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Herb   /ərb/  /hərb/   Listen
Herb

noun
1.
A plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests.  Synonym: herbaceous plant.
2.
Aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities.



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"Herb" Quotes from Famous Books



... the two boys who stood near their father, perplexed by the dialogue to which they had listened. They shook their heads, when, glancing up at Scipio, the questioner repeated, "Do you know?" and not waiting for a reply, "That's snakeroot; smell it!" He plucked a portion of the herb, rubbed it between his thumb and forefinger and thrust the bruised substance first under his own nose and then beneath the reluctant nostrils of the ...
— A Dream of Empire - Or, The House of Blennerhassett • William Henry Venable

... better after my long sleep, though still weak an' wobbly. I'd hev made myself some herb tea, but I wuz beginnin' to git tre-men-jeous-ly hungry. Managed to watch at a spring not far from here until a deer came down to drink one night, an' I shot him. Been livin' on deer meat since then, an' waitin' fur my headache to go away. Expected ...
— The Riflemen of the Ohio - A Story of the Early Days along "The Beautiful River" • Joseph A. Altsheler

... else, as is said in this same Book of Proverbs: 'The hope of the godless' shall be like one of those water plants, the papyrus or the flag, which, when the water is taken away, 'withereth up before any other herb.' It is for us to determine whether the afterwards that we must enter upon shall be the land in which our hopes shall blossom and fruit, and blossom again immortally, or whether we shall leave behind us, with all the rest that we would fain keep, the possibility of anticipating any good. 'Surely ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... Leicester, if gentle words might comfort me, Thy speeches long ago had eas'd my sorrows, For kind and loving hast thou always been. The griefs of private men are soon allay'd; But not of kings. The forest deer, being struck, Runs to an herb that closeth up the wounds: But when the imperial lion's flesh is gor'd, He rends and tears it with his wrathful paw, [And], highly scorning that the lowly earth Should drink his blood, mounts up to the air: And so ...
— Edward II. - Marlowe's Plays • Christopher Marlowe

... recognize a divine involution as the antecedent and causation of all so-called natural evolution. We see each link in the chain of being, from least to greatest, from the simplest to the most complex; grass, herb, and tree, fish, reptile, bird, and beast, as multiple yet orderly expressions of the immanence and permanence of the fatherhood of God. We view the creation of man as His highest handiwork, in which the seed of human life, bearing ...
— The Arena - Volume 4, No. 24, November, 1891 • Various

... learning, they left modern GALLANTRY and the POINT OF HONOUR, which still maintain their influence, and are the genuine offspring of those ancient affectations. [FN [f] In all legal single combats, it was part of the champion's oath, that he carried not about him any herb, spell, or enchantment, by which he might procure victory. Dugd. ...
— The History of England, Volume I • David Hume

... various view: Groves whose rich trees wept odorous gums and balm; Others whose fruit, burnished with golden rind, Hung amiable—Hesperian fables true, If true here only—and of delicious taste. Betwixt them lawns, or level downs, and flocks Grazing the tender herb, were interposed, Or palmy hillock; or the flowery lap Of some irriguous valley spread her store, Flowers of all hue, and without thorn the rose. Another side, umbrageous grots and caves Of cool recess, o'er ...
— The Astronomy of Milton's 'Paradise Lost' • Thomas Orchard

... surgery, as it appears in Homer, is simply a certain amount of practical knowledge gained by rough experience, largely supplemented by primitive superstition. It was quite as important to know the proper prayers and charms wherewith to approach "Apollo the Healer," as to understand the kind of herb poultice which would keep wounds from festering. Homer speaks of Asclepius; however, in early days he was not a god, but simply a skilful leach. Then as we approach historic times the physician's art becomes more regular. Asclepius is elevated into ...
— A Day In Old Athens • William Stearns Davis

... Chinese, though until our times no regular intercourse subsisted between the two countries. It is recorded that a fleet freighted with youth and maidens was despatched thither by the builder of the Great Wall to seek in those islands of the blest for the herb of immortality; but none of them returned. It was to be a colony, and the flowery robe by which its object is veiled is not sufficient to hide the real aim of that ambitious potentate. Yet, through that expedition and subsequent emigrations, a pacific conquest was effected which does honor to ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume XIV • John Lord

... seem to spring directly up from the mud without anything to cling to, but generally they are fastened to rocks or large stones, and spread out and out from them. Here they look so much like a kind of herb, that Folks who make a study of things in nature, and are called naturalists, for a long time took them to be a kind of sea-plant, and for years it was a puzzle as ...
— Lord Dolphin • Harriet A. Cheever

... herb-gatherer had brought her infant with her on her quest, and had laid it down on a bed of soft grass while she worked. And it was this infant, wrapped as Tom afterward saw in a piece of deer-skin, at which the ...
— Tom Swift and his Big Tunnel - or, The Hidden City of the Andes • Victor Appleton

... veins; The wedding song of sun and rains He is, the dance of children, thanks Of sowers, shout of primrose-banks, And eye of violets while they breathe; All these the circling song will wreathe, And you shall hear the herb and tree, The better heart of men shall see, Shall feel celestially, as long As you crave ...
— Poems of To-Day: an Anthology • Various

... my dearest cousin, certainly is that no green herb of a secret will spring up and flourish between ...
— The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1 of 2) • Frederic G. Kenyon

... is a native of Great Britain. In its wild state it has a strong, disagreeable taste and smell, and is known as smallage. By cultivation it becomes more mild and sweet. It is usually eaten uncooked as a salad herb, or introduced into soups as a flavouring. In its raw state, ...
— Science in the Kitchen. • Mrs. E. E. Kellogg

... with water, the goddess, unseen, dipped into the vessel a branch of dit'ta-ny, a plant famous for its healing qualities. At the same time she injected celestial ambrosia, and juice of the all-curing herb pan-a-ce'a. ...
— Story of Aeneas • Michael Clarke

... know how all this comes about, and in what way it can be remedied. How it comes about will be perfectly obvious to any one who has considered the growth of medicine. I suppose that medicine and surgery first began by some savage, more intelligent than the rest, discovering that a certain herb was good for a certain pain, and that a certain pull, somehow or other, set a dislocated joint right. I suppose all things had their humble beginnings, and medicine and surgery were in the same condition. People who wear watches know nothing about watchmaking. A watch goes wrong and it stops; ...
— Critiques and Addresses • Thomas Henry Huxley

... on the Sea of Liguria, lying to the south of Corsica. It is said that an herb grew there, which, when eaten, produced a painful grin, called Sardonius risus. The island now belongs to the Duke of Saxony, with the title ...
— A Dialogue Concerning Oratory, Or The Causes Of Corrupt Eloquence • Cornelius Tacitus

... vow it is." For once Colonel Boyce was stung. He fell silent and fidgeted, and made a long arm for the herb water by his bed. Mrs. Weston gave it him. "Let be, can't you?" he cried, and drank all the same. "Eh, Kate that came over my guard.... She has made you suffer, the shrew. Egad, I could whip her through the town ...
— The Highwayman • H.C. Bailey

