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Howe

noun
1.
United States editor (1920-1993).  Synonym: Irving Howe.
2.
Canadian hockey player who holds the record for playing the most games (born 1928).  Synonyms: Gordie Howe, Gordon Howe.
3.
United States feminist who was active in the women's suffrage movement (1819-1910).  Synonym: Julia Ward Howe.
4.
United States inventor who built early sewing machines and won suits for patent infringement against other manufacturers (including Isaac M. Singer) (1819-1867).  Synonym: Elias Howe.






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"Howe" Quotes from Famous Books



... who follows the effect open hostility with England had upon the American theatre, will find most interesting material relating to the dramatic activities of the soldiers under the leadership of Generals Burgoyne and Howe. In fact, no account of dramatic writings in this country can ignore the fact that General Burgoyne, apart from the farce which incited Mrs. Mercy Warren, was himself a serious dramatist, who took his work seriously, and whose dramas may be obtained at any large reference library. ...
— Representative Plays by American Dramatists - 1765-1819 • Various

... opinion as to which of our patriotic hymns or songs is distinctively the national anthem of America. Senator Hoar seems to have made up his mind in favor of "The Battle Hymn of the Republic." Writing of its author, Julia Ward Howe, in 1903, he said: "We waited eighty years for our American national anthem. At last God inspired an illustrious and noble woman to utter in undying verse the thought which we hope is forever to animate the soldier ...
— Eclectic School Readings: Stories from Life • Orison Swett Marden

... the grounds and outhouses of Iranistan to Elias Howe, Jr., the inventor of the sewing-machine. The property brought $50,000, which, with the $28,000 insurance went into Barnum's assets to satisfy clock creditors. It was Mr. Howe's intention to erect a splendid mansion on the estate, but his untimely and lamented death prevented the ...
— A Unique Story of a Marvellous Career. Life of Hon. Phineas T. • Joel Benton

... of FRONTENAC to consist of the Townships of Kingston, Wolfe Island, Pittsburg and Howe ...
— The British North America Act, 1867 • Anonymous

... overlooking the garden. There was a little brown room where a ci-devant vicar had written his sermons, with a big cupboard in the wall where he hung his cassock. He had a grown-up family, but his wife was dead. One day he married again and brought home a slim, pale-faced girl—a certain Priscilla Howe—to be the mistress of his house. There were stories rife in the village that her step-children were too much for poor, pretty Priscilla; that while her husband wrote his sermons in the little brown room the young wife pined and ...
— Uncle Max • Rosa Nouchette Carey

... cast your eye into that field of wheat She's there as large as life."— "My bitter disgrace! Howe'er shall I face ...
— Flamsted quarries • Mary E. Waller

... sometime in August, 1776, he accepted a commission of Lieutenant Colonel Commandant, signed by General Howe and empowering him to raise a battalion of Rangers for the British Army. To this work he now applied ...
— Bay State Monthly, Volume II. No. 4, January, 1885 - A Massachusetts Magazine • Various

... 1595 to Thomas Millington as, "for his Copie vnder th[e h]andes of bothe the wardens a ballad intituled, The Norfolk gent his will and Testament and how he Commytted the keepinge of his Children to his owne brother whoe delte moste wickedly with them and howe God plagued him for it." It was printed as a black-letter ballad in 1670. Addison wrote a paper on it in "The Spectator" (No. 85), praising it as "one of the darling songs of ...
— A Bundle of Ballads • Various

... Clarke and his followers fought as partisan rangers, but he soon drew around him a compact and disciplined body of men who were ready to go wherever he might lead them. He did not confine his efforts to his new neighborhood We hear of him with Howe's ill-fated expedition against East Florida, where, at Alligator Creek, he was asked to perform the impossible feat of storming with a troop of horse a camp intrenched behind logs and brushwood. He was no doubt amazed at the stupidity ...
— Stories Of Georgia - 1896 • Joel Chandler Harris

... "Howe'er it be, it seems to me 'Tis only noble to be good: True hearts are more than coronets, And simple ...
— Speeches: Literary and Social • Charles Dickens

... Cou. Howe's this? It is confess'd I have talk'd in my tyme And talk'd too much, but not too much of you; For I but seldome thought of such a woman: For ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. II • Various

... pause). Sir, nothing can surprise me which a court Inspired by Burleigh's hate and Hatton's zeal, Howe'er unjust, may venture to pronounce: But I have yet to learn how far the queen Will dare in execution ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... not a sudden outburst of reckless joy on the part of the Philadelphians; for long before the coming of Howe the wealthier families had given social functions that delighted and astonished foreign visitors. We are sure that as early as 1738 dancing was taught by Theobald Hackett, who offered to instruct in "all sorts of fashionable English and French dances, after the newest and politest ...
— Woman's Life in Colonial Days • Carl Holliday

... The Howe sewing machine factory at Bridgeport, Connecticut, became the American Graphophone plant; Tainter went there to supervise the manufacturing, and continued his inventive work for many years. This Bridgeport ...
— Development of the Phonograph at Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory • Leslie J. Newville

