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Hie

verb
(past & past part. hied; pres. part. hieing or hying)
1.
Move fast.  Synonyms: belt along, bucket along, cannonball along, hasten, hotfoot, pelt along, race, rush, rush along, speed, step on it.  "The cars raced down the street"






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Hie" Quotes from Famous Books



... breeze, come and fan me; you know how I love you! You make the groves and my solitary rambles delightful." He was running on in this way when he heard, or thought he heard, a sound as of a sob in the bushes. Supposing it some wild animal, he threw hie javelin at the spot. A cry from his beloved Procris told him that the weapon had too surely met its mark. He rushed to the place, and found her bleeding and with sinking strength endeavoring to draw forth ...
— TITLE • AUTHOR

... famous a Lord: But leaving him that dying left al Artes, and al strangers as Orphanes, forsaken, and friendles, I will wholy convert my muze to you (my second patron) who amongst many that beare their crests hie, and mingle their titles with TAMMARTI QUAM MERCURIO are an unfayned embracer of vertues, and nourisher of knowledge and learning. I published long since my first fruits of such as were but meanely ...
— Shakespeare's Lost Years in London, 1586-1592 • Arthur Acheson

... My senses mortifie, and come to death: And with a quiet blow pass forth perhaps Unto a life of more tranquilitie: But too too much, Nicander, too much griev'd I am, in so young years, Fortune so hie, An Innocent, I should be doom'd to ...
— Pastoral Poetry and Pastoral Drama - A Literary Inquiry, with Special Reference to the Pre-Restoration - Stage in England • Walter W. Greg

... the god of Love is not Cupidity, but Cupid. Perchance 'tis well, for had I wed That maid of dark-brown curls, You had not been, or been, instead Of boy, a pair of girls. Now listen to me, Walter Smith; Hie to yon plumber bold, An thou would'st ease my dying pang, His 'prentice be enrolled. For Jones has houses many on The fashionable squares, And thou, perchance, may'st be called in To see to the repairs. Think on thy father's ...
— Humour of the North • Lawrence J. Burpee

... Now hie thee back, thou little foot-page, And greet thy lady from me, And tell her that I, her own true love, Will ...
— The Book of Brave Old Ballads • Unknown

... the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, A.D. 658, that "Cenwealh in this year fought against the Welsh at Pen, and put them to flight as far as the Parret." "Her Kenwealh gefeaht aet Peonnum with Wealas, and hie geflymde oth Pedridan." Upon this passage Lappenberg in his "England under the Anglo-Saxon kings" remarks: "The reign of Cenwealh is important on account of the aggrandisement of Wessex. He defeated in several battles the Britons of Dyvnaint and ...
— A Glossary of Provincial Words & Phrases in use in Somersetshire • Wadham Pigott Williams

... steady, man," said the knight. "Hie thee back again to the lodge and wait for me there. Wilton shall let you share his supper if thou wilt. I will tell them you are a gardener if they ask aught about thee," and in answer to the beckoning of his wife, Sir Ronald ...
— Heiress of Haddon • William E. Doubleday

... throat to sing throuw, Len' me yer wings to gang hie, And I'll sing ye a sang a laverock to cow, And for bliss ...
— Heather and Snow • George MacDonald

... have them performed under his roof. That is as good as going to Church to be the central figures of the mummery of priests. But be this as You will. Whether in Church or at home, whether by your father or by gibbering Levites the ceremony is performed, we must hie us to the desert after it is done. I shall hire the camels and prepare the necessary set-out for the wayfare a day or two ahead. No, I must not be a burden to you, my Heart. I must be able to work for you as for myself. And Allah alone, through ...
— The Book of Khalid • Ameen Rihani

... upon the instant was everything! The sunshine was a beating, pulsing ether animated with love! The trees, the fields, the yellow-breasted lark, pouring forth his autumn lay, the swallows, glancing in the golden sunshine and weaving in and out on billowy wing the endless dance with which they hie them southward ere the winter comes—everything she saw or heard was eloquent with look and tones of love! The grand old horse that carried her so easily, how strange and how delightful was this double ownership, which yet was only one! Hers? Hesden's? Hesden's because ...
— Bricks Without Straw • Albion W. Tourgee

... experiment comes to be tried, on a practical scale, such as we are now, one and all, about to realize, theories and fancies sink wonderfully in the scale. For some weeks past, everything with the power of motion or locomotion has been exerting itself to quit the place and the region, and hie to more kindly latitudes for the winter. Nature has also become imperceptibly sour tempered, and shows her teeth in ice and snows. Man-kind and bird-kind have concurred in the effort to go. We have witnessed ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... from heaven, from heaven so hie, Of angeles ther came a great companie, With mirthe, and joy, and great solemnitye, The sange, terly, terlow; So mereli the sheppardes ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 - Christmas Poems from 'round the World • Various

