...
— The Buccaneer - A Tale • Mrs. S. C. Hall

... chide, admonish; berate, betongue[obs3]; bring to account, call to account, call over the coals, rake over the coals, call to order; take to task, reprove, lecture, bring to book; read a lesson, read a lecture to; rebuke, correct. reprimand, chastise, castigate, lash, blow up, trounce, trim, laver la tete[Fr], overhaul; give it one, give it one finely; gibbet. accuse &c. 938; impeach, denounce; hold up to reprobation, hold up to execration; expose, brand, gibbet, stigmatize; show up, pull up, take up; cry "shame" upon; be outspoken; raise a hue and ...
— Roget's Thesaurus • Peter Mark Roget

... are we, tra la, That ply on the emerald sea, tra la; With loving and laughing, And quipping and quaffing, We're happy as happy can be, tra la— With ...
— The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan - The 14 Gilbert And Sullivan Plays • William Schwenk Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan

... Herodotus, Arabian Nights, Canterbury Tales, Montaigne's Essays, Shakespeare, Gibbon. Famous literary compositions at different levels or in their various classes are Boccaccio's Decameron, Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, Aretino, Spenser's Faery Queen, Rabelais, Pilgrim's Progress, La Fontaine's Tales, Rousseau's Confessions, Tristram Shandy, Candide, Don Juan; and even among these how fair a proportion depends for its value and fruitfulness on the student? And, again, on his training. ...
— The Book-Collector • William Carew Hazlitt

... of her vulgarised charms the meek matron would consent to encase herself in one of Seraphine's severest corsets, called in bitterest mockery a la sante—at five guineas—in order that the dressmaker might measure ...
— Phantom Fortune, A Novel • M. E. Braddon

... Mrs. Allingham painted in the company of his beloved 'Tib' in the garden at Chelsea, or as Whittington, the hero of our milk-and-water days: think of El Daher Beybars, who fed all feline comers, or 'La Belle Stewart,' Duchess of Richmond, who, in the words of the poet, 'endowed a college' for her little friends: you must be as approbative of their character, their amenableness to education, their inconstancy, not to say indifference ...
— Concerning Cats - My Own and Some Others • Helen M. Winslow

... Egg beater. Rotary, or Dover, recipes, recipes, Individual baking dishes for, souffle, Eggplant, Baked, Food value and composition of, Preparation of, Sauted, Scalloped, Eggs, a la goldenrod, Alpine, and place in the diet, Description of, as food, Value of, Beating of, Breaking of, Candling, Clipped, Commercial preservation of, Cooking, Cooking of, Creamed, Desiccated, Deterioration of, Digestibility of, Extra fancy, Fancy, Fat in, for cooking, Preliminary ...
— Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 2 - Volume 2: Milk, Butter and Cheese; Eggs; Vegetables • Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences

... city of Tacoma, utilizing the third of the rivers emptying into the Sound. The Nisqually is dammed above its famous canyon, at an elevation of 970 feet, where its minimum flow is 300 second feet. The water will be carried through a 10,000-foot tunnel and over a bridge to a reservoir at La Grande, from which the penstocks will carry it down the side of the canyon {p.112} to the 40,000 horse-power generating plant built on a narrow shelf a few feet above the river. The city expects to be able to produce power for its own use, with a considerable margin ...
— The Mountain that was 'God' • John H. Williams

... want you to help me to choose the other presents. There; these," pointing to a scarf and a muslin dress adorned with the wings of diamond beetles, "are for some young cousins of my own; but you will be able best to choose what the other De la Poers and your cousins ...
— Countess Kate • Charlotte M. Yonge

... front went hopelessly astray and took the wrong turning. The leading battalion was, however, very shortly extricated and put on the right road, and after passing Tournans we halted, after a sixteen-mile march, at a magnificent chateau near Gagny (Chateau de la Monture) at ...
— The Doings of the Fifteenth Infantry Brigade - August 1914 to March 1915 • Edward Lord Gleichen

... la complaisance, monsieur?" said Mademoiselle Viefville, taking the glass from the unresisting hand of Mr. Effingham. "Ha! le combat commence ...
— Homeward Bound - or, The Chase • James Fenimore Cooper