... however, that the prince should highly contemn the nobility: "Remember, howe that error brake the king, my grandfather's heart. Consider that vertue followeth oftest noble blood: the more frequently that your court can be garnished with them, as peers and fathers of your land, thinke it the ...
— Literary Character of Men of Genius - Drawn from Their Own Feelings and Confessions • Isaac D'Israeli

... of your Recreation, I in your Looks can read the Play's Damnation. Lord! how ye stare to find an honest Bride, A thing you think a Monster in Cheapside. Whither you boast that you so often come, And leave your footmen to perform at home. Yet 'tis no little Comfort t' us howe're, You oftner bring th' Estate than get the Heir. Unjustly therefore you your Fortune blame, She's kinder to your Blood that ...
— The City Bride (1696) - Or The Merry Cuckold • Joseph Harris

... the Resolution proceeded westward, sighting Howe Island, seen by Captain Wallis, and afterwards an island before unknown, to which the name of Palmerston was given. On the 20th of June she came in sight of an island eleven leagues in circuit. Keeping the ship well out to ...
— Notable Voyagers - From Columbus to Nordenskiold • W.H.G. Kingston and Henry Frith

... enough; and you too being ready, there is a noise! Clink, clank, death and fury; all persons gathering round, and new quarrels springing from this one! And Dogberry comes up with the town guard? And the shopkeepers hastily close their shops? Nay, it is hardly necessary, says Mr. Howe; these buckler fights amount only to noise, for most part; the jingle of iron against tin and painted leather. Ruffling swashers strutting along with big oaths and whiskers, delight to pick a quarrel; but the rule is you do not thrust, you do not ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 3, No. 1, April, 1851 • Various

... last, one day, these deliberate people finally made up their minds that it was time to rise,—and when they rose, everything else fell. In less than a year afterwards, Boston being finally evacuated, one of General Howe's mortified officers wrote home to England, in words which might form a Complete Letter-Writer for every army-officer who has turned traitor, from Beauregard downward,—"Bad times, my dear friend. The displeasure I feel in the ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 8, Issue 45, July, 1861 • Various

... Miss Howe to Clarissa.—Is astonished, confounded, aghast. Repeats her advice to ...
— Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9) • Samuel Richardson

... months later, September 5, 1893, his life came to an end—a life that had been in no way great, but that had been spent in the loving and faithful service of his fellow-men. At his funeral, Mrs. Julia Ward Howe, an intimate friend of many years, read this just and ...
— Early Letters of George Wm. Curtis • G. W. Curtis, ed. George Willis Cooke

... have lain, Me not worth your thought you prized; But your malice was in vain, For your favours I despised. And, howe'er you value me, I with praise shall thought on be When the world esteems you not And your ...
— Pastoral Poems by Nicholas Breton, - Selected Poetry by George Wither, and - Pastoral Poetry by William Browne (of Tavistock) • Nicholas Breton, George Wither, William Browne (of Tavistock)

... passed, evidently regarding us with apprehension as detectives. Mifflin, never at a loss, remarked loudly "No, I see no footprints here," and as the ragged one passed hastily on with head twisted over his shoulder, we followed him. At the corner of Howe Street he broke into an uneasy shuffle, and Mifflin turned a great laugh into a ...
— Shandygaff • Christopher Morley

... the 26th of August, and I had no hope that Miss Cobbe could be at her town residence, but I felt bound to deliver Mrs. Howe's letter, and I wished to give her a Vassar pamphlet; so I took a cab and drove; it was at an enormous distance from my lodging—she told me it was six miles. I was as much surprised as delighted ...
— Maria Mitchell: Life, Letters, and Journals • Maria Mitchell

... you by that which you profess, (Howe'er you came to know it,) answer me; Though you untie the winds and let them fight Against the churches'; though the yeasty waves Confound and swallow navigation' up; Though bladed corn be lodged, and trees blown down'; Though castles topple on their ...
— McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... of Gods, an instrument Wherewith all mortals shall be plagued or blest, Even at my pleasure; yea, thou shalt be bent This way and that, howe'er it like me best: And following thee, as tides the moon, the West Shall flood the Eastern coasts with waves of war, And thy vex'd soul shall scarcely be at rest, Even in the ...
— Helen of Troy • Andrew Lang

... theatrical career after the opening of Drury lane theatre, in 1663. She appears to have been the first female representative of Desdemona. By Prince Rupert she had a daughter, named Ruperta, married to Lieutenant-general Howe, who survived her husband many years, dying at Somerset ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... men present at the trial-men who also fight for their ideals. There was Frederic C. Howe, then Commissioner of Immigration of the Port of New York, Frank P. Walsh, International labor leader, Dudley Field Malone, then Collector of the Port of New York, Amos Pinchot, liberal leader, John A. H. Hopkins, then liberal-progressive leader in New Jersey ...
— Jailed for Freedom • Doris Stevens

... meanness of those people's notions, who degrade the dignity of their species, and put human nature on a level with that of the brute creation. In all this devotion there was no doubt something of Mrs. Howe. "Epistles for the Ladies" was not the first "attempt to employ the ornaments of romance in the decoration of religion"[6] nor the best, but along with the pious substance the author sometimes adopts an ...
— The Life and Romances of Mrs. Eliza Haywood • George Frisbie Whicher