... to laws, and that must eend in anarchy and bloodshed. No,' said the old man, raising his voice, and giving the table a wipe with his fist that made the glasses all jingle agin, 'give me the country—that country to which he that made it said, "Bring forth grass, the herb yieldin' seed, and the tree yieldin' fruit," AND WHO SAW THAT IT WAS GOOD. Let me jine with the feathered tribe in the mornin' (I hope you get up airly now, Sam; when you was a boy there was no gittin' you out of bed at no rate), and at sunset, in the hymns which they utter in ...
— The Clockmaker • Thomas Chandler Haliburton

... from a Bournemouth shopkeeper named Richard Oliver. It seems that Oliver is troubled with pimples on his face, and that Emma Barney—not an inappropriate name, by the way—said she could cure these by means of a certain herb, the name of which she would divulge 'for a consideration.' Before doing so, however, she required Richard's coat and waistcoat, and some silver to 'steam in hot water,' after which the name of the ...
— Gipsy Life - being an account of our Gipsies and their children • George Smith

... sent over by Raleigh; and yet another. They were failures. But there was one, single thing which was not a failure. This was the discovery of a herb called "Yppowoc," or tobacco, the leaves of which—when dried—were smoked by the natives ...
— Famous Privateersmen and Adventurers of the Sea • Charles H. L. Johnston

... gits sick, deir mammies luked af'er em but de Marse gived de rem'dies. Yes, dere wuz dif'runt kinds, salts, pills, Castah orl, herb teas, garlic, 'fedia, sulphah, whiskey, dog wood bark, sahsaparilla an' apple ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves: The Ohio Narratives • Works Projects Administration

... must of course be fertilised by pollen from a distinct plant in order to yield any seeds. The plants on which I experimented were hermaphrodites; they had been cultivated for a long period as a pot-herb in my kitchen garden, and were, like so many long-cultivated plants, extremely sterile. As I felt doubtful about the specific name I sent specimens to Kew, and was assured that the species was Origanum vulgare. My plants formed one great ...
— The Effects of Cross & Self-Fertilisation in the Vegetable Kingdom • Charles Darwin

... of the road about two miles from Botley. Before Mr. Dangle's appearance, Mr. Hoopdriver had been learning with great interest that mere roadside flowers had names,—star-flowers, wind-stars, St. John's wort, willow herb, lords and ladies, bachelor's buttons,—most curious names, some of them. "The flowers are all different in South Africa, y'know," he was explaining with a happy fluke of his imagination to account for his ignorance. Then suddenly, heralded by clattering sounds and ...
— The Wheels of Chance - A Bicycling Idyll • H. G. Wells

... more at their ease, and with the aid of long purses can indulge in all the luxuries so amply provided by liberal caterers; but still 'fair play' is our motto; and we will at once throw open the abbey-doors and marshal forth the most brilliant cortege that ever issued from its sacred walls; the herb-woman, Miss Fellows, and her attendants, strewing the path with flowers, blending the red rose and the white together, symbolical of the fact, that 'no longer division racked the state,' but that unreserved allegiance ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, February 1844 - Volume 23, Number 2 • Various

... make a most famous physician of you. Whenever you are called to a sick person, I will take care and show myself to you. If I stand at the foot of the bed, say boldly, 'I will soon restore you to health,' and give the patient a little herb that I will point out to you, and he will soon be well. If, however, I stand at the head of the sick person, he is mine; then say, 'All help is useless; ...
— Folk-lore and Legends: German • Anonymous

... suggesting the well-saged dressing of a turkey. A round mouthful of luscious mellowness, with a bouquet—a snapping reminder to the nose. And there's just a soupcon of new-mown hay above the green freckles of herb to delight the eye and set the fancy free. So this is the veritable vert, green cheese—the moon is made of it! Vert veritable. A general favorite with everybody who ever tasted it, for generations ...
— The Complete Book of Cheese • Robert Carlton Brown

... bad, even for Islip," said Miss Gale. "Here is one of our deadliest poisons planted by the very side of an esculent herb, which it resembles. You don't happen to have hired the devil for gardener at any time, do you? Just fancy! any cook might come out here for horseradish, and gather this plant, and lay you all dead at your own table. It is the Aconitum of medicine, the Monk's-hood or ...
— The Woman-Hater • Charles Reade

... notice began almost before it was light. About sunrise they passed, in the wood of Bondy, a poor herb-man, with his ass and panniers of greens. When the hue and cry began, this herb-man told of the fine new berlin he had seen in the wood of Bondy; and thus set pursuers upon their track. Besides the eight horses wanted for ...
— The Peasant and the Prince • Harriet Martineau

... from his fancy, at the urgent call of Messrs. Brown and Younger, would have been likely to draw nothing but iron balls from Radetzky's cannon; or failing so vast an effect, an immediate external application to the poet himself of that famous herb Pantagruelion, cure for all public ills and private woes, which men call hemp. Nevertheless, it was a noble subject; one which ought surely to have been taken up by some of our poets, for if they do not make a noble poem of it, it will be their own fault. ...
— Two Years Ago, Volume I • Charles Kingsley

... order Umbelliferae), a perennial herb with a leafy hollow stem, 2 to 3 ft. high, much divided leaves, whitish beneath, a large sheathing base, and terminal umbels of small white flowers, the outer ones only of which are fertile. The fruit is dark brown, long (3/4 to 1 in.), narrow and beaked. The plant is a native of central ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 3 - "Chitral" to "Cincinnati" • Various

... that a celibate who has been subject to a diet consisting of the herb hanea, of cucumbers, of purslane and the applications of leeches to his ears, as recommended by Sterne, would be able to carry by storm the honor of your wife? Suppose that a diplomat had been clever enough to affix a permanent linen plaster to the head of ...
— The Physiology of Marriage, Part II. • Honore de Balzac

... per se, will cure invalids of any class, they are certainly worthless in this class of patients. The whole materia medica affords no root, herb, extract, or compound that alone will cure a person suffering from emissions. Thousands of unfortunates have been ruined by long-continued drugging. One physician will purge and salivate the patient. Another will dose him with phosphorus, ...
— Plain Facts for Old and Young • John Harvey Kellogg

... into the same hole ten or twelve seeds of the said Nicotiana together, and fill up the hole again: for it is so small, as that if you should put in but four or five seeds the earth would choake it: and if the time be dry, you must water the place easily some five days after: And when the herb is grown out of the earth, inasmuch as every seed will have put up his sprout and stalk, and that the small thready roots are entangled the one within the other, you must with a great knife make a composs within the earth in the places about this plot where they grow and take up the earth and ...
— Tobacco in Colonial Virginia - "The Sovereign Remedy" • Melvin Herndon

... or ajes (Dioscorea alata), copei (Clusia alba), guayacan (Guaiacum officinale), guajaba (Psidium pyriferum), guanavano (Anona muricata), mani (Arachis hypogaea), guama (Inga), henequen (was supposed from the erroneous accounts of the first travellers to be an herb with which the Haitians used to cut metals; it means now every kind of strong thread), hicaco (Chrysobalanus icaco), maghei (Agave Americana), mahiz or maiz (Zea, maize), mamei (Mammea Americana), mangle (Rhizophora), pitahaja (Cactus pitahaja), ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America • Alexander von Humboldt