... "La Gioconda" on one of the days after her return to Paris, when a charge of four shillings was made for admission, and, towards the end of the day, the smile is said to have worn ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 146., January 14, 1914 • Various

... all the streets,—sonnet to Doctor Massarenti, who cured Madame Tagliani; sonnet to young Guadagni, on the occasion of his becoming Bachelor of Arts, etc., etc. At Faenza, these mural inscriptions evinced a certain degree of fanaticism, but the fanaticism of the dramatic art: Viva la Ristori! Viva la diva Rossi! At Rimini, and at Forli, I read Viva Verdi! (which words had not then the political significance they have recently attained,) Viva la Lotti! together with a long list ...
— The Roman Question • Edmond About

... watch me boys whut Ahm gonna do to him. Ahm gonna laff in notes, while Ah work on him. (he lifts a checker high in the air preparatory to the jump, laughing to the scale and counting each checker he jumps out loud) Do, sol, fa, me, la! One! (jumps a checker) la, sol, fa, me, do! Two! (jumps another) Do, re, fa, me, do, Three! Me, re, la, so, fa! Four! (the crowd is roaring with laughter) Sol, fa, me, la, sol, do! Five! Ha! Ha! boys I got [Note: "the" x-ed out] de ole tush hawg! I got him in de ...
— De Turkey and De Law - A Comedy in Three Acts • Zora Neale Hurston

... easy," said Gouache, thoughtfully. "A handful of students, a few paving-stones, 'Vive la Republique!' and we have a tumult in ...
— Saracinesca • F. Marion Crawford

... lake at D, Sousi pointed and said, "They are here." We sneaked with the utmost caution that way—it was impossible to follow any one trail—and in 200 yards Sousi sank to the ground gasping out, "La! la! maintenon faites son portrait au taut que vous voudrez." I crawled forward and saw, not one, but half a dozen Buffalo. "I must be nearer," I said, and, lying flat on my breast, crawled, toes and elbows, up to a bush within 75 yards, where I made shot No. 1, and saw here that ...
— The Arctic Prairies • Ernest Thompson Seton

... on the objections to the reality and immutability of moral distinctions and to the universal diffusion of the moral faculty. The reference is, in the first instance, to Locke, and then to what he terms, after Adam Smith, the licentious moralists—La Rochefoucauld and Mandeville. The replies to these writers contain ...
— Moral Science; A Compendium of Ethics • Alexander Bain

... way, after that moment's pause, with hasty and impatient steps. On the way up he encountered Sarah the housemaid, who stopped in the middle of the stairs to make a frightened little curtsy, and utter an alarmed "La!" of recognition and surprise. But Sarah turned round as soon as she had recovered herself, to say that her missis wanted very bad to see Mr Wentworth as soon as he came home; but she was gone up to bed now, and didn't he think it would be a pity to wake her up? The Curate gave her only a ...
— The Perpetual Curate • Mrs [Margaret] Oliphant

... curing beef To dry beef for summer use To corn beef in hot weather Important observations on roasting, boiling, frying, &c. Beef a-la-mode Brisket of beef baked Beef olives To stew a rump of beef A fricando of beef An excellent method of dressing beef To collar a flank of beef To make hunter's beef A nice little dish of beef Beef steaks To hash beef Beef steak pie ...
— The Virginia Housewife • Mary Randolph

... to the castle, which, with the title of "La Joyeuse Garde" bestowed upon it in memory of the happy event, was conferred on Sir Launcelot by Arthur, as ...
— Bulfinch's Mythology • Thomas Bulfinch

... "Hop-la!" she cried, mounting Giant. Her sister Varya got on Maika, Nikitin on Count Nulin, the officers on their horses, and the long picturesque cavalcade, with the officers in white tunics and the ladies in their riding habits, moved at a walking ...
— The Party and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... conception of the mind, must necessarily belong to some other part of speech. They who wish to speak often, or rather, to make noises, when they have no useful information to communicate, are apt to use words very freely in this way; such as the following expressions, la, la me, my, O my, O dear, dear me, surprising, astonishing, ...
— English Grammar in Familiar Lectures • Samuel Kirkham

... Cir cu la'tion. The passage of the blood from the heart into the arteries, and from them through the capillaries into the veins, and through the veins ...
— A Handbook of Health • Woods Hutchinson