... Kiyokimi, in 802, and the latter accompanied Fujiwara Kuzunomaro, two years later. Saicho was specially sent to China by his sovereign to study Buddhism, in order that, on his return, he might become lord-abbot of a monastery which his Majesty had caused to be built on Hie-no-yama—subsequently known as Hiei-zan—a hill on the northeast of the new palace in Kyoto. A Japanese superstition regarded the northeast as the "Demon's Gate," where a barrier must be erected against the ingress of evil influences. Saicho also brought from China ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... looked behind with a pleased face, and I felt so proud to think I was doing well; but suddenly I got dreadfully confused when he turned around and said, "Hie out!" ...
— Beautiful Joe - An Autobiography of a Dog • by Marshall Saunders

... and cool and pleasant" So you hie yourself away To the wild-wood sweet and shady For a joyous, happy day; Then the rain comes down in torrents Till it drowns the very snakes, And you have a high example Of ...
— Oklahoma Sunshine • Freeman E. (Freeman Edwin) Miller

... agreed, under Rob's direction, to set to work at once. So Rob bade his brothers and cousin get their rude fishing rods, and hie away down to the rocks at the mouth of the harbor, and see what fish they could get for him during ...
— The New McGuffey Fourth Reader • William H. McGuffey

... bare, All the pigs of Taiarapu raised their snouts in the air. Songs were recited, and kinship was counted, and tales were told How war had severed of late but peace had cemented of old The clans of the island. "To war," said they, "now set we an end, And hie to the Namunu-ura even as a friend ...
— Ballads • Robert Louis Stevenson

... any one at that place. And, O foremost of conquerors, on all sides of that mountain, there exist mines of gold, resplendent as the rays of the sun. And O king, the attendants of Kuvera, desirous of doing good to him, protect these mines of gold from intruders, with uplifted arms. Hie thee thither, and appease that adorable god who is known by the names of Sarva, Bedha, Rudra, Sitikantha, Surapa, Suvarcha, Kapardi, Karala, Haryyaksha, Varada, Tryaksha, Pushnodantabhid, Vamana, Siva, Yamya, Avyaktarupa, Sadvritta, Sankara, ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... should be. Who ever saw a dog come out of the water and not shake himself? Carlo, hie, Carlo!" and George threw a stone along the ground, after which Carlo trotted; but his limbs seemed to work stiffly; the stone spun round a sharp corner in the road, the ...
— It Is Never Too Late to Mend • Charles Reade

... one's a funny fellow; every one's a little mellow; Follow, follow, follow, follow, o'er the hill and in the hollow! Merrily, merrily, there they hie; now they rise and now they fly; They cross and turn, and in and out, and down in the middle, and wheel about,— With a "Phew, shew, Wadolincon! listen to me Bobolincon!— Happy's the wooing that's speedily ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 2, Issue 12, October, 1858 • Various

... not yet strong enough for travelling. The snow lies thickly on the ground, and the winter's wind whistles keenly through the forest and across the plain. Stay a while with your good friends here, and I'll come back for thee, and then we will hie away to lead the free life we have enjoyed so long." Old Michael spoke in a more subdued tone ...
— The Trapper's Son • W.H.G. Kingston

... get leave of your dads, And away to the Maypole hie, For ev'ry fair has a sweetheart there, And the ...
— Old Ballads • Various

... Episcopal clergyman I have ever known, and I have known many, ever made any such claim. They take up the profession because it supplies honors and a "living." Then they can do good, too, and all men want to do good. So they hie them to a divinity school and are taught the mysteries of theological tierce and thrust; and interviewing a clerical tailor they are ready to accept the honors and partake of the living. After a careful study of the life of Patrick Bronte I can not find that his ambition ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great, Vol. 2 of 14 - Little Journeys To the Homes of Famous Women • Elbert Hubbard

... little of a migratory movement even up and down the mountains among these interesting birdlets. In the winter a few descend from the heights and dwell on the plains, where the weather is not so rigorous. On the approach of spring they again hie up into the mountains, spending the summer there and rearing their pretty bairns. However, the majority of them remain in the mountains all winter, braving the bitterest and fiercest storms, often at an altitude of 8,000 feet. Their breeding range is from 6,000 ...
— Our Bird Comrades • Leander S. (Leander Sylvester) Keyser

... came and went: but scarce more than a sennight had passed ere I learned that he had come to dwell in Paris all out; and but little more time was spent when one even, Dame Isabel de Lapyoun came into our chamber as we were about to hie us abed, and saith she, speaking to none in especial, but ...
— In Convent Walls - The Story of the Despensers • Emily Sarah Holt

... government or party (for party being, for the most part, an irrational sort of thing, has no connexion with the object we have in view)—if I might apply those words to education as Hamlet applied them to the skull of Yorick, I would say—"Now hie thee to the council-chamber, and tell them, though they lay it on in sounding thoughts and learned words an inch thick, to this complexion ...
— Speeches: Literary and Social • Charles Dickens

... down from your horse o' pride, I trow ye talk too loud and hie, And I will make you a triple word, And syne, if ye dare, ye shall ...
— Verses 1889-1896 • Rudyard Kipling