... Chicago railway have just rebuilt in the most permanent manner an iron bridge over the Alleghany river, to replace the old wooden Howe truss bridge, which had become inadequate to the increasing traffic. The new bridge opens like a fan towards the freight yard at Pittsburg being at the narrowest part, next to the main span 55 feet wide. The river is crossed with spans ...
— Scientific American, Vol. 17, No. 26 December 28, 1867 • Various

... fifty," said Albert, "I'd come in ahead of 'em all. I've got testimonials of character and qualifications from Prof. Howe, Rev. Joseph Lee, Dr. Henshaw, and Esq. Jenks, the great railroad contractor. His name alone is enough to ...
— Tiger and Tom and Other Stories for Boys • Various

... prayers the God addressed: "Bali. Virochan's mighty son, His sacrifice has now begun: Of boundless wealth, that demon king Is bounteous to each living thing. Though suppliants flock from every side The suit of none is e'er denied. Whate'er, where'er howe'er the call, He hears the suit and gives to all. Now with thine own illusive art Perform, O Lord, the helper's part: Assume a dwarfish form, and thus From fear ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... Hubert Howe Bancroft (1832-1918) was massing in San Francisco at his own expense the greatest assemblage of historical documents any one individual ever assembled. While his interviewers and note-takers sorted down tons of manuscript, ...
— Guide to Life and Literature of the Southwest • J. Frank Dobie

... the heat, and the press, and the noise, and the din, Were so great, that, howe'er unwilling, Our Reporter no longer was able to stay, But came in his own defence away, And left the ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb IV - Poems and Plays • Charles and Mary Lamb

... as by appointment to Mr. Childs' office; he has a beautifully fitted-up room, filled with all kinds of curiosities,—Tom Moore's harp, Washington's chair, Louis Napoleon's cup and saucer, splendid clocks of all kinds; one of them belonged to Lord Howe, which he had to leave behind him when he was "obliged to run away from the States in such a hurry!" Mr. Childs' seemed to think I must know all about this, but I am afraid I had quite forgotten that humiliation. This ...
— The British Association's visit to Montreal, 1884: Letters • Clara Rayleigh

... schooner, with William Story as master, sailed from Newburyport about the 10th of April, arriving at Passamaquody on the 14th, and at St. John on the 18th. The men set to work immediately on their arrival, and the quietude that had reigned beneath the shadow of Fort Howe hill was broken by the sound of the woodsman's axe and the carpenter's saw and hammer. Among the first buildings erected were a log store 20 feet by 30 feet, a dwelling house 19 feet by 35 feet, and a building adjoining it ...
— Glimpses of the Past - History of the River St. John, A.D. 1604-1784 • W. O. Raymond

... short and high, but she sailed well, and carried the tallest masts and squarest canvas of any of England's gun-ships. She had just returned from Spithead, where there were twenty or thirty ships of war, called a fleet, lying under command of Lord Howe. It was on the 29th of August, 1782. She was lying off Portsmouth; her decks had been washed the day before, and the carpenter discovered that the pipes which admitted water to cleanse the ship was worn out, and must be replaced. This pipe being three feet under the water, ...
— Thrilling Stories Of The Ocean • Marmaduke Park

... vapours cloud the brain, And bind the spirits in their heavy chain; Howe'er the cause fantastick may appear, The effect is real, and the ...
— Intestinal Ills • Alcinous Burton Jamison

... warmest wish to Heaven is sent! Long may thy hardy sons of rustic toil Be blest with health, and peace, and sweet content! And oh! may Heaven their simple lives prevent From Luxury's contagion weak and vile! Then, howe'er crowns and coronets be rent, A virtuous populace may rise the while, And stand a wall of ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 7 • Various

... project. Captain Flinders had, however, previously succeeded in making a most minute and elaborate survey of the whole extent of the South coast, between Cape Leeuwin and Bass Strait; of the East Coast, from Cape Howe to the Northumberland Islands; of the passage through Torres Strait; and of the shores ...
— Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia - Performed between the years 1818 and 1822 • Phillip Parker King

... publication of our last paper, we have received a communication from Messrs. Howe and Bates, of New York, the publishers of Miss Monk's 'Awful Disclosures.' It appears that some influences have been at work in that city, adverse to the free examination of the case between her and the priests of Canada; ...
— Awful Disclosures - Containing, Also, Many Incidents Never before Published • Maria Monk

... sweeps the whole gamut of the moral law. Many stories develop the same theme but none just like this. Stevenson himself is drawn again to the same problem a little later in "Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." Hawthorne tried it in "Howe's Masquerade," in which the cloaked figure is the phantom or reduplication of Howe himself. In Poe's "William Wilson," to which Stevenson is plainly indebted, the evil nature triumphs over the good. But "Markheim," by touching more ...
— Short Stories Old and New • Selected and Edited by C. Alphonso Smith

... by our sweet sister Death, From whom no man escapes, howe'er he try! Woe to all those who yield their parting breath In mortal sin! But blessed those who die Doing thy will in that decisive hour! The second death o'er such shall have no power. Praise, blessing, and thanksgiving to my ...
— The Golden Dog - Le Chien d'Or • William Kirby

... 13th of April the north-west end of Van Diemen's Land came in sight but it was not until the 15th that we entered Bass Strait by the passage between King's and Hunter's Islands. Off Cape Howe we boarded a trading brig belonging to Port Jackson bound to Van Diemen's Land, from which we obtained pleasing and satisfactory news of our friends at Sydney, as also the gratifying intelligence of the promotion of myself to ...
— Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia] [Volume 2 of 2] • Phillip Parker King

... ren: tyme it is to rowe: Our Carake fletis[6]: the se is large and wyde And depe Inough: a pleasaunt wynde doth blowe. Prolonge no tyme, our Carake doth you byde, Our felawes tary for you on every syde. Hast hyther, I say, ye folys[7] naturall, Howe oft shall I you unto ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 5 • Various

... necessary spark, They search the town, and beat about the Park; 20 To all his most frequented haunts resort, Oft dog him to the ring, and oft to court, As love of pleasure or of place invites; And sometimes catch him taking snuff at White's. Howe'er, to do you right, the present age Breeds very hopeful monsters for the stage; That scorn the paths their dull forefathers trod, And wont be blockheads in the common road. Do but survey this crowded house to-night:— ...
— The Poetical Works of Addison; Gay's Fables; and Somerville's Chase • Joseph Addison, John Gay, William Sommerville

... howe plenty suffers ofte, And hasty clymers sone do fall, I see that those which are alofte Mishapp dothe threaten moste of all; They get with toyle, they keepe with feare, Suche cares my mynde ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 22., Saturday, March 30, 1850 • Various

... school histories had wrapped round the fables. He lays bare the political state of Britain at that time. What did you learn at your school of that political state? Did you ever wonder able General Howe and his manner of fighting us? Did it ever strike you that, although we were more often defeated than victorious in those engagements with him (and sometimes he even seemed to avoid pitched battles with us when the odds were all in his favor), yet somehow England did seem to reap the ...
— A Straight Deal - or The Ancient Grudge • Owen Wister

... patron, "but ye ken we maun hae turnips for the lang sheep, billie, and muckle hard wark to get them, baith wi' the pleugh and the howe; and that wad sort ill wi' sitting on the broomy knowe, and cracking about Black Dwarfs, and siccan clavers, as was the gate lang syne, when the short sheep were ...
— The Black Dwarf • Sir Walter Scott

... examined is that of William Howe, London, 1819, which contains "New Sermons to Asses," and other ...
— Laurence Sterne in Germany • Harvey Waterman Thayer

... hold your tongue: Each praised within, is happy all day long; But how severely with themselves proceed The men, who write such verse as we can read? Their own strict judges, not a word they spare That wants, or force, or light, or weight, or care, Howe'er unwillingly it quits its place, Nay though at Court, perhaps, it may find grace: Such they'll degrade; and sometimes, in its stead, In downright charity revive the dead; Mark where a bold expressive ...
— Essay on Man - Moral Essays and Satires • Alexander Pope

... held. Hale, whole. Heels-ower-hurdie, heels over head. Hinney, honey. Hirstle, to bustle. Hizzie, wench. Howe, hollow. Howl, hovel. Hunkered, crouched. Hypothec, lit. in Scots law the furnishings of a house, and formerly the produce and stock of a farm hypothecated by law to the landlord as security for rent; colloquially "the whole ...
— Weir of Hermiston • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Sedgemoor, because the Duke had a house in Soho, then King's Square. It is much more likely that the reverse is the case, and the Duke took the watchword from the locality in which he lived, for the word Soho occurs in the rate-books long before the Battle of Sedgemoor was fought. In 1634 So-howe appears in State papers; and various other spellings are extant, as Soe-hoe, So-hoe. This district was at one time a favourite hunting-ground, and Halliwell-Phillipps in the "Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words" suggests that the name has arisen from a favourite hunting ...
— The Strand District - The Fascination of London • Sir Walter Besant

... was the freshe quene, I mean Alceste, the noble true wife, And for Admete howe she lost her life, And for her trouthe, if I shall not lye, How she was ...
— The plant-lore & garden-craft of Shakespeare • Henry Nicholson Ellacombe

... Unnoticed by the crowd unfeeling, And whilst the rest, or sad or gay, Wasted in idleness the day, The sacred image still concealing, Before it pouring forth her prayer, She watched with ever jealous care; Even as our hearts to error given, Yet lighted by a spark from heaven, Howe'er from virtue's paths we swerve, One holy feeling ...
— The Bakchesarian Fountain and Other Poems • Alexander Pushkin and other authors

... these was the Rev. Joseph Howe, then pastor at the New South Church, on Church Green, in this city, a young man of rare talents and eminent piety. Unfortunately, the fear and excitement consequent on the hostile relation of the colonies at that time ...
— The Coquette - The History of Eliza Wharton • Hannah Webster Foster

... Puritan theology are "The Good Man the Living Temple of God," and "Vanity of Men as Mortal," He was a man of intellect and imagination. His sermons, tho often long and cumbersome, are marked by warmth of fancy and a sublimity of spirit superior to his style. Howe was a leading spirit in the effort made for the union of the Congregational and Presbyterian bodies. He ...
— The World's Great Sermons, Vol. 2 (of 10) • Grenville Kleiser

... "As Sir W. Howe does not think of acting from Rhode island into the Massachusets, the force from Canada ...
— The Fifteen Decisive Battles of The World From Marathon to Waterloo • Sir Edward Creasy, M.A.

... indeed news," he exclaimed. "Sir Roger Curtis has arrived with despatches from Earl Howe announcing a magnificent victory gained by him with twenty-five ships over the French fleet of twenty-six, on the 1st June, west of Ushant; seven of the French captured, two sunk, when the French admiral, after an hour's close action, crowded sail, ...
— Won from the Waves • W.H.G. Kingston

... went to Windsor to-day with petitions. Yesterday Lord Howe and three others went. I believe these peers have been: Duke of Newcastle, Kenyon, Rolle, Howe, O'Neil, Bexley, Winchelsea, Farnham, ...
— A Political Diary 1828-1830, Volume II • Edward Law (Lord Ellenborough)

... had been conducted on somewhat grave and serious lines, as a kind of Boston cousin, as it were, of the "North American," and was now in a state of change. Mr. Buckingham relinquished the editorship, and the magazine went into the hands of Dr. Samuel G. Howe and John O. Sargent. It was at this favorable moment that Goodrich appeared with Hawthorne's manuscript; the piece was accepted; and it was published, half in the first and half in the second number issued by the new editors, in November and ...
— Nathaniel Hawthorne • George E. Woodberry

... sweetest deary, God grant that some good respite we may have, For your sad sorrow diggeth up my grave; And this hath been a lonesome, fearsome day, and weary; That cruel dream of fire I had some time ago, Howe'er I strove, did always haunt me so! And then, thou know'st the storm; oh, I was terrified, So that, to-night, my dear, I ...
— Jasmin: Barber, Poet, Philanthropist • Samuel Smiles

... Tilley, who was at this Quebec meeting, was sent to England as a delegate to confer with the imperial government with regard to the railway, while Nova Scotia was represented by the Hon. Joseph Howe, and Canada, by the Hon. P. M. Vankoughnet. The delegates reached England in November and placed themselves in communication with the Duke of Newcastle, who was then colonial secretary, and they also had ...
— Wilmot and Tilley • James Hannay

... Lord Howe's and his sister's courage prompted the attack on them by a gang of hypnotists 120 years ago.[6] Poltergeist disturbances are caused by a single person generally; it is not impossible that in rare cases there is ...
— Inferences from Haunted Houses and Haunted Men • John Harris

... one of his devil's raids, tore a baby from its mother's breast by the leg, dashed its brains out against a tree, and then—I daren't tell a woman what happened." [Note: Tom was confusing Touan with Michael Howe. The latter actually did commit this frightful atrocity; but I never heard that the former actually combined the two ...
— The Recollections of Geoffrey Hamlyn • Henry Kingsley

... General Lee became the occasion of embittering the complaints on this subject, and of aggravating the sufferings of the prisoners of war. Before that event something like a cartel for the exchange of prisoners had been established between Generals Howe and Washington, but the captivity of General Lee interrupted that arrangement. The general, as we have seen, had been an officer in the British army, but having been disgusted had resigned his commission, and, at the beginning of the troubles, ...
— Life And Times Of Washington, Volume 2 • John Frederick Schroeder and Benson John Lossing

... containing fifteen of the lectures concerning Goethe which were read at the Concord School of Philosophy last summer. Prof. Hewett furnishes an account of the newly-discovered Goethe manuscripts for the introduction to the volume. Among the writers are Drs. Bartol and Hedge, Mrs. Howe, Mrs. Cheney, Mrs. Sherman of Chicago, Mr. Soldan of St. Louis, Mr. Snider of Cincinnati, Mr. Partridge of Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Davidson of New Jersey, Prof. White of Ithaca, N.Y., and Messrs. Emery, Harris, and Sanborn of Concord, the last named ...
— The Olden Time Series, Vol. 1: Curiosities of the Old Lottery • Henry M. Brooks

... brush and pen, They are but tongues to tell of life sincerely; The thaumaturgic Day, the might of men, O God of Scribes, grant us to grave them clearly! Grant heart that homes in heart, then all is well. Honey is honey-sweet, howe'er the hiving. Each to his work, his wage at evening ...
— Rhymes of a Rolling Stone • Robert W. Service

... behold the transformation; see how institutions and industrial establishments for the blind have sprung up as if by magic; see how many of the deaf have learned not only to read and write, but to speak; and remember that the faith and patience of Dr. Howe have borne fruit in the efforts that are being made everywhere to educate the deaf-blind and equip them for the struggle. Do you wonder that I am full ...
— Optimism - An Essay • Helen Keller

... rendezvoused at 648 Broadway, and were mustered into the service of the United States by Lieutenant-colonel D. B. Sackett, of the regular army. At four o'clock P. M. we were ordered aboard a train of cars, and told that our destination was Camp Howe, near Scarsdale, twenty-four miles north of the city, between the Harlem and East rivers. We reached the place just in time to pitch our tents for the night—an operation which was not only new and strange, but performed in any thing ...
— Three Years in the Federal Cavalry • Willard Glazier

... portal glimmering out Between new flowers that put to rout Our other fancies: in sweet fear We tiptoed past, and seemed to hear A sound of singing from within That told our souls of Peterkin: Our thoughts of him were still the same Howe'er the shadows went and came, So, on we wandered, hand in hand, And ...
— Collected Poems - Volume One (of 2) • Alfred Noyes

... and scraps, and odds and ends of history are retailed to the listener who cares to listen—traditions of the War of 1812, when Beresford's fleet lay off the harbor threatening to bombard the town; tales of the Revolution and of Earl Howe's warships, tarrying for a while in the quiet harbor before they sailed up the river to shake old Philadelphia town with the thunders of their guns at Red ...
— Howard Pyle's Book of Pirates • Howard I. Pyle

... ale take its natural course, sir; she was for qualifying it every now and then with a dram, as the saying is; and an honest gentleman that came this way from Ireland, made her a present of a dozen bottles of usquebaugh—but the poor woman was never well after: but, howe'er, I was obliged to the gentleman, ...
— The Beaux-Stratagem • George Farquhar

... end of that long living Queen, This King's fair entrance, and our peace with Spain, We and the Dutch at length ourselves to sever; Thus the world doth and evermore shall reel; Yet to my goddess am I constant ever, Howe'er blind Fortune turn her giddy wheel; Though heaven and earth prove both to me untrue, Yet am I still inviolate ...
— Elizabethan Sonnet Cycles - Idea, by Michael Drayton; Fidessa, by Bartholomew Griffin; Chloris, by William Smith • Michael Drayton, Bartholomew Griffin, and William Smith

... have ebbed away for evermore, And all through following you to this wild wood, Because I saw you sad, to comfort you. Lo now, what hearts have men! they never mount As high as woman in her selfless mood. And touching fame, howe'er ye scorn my song, Take one verse more—the lady ...
— Idylls of the King • Alfred, Lord Tennyson

... County Judge, and afterwards appointed to the United States Senate by Governor Weller; N.E. Whitesides, afterwards a member of the Legislature from Yuba, and Speaker of the House; F.L. Hatch, now County Judge of Colusa; George Howe, afterwards Treasurer of the County; and Wm. S. Belcher, who afterwards rendered good service to the public as a School Commissioner, also practiced at the Marysville bar ...
— Personal Reminiscences of Early Days in California with Other Sketches; To Which Is Added the Story of His Attempted Assassination by a Former Associate on the Supreme Bench of the State • Stephen Field; George C. Gorham

... said that they are treated as rebels, except the Tories, who support the cause of the Crown. General Gage is in command, and Generals Howe, Clinton, and Burgoyne ...
— From Farm House to the White House • William M. Thayer

... you thank God that you lost none there, 'Cause they were such who lived not when they were; Yet your great general (who doth rise and fall, As his successes do, whom you dare call, As fame unto you doth reports dispense, Either a ———— or his excellence) Howe'er he reigns now by unheard-of laws, Could wish his fate together with ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... your mirth and rude alarm, For none shall do them shame or harm." "Hear ye his boast?" cried John of Brent, 140 Ever to strife and jangling bent; "Shall he strike doe beside our lodge, And yet the jealous niggard grudge To pay the forester his fee? I'll have my share, howe'er it be, 145 Despite of Moray, Mar, or thee." Bertram his forward step withstood; And, burning in his vengeful mood, Old Allan, though unfit for strife; Laid hand upon his dagger-knife; 150 But Ellen boldly stepped between, And dropped at once the tartan screen. ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... Howe, smiling good-naturedly at his niece, "the importance of this occasion has made everybody so full of suppressed excitement one can't breathe ...
— John Ward, Preacher • Margaret Deland

... of Brock—with his exceptional military attainments—to the chief command in Upper Canada, at the point of greatest danger, was a rare piece of good fortune for the colony. Of the American military leaders, Generals Howe, Dearborn and Wadsworth were all examples of a common standard; even Sir George Prevost, the new Governor-General of Canada and Commander-in-Chief, was tuned in ...
— The Story of Isaac Brock - Hero, Defender and Saviour of Upper Canada, 1812 • Walter R. Nursey

... dear Mr. SMILLIE, We value you highly Howe'er so ferociously raven you. We must find a way out, And we shall do, no doubt, If we only explore ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 159, October 6, 1920 • Various

... sixteen years with Polly without learning to leap to conclusions. "Run down and ask Mrs. Howe if she will let us have her hall-bedroom tonight," she replied; "nod your head for yes when you come back, and I 'll act accordingly; I have a request to make of Edgar, and am glad to have so early an ...
— Polly Oliver's Problem • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... Howe's successes in the Jersies, and the prospect of getting possession of Philadelphia, made the Ministry hope for a speedy termination of their dispute with us, I know war with France was nearly determined on. The insolence of apparent success dictated that Memorial, which Sir Joseph ...
— The Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, Vol. IX • Various

... thee. But I swear to God who dwelleth in the high firmament, That till upon my charger I gallop in content Against the Moors, and till I wield both spear and brand again, And till unto my elbow from the blade the blood doth drain Before the Cid illustrious, howe'er so small it be, I will not take the value of a copper groat from thee. When through me some mighty treasure thou hast at thy command. I will take thy gift; till such a time, all else is ...
— The Lay of the Cid • R. Selden Rose and Leonard Bacon

... When Sir William Howe succeeded General Gage as governor and military commander of the New England province, he at once set to work to make himself and the King's cause popular in a social way by giving a series of fine entertainments in ...
— A Flock of Girls and Boys • Nora Perry

... policy, and almost necessary in the circumstances. If a man finds a woman admires him, were it only for his acquaintance with geography, he will begin at once to build upon the admiration. It is only by unintermittent snubbing that the pretty ones can keep us in our place. Men, as Miss Howe or Miss Harlowe would have said, 'are such encroachers.' For my part, I am body and soul with the women; and after a well-married couple, there is nothing so beautiful in the world as the myth of the divine huntress. It is ...
— The Pocket R.L.S. - Being Favourite Passages from the Works of Stevenson • Robert Louis Stevenson

... the distance, with foreground of rude and rugged rocks. Around the rugged rocks a quaint funeral service. HENRY IRVING, "the Master" not only of Ravenswood, but the art of acting (as instanced by a score of fine impersonations), flouts the veteran comedian, HOWE; and, Howe attired? He is in some strange garb as a nondescript parson. Then "Master" (as the Sporting Times would irreverently speak of him) soliloquises over Master's father's coffin. Arrival of Sir William Ashton. Row and flashing of steel in torchlight. ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 99, October 4, 1890 • Various

... up the howe, Her living image in her yowe Comes bleating till him, owre the knowe, For bits o' bread; An' down the briny pearls rowe For ...
— Poems And Songs Of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... and hid sense Is, that a well erected confidence Can fright their pride, and laugh their folly hence. Here now, put case our author should, once more, Swear that his play were good; he doth implore, You would not argue him of arrogance: Howe'er that common spawn of ignorance, Our fry of writers, may beslime his fame, And give his action that adulterate name. Such full-blown vanity he more doth loth, Than base dejection; there's a mean 'twixt both, Which with a constant firmness he pursues, ...
— The Poetaster - Or, His Arraignment • Ben Jonson

... sickness, that the whole squadron was obliged to return into port about the second week in June, not having had communication with any port, but having cruised solely between Brest and the Lizard. In the beginning of the same month another large squadron sailed, all in perfect health, under Lord Howe's command, for the Dutch coast. Toward the end of the month, just at the time, therefore, when the Goliah became full of the disease, it appeared in the Rippon, the Princess Amelia, and other ships ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 595, May 28, 1887 • Various

... is now no more, but the record of his labors exists in his published works, and in the impulse which he gave to archaeological investigations. We receive the first notice of his death from Mr. Hubert Howe Bancroft, who pays the following eloquent tribute to his memory: "Brasseur de Bourbourg devoted his life to the study of American primitive history. In actual knowledge pertaining to his chosen subjects, no man ever equalled ...
— The Mayas, the Sources of Their History / Dr. Le Plongeon in Yucatan, His Account of Discoveries • Stephen Salisbury, Jr.

... 1st of August, 1758, the fleet under Commodore Howe, with the transports, again set sail for Cherburgh. They landed with little opposition from the French, and entered the town. Immense sums had been there laid out upon the fortifications, and the harbour was one of the strongest in Europe. The work of all this labour and expence ...
— A Museum for Young Gentlemen and Ladies - A Private Tutor for Little Masters and Misses • Unknown

... British commander had made a mistake. His letters to Congress are full of suggestions which citizens could only slightly value, so long as they saw Boston still under British control. It is difficult to see how the war could have been a success, if New York had been occupied, in force, by Lord Howe in 1775, and the rashness of Gates had not precipitated the skirmish at Lexington and the battle of Bunker Hill. It is no less hard to see where and how Washington could have found time, place, and suitable conditions for that practical ...
— The Bay State Monthly, Vol. 1, Issue 1. - A Massachusetts Magazine of Literature, History, - Biography, And State Progress • Various

... interested so many in England. I had not an opportunity of visiting this asylum till the morning of the day on which I sailed for Europe, and had no opportunity of conversing with this interesting girl, as she was just leaving for the country. I saw her preceptor, Dr. Howe, whose untiring exertions on her behalf she has so wonderfully rewarded. He is a very lively, energetic man, and is now devoting himself to the improvement of the condition of idiots, in which already he has been ...
— The Englishwoman in America • Isabella Lucy Bird

... of the dark range and stood at that point where Great Howe fringes downward to the plain, he turned about and rode back on the opposite side of the pikes. Once more he rode in and out of cavernous alcoves, up and down hillocks and hollows, over bowlders, over streams, ...
— The Shadow of a Crime - A Cumbrian Romance • Hall Caine

... of Walter Hylton: 'to a deuoute man in temperall estate howe he shulde rule hym' etc. ...
— Henry the Sixth - A Reprint of John Blacman's Memoir with Translation and Notes • John Blacman

... to-night that he was coming to see me. The messenger got through the British lines. But the redcoats are everywhere. They were quartered in our house. For months I have been little more than a servant to a dozen of My Lord's Howe's officers. They are gentlemen, though: I have no complaint. Then they left, and father, knowing it, wanted ...
— Astounding Stories, April, 1931 • Various

... part of the State includes early episodes of Mormonism. In Painesville was published a book by E.D. Howe purporting to show that "the historical p(art?) of the book of Mormon" was plagiarized from a romance called The Manuscript Found written by Solomon Spalding of Conneaut (about 1809). This claim has not been fully verified by ...
— The Greatest Highway in the World • Anonymous

... event so fortunate Would, unexpected on my part, arrive, Although the Gods themselves should purpose it. But Pallas him answer'd caerulean-eyed. Telemachus! what word was that which leap'd The iv'ry guard[7] that should have fenced it in? A God, so willing, could with utmost ease Save any man, howe'er remote. Myself, I had much rather, many woes endured, Revisit home, at last, happy and safe, 300 Than, sooner coming, die in my own house, As Agamemnon perish'd by the arts Of base AEgisthus and the subtle Queen. ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer

... whyche in a certeine epistle wryten vnto a frynde of hys, exhorteth m[en] what soeuer they reade in straunge tongues, diligently to translate the same into their owne language: because that in it we sonar perceiue if there be any faute in our speaking, and howe euerye thynge eyther rightly hangeth together or is darkely, ruggishly, and superfluously wrytt[en]. No lerned nacion hath there bene but y^e learned in it haue written of schemes & fygures, which thei wold not haue don, except thei had perceyued ...
— A Treatise of Schemes and Tropes • Richard Sherry

... its disposing influence supreme, The lustre of the seal should be complete: But nature renders it imperfect ever, Resembling thus the artist in her work, Whose faultering hand is faithless to his skill. Howe'er, if love itself dispose, and mark The primal virtue, kindling with bright view, There all perfection is vouchsafed; and such The clay was made, accomplish'd with each gift, That life can teem with; such the burden fill'd The virgin's bosom: ...
— The Divine Comedy, Complete - The Vision of Paradise, Purgatory and Hell • Dante Alighieri

... 'preludium' (Beaumont, Psyche), 'prelude'; 'precipitium' (Coryat) 'precipice'; 'aconitum' (Shakespeare) 'aconite'; 'balsamum' (Webster) 'balsam'; 'heliotropium' (Holland) 'heliotrope'; 'helleborum' (North) 'hellebore'; 'vehiculum' (Howe) 'vehicle'; 'trochaeus' and 'spondaeus' (Holland) 'trochee' and 'spondee'; and 'machina' (Henry More) 'machine'. We have 'intervalla', not 'intervals', in Chillingworth; 'postulata', not 'postulates', ...
— English Past and Present • Richard Chenevix Trench

... fragment remained big enough to give us an anchorage and shelter. Two miles away we could see a larger piece of ice, and to it we managed, after some trouble, to secure the boats. I brought my boat bow on to the floe, whilst Howe, with the painter in his hand, stood ready to jump. Standing up to watch our chance, while the oars were held ready to back the moment Howe had made his leap, I could see that there would be no possibility of getting the galley ashore that night. Howe just managed to get a footing on the edge ...
— South! • Sir Ernest Shackleton

... girls," exclaimed the youngest Miss Morton flippantly, "he's sent around to the Music School for Miss Howe to come and ...
— In the Heart of a Fool • William Allen White

... Lee and Robert Howe, of the Continental army, hastened immediately to the defense of that city, and among the soldiers who followed them was John Koen. Here again the British were defeated, Colonel Moultrie's Palmetto fortifications proving an effective defense to the city by the sea, and Thompson's ...
— In Ancient Albemarle • Catherine Albertson

... drawings which were afterwards engraved and published in his celebrated Journal of the Voyage. Though this young gentleman, who had been placed under Captain Phipps's protection by his noble patron, Lord Howe, possessed the advantage of having received instructions in the arts and sciences to which Horatio was, at that time, almost a stranger, the latter had liberality enough not only to admire, but to applaud, the ingenuity which he witnessed ...
— The Life of the Right Honourable Horatio Lord Viscount Nelson, Vol. I (of 2) • James Harrison

... no curse for you or yours, But Friendship's ready grasp, And Faith to stand by you and yours Unto our latest gasp— To stand by you against all foes, Howe'er, or whence they come, With traitor arts, or bribes, or blows, From England, France, ...
— Thomas Davis, Selections from his Prose and Poetry • Thomas Davis

... tale speaks to the magic carpet. It carries him whithersoever he desires. This yearning for personality in furniture begins to be crudely worked upon in the so-called trick-scenes. The typical commercialized comedy of this sort is Moving Day. Lyman H. Howe, among many excellent reels of a different kind, has films ...
— The Art Of The Moving Picture • Vachel Lindsay

... sumthyng to help yu wen I seen him come in To Day fur I new jus howe yu felt but thay wasent no wours than thay always was, and he nose it! and thay studdid more fur yu I think than thay did for any but I think it mus be harrd for yu not bein' use to us. I think yu was tired. When we was singin' I thot howe tired ...
— Cape Cod Folks • Sarah P. McLean Greene



Words linked to "Howe" :   hockey player, artificer, Elias Howe, editor in chief, Gordon Howe, Irving Howe, discoverer, ice-hockey player, suffragist, inventor, Julia Ward Howe, Gordie Howe, editor



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