... of the technical part of his business, it is also desirable that the up-to-date workman should be familiar with the subject from a historical point of view. To aid in such an understanding of the matter we have translated from "L'Almanach de l'Horologerie et de la Bijouterie" the matter contained in ...
— Watch and Clock Escapements • Anonymous

... l' anno, Bella madre de' fiori, D'erbe novelle e di novelli amori, Tu torni ben; ma teco Non tornano i sereni E fortunati di de le mie gioje: Tu torni ben, tu torni, Ma teco altro non torna Che del perduto mio caro tesoro La rimembranza misera e dolente: Tu quella sei, tu quella, Ch'era pur dianzi si vezzosa e bella; Ma non son io gia quel ch'un tempo fui, Si caro a gli ...
— Primavera - Poems by Four Authors • Stephen Phillips, Laurence Binyon, Manmohan Ghose and Arthur Shearly Cripps

... communities. It was because the incautious physician had mistaken him for a member of the brotherhood of Israel that he had ventured upon his now transparent jests. "Good God!" thought Da Costa, sickening as he remembered the auto-da-fe he had seen at Lisbon in his boyhood, when De la Asuncao, the Franciscan Jew monk, clothed in the Sanbenito, was solemnly burnt in the presence of the king, the queen, the court, and the mob. "What if 'twas my tale to Frei Jose that led to Dom Diego's arrest! But no, that were ...
— Dreamers of the Ghetto • I. Zangwill

... suggestion for the character of Fenella in Peveril of the Peak was taken from Goethe, as we learn by Scott's acknowledgment in the Introduction. Another German from whom Scott borrowed a suggestion—this time for the unlucky "White Lady of Avenel"—was the Baron de la Motte Fouque. Scott was evidently interested in his work, though he thought Fouque sometimes used such a profusion of historical and antiquarian lore that readers would find it difficult to follow the narrative.[342] Sir Walter asked his son to tell the Baroness ...
— Sir Walter Scott as a Critic of Literature • Margaret Ball

... by law or by the constitution, such removal emancipates them, such law or constitution abolishing their slavery. This principle is asserted in the decision of the Supreme Court of Louisiana, in the case of Lunsford vs. Coquillon, 14 Martin's La. Reps. 401. Also by the Supreme Court of Virginia, in the case of Hunter vs. Fulcher, 1 Leigh's Reps. 172. The same doctrine was laid down by Judge Washington, of the United States Supreme Court, in the case of Butler vs. Hopper, Washington's Circuit Court Reps. 508. This ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... left of the 2nd Corps the 3rd Division had made some advance to the line Lorgies—Herlies. The 5th Division on the right was up against La Bassee, but could make no further headway. It was a ...
— 1914 • John French, Viscount of Ypres

... met on the 2d of January, 1649, resolved to enforce the execution of the declaration, which, they pretended, had been infringed in all its articles; and the Queen was resolved to retire from Paris with the King and the whole Court. The Queen was guided by the Cardinal, and the Duc d'Orleans by La Riviere, the most sordid and self-interested man of the age in which he lived. As for the Prince de Conde, he began to be disgusted with the unseasonable proceedings of the Parliament almost as soon as he had concerted ...
— The Memoirs of Cardinal de Retz, Complete • Jean Francois Paul de Gondi, Cardinal de Retz

... Mr. Dod. "How remarkably contracted the Place de la Concorde looks down there, doesn't it! It's like looking through the wrong end of ...
— A Voyage of Consolation - (being in the nature of a sequel to the experiences of 'An - American girl in London') • Sara Jeannette Duncan

... hommes ouvrant la carriere Des grands et des nobles talents, Ils n'ont mis aucune barriere A ...
— Madame Roland, Makers of History • John S. C. Abbott

... years old, a cautious, clever lawyer whose abilities were to make a great impression upon the history of his country. He belonged to a family of Huguenot merchants. The Jays lived at La Rochelle until the revocation of the Edict of Nantes drove the great-grandfather to England, where the family continued until 1686, when Augustus, the grandfather, settled in New York. It was not a family of aristocrats; ...
— A Political History of the State of New York, Volumes 1-3 • DeAlva Stanwood Alexander