... YERBA BUENA do, sir?" responded the youth gravely. "It's the old Spanish title of the first settlement here. It comes from the name that Father Junipero Serra gave to the pretty little vine that grows wild over the sandhills, and means 'good herb.' He called it 'A balm ...
— A Ward of the Golden Gate • Bret Harte

... to speak, is shown in his easy variety of pursuits. Printer, postmaster, almanac maker, essayist, chemist, orator, tinker, statesman, humorist, philosopher, parlor man, political economist, professor of housewifery, ambassador, projector, maxim-monger, herb-doctor, wit:—Jack of all trades, master of each and mastered by none—the type and genius of his land. Franklin was everything but a poet. But since a soul with many qualities, forming of itself a sort of handy index and pocket ...
— Israel Potter • Herman Melville

... an oozy bed!—luscious, sun-golden cow-lilies rose sturdily triumphant, dripping with color, glowing in sheen. The button-bush hung out her balls, and white alder painted the air with faint perfume; willow-herb built her bowery arches, and the flags were ever glancing like swords of roistering knights. These flags, be it known to such as have grown up in grievous ignorance of the lore inseparable from "deestrick school," hold the most practical significance ...
— Meadow Grass - Tales of New England Life • Alice Brown

... cold marble o'er my body rise— But only earth above, and sunny skies. Thus would I lowly lie in peaceful rest, Nursing the Herb Divine from out my breast. Green let it grow above this clay of mine, Deriving strength from strength that I resign. So in the days to come, when I'm beyond This fickle life, will come my lovers fond, And gazing on the plant, their grief restrain In ...
— Pipe and Pouch - The Smoker's Own Book of Poetry • Various

... thought it would be no harm—as he was not a merchant, and did not intend to exercise evil influences upon the people of America by inducing them to buy tea—if he appropriated to himself a little of this most desirable herb, which was to be burned and wasted ...
— Stories of New Jersey • Frank Richard Stockton

... guilty"—Miss Marty poured out a glassful—"if its name suggests a foreign origin. You men, I know, profess a preference for foreign wines; and so, humorously, I hit on the name of Fra Angelico, from the herb angelica, which is its main ingredient. In reality, as I can attest, it is English to ...
— The Mayor of Troy • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... cure for a snake-bite if bruised into a poultice and bound upon the place soon after one is bitten. My father showed it to me a great many years ago, when I was a little shaver, and told me how he had learned about it from an old Indian herb-doctor. He tried it several times for moccasin-and adder-and copperhead-bites among his servants, and it was a cure in every instance. It grows on both sides of this branch, and nowhere else that I know of on the plantation. My father was ...
— When Grandmamma Was New - The Story of a Virginia Childhood • Marion Harland

... go after them in such a solemn manner. Our "sprout" hunts were not so funereal a function; rather more jovial, and much more sociable. Also this devotion to the search for the herb of the field excited our curiosity. They were all the time craving green stuff, and going after it so constantly. We had a story going around which was supposed to explain the craving of a Tar Heel's ...
— From the Rapidan to Richmond and the Spottsylvania Campaign - A Sketch in Personal Narration of the Scenes a Soldier Saw • William Meade Dame

... water with which they made the coffee that I was to drink, though not in that which Marie proposed to drink with me, the strong taste and black hue of the coffee effectually hiding any flavour or colour that there might be in the herb. Also the vrouw cooked some food which she gave to Hans to carry. First, however, he went to investigate the old mealie-pit which was within a few paces of the back door of the Prinsloos' house. He reported that it would do well ...
— Marie - An Episode in The Life of the late Allan Quatermain • H. Rider Haggard

... had been taken down from the door, and the blessed herb, moly, was incautiously thrown aside; neither had Goody Dickisson offered up the usual petition that evening, to be defended from the snares of the devil. Her discontent was too great, and she was in a fitter mood for murmuring ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2) • John Roby

... throughout the country that Lanrivain had formerly been on good terms with the lady of Cornault; but that he had been absent from Brittany for over a year, and people had ceased to associate their names. The witnesses who made this statement were not of a very reputable sort. One was an old herb-gatherer suspected of witch-craft, another a drunken clerk from a neighbouring parish, the third a half-witted shepherd who could be made to say anything; and it was clear that the prosecution was not satisfied with ...
— The Early Short Fiction of Edith Wharton, Part 1 (of 10) • Edith Wharton

... undersigned, hereby enter into partnership to search for and sell, to our mutual profit, the herb known as Simiacine, the profits to be divided into three equal portions, after the deduction of one-hundredth part to be handed to the servant, Joseph Atkinson. Any further expenses that may be incurred ...
— With Edged Tools • Henry Seton Merriman

... Herb-Soup, the Foundation. Hops. Hare, to pot. Herbs, to dry. Hare coursed, how to keep. Ditto hunted, to dress. Ditto the Pudding for it. Ditto to roast. Hare, to stew. Hung-Beef. Herbs infused ...
— The Country Housewife and Lady's Director - In the Management of a House, and the Delights and Profits of a Farm • Richard Bradley

... "insane herb." Davis, who visited Sumatra in 1599 (Purchas i. 120) speaks "of a kind of seed, whereof a little being eaten, maketh a man to turn foole, all things seeming to him to be metamorphosed." Linschoten's "Dutroa" was a poppy-like bud containing small kernels like melons which stamped and ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... a chest or drawer, should have some pleasant, cleanly herb like lavender or sweet-grass, or the old- fashioned clover, or bags of Oriental orris-root, put between them, that they may come to the table smelling ...
— Manners and Social Usages • Mrs. John M. E. W. Sherwood

... of the natives especially attracted the attention of their visitors, and for the oddity of the thing may best be recorded in Cartier's manner. It is an early account of the use of tobacco. 'There groweth also,' he wrote, 'a certain kind of herb, whereof in summer they make a great provision for all the year, making great account of it, and only men use it, and first they cause it to be dried in the sun, then wear it about their necks, wrapped in a little beast's skin made like ...
— The Mariner of St. Malo: A Chronicle of the Voyages of Jacques Cartier • Stephen Leacock

... Psalm,—that most magnificent of all descriptions of the glory, the omnipotence, and the goodness of the Creator, God,—wine is enumerated among the richest of his blessings bestowed upon man. 'He causeth the grass to grow,' says the Psalmist, 'for the cattle, and herb for the service of man, that he may bring forth food out of the earth, and wine that maketh glad the heart of man, and oil to make his face to shine, and bread that strengtheneth ...
— Memoir of the Life of John Quincy Adams. • Josiah Quincy

... back to him, he could see the bare wooden-like walls of his sleeping-room, the locker, the one window bright with sunlight, the open door of the tank-room, and the little staircase to the tower. There was a strange smoky and herb-like smell in the room. He made an effort to rise, but as he did so a small sunburnt hand was laid gently yet restrainingly upon his shoulder, and he heard the same musical cry as before, but this time modulated to a girlish laugh. He raised his head faintly. Half squatting, half kneeling ...
— Under the Redwoods • Bret Harte