... Hie away to the house on the brow, Gaffer-Gray; And knock at the jolly priest's door. 'The priest often preaches Against worldly riches; But ne'er gives a mite ...
— The Adventures of Hugh Trevor • Thomas Holcroft

... on rich array. Thomas dwelled in that solace 205 More than I you say, parde; Till on a day, so have I grace, My lovely lady said to me[53]; "Do busk thee, Thomas; thee buse[54] again; For thou may here no longer be; 210 Hie thee fast with might and main; I shall thee bring till Eildon tree." Thomas said then with heavy cheer[55], "Lovely lady, now let me be; For certes, lady, I have been here 215 Nought but the space of dayes three!" "For sooth, Thomas, as I thee tell, Thou hast been here three year ...
— The Sources and Analogues of 'A Midsummer-night's Dream' • Compiled by Frank Sidgwick

... the maid, "Listen to me, my dove, When I gave thee away, I deem'd that I gave My child to one who would gain renown, By the deeds which had given his sires renown, To a boy who would snatch, ere his limbs were grown, The heaviest bow of the strongest man, And hie to the strife with a painted face, And a shout that should ring in the lonely glades, Like a spirit's among the hills; I did not deem I had given my dove To a youth with the heart of a doe; A gatherer-in ...
— Traditions of the North American Indians, Vol. 1 (of 3) • James Athearn Jones

... mentally speaking, with a shake or two of his big teeth, and calmly informed you that in his opinion you were nothing more than a very empty-headed, pretentious, ignorant young woman—perhaps even, after the plain-spoken vocabulary of hie kind, a ...
— Philistia • Grant Allen

... flinty countenance of Hermiston. And a kind of horror fell upon her at what she had done. She wore a tragic mask. "Erchie, the Lord peety you, dear, and peety me! I have buildit on this foundation" - laying her hand heavily on his shoulder - "and buildit hie, and pit my hairt in the buildin' of it. If the hale hypothec were to fa', I think, laddie, I would dee! Excuse a daft wife that loves ye, and that kenned your mither. And for His name's sake keep yersel' frae inordinate desires; haud your heart in baith your hands, carry it canny and laigh; dinna ...
— Weir of Hermiston • Robert Louis Stevenson

... a temporary halt; addressing himself to a Turkish youth, who had been attached to his person in the capacity of secretary, he said, "Yakoub, hie thou in advance, with an escort of two soldiers and two slaves, and push on to Florence. There seek an immediate interview with the president of the council of state, and acquaint that high functionary with the tidings of my approach. ...
— Wagner, the Wehr-Wolf • George W. M. Reynolds

... the slightest notion, ye Inspectors of Police, that in the teeth of the law, and under its very eyes, a shameless gaming-house exists in moral Yorkshire, throughout every Doncaster St Leger race-week? Of course you haven't; never dreamed of such a thing—never could, never would. Hie you, then, and prosecute this wretched gang of betting-touts, congregating at the corner of Bride Lane, Fleet Street; quick, lodge informations against this publican who has suffered card-playing to take place, raffles, or St ...
— The Gaming Table: Its Votaries and Victims - Volume I (of II) • Andrew Steinmetz

... sev'n hundred camelry; Silver and gold, four hundred mules load high; Fifty wagons his wrights will need supply, Till with that wealth he pays his soldiery. War hath he waged in Spain too long a time, To Aix, in France, homeward he will him hie. Follow him there before Saint Michael's tide, You shall receive and hold the Christian rite; Stand honour bound, and do him fealty. Send hostages, should he demand surety, Ten or a score, our loyal oath to bind; Send him our sons, the first-born of our wives;— An he be slain, I'll surely furnish ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... his sickness began upon newes of the taking of the Francis' (his stern-most vessel). 'The 18th day wee weied and stood north and by east into a lesser sound, which Sir Francis in his barge discovered the night before; and ankored in 13 fadomes, having hie steepe hiles on either side, some league ...
— At Last • Charles Kingsley

... Simon Blount came timely and well-trained. At once she set him on Withers, as one would hie on a good dog at a thief; and it was not long before she had the pleasure of seeing the ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II., November, 1858., No. XIII. • Various

... lights do seem so rudely thrown And scattered throughout the spacious skie, Yet each most seemly sits in his own Throne In distance due and comely Majesty; And round their lordly seats their servants hie Keeping a well-proportionated space One from another, doing chearfully Their dayly task. No blemmish may deface The worlds in severall deckt with all ...
— Democritus Platonissans • Henry More

... individuality. In a letter of Elizabeth to her brother Edward VI, long-before "Euphues" was written, occurs the following passage: "Like as a shipman in stormy wether plukes down the sails tarrying for bettar winde, so did I, most noble kinge, in my unfortunate chanche a Thursday pluk downe the hie sailes of my joy and comforte, and do trust one day that as troublesome waves have repulsed me backwarde, so a gentil winde will bringe me forwarde to my haven."[58] This is a moderate specimen ...
— A History of English Prose Fiction • Bayard Tuckerman