... see a real nation, numerically small, in whose veins the Anglo-Saxon blood flows almost untainted; I see rich men casting down their gold, and strong men casting down their lives, as if both were dross, in the cause they have sworn to win; I see Sybarites enduring hardships that un vieux de la vieille would have grumbled at, without a whispered murmur; I hear gentle and tender women echo in simple earnestness the words that once were spoken to me by a fair Southern wife—"I pray that Philip may die in the front, and that they may burn me ...
— Border and Bastille • George A. Lawrence

... by Bassano Translations from the Spanish of Antonio Machado Vagones de Tercera Quai de la Tournelle Of Foreign ...
— When Winter Comes to Main Street • Grant Martin Overton

... in from the Buttery and slam them down on the Table, a la Commercial Hotel, but when it came to building up an intricate Design with an ingrowing Napkin, three spoons, four Knives, five forks, and all the long-stemmed Glasses, to say nothing of an artful pyramiding of Cut Flowers around the Candelabra, then ...
— Ade's Fables • George Ade

... to the heavens, when Secchi and Huggins studied the chemistry of the stars by means of the spectroscope, and when Warren De la Rue set up a photoheliograph at Kew, we see that a progress in the same direction as before, in the evolution of our conception of the universe, was being made. Without definite expression at any particular date, it came to be an accepted fact that ...
— History of Astronomy • George Forbes

... "Les Amies de la Jeune Fille," in its early days, realised the danger to young girls travelling, and thus early commenced to safeguard them against it. Much was done, but nothing commensurate with ...
— Fighting the Traffic in Young Girls - War on the White Slave Trade • Various

... de la France, B. IV. C. 9, is selected the following account of the Gypsies in that country: "On August 17th, 1427, came to Paris, twelve Penitents, Penanciers, as they called themselves, viz: a Duke, an Earl, and ten men, all on horse-back, and calling themselves good ...
— A Historical Survey of the Customs, Habits, & Present State of the Gypsies • John Hoyland

... significance. But he was a man, and a man in love, fighting the strongest instincts of his nature; and the bewildering beauty of her as she danced, the languorous, ethereal allure, delicately sensuous as the fragrance of a La France rose, sent the hot blood rioting through his veins. . . . She was going—slowly retreating from him. The primal man in him, the innate hunter who took his mate by capture, swept him headlong. With a bound ...
— The Lamp of Fate • Margaret Pedler

... Persian, who was assisted by Geronino Verroneo, an Italian, and Austin de Bordeaux, a Frenchman. They are credited with the mosaics and other decorations. Austin designed and made the famous peacock throne at Delhi. Governor La Fouche of that province, who has carefully restored the park that surrounds the building, and is keeping things up in a way that commands hearty commendation, has the original plans and specifications, ...
— Modern India • William Eleroy Curtis

... possible?" exclaimed La Luciola, clapping her hands with joy. "Who is the composer of the new opera? Gioberto, Palmerelli, or perhaps you, Ticellini? But stay! before we go any further, I make one condition: the subject must not ...
— The Son of Monte-Cristo, Volume I (of 2) • Alexandre Dumas pere

... de la Brosse.] Secretary of Philip III of France. The courtiers, envying the high place which he held in the king's favour, prevailed on Mary of Brabant to charge him falsely with an attempt upon her person for which supposed crime ...
— The Divine Comedy • Dante

... Historico Nacional, Madrid; the third, from a MS. in the Biblioteca Nacional, Madrid; the fourth, sixth, and seventh, from MSS. in the Archivo general de Indias, Sevilla; the fifth, from a MS. in the Academia Real de la Historia, Madrid; and the last two, from Pastells's edition ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume XXV, 1635-36 • Various

... even to very homely expostulations, still, in the last resort, no doubts were felt that the oracle must be right. Brouwer, the Belgic scholar, who has so recently and so temperately treated these subjects (Histoire de la Civilisation Morale et Religieuse chez les Grecs: 6 tomes: Groningue—1840), alleges a case (which, however, we do not remember to have met) where the client ventured to object:—"Mon roi Apollon, je crois que tu es fou." But cases are obvious which look ...
— Memorials and Other Papers • Thomas de Quincey

... ce n'est pas la guerre! These events never occurred, as we shall see later, yet the poet has the old reiving spirit, the full sense of the fierce manly times, and possesses a traditional knowledge of the historical personages of the day, and knows ...
— Sir Walter Scott and the Border Minstrelsy • Andrew Lang