... Purple Willow-herb bent over To her shadow fair; Meadow-sweet, in feathery clusters, Perfumed all the air; Silver-weed was there, And in one calm, grassy spot, ...
— Legends and Lyrics: Second Series • Adelaide Anne Procter

... Louis XV had been equal to that of the prince de Soubise, and that he had evinced it by the absence of mind which he had manifested in his discourse and manners. M. de Chauvelin then turning towards me, said, "Well, madame, on what evil herb have you walked to-day? Can it be possible that you would make the prince, who is your friend, responsible for the hatred which ought to be flattering rather than painful to you, since it is a homage exacted ...
— "Written by Herself" • Baron Etienne Leon Lamothe-Langon

... we are not accustomed to consider Cabbage as an herb, it began existence as cole-wort, a shrub or herb on the south coast of England. Cultivation has developed it into a firm round head; and as a vegetable, abounding as it does in nitrogen, it ranks next to beans as a food. Cauliflower is a very delicate and highly prized form of cabbage, but ...
— The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking - Adapted to Domestic Use or Study in Classes • Helen Campbell

... put into it and is quickly scalded with boiling water. The first liquid must at once be poured off into the slop-bowl—the tea thus becomes purer and more aromatic; and by the way, it's also known that Chinamen are pagans and prepare their herb very filthily. After that the tea-pot must be filled anew, up to a quarter of its volume; left on the tray, covered over with a towel and kept so for three and a half minutes. Afterwards pour in more boiling water almost up to the top, cover it again, let it stay just ...
— Yama (The Pit) • Alexandra Kuprin

... the same principle as were talismans. Says CORNELIUS AGRIPPA: "The manner of making these kinds of Magical Rings is this, viz.: When any Star ascends fortunately, with the fortunate aspect or conjunction of the Moon, we must take a stone and herb that is under that Star, and make a ring of the metal that is suitable to this Star, and in it fasten the stone, putting the herb or root under it—not omitting the inscriptions of images, names, and characters, as also the proper suffumigations...."(1) SOLOMON'S ...
— Bygone Beliefs • H. Stanley Redgrove

... impure spirits rejoice in bloody immolations and delight in the fumes of flesh burning on the altars.[76] Terrible acts and words attended all immolations. Plutarch[77] mentions an example of the dark sacrifices of the Mazdeans. "In a mortar," he says, "they pound a certain herb called wild garlic, at the same time invoking Hades (Ahriman), and the powers of darkness, then stirring this herb in the blood of a slaughtered wolf, they take it away and drop it on a spot never reached by the rays of the sun." ...
— The Oriental Religions in Roman Paganism • Franz Cumont

... ice and snow to mix with the great world of thought outside. "Stone walls do not a prison make nor iron bars a cage." Fighting our way with the mosquitoes, under birches somewhat dwarfed but beautiful, through a pungent bocage of ground pine, wild roses, giant willow-herb, mints innumerable and Labrador tea (Ledum latifolium), we reach the H.B. garden where the potatoes are six or eight inches high. We wander into a little graveyard, surely the most lonely God's acre in all Canada. The inscriptions in syllabic Chipewyan show the patient devotion of ...
— The New North • Agnes Deans Cameron

... N. J., red berries South. Flowering raspberry Deep red purple Copses, wooded banks; New Eng. Fumitory, climbing Purplish-white Wet woods; West. Great-spurred violet Pale violet Damp shady woods; Mass. Rare. Great willow-herb Pink-purple Low grounds, burned pastures, and woods. Green violet Greenish-white Open woods; N. Y., Pa. Rare. Green-weed Yellow Dry hills; Mass., Middle States, W. Hedysarum Violet-purple Mountains; New England, Me. Herb-robert Red-purple Shady ravines, ...
— Harper's Young People, June 8, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... severally swore that the cause in which they were to fight was true, and that they did not deal in any witchcraft or magic art, by which they expected to gain the victory over their adversary; and also, that they had not about their persons any herb or stone, or charm of any kind, by which they hoped to obtain ...
— Margaret of Anjou - Makers of History • Jacob Abbott

... is made one with Nature: there is heard His voice in all her music, from the moan Of thunder, to the song of night's sweet bird; He is a presence to be felt and known In darkness and in light, from herb and stone, Spreading itself where'er that Power may move Which has withdrawn his being to its own; Which wields the world with never wearied love, Sustains it from beneath, and ...
— Percy Bysshe Shelley • John Addington Symonds

... admirers, particularly for salad purposes. Now, it is to be carefully noted that the accompaniments, or "fourniture," of these two varieties of endive are vastly different. With the Batavian it usually is formed of chervil, tarragon, and that delicate alliaceous salad herb, chives. On the other hand, a chapon is used with the curly endive; it consists of a crust of bread over which a clove of garlic has been rubbed. This is thrown into the bowl and tossed about during the process of mixing the salad, ...
— The Art of Living in Australia • Philip E. Muskett (?-1909)

... sent Friday to the shore, to get a sort of herb that grew there. I soon heard him cry out to me, "O grief! O bad! O bad! O out there boats, one, two, three!" "Keep a stout heart," said I, to cheer him. The poor man shook with fear; for he thought that the men who brought him here, had now ...
— Robinson Crusoe - In Words of One Syllable • Mary Godolphin

... triangle, stood a large old cheese house, built of lattice work made of beams nailed across one another, like a cage. In it there shone many scores of white cheeses; around them bunches of sage, bennet, cardoon, and wild thyme hung drying, the entire herb apothecary shop of the Seneschal's daughter. The cheese house was some twenty feet square, but it rested only on a single great pillar, like a stork's nest. The old oaken pillar slanted, for it was already half decayed, ...
— Pan Tadeusz • Adam Mickiewicz

... the only one in the paragraph with a distinctively Maya physiognomy. It is a compound of xiu, the generic term for herb or plant, and tutul, a reduplicated form of tul, an abundance, an excess, as in the verb tutulancil, to overflow, etc. (Diccionario de Ticul, MS.). It would appear therefore to be a local name, and to signify a place where there was an abundance of herbage. The surname is ...
— The Maya Chronicles - Brinton's Library Of Aboriginal American Literature, Number 1 • Various

... the taste of the water, but is an excellent helper of digestion, serving to quicken the spirits, and to purify the blood.[232] There is also another help for digestion and to comfort the stomach, used by those who refrain from wine. This is an herb called betel, or paune, its leaf resembling that of our ivy. They chew this leaf along with a hard nut, called areka, somewhat like a nutmeg, mixing a little pure white lime among the leaves; and when they have extracted the juice, they throw away the remains. This has many ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume IX. • Robert Kerr

... from amidst one of the neighbouring copses, which studded the ground towards the chase of Marybone, came soft and distant on the serene air. The balm and freshness of spring were felt in the dews, in the skies, in the sweet breath of young herb and leaf; through the calm of ever-watchful nature, it seemed as if you might mark, distinct and visible, minute after minute, the blessed ...
— The Last Of The Barons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... and crown of the Old Testament; the summing up of all that is true and eternal in the old Jewish faith; as true for us as for them: as true millions of years hence as it is now—which cries to all heaven and earth, from the skies above our heads to the green herb beneath our feet, "O all ye works of the Lord, bless ye the Lord; praise Him and magnify Him for ever." On that one hymn I take my stand. That is my charter as a student of Natural Science. As long as that is sung in an English church, I have a right ...
— Town Geology • Charles Kingsley