... unhale. Elde me is bistolen on ar ich hit iwiste Ne mai ich isien bifore me for smeche ne for miste. Ar[gh]e we be to don god to juel al to riste More eie stonde man of man an him do of criste. 20 e wel ne de e hwile he mai wel ofte hit sal him rewen. an alle men sulle ripen at hie ar sewen. Do al to gode at he mu[gh]e ech e hwile he be aliue. Ne lipne noman to muchel to childe ne to wiue. | e e him selfe for[gh]iet for wiue oer for childe [f. 1v He sal cumen on euel stede bute him ...
— Selections from early Middle English, 1130-1250 - Part I: Texts • Various

... between their forbears in the auld troublesome time byepast. And Mrs. Glass has been kind like my very mother. She has a braw house here, and lives bien and warm, wi' twa servant lasses, and a man and a callant in the shop. And she is to send you doun a pound of her hie-dried, and some other tobaka, and we maun think of some propine for her, since her kindness hath been great. And the Duk is to send the pardon doun by an express messenger, in respect that I canna travel sae fast; and I am to come doun wi' twa of his Honour's servants—that is, John Archibald, ...
— Sir Walter Scott - (English Men of Letters Series) • Richard H. Hutton

... fie hie sly cry shy vie sty pry why lied fried sky tied vied tried pried ally rely defy deny reply spry skies flies cried supply ...
— The Beacon Second Reader • James H. Fassett

... to the pottage, that it boil not over. Al'ce, thou idle jade!"—with a sound box on the ear,—"thou hast left out the onions in thy blanch-porre! Margery! Madge! Why, Madge, I say! Where is Mistress Margery, maidens? Joan, lass, hie thee up, and see whether Mistress Margery be ...
— Mistress Margery • Emily Sarah Holt

... strode and thus he spoke, to that Archbishop meek: "I take the land thy king bestows from Eure to Michael-peak, I take the maid, or foul or fair, a bargain with the toast, And for thy creed, a sea-king's gods are those that give the most. So hie thee back, and tell thy chief to make his proffer true, And he shall find a docile son, and ye a ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... At the command "Hie on!" the young pointer ran eagerly around the horse, looking up into the man's face to be sure he had heard aright. Something he saw there made him momentarily droop his ears and tail. Again there ...
— Frank of Freedom Hill • Samuel A. Derieux

... thy polluted lot, Hie thee, Maiden, hie thee hence! Seek thy weeping Mother's cot, 15 With a ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol I and II • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... Plunge in the tempting torrent of delight, And sink in misery. All they wish'd on earth, Possessing here, whom have they to accuse, But their own folly, for the lot they chose? Yet, for that these injured themselves alone, They to the house of PENITENCE may hie, And, by a long and painful regimen, To wearied Nature her exhausted powers Restore, till they shall learn to form the wish Of wisdom, and ALMIGHTY GOODNESS grants That prize to him who seeks it." Whilst he spake, The board is spread. With ...
— Poems, 1799 • Robert Southey

... much as the king regarded not my words, being absorbed in play. O Charioteer, I seek thy protection. Do my behest. My mind misgiveth me. The king may come to grief. Yoking Nala's favourite horses endued with the fleetness of the mind, do thou take these twins (my son and daughter) on the car and hie thou to Kundina. Leaving the children there with my kindred as also the car and the horses, either stay thou there, or go to any other place as it listeth thee." Varshneya, the charioteer of Nala, then reported in detail these words of Damayanti unto ...
— Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1 • Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa

... Hie away; and aim thy flight Where consort none other fowl Than the bat and sullen owl; Where upon the limber grass Poppy and mandragoras With like simples not a few Hang for ever drops of dew. Where flows Lethe without coil Softly like a stream of oil. ...
— Pastoral Poems by Nicholas Breton, - Selected Poetry by George Wither, and - Pastoral Poetry by William Browne (of Tavistock) • Nicholas Breton, George Wither, William Browne (of Tavistock)

... was one of mere routine. Harry showed the note to Jacob, and said, "You may as well come with Hie, Jacob. Your drilling is over for the day, and you can aid me looking through the stores. Mike," he said, "we shall be back to supper. We are only going down to the port." The two officers buckled ...
— Friends, though divided - A Tale of the Civil War • G. A. Henty

... wind as they danced their garlands of enchanted sausages, he looked as if he wanted to be won. And when his dogs growled at them he cried, "Cuss!" (M.), which means Stop! but which the dogs only knew as "Hie, at them!" So they flew at the witches, and these flashed up like fire into their own dreadful forms of female fiends. Then there was a terrible tumult, for never before in the land of the Wabanaki had there been such a battle. All the earth and rocks around were torn up. All the while the Master ...
— The Algonquin Legends of New England • Charles Godfrey Leland

... hie honour suld be hir hud, Upoun hir heid to weir, Garneist with governance so gud, Na demyng suld ...
— Six Centuries of English Poetry - Tennyson to Chaucer • James Baldwin