... one of the houses which, after this fashion, lined the Pont au Change, sat, on the evening of the day on which Philip de la Mole had escaped from the Louvre, three persons, the listlessness of whose attitudes showed that they were all more or less ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846 • Various

... handed to the Government on the 15th, and the 'Tsala' commented on it on September 19, before the daily papers. I think that the daily papers were still trying to reconcile their previous articles about the loyalty of ALL WHITE SOUTH AFRICANS with the resignation. The fact that General De la Rey was shot while travelling in the same car with General Beyers on the same day that Beyers resigned is cited as a further proof of the unswerving loyalty of all the Boers. One cannot understand how these white folks reason; but the attitude of the Imperial Government ...
— Native Life in South Africa, Before and Since • Solomon Tshekisho Plaatje

... the half-uttered prayers, the curious little half-conscious efforts to regain form and dignity. She could only pray to the Virgin. When relieved by the daughter of Madame's French friend, who spoke good English, she murmured desperately: "Oh! mademoiselle, madame est tres fatiguee—la pauvre tete—faut-il enlever les cheveux? Elle fait ca toujours pour elle-meme." For, to the girl, with her reverence for the fastidious dignity which never left her mistress, it seemed sacrilege to divest her of her crown ...
— Tatterdemalion • John Galsworthy

... One glance at our cabins, at the crowded decks and dining-room, at the little writing-room above, where the ink had congealed in the ink-wells, sufficed to bring home to us that the days of luxurious sea travel, of a la carte restaurants, and Louis Seize bedrooms were gone—at least for a period. The prospect of a voyage of nearly two weeks was not enticing. The ship, to be sure, was far from being the best of those still running ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... that I shall give you pleasure and joy when I tell you that La Conjuration d'Ambroise, thus says my porter, is announced as a real money-maker. There was a line this evening as at Villemer, and Magny which is also a barometer, ...
— The George Sand-Gustave Flaubert Letters • George Sand, Gustave Flaubert

... the justice of the observation is admitted, and it is decided that the victims shall be made to pass slowly between two rows of slaughterers, who shall be under the obligation to strike with the back of the sword only so as to prolong the agony. At the prison de la Force the victims are stripped stark naked and literally "carved" for half an hour, after which, when every one has had a good view, they are finished off by a blow ...
— The Crowd • Gustave le Bon

... if we may believe reports, was, like the Chevalier of Alencon, an old gentleman, tall, thin, withered, and moneyless. He of Bourges had emigrated; he of Touraine hid himself; he of Alencon fought in La Vendee and "chouanized" somewhat. The youth of the latter was spend in Paris, where the Revolution overtook him when thirty years of age in the midst of ...
— An Old Maid • Honore de Balzac

... up aloft come in handiest. I've seen the Hightalians who do the fruit trade up the big rivers that run north from the Plate—La Plata, you call it. They sail up for months to go and buy oranges to bring down for Europe and the States. They use brigs with spars so long you'd think they'd topple their boats over. Do ...
— Old Gold - The Cruise of the "Jason" Brig • George Manville Fenn

... it is, young mistress mine, All about this valiant knight, Who came to me all drunk with wine, At the dead hour of the night. He seized me struggling to get free, And swore by the goat of Jove, He would me fee, if I would be, La! my lady! I fear to tell it ...
— Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Volume XXIV. • Revised by Alexander Leighton

... La Fontaine stole one of Grattelard's dialogues bodily, and converted it into the celebrated fable of The Acorn and the Pumpkin. Grattelard was contemporary with Tabarin, as remarked above: he and his partner, Desiderio ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 26, August, 1880 - of Popular Literature and Science • Various

... Europe through literary channels, Professor Cowell says, "They are the stray waifs of literature, in the course of their long wanderings coming to be recognized under widely different aspects, as when they are used by Boccaccio, or Chaucer, or La Fontaine." ...
— More Jataka Tales • Re-told by Ellen C. Babbitt

... are roses golden white, Like the stars that lovers watch On a purple summer night. Here are roses ruddy red, Here are roses Cupid's pink; Here are roses like his cheeks— Deeper—like his lips, I think. Vogue la galere! what if they die, ...
— Old Spookses' Pass • Isabella Valancy Crawford