... to give it a fair chance of success. If some of the warm spots of this kind in the south of England or Ireland were selected, who knows but that our cottagers might be able to grow their own tea? at all events, they might have the fragrant herb to look upon. ...
— The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom • P. L. Simmonds

... heavens, and I will speak; And hear, O earth, the words of my mouth. My doctrine shall drop as the rain, My speech shall distil as the dew, As the small rain upon the tender herb, And as the showers upon the grass: Because I will publish the name of the Lord: Ascribe ye greatness unto our God. He is the Rock, His work is perfect: For all His ways are judgment: A God of truth and without iniquity, Just and right ...
— Men of the Bible • Dwight Moody

... form, they have gone on developing ever since, from the homogeneous to the heterogeneous, assuming ever more varied shapes, till at last they have reached their present enormous variety of tree, and shrub, and herb, and seaweed, of beast, and bird, and fish, and creeping insect. Evolution throughout has been one and continuous, from nebula to sun, from gas-cloud to planet, from early jelly-speck to man or elephant. So at least ...
— Falling in Love - With Other Essays on More Exact Branches of Science • Grant Allen

... absurd and proud custom of walking in public in boots, and the ridiculous one of wearing the hair long;* - statutes, moreover, which demanded of him to refrain from all taverns, wine-shops, and houses in which they sold wine or any other drink, and the herb called nicotiana or "tobacco"; not to hunt wild beasts with dogs or snares or nets; not to carry cross-bows or other "bombarding" weapons, or keep hawks for fowling; not to frequent theatres or the strifes of gladiators; ...
— The Adventures of Mr. Verdant Green • Cuthbert Bede

... miles a day, since sometimes the country was open and we crossed it with speed. Yet although our dangers were so many, strangely enough, during all this time, even in that heat neither of us fell sick, as I think because of the herb which Kari carried in his bag, that I found was named Coca, whereof we obtained more as we went and ate from time to time. Nor did we ever really suffer from starvation, since when we were hungry we ...
— The Virgin of the Sun • H. R. Haggard

... and awe at the storied hat, when Virgie emerged from the parlor door with the dreaded article in her hand, and, hanging it on the peg, came with superstitious fear and relief into the colonnade. Aunt Hominy hurried her to the kitchen, strewed her with herb-dust, waved a rattle of snake's teeth in a pig's weazen over her head, and ended by pushing a sweet piece of preserved watermelon-rind down ...
— The Entailed Hat - Or, Patty Cannon's Times • George Alfred Townsend

... glad to say. But my poor daughter had, a short time ago, such bad inflammation in her eyes that she would have gone blind had I not been able to find the magic herb, which cured ...
— The Orange Fairy Book • Andrew Lang

... a necessary part of theoretic pleasure is very evident when we consider that, by the presence of these feelings, even the lower and more sensual pleasures may be rendered theoretic. Thus Aristotle has subtly noted, that "we call not men intemperate so much with respect to the scents of roses or herb-perfumes as of ointments and of condiments," (though the reason that he gives for this be futile enough.) For the fact is, that of scents artificially prepared the extreme desire is intemperance, but of natural and God-given scents, which take ...
— Modern Painters Volume II (of V) • John Ruskin

... head nurse to get some herb tea from the dispensary at the end of the corridor, and there, all alone, she found the medical assistant, a tall man, with a blotchy face, who had for a long time been bothering her. In trying to get away from him Maslova gave him such a push that he ...
— Resurrection • Count Leo Tolstoy

... found a stone with a hole in it into which he stuck a cross made of two pieces of wood tied together with dried grass, and to this cross he prayed. In the intervals of prayer and repentance he gathered the herb malva, dried it, powdered it, mixed it with water into paste, formed it into cakes, baked them in the sun and ate them. When his time came, he died, and gradually his corpse became a skeleton, but his spirit still dwelt within because it was so ordained. His dying ...
— Castellinaria - and Other Sicilian Diversions • Henry Festing Jones

... life up for lost and said to the Magian, "By the right of that thou worshippest and by the faith wherein thou believest, I conjure thee to tell me what is the object wherefor thou hast brought me!" Bahram replied, "The art of alchemy may not be accomplished save by means of a herb which groweth in the place where the clouds pass and whereon they split. Such a site is yonder mountain upon whose head the herb groweth and I purpose to send thee up thither to fetch it; and when we have it, I will show thee the secret of this craft ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 8 • Richard F. Burton

... advisable to use the earthenware pot, unless a silver or metal one can be procured sufficiently large to contain at once all that may be required. These facts are readily explained by considering, that the action of heat retained by the silver vessel so far exhausts the herb as to leave very little soluble substance for a second infusion; whereas the reduced temperature of the water in the earthenware pot, by extracting only a small proportion at first, leaves some soluble matter for the action of ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction. - Volume XIII, No. 376, Saturday, June 20, 1829. • Various

... shall ye pu' where the well rins deep? One with another. Green herb of death, fine flower ...
— Poems and Ballads (Third Series) - Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles - Swinburne—Vol. III • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... he) each herb with restlesse leaves To th' starres doth strive and upward heaves: Remov'd from heaven they weep, the field appeares All o're dissolv'd in pious teares: The white-flowr'd Woodbine, and the blushing Rose Branch into th'aire ...
— The Odes of Casimire, Translated by G. Hils • Mathias Casimire Sarbiewski

... appear'." The contraction of the cooling earth caused the elevation of the land, and the draining of the waters into the seas. The geologist Lyell says, "All land has been under water." Hitchcock says, "The surface of the globe has been a shoreless ocean." "And the earth brought forth grass, herb yielding seed after its kind, and tree bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after its kind." Though the sun was not yet visible on account of dense clouds and vapors, the warm, humid atmosphere was ...
— The Evolution Of Man Scientifically Disproved • William A. Williams

... and the cool sound Of running waters soothe thee. Mark how clear It sparkles o'er the shallows, and behold Where o'er its surface wheels with restless speed Yon glossy insect, on the sand below How the swift shadow flies. The stream is pure In solitude, and many a healthful herb Bends o'er its course and drinks the vital wave: But passing on amid the haunts of man, It finds pollution there, and rolls from thence A tainted tide. Seek'st thou for HAPPINESS? Go Stranger, sojourn in the woodland cot Of INNOCENCE, and thou shalt ...
— Poems • Robert Southey

... And the Epeans thus were close engaged, 890 I first a warrior slew, Mulius the brave, And seized his coursers. He the eldest-born Of King Augeias' daughters had espoused The golden Agamede; not an herb The spacious earth yields but she knew its powers, 895 Him, rushing on me, with my brazen lance I smote, and in the dust he fell; I leap'd Into his seat, and drove into the van. A panic seized the Epeans when they saw The leader of their horse o'erthrown, ...
— The Iliad of Homer - Translated into English Blank Verse • Homer

... LYSIMACHUS. Why, your herb-woman; she that sets seeds and roots of shame and iniquity. O, you have heard something of my power, and so stand aloof for more serious wooing. But I protest to thee, pretty one, my authority shall not see thee, or else look friendly upon ...
— Pericles Prince of Tyre • William Shakespeare [Clark edition]

... "The Lure," of this and that in nature, and all mean the same thing: that the salvation of man is to be found on, and by means of, the green earth out of which he was born, and that, as there is no ill of his body which may not be healed by the magic juices of herb and flower, or the stern potency of minerals, so there is no sickness of his soul that may not be cured by the sound of the sea, the rustle of leaves, or the songs ...
— Vanishing Roads and Other Essays • Richard Le Gallienne

... deeper yet in herb and fern, Look further thro' the chace, Spread upward till thy boughs discern The front ...
— The Early Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Tennyson

... follows: Achatius (Acacius), Aegidius, Barbara (cf. St. Barbara's cress), Blasius (the "defender" of those afflicted with throat diseases), Catharine (cf. St. Catharine's flower), Christopher (cf. St. Christopher's herb), Cyriacus, Dionysius, Erasmus (Italian: San Elmo; cf. St. Elmo's fire), Eustachius, George the Martyr (cf. St. George's herb), Margaret, Pantaleon, and Vitus (cf. St. Vitus's dance). Luther's Sermons on the First ...
— Works of Martin Luther - With Introductions and Notes (Volume I) • Martin Luther

... from practising his art in our State, lest the taste of our citizens be corrupted by him? We would not have our guardians grow up amid images of moral deformity, as in some noxious pasture, and there browse and feed upon many a baneful herb and flower day by day, little by little, until they silently gather a festering mass of corruption in their own soul. Let our artists rather be those who are gifted to discern the true nature of the beautiful and graceful; then will our youth dwell in a land of health, amid fair sights and sounds, ...
— The Republic • Plato

... warmth were like four great black cats. It was indeed a pleasant spot, and contentment oozed into one by every pore. The canon rolled himself another cigarette, smiling as he inhaled the first sweet whiffs; and one could not but think the sovereign herb must greatly ease the journey along the steep and narrow way which leads to Paradise. The smoke rose into the air lazily, and the old cleric paused now and again to look at it, the little smile of self-satisfaction breaking ...
— The Land of The Blessed Virgin; Sketches and Impressions in Andalusia • William Somerset Maugham

... no cooling herb Or medicinal liquor can asswage, Nor breath of vernal air from snowy Alp. Sleep hath forsook and given me o'er To death's benumming opium as my only cure, Thence faintings, swoonings of despair, And ...
— David Elginbrod • George MacDonald

... said to smoke!" replied Ravonino with something of a humorous twinkle in his eyes. "But we don't smoke. We only snuff. In making our snuff we first dry the tobacco leaves and grind them to powder. Then to this we add the ashes of the leaves of a sweet-smelling herb, the mixture being twice as much tobacco as ashes; a small quantity of potash or salt is added, and then it is considered fit ...
— The Fugitives - The Tyrant Queen of Madagascar • R.M. Ballantyne

... leaves there is hounds tongue. Wear it at the feet of you against dogs what be savage. Herb Benet you nail upon the door. No witch nor evil thing can enter to ...
— Six Plays • Florence Henrietta Darwin

... Same old rain-barrel! Same old beehives! Same old well-sweep! Wouldn't trade them for any others in the world. I like everything about the place—like the 'Old Man' that grows by the gate; and the tomato trellis—nobody else treats tomatoes like flowers; and the herb garden, and the cupboard with the little wood-carvings in it that Uncle Ben made. You remember Uncle Ben? Been a sailor—broke both legs—had 'em cut off—and sat around and carved while Aunt Ellen taught school. Happy they were—no one happier. Brought me up, you know. Didn't ...
— Painted Windows • Elia W. Peattie

... Scotland." In most parts of Ireland, however, in addition to growing wild it is carefully cultivated in gardens, and occasionally on a rather extensive scale; and this is done wholly and solely in obedience to a steady popular call for the herb by phthisical sufferers. Constantly, in Irish newspapers, there are advertisements offering it for sale; and there are, in this city, pharmaceutical establishments of the first rank in which it can be bought. Still it does not appear in the Pharmacopoeia; nor, as far as I know, has its use ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 415, December 15, 1883 • Various

... he announced, "and I am afraid that Mrs. Jabe is contemplating a hot footbath and some sort of herb tea; and we ought to turn in pretty early to-night, for Captain Jabe has announced that he will sail between four and five o'clock ...
— The House of Martha • Frank R. Stockton

... to church by way of River Street. Above the stone wall on the west side of River Street was an abundant growth of tansy. It was Judge Nelson's invariable habit to pick a sprig of tansy on his way to Sunday morning service, and he entered the church absently holding the pungent herb to his nostrils, as he made his way to the pew now marked by a tablet ...
— The Story of Cooperstown • Ralph Birdsall

... the long horns of Lobsters, each of whose stems or quills, DD, were brisled or brushed with multitudes of small stiff hairs, issuing out every way from the several joints, like the strings or sproutings of the herb Horse-tail, which is oft observ'd to grow among Corn, and for the whole shape, it does very much resemble those brushy Vegetables; besides these, there are two other jointed and brisled horns, or feelers, ...
— Micrographia • Robert Hooke

... without a blemish. Then place the following articles on a platter: One hard-boiled egg, a lamb bone that has been roasted in ashes, the top of a nice stick of horse-radish (it must be fresh and green), a bunch of nice curly parsley and some bitter herb (the Germans call it lattig), and, also, a small vessel filled with salt water. Next to this platter place a small bowl filled with [Hebrew **] prepared as follows: Pare and chop up a few apples, add sugar, cinnamon, pounded almonds, some white wine ...
— The International Jewish Cook Book • Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

... at the end of the garden, through and beyond the pot-herb part, and upon a little bank which overhung a little lane. Here in this corner a good woman had contrived what women nearly always understand the best, a little nook of pleasure and of perfume, after the rank ranks of the kitchen-stuff. ...
— Mary Anerley • R. D. Blackmore

... glass, that's the glass of health, and in that the herb of health is found growing; put it up on the beam in the ceiling, and at the end of the year you may be sitting in the ...
— What the Moon Saw: and Other Tales • Hans Christian Andersen

... falls the snow, lo! ev'ry herb and tree, That in seclusion through the wintry hours Long time had been held fast, breaks forth in flow'rs That ne'er in spring were ...
— Japanese Literature - Including Selections from Genji Monogatari and Classical - Poetry and Drama of Japan • Various

... round circle, hanging down very low upon their cheeks, whereon they hang things of a reasonable weight. The nails of their hands are an inch long, their teeth are as black as pitch, and they renew them often, by eating of an herb with a kind of powder, which they always carry about them in a cane for ...
— Sir Francis Drake's Famous Voyage Round the World • Francis Pretty

... amazingly humorous books I have read for a long time. In the circumstances my amusement was mingled with a certain amount of respectful sorrow. Sir Gerald Cardine took morphia tablets freely; on the essence of what strange herb Mr. STANLEY PORTAL HYATT had been browsing before he began to write The Way of the Cardines I simply dare not think. I should recommend readers to mitigate the crudity of his opinions, as I did, by softening the C of Sir Gerald's perpetually reiterated surname all through. ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, January 28, 1914 • Various

... a rich debauchee, Callion, sent in company with another slave, Percas, to carry some all-potent nostrum to Fibullius, a friend of Callion, who was suffering from an attack of stone. Euphormio cures Fibullius, not by the drug with which he was armed, but by a herb, which he sought for and found on a mountain. Fibullius, to reward his benefactor, offers him as a wife a most beautiful girl, whom he introduces to him privately while in his sick room. Euphormio looks with no little suspicion on the offer; but, after a few excuses, which are overruled ...
— Notes and Queries, No. 2, November 10 1849 • Various

... getting the money in the morning I passed the night at play, and I lost the five hundred sequins in advance. At day-break, being in need of a little quiet, I went to the Erberia, a space of ground on the quay of the Grand Canal. Here is held the herb, fruit, and ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... idleness either. She had her spinning-wheel and loom to make their garments; she worked also in her garden, raising vegetables, herbs and chickens; and they talked over their day's labor as they enjoyed their simple supper of herb tea, bread and watercresses. Their menu was oft times more tempting, thanks to Ruth's generous purchases on her way home. Being busy, practical women, their talk during the evening was chiefly on ...
— The Woman's Bible. • Elizabeth Cady Stanton

... tell you, when you ask me softly and without threats, O King? See"—and Zikali took up some of the twisted roots—"these are the roots of a certain poisonous herb that blooms at night on the tops of mountains, and woe be to the ox that eats thereof. They have been boiled in gall and blood, and ill will befall the hut in which they are hidden by one who can speak the ...
— Child of Storm • H. Rider Haggard

... sacrifices of blood. He was to be worshipped only with prayers, with offerings of the inspiring juice of the now unknown herb Homa, and by the preservation of the sacred fire, which, understand, was not he, but the symbol—as was light and the sun—of the good spirit—of Ahura Mazda. They had no images of the gods, these old Persians; no temples, ...
— Lectures Delivered in America in 1874 • Charles Kingsley

... Sidney. "He's like your Monkey on a Stick, only bigger, Herb. I'm going in and ask ...
— The Story of Calico Clown • Laura Lee Hope

... dark snares, and dogs, And more unpitying men, the garden seeks Urged on by fearless want. The bleating kind Eye the bleak heaven, and next the glistening earth, With looks of dumb despair; then, sad-dispersed Dig for the withered herb through heaps ...
— The Age of Pope - (1700-1744) • John Dennis

... abortive calf is buried under the path along which the cows go to the fields, to prevent them being accidentally injured. One description of herb given to a horse prevents the horse-shoer pricking the animal's feet; and another, put into a man's shoes, enables him to travel more than forty miles a day without becoming wearied. Moon-wort is a powerful charm that loosens locks, fetters, and shoes from ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... Your herb-snuff and the four glasses are lying in my warehouse, but I can hear of no ship going to Paris. You are now at FOntainbleau, but not thinking of Francis 1. the Queen of Sweden, and Monaldelschi. It is terrible that one cannot ...
— Letters of Horace Walpole, V4 • Horace Walpole

... vineyards; but for the most part this neglected Crim-Tartary was a wilderness of steppe or of mountain-range, much clothed towards the west with tall stiff grasses, and the stems of a fragrant herb like southernwood. The bulk of the people were of Tartar descent, but no longer what they had been in the days when nations trembled at the coming of the Golden Horde; and although they yet hold to the Moslem faith, their religion has ...
— Celebrated Women Travellers of the Nineteenth Century • W. H. Davenport Adams

... smallest flower at his feet. I think so. For I know it was so with me. My feeling that those enormous trees over my head were God's trees, did not take away in the least from my feeling of God's wisdom and power in the tiniest herb at their feet. Nay rather, it increased my feeling that God was filling all things with life and beauty; till the whole forest,—if I may so speak in all humility, but in all honesty—from the highest to the lowest, from the hugest to the smallest, and every leaf and bud therein, seemed ...
— Westminster Sermons - with a Preface • Charles Kingsley

... the St. Lawrence, Jacques Cartier returned towards Canada, where he did not delay to rejoin his ships. We owe to him the first information on tobacco for smoking, which does not seem to have been in use throughout the whole extent of the New World. "They have a herb," he says, "of which they collect great quantities during the summer for the winter; they esteem it highly, and the men alone use it in the following manner: they dry it in the sun and carry it on their necks in a small skin of an ...
— Celebrated Travels and Travellers - Part I. The Exploration of the World • Jules Verne

... enough, that this plant should have found its way into every part of the world, among savage as well as civilized nations, even into the deserts of Africa, where it was found in constant use among the Booshuanas, a people, till very lately, totally unknown; and it is equally singular, that an herb of so disagreeable a taste should, by habit, obtain an ascendency so far over the appetite, as not easily ...
— Travels in China, Containing Descriptions, Observations, and Comparisons, Made and Collected in the Course of a Short Residence at the Imperial Palace of Yuen-Min-Yuen, and on a Subsequent Journey thr • John Barrow

... death of the many, the survival of the few. We must think over all the causes of destruction to each organism,—to the seed, the young shoot, the growing plant, the full-grown tree, or shrub, or herb, and again the fruit and seed; and among animals, to the egg or new-born young, to the youthful, and to the adults. Then, we must always bear in mind that what goes on in the case of the individual or family group we may observe or think of, goes on also among the millions ...
— Darwinism (1889) • Alfred Russel Wallace

... and Sartliff placed himself in an easy position at the foot of an old beech, extending his limbs and bare feet over the dry leaves, in such a way as not to injure any springing herb. "Mr. Ridgeley," said he, "I would like to know more of you. You young men are fresher, see, and what is better, feel quicker and clearer than the older and more hackneyed. Are you already shelled over with accepted dogmas, and without the power of ...
— Bart Ridgeley - A Story of Northern Ohio • A. G. Riddle

... a pound of tough beef in the sarcofagus, and there another kills himself by discovering his jocular vein. Things change so that I declare I don't know how to subscribe for any diseases nowadays. New names and new nostrils takes the place of the old, and I might as well throw my old herb-bag away." ...
— Little Masterpieces of American Wit and Humor - Volume I • Various

... after hanging the different articles they take for sale, they mount themselves. Milk, sour and sweet, a little honey, lowls, gussub, and gafooly, are amongst their wares; fat and meloheea (ochra), a green herb, which, with the bazeen, all negroes eat voraciously, and indeed Christians too, as was afterwards experienced. The men brought oxen, sheep, goats, and slaves; the latter were few in ...
— Lander's Travels - The Travels of Richard Lander into the Interior of Africa • Robert Huish

... chessmen and cards because some of them were named kings and queens, and all the books with coats of arms on them; they refused to get ointment for a gathering on Madame Elisabeth's arm; they, would not allow her to make a herb-tea which she thought would strengthen her niece; they declined to supply fish or eggs on fast-days or during Lent, bringing only coarse fat meat, and brutally replying to all remonstances, "None ...
— Memoirs Of The Court Of Marie Antoinette, Queen Of France, Complete • Madame Campan

... Goddess of the Wood, with her own divine hand, and with every magical herb of the forest, has anointed me King. Behold the complexion of royalty!—and henceforward transact nothing ...
— Hindu Literature • Epiphanius Wilson

... us'd. The peascod green, oft with no little toil He'd seek for in the fattest, fertil'st soil And rend it from the stalk to bring it to her, And in her bosom for acceptance woo her. No berry in the grove or forest grew That fit for nourishment the kind bird knew, Nor any powerful herb in open field To serve her brood the teeming earth did yield, But with his utmost industry he sought it, And to the cave for chaste ...
— A History of English Literature - Elizabethan Literature • George Saintsbury

... sanguine hopes. This plant, Theophrastus assures us, possesses so wonderful a property of exciting venery that a mere application of it to the parts of generation will enable a man to accomplish the act of love twelve times successively. Speaking of this plant, Venette[147] says that the herb which the Indian King Androphyl sent to King Antiochus was that it was so efficacious in exciting men to amorous enjoyment as to surpass in that quality, all other plants, the Indian who was the bearer of it assuring the king "qu'elle lui avait donné de la ...
— Aphrodisiacs and Anti-aphrodisiacs: Three Essays on the Powers of Reproduction • John Davenport

... herb EVERLASTING, the fragrant immortelle of our autumn fields, has the most suggestive odor to me of all those that set me dreaming. I can hardly describe the strange thoughts and emotions that come to me as I inhale the aroma ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... way that ran Beyond the fields to where the woods began To spread green matwork for the mountains' feet; A region where the Silence had her seat And hearkened to the sounds that only she Can hear—the fall of dew on herb and tree; The voice of the growing of the grass; the night Down-fluttering breathless from the heaven's height; And autumn whispering unawares at times Strange secrets and dark sayings, wrapt in rhymes Wind-won from forest branches. At this place The ...
— The Poems of William Watson • William Watson

... seven-night." A consumption of seven pounds of tobacco in eight days is a pretty "tall order"! Then he goes on to brag of its quality—your right Trinidado—and to assert that he had been in the Indies, where the herb grows, and where he himself and a dozen other gentlemen had for the space of one-and-twenty weeks known no other nutriment than the fume of tobacco. This again was tolerably "steep" even for this Falstaff-like braggart. He continues with more bombast in praise of the medicinal virtues of ...
— The Social History of Smoking • G. L. Apperson

... seems appropriate enough, but why should parsley in olden times have been associated with death? It is recorded that a few bundles of parsley once threw a whole Greek army into panic, because in Greece the tombs of the dead were strewn with the herb. With them 'to be in need of parsley' was ...
— Storyology - Essays in Folk-Lore, Sea-Lore, and Plant-Lore • Benjamin Taylor

... perfume which communicates to every living being the thrill of fecundation, which, when you are in a boat, makes you dip your hands in the rippling water and let your hair fly in the wind, while your thoughts grow green like the boughs of the forest? A tiny herb, the sweet-smelling anthoxanthum is the principal of this veiled harmony. Thus, no one can stay in its proximity unaffected by it. Put into a nosegay its glittering blades streaked like a green-and-white netted dress; inexhaustible ...
— Balzac • Frederick Lawton

... asked Frau Brandt, as Maria Dolores came into her sitting-room, a vast, square, bare room, with a marble floor and a painted ceiling, with Venetian blinds to shelter it from the sun, and a bitter-sweet smell, as of rosemary or I know not what other aromatic herb, upon its ...
— My Friend Prospero • Henry Harland

... me where you have been racing all the day, to get your head so disordered," said Mistress Mabel; and she despatched Mary to her store closet for some herb tea for Harry to take ...
— Hayslope Grange - A Tale of the Civil War • Emma Leslie

... YERBA BUENA do, sir?" responded the youth gravely. "It's the old Spanish title of the first settlement here. It comes from the name that Father Junipero Serra gave to the pretty little vine that grows wild over the sandhills, and means 'good herb.' He called it 'A balm for ...
— A Ward of the Golden Gate • Bret Harte

... mighty hand of conscience struck him in his proudest hour—the humblest things of earth, brought deathly terror to his soul. 'Twas evident the appearance of the mullen plant, which drew us to the spot, had been the cause of his death. The words of the old sailor seemed true. The lowly herb had brought the crime to light, and in the hand of heaven had ...
— Sketches And Tales Illustrative Of Life In The Backwoods Of New Brunswick • Mrs. F. Beavan

... desert was found a specimen of Amaranthus ten feet high. A year later the same species in the same place matured in the drought at four inches. One hopes the land may breed like qualities in her human offspring, not tritely to "try," but to do. Seldom does the desert herb attain the full stature of the type. Extreme aridity and extreme altitude have the same dwarfing effect, so that we find in the high Sierras and in Death Valley related species in miniature that reach a comely growth in mean temperatures. Very fertile are the desert plants ...
— The Land of Little Rain • Mary Austin

... silently to a pile of stones. He deposited the stake in its proper place, and returned to find her seated on the ground, plucking a handful of the leaves of a little erect herb that grew abundantly in the hollow. These she rubbed together and held to ...
— The Claim Jumpers • Stewart Edward White



Words linked to "Herb" :   earthnut, argemone, Emmanthe penduliflora, campanula, Ayapana triplinervis, alecost, beaked parsley, grains of paradise, butterflower, Coptis trifolia groenlandica, Berteroa incana, devil's claw, Eranthis hyemalis, clammyweed, benne, chicory, Diplotaxis erucoides, camphor dune tansy, astrantia, Gerardia virginica, Echium vulgare, Chrysanthemum balsamita, Gerardia pedicularia, Dalmatian pyrethrum, vascular plant, Anacyclus pyrethrum, Eupatorium perfoliatum, carrot, Diplotaxis muralis, fenugreek, fringepod, dittany, black saltwort, agueweed, Halogeton glomeratus, bugleweed, coleus, banana tree, gramineous plant, Ageratina altissima, eggplant bush, flax, Ananas comosus, Cichorium intybus, endive, gall of the earth, bird of paradise, Bowiea volubilis, buckwheat, chamois cress, asparagus, Anigozanthus manglesii, Anthyllis vulneraria, beetleweed, cockscomb, Chrysanthemum parthenium, day lily, flame-flower, gromwell, giant buttercup, Abelmoschus esculentus, belladonna plant, tracheophyte, caryophyllaceous plant, celery, corn mayweed, catmint, Galax urceolata, Desmanthus ilinoensis, coreopsis, angelique, Coriandrum sativum, Asparagus plumosus, aroid, Dicentra cucullaria, baby blue-eyes, Cnidoscolus urens, Arnoseris minima, cruciferous plant, Amsinckia grandiflora, black archangel, dead nettle, Curcuma longa, galax, Celosia cristata, blowball, celeriac, anise, gesneria, ayapana, false rue, Acinos arvensis, glasswort, achillea, celery root, Eupatorium rugosum, Anthriscus sylvestris, asclepiad, barrenwort, dragonhead