... rear only four children per marriage, and if we are to give the medical man liberty to weed out the weaklings, it behoves us to see that the children whom we produce are of the best quality. Let us, therefore, hie to the stud-farm, observe its methods and proceed to apply them to the human race. We must definitely prevent feeble-minded persons from propagating their species. Within limits, that is a proposition with which all instructed persons ...
— Science and Morals and Other Essays • Bertram Coghill Alan Windle

... But though he took no particular pains to understand their rhetoric, he did feel the music which came through the man who was speaking and the men who were listening. The power of the speaker was raised to the hundredth degree by the echo thrown back from hie hearers. At first Christophe only took stock of the speakers, and he was interested enough to make the acquaintance of some ...
— Jean-Christophe Journey's End • Romain Rolland

... Hie thee to the breezy common, where the melancholy goose Stalks, and the astonished donkey finds that he is really loose; There amid green fern and furze-bush shalt thou soon MY WHOLE behold, Rising 'bull-eyed and majestic'—as ...
— Verses and Translations • C. S. C.

... Yellow Jack! hie thee hack! hie thee back! To thy damp, drear abode in the jungle; I'll be sober and staid, And drink lemonade, Try and catch me—you'll make ...
— Rattlin the Reefer • Edward Howard

... incomparable specimen of modern sculpture which stands on high at King's-Cross, lifted up, in order, we presume, to enable the good citizens duly to feast their eyes upon its manifold perfections, as they daily hie them to and fro between their western or suburban retreats and the purlieus of King Street or Cheapside. What estimate would the stranger form of the taste or skill of those who placed on its pedestal the statue we have first supposed ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 - Vol. 53, January, 1843 • Various

... looked-for day. The ninth fair dawn Bright Phaethon drove up a cloudless sky. Rumour and great Acestes' name had drawn The neighbouring folk; shoreward in crowds they hie To see the Trojans, or the games to try. Piled in the lists the presents they behold, Green garlands, tripods, robes of purple dye, The conqueror's palm, bright armour for the bold, And many a talent's weight of silver and ...
— The Aeneid of Virgil - Translated into English Verse by E. Fairfax Taylor • Virgil

... monster, Death, Shaking and quivering, pale and wan for fear, Stands aiming at me with his murdering dart, Who flies away at every glance I give, And, when I look away, comes stealing on. Villain, away, and hie thee to the field! I and mine army come to load thy back With souls of thousand mangled carcasses. Look, where he goes; but see, he comes again, Because I stay: Techelles, let us march And weary Death with bearing souls to hell. Part II, ...
— The Principles of English Versification • Paull Franklin Baum

... For recreation, especially [in] the spring, In that it yields great store of rare delights; And, passing farther than our wonted walks, Scarce ent'red were within these luckless woods. But right before us down a steep-fall hill, A monstrous ugly bear did hie him fast To meet us both—I faint to tell the rest, Good shepherd—but suppose the ghastly looks, The hideous fears, the thousand hundred woes, Which at this ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition) • Various

... it's almost a declaration!" cried Madeleine, not unnettled. "Take my advice, Heinz. Hie you home, and marry the person you ought to. Take pity on the poor thing's constancy. Unless," she added, a moment later, with a sarcastic laugh, "since you're still so infatuated with Louise, you persuade her to transfer her favours ...
— Maurice Guest • Henry Handel Richardson

... not have scurried away more precipitately. He then ponderously marched his charge to the door, where, assuredly, he did a strange thing. Instead of knocking or ringing, he stood on the step and called out sharply, "Hie, hie, hie!" until ...
— The Little White Bird - or Adventures In Kensington Gardens • J. M. Barrie

... thou would'st highly That would'st thou holily; would'st not play false. And yet would'st wrongly win: thou'dst have, great Glamis, That which cries, Thus thou must do, if thou have it; And that which rather thou dost fear to do, Than wishest should be undone. Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear; And chastise with the valor of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical[114] aid doth seem To have thee ...
— Characteristics of Women - Moral, Poetical, and Historical • Anna Jameson

... her kirtle green A little aboon her knee, The lady snooded her yellow hair A little aboon her bree, And she's gane to the good greenwood As fast as she could hie. ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends - Scotland • Anonymous

... while. Then an old and venerable Shaykh appeared to him in a vision[FN16] and said to him, "O Zayn al-Asnam, sorrow not; for after sorrow however sore cometh naught but joyance; and, would'st thou win free of this woe, up and hie thee to Egypt where thou shalt find hoards of wealth which shall replace whatso thou hast wasted and will double it more than twofold." Now when the Prince was aroused from his sleep he recounted ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... so long? Thine is it to win wedlock's noblest crown! Know that Zeus' heart thro' thee is all aflame, Pierced with desire as with a dart, and longs To join in utmost rite of love with thee. Therefore, O maiden, shun not with disdain Th' embrace of Zeits, but hie thee forth straightway To the lush growth of Lerna's meadow-land, Where are the flocks and steadings of thy home, And let Zeus' eye be eased of its desire. Night after night, haunted by dreams like these, Heartsick, ...
— Suppliant Maidens and Other Plays • AEschylus

... hie thee home!" And the white-faced ill-favoured brute was off like a shot in the darkness. Now I might lie down—now I might sleep. In my drowsy stupor I felt that I was being tenderly covered up by my brother; ...
— The Half-Brothers • Elizabeth Gaskell

... be? All my limbs of power are reft. And all strength my hand has left. Can it he? None are strangers that I see! And our brethren 'tis who go On before, the way to show! Oh, the reckless impious ones! How they, with their jarring tones, Beat the time, as on they hie! ...
— The Poems of Goethe • Goethe

... said our noble king; 'A message ye maun gang for me; Ye maun hie to Ettrick Forest, To yon ...
— Ballads of Robin Hood and other Outlaws - Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - Fourth Series • Frank Sidgwick

... Gow (stabs him). Thus! Hie after the Prince and tell him y'are the first fruits of his nectarine tree. Bleed there ...
— Songs from Books • Rudyard Kipling

... Manuel. Hie to the castle, some of ye, and bring What aid you can. Saddle the barb, and speed For the leech to the ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. IV - With His Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... the lot of the fender-fisherman be happier? No colds, quinsies or asthmas follow his incursions into the realms of fancy where in cool streams and peaceful lakes a legion of chubs and trouts and sawmon await him; in fancy he can hie away to the far-off Yalrow and once more share the benefits of the companionship of Kit North, the Shepherd, and that noble Edinburgh band; in fancy he can trudge the banks of the Blackwater with the sage of Watergrasshill; in fancy he can hear the music of the ...
— The Love Affairs of a Bibliomaniac • Eugene Field

... Triune, is it He Who dares arrest the wheels of destiny And plunge me in the lowest Hell of Hells? Will not the lightning's blast destroy my frame? Will not steel drink the blood-life where it swells? 5 No—let me hie where dark Destruction dwells, To rouse her from her deeply caverned lair, And, taunting her cursed sluggishness to ire, Light long Oblivion's death-torch at its flame And calmly mount Annihilation's pyre. 10 Tyrant of Earth! pale Misery's jackal Thou! Are there no stores of vengeful violent ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... wife, by some process of mental telepathy, became convinced of the notion that pair Wully would be jist wearyin' for her, he wasna' weel onyway, an' micht jist slip awa' afore she saw him; and away the devoted sister would hie, leaving the forsaken husband and his home to whatever ill-luck fate might send. As his house was faultlessly and economically run when its mistress was there, and fell into ruinous neglect in her absence, Jake generally succumbed at an early ...
— 'Lizbeth of the Dale • Marian Keith

... there I'll stay, Respect and honour, whilst I breathe, To find his honour'd roof beneath. My chief of long lin'd ancestry Can harbour sons of poesy; I've heard, for so the muse has told, He's kind and gentle to the old; Yes, to his castle I will hie; There's none to match it 'neath the sky: It is a baron's stately court, Where bards for sumptuous fare resort; There dwells the lord of Powis land, Who granteth every just demand. Its likeness now I'll limn you out: 'Tis water girdled wide ...
— Wild Wales - Its People, Language and Scenery • George Borrow

... smart? Who doeth not fele, or beare som- time, a bitter storme, to doleful tune, mirth full oft chaunged is, the meaner state, more quiet rest, on high, who climes more deper care, more dolefull harte doeth presse, moste tempestes hie trees, hilles, & moutaines beare, valleis lowe rough stor- mes doeth passe, the bendyng trees doeth giue place to might by force of might, Okes mightie fall, and Ceders high ar re[n]t from the roote. The state full meane ...
— A booke called the Foundacion of Rhetorike • Richard Rainolde

... blaze through space, and be a falling star; If only once, and by one glorious deed, I could but knit the name of Catiline With glory and with deathless high renown,—Then should I blithely, in the hour of conquest, Leave all, and hie me to an alien shore, Press the keen dagger gayly to my heart, And die; for then I ...
— Henrik Ibsen • Edmund Gosse

... for afternoon, When the midday meal is over, When the winds have sung themselves into a swoon, And the bees drone in the clover, Then hie to me, hie, for a lullaby— Come, my baby, do; Creep into my lap, and with a nap We'll break the day ...
— The Kingdom of Love - and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... be loved for myself alone. I will change my name, and hie me to pastures new, and all the affection that is then lavished upon me will be pure ...
— The Fiend's Delight • Dod Grile

... midnight, when as behold there crept in a Wesel into the chamber, and she came against me and put me in very great feare, insomuch that I marvelled greatly at the audacity of so little a beast. To whom I said, get thou hence thou whore and hie thee to thy fellowes, lest thou feele my fingers. Why wilt thou not goe? Then incontinently she ranne away, and when she was gon, I fell on the ground so fast asleepe, that Apollo himself could not discern which of ...
— The Golden Asse • Lucius Apuleius

... loons I could not buy.' 20 (Withal none here nor there owned I Who broken leg of Couch outworn On nape of neck had ever borne!) Then she, as pathic piece became, "Prithee Catullus mine, those same 25 Lend me, Serapis-wards I'd hie." * * * * "Easy, on no-wise, no," quoth I, "Whate'er was mine, I lately said Is some mistake, my camarade One Cinna—Gaius—bought the lot, 30 But his or mine, it matters what? I use it freely as though bought, ...
— The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus • Caius Valerius Catullus

... baronet, and the fair Mrs. Rachel?—Ah, ye laugh, young man! In troth she was the fair Mrs. Rachel in the year of grace seventeen hundred and sixteen; but time passes—ET SINGULA PRAEDANTUR ANNI—that is most certain. But once again, ye are most heartily welcome to my poor house of Tully-Veolan!—Hie to the house, Rose, and see that Alexander Saunderson leaks out the old Chateau Margaux, which I sent from Bourdeaux to Dundee in ...
— Waverley • Sir Walter Scott

... of frozen night Shall poor Sylvander hie; Depriv'd of thee, his life and light, The sun of all ...
— The Complete Works of Robert Burns: Containing his Poems, Songs, and Correspondence. • Robert Burns and Allan Cunningham

... at the very moment he was sallying from his palace gates to his pleasant pastime. He took aside Lord Hastings, and communicated the news to his able favourite. "Put spurs to thy horse, Hastings, and hie thee fast to Baynard's Castle. Bring back Gloucester. In these difficult matters that boy's head ...
— The Last Of The Barons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... is heard with grief by all Met at Poseidon's festival; All Greece is conscious of the smart, He leaves a void in every heart; And to the Prytanis [33] swift hie The people, and they urge him on The dead man's manes to pacify And with the murderer's ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... young be fledged and with them hie Where costly day drops down in crimson light? (Fortunate countries of the firefly Swarm with blue diamonds ...
— Poems by Jean Ingelow, In Two Volumes, Volume I. • Jean Ingelow

... if any be so hardy, That would go with thee and bear thee company. Hie thee that you were gone to God's magnificence, Thy reckoning to give before his presence. What, weenest thou thy life is given thee, And ...
— Everyman and Other Old Religious Plays, with an Introduction • Anonymous

... Brother," I said, as soothingly as I could, "that you'd better go Home, and tie a Wet Clout round your Head; or, better still, hie to a Chirurgeon and be let Blood. Have you e'er ...
— The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 3 of 3 • George Augustus Sala

... when I heard these words, that the pillars of the earth sank beneath me, and that the roof of the house was carried away in a whirlwind. The drums of my ears crackit, blue starns danced before my sight, and I was fain to leave the house and hie me home to the manse, where I sat down in my study, like a stupified creature, awaiting what would betide. Nothing, however, was found against the weaver lads; but I never from that day could look on Mr Cayenne as a Christian, though surely he was ...
— The Annals of the Parish • John Galt

... If so minded, hie you to the nearest grove and, digging down through the mid-winter's snow, bring home a spadeful of leaf-mould. Examine it carefully with hand-lens and microscope, and then prophesy what warmth and light will bring forth. "Watch the unfolding life of plant and animal, and then come from your ...
— The Log of the Sun - A Chronicle of Nature's Year • William Beebe

... to hie to Iceland in some altered shape, and to try what he could learn there to tell him: and he set out in the shape of a whale. And when he came near to the land he went to the west side of Iceland, north around the land, where he saw all the mountains and ...
— Heimskringla - The Chronicle of the Kings of Norway • Snorri Sturluson

... In danger both, and in our cause! Minstrel, the Douglas dare not pause. Why else that solemn warning given, 'If not on earth, we meet in heaven!' 230 Why else, to Cambus-kenneth's fane, If eve return him not again, Am I to hie, and make me known? Alas! he goes to Scotland's throne, Buys his friend's safety with his own; 235 He goes to do—what I had done, Had ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... gun has been fired, the vessel must fly To the town from the green wood shady. Come, friends, now we to the table will hie, A gentleman and a ...
— O. T. - A Danish Romance • Hans Christian Andersen

... it chanced so, Bold Robin in forest did spy A jolly butcher, with a bonny fine mare, With his flesh to the market did hie. ...
— Heroes Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... naked, when on the sound row'd we, Hard in hand, as we twain against the whale-fishes 540 Had mind to be warding us. No whit from me In the waves of the sea-flood afar might he float The hastier in holm, nor would I from him hie me. Then we two together, we were in the sea For a five nights, till us twain the flood drave asunder, The weltering of waves. Then the coldest of weathers In the dusking of night and the wind from the northward Battle-grim ...
— The Tale of Beowulf - Sometime King of the Folk of the Weder Geats • Anonymous

... (Pace etiamnum durante Diuque ut boni jam omnes sperant duratura) Cum summa potestate legatus; MATTHAEUS PRIOR, armiger: Qui Hos omnes, quibus cumulatus est, titulos Humanitatis, ingenii, eruditionis laude Superavit; Cui enim nascenti faciles arriserant musae. Hune puerum schola hie regia perpolivit; Juvenem in collegio S'ti Johannis Cantabrigia optimis scientiis instruxit; Virum denique auxit; et perfecit. Multa cum viris principibus consuetudo; Ita natus, ita institutus, ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. in Nine Volumes - Volume the Eighth: The Lives of the Poets, Volume II • Samuel Johnson

... think men have kept silent about your misdeeds?' she asked. 'Hie hence when I bid you, or you shall not see the new ...
— The Red Romance Book • Various

... he goes wrong is that his primary object in coming here was to meet Hie chief of the Japanese Secret Service, to whom he has made a proposition of precisely ...
— The Pawns Count • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... come to our planet in this way, it seems, and hasten to incarnate themselves in as promising unborn though just begotten men and women as they find, that they may the sooner be free to hie them sunwards with all ...
— The Martian • George Du Maurier

... they, by transgressing their own principles, make it apparent what kind of a spirit is moving them, while they, by virtue of the foundation of such principles, are scoffers and Ishmaels of all well-ordered church-life. Hic Rhodus, hie saltant (Here is Rhodes, here they dance)." "Also here" (as in Europe), Falckner proceeds, "the Protestant Church is divided in three nations; for there is here an English Protestant Church, a Swedish ...
— American Lutheranism - Volume 1: Early History of American Lutheranism and The Tennessee Synod • Friedrich Bente

... Troop will be impatient; let us hie Back to our post, and strip the Scottish Foray Of their rich Spoil, ere they recross the Border. —-Pity that our young Chief will have no part ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth - Volume 1 of 8 • Edited by William Knight

... by the sweetness of his language and delivery, And readily inferring what this prelude betokened, We hasted to open the door, and received him with welcome, Saying to the servant, "Hie! Hie! Bring whatever is ready!" But the stranger said, "By Him who brought me to your abode, I will not taste of your hospitality, unless you pledge to me That you will not permit me to be an incumbrance to you, Nor impose on yourselves necessity of ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 2 • Charles Dudley Warner

... own neck into the trap? they had better go about their business, and not trouble poor people. Bah! such a speech was not like Louis Herbois! but out it came, Heaven knows how, and no sooner had I finished than up runs the young creature, and seizing my moustache she cries, "My brave fellow, hie away, and crop off all this; none but men have a right to it; God grant you were not born in France; no Frenchman could give such an answer to a man imploring protection for his wife. Look at my husband—did he ask aid for himself? Do you think he would turn ...
— The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 2, January, 1851 • Various

... custom of the peasantry which takes place the Monday before Lent. The young men dress themselves gaily, and, armed with wooden clubs, hie them to the village green. Here a barrel is suspended with a cat inside it. Each man knocks the barrel with his club as he runs underneath it, and he who knocks a hole big enough to liberate poor puss is the ...
— Denmark • M. Pearson Thomson

... got by the hie Law, [4] Then straight I doe attend them, For if Hue and Crie doe follow, I A wrong way soone doe send them. Still ...
— Musa Pedestris - Three Centuries of Canting Songs - and Slang Rhymes [1536 - 1896] • John S. Farmer

... yet are those King-folk lovely, and no guile of heart they know, And, in troth and love rejoicing, by Sigurd's side they go: O'er heath and holt they hie them, o'er hill and dale they ride, Till they come to the Burg of the Niblungs and the war-gate of their pride; And there is Grimhild the wise-wife, and she sits and spins ...
— The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs • William Morris

... Colignon's recruits travelled mostly of will and at their own charge. In Franken, in Schwaben, in the Rhine Countries, a dissolute son would rob his father,—as shopmen their masters' tills, and managers their cash-boxes,—and hie off to those magnanimous Prussian Officials, who gave away companies like kreutzers, and had a value for young fellows of spirit. They hastened to Magdeburg with their Commissions; where they were received ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XIX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... praised it. So what with hope of good, and hate of ill, He me perswaded forth with him to fare. Nought tooke I with me, but mine oaten quill: Small needments else need shepheard to prepare. So to the sea we came; the sea, that is A world of waters heaped up on hie, Rolling like mountaines in wide wildernesse, Horrible, hideous, roaring ...
— Spenser - (English Men of Letters Series) • R. W. Church

... wailing of the midnight wind Thy lowly dwelling comes into my mind. When rain beats on my roof, wild storms abroad, I think upon thy bare and beaten sod; I hate the comfort of a shelter'd home, And hie me forth o'er fenceless fields to roam: I leave the paths of men for dreary waste, And bare my forehead to the howling blast. O Mary! loss of thee hath fix'd my doom: This world around me is a weary gloom: Dull heavy musings down my spirits ...
— Poems, &c. (1790) • Joanna Baillie

... is seal'd, and on it writ 'At Ardea to my lord with more than haste.' The post attends, and she delivers it, Charging the sour-faced groom to hie as fast As lagging fowls before the northern blast: Speed more than speed but dull and slow she deems: ...
— The Rape of Lucrece • William Shakespeare [Clark edition]



Words linked to "Hie" :   push forward, move, scud, dart, travel, charge, thrust ahead, bucket along, go, shoot down, linger, dash, shoot, flash, locomote, scoot, tear, buck, barge



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