... did not fast on purpose, but his long walks through wild country and indigent people inflicted on him much severe deprivation: moreover, as he ate whatever food offered itself,—food unpalatable and often indigestible to him, his whole frame might have vied in emaciation with a monk of La Trappe. ...
— Phases of Faith - Passages from the History of My Creed • Francis William Newman

... replied Lienarde, in great confusion; "it is my neighbor, Gisquette la Gencienne, who wishes to ...
— Notre-Dame de Paris - The Hunchback of Notre Dame • Victor Hugo

... "La, now! Who'd ever have thought of such a thing?" Bunting exclaimed, in admiration. "The newspapers do have some useful hints ...
— The Lodger • Marie Belloc Lowndes

... the latter in Philidor's Defence. These two kinds of games are found in chess-play because they are found in human temperament; as there are brilliant and daring Napoleons, and cautious, pertinacious Washingtons in war, so are there in chess Philidor and La Bourdonnais, Staunton and Morphy. In examining Mr. Staunton's play, for example, one is struck with the French tact of M. St. Amant's remark, made many years ago: "M. Staunton has the solidity of iron, but neither the purity of gold nor the brilliancy of ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 5, No. 32, June, 1860 • Various

... Reeves told the Phill-la-me-york story which was told by Austin Pen Parnell. You will find it in his story. The only difference between his story and Parnell's is that Reeves had the conclusion. He claimed that the old master got in a fight with one of the slaves present and yelled out his identity when he was getting ...
— Slave Narratives: Arkansas Narratives - Arkansas Narratives, Part 6 • Works Projects Administration

... something that I can quite recommend; it's decidedly a la mode, worn by all the duchesses, countesses, baronesses, and lady mayoresses, at all the balls, routs, conversaziones, and concerts given this season! And—yes, just try that bonnet on your head, and look at yourself in this glass"—(Folly always carries ...
— The Crown of Success • Charlotte Maria Tucker

... Ages. The people primitively worshipped idols. The clergy, headed by the Dominican and Franciscan monks, introduced Lady Days into the calendar and invented the rosary to facilitate the recital of the Aves; secular orders of knighthood placed themselves under the Virgin's protection (La Chevalerie de Sainte Marie), but the rarest minds, sublimating the beloved, raised her into Heaven and worshipped her as divine. The established religion was compelled to enter into partnership with the great emotion of the ...
— The Evolution of Love • Emil Lucka

... protection of the unfortunate Indians in his foreign dominions, and he stopped the progress of African slavery by an order that all slaves in his American islands should he made free. This order was executed by Pedro de la Gasca. Manumission took place as well in Hispaniola as on the Continent; but on the return of Gasca to Spain, and the retirement of Charles into a monastery, ...
— The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the - Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, by the British Parliament (1839) • Thomas Clarkson

... At La Folie one of the Salvation Army lassies going across the fields on some errand of mercy found three American graves undecorated and bare on Memorial Day, and turning aside from the road she gathered great armfuls of scarlet ...
— The War Romance of the Salvation Army • Evangeline Booth and Grace Livingston Hill

... and CONRAD appears, pale but erect,—N.B. The whole of this scene has been compared to one in "La Tosca"—which, however, it exceeds in ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 99, August 9, 1890. • Various

... sideways glance, she betrayed knowledge of my presence. Her own transaction was all matter-of-fact, as if engaging passage to Benton of Wyoming Territory contained no novelty for her. Could she by any chance live there—a woman dressed like she was, as much a la mode as if she walked Broadway in New York? Omaha itself had astonished me with the display upon its streets; and now if Benton, far out in the wilderness, should prove another surprise——! Indeed, ...
— Desert Dust • Edwin L. Sabin



Words linked to "La" :   US, Morgan City, Baron de la Brede et de Montesquieu, metal, Confederate States of America, United States, the States, USA, Red River, Baton Rouge, Ouachita River, south, U.S., lah, United States of America, Deep South, Shreveport, Louisiana, dixie, New Orleans, La Fontaine, Monroe, Gulf States, Confederate States, American state, America, confederacy, red, metallic element, La Paz, Alexandria, capital of Louisiana, Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Ouachita, U.S.A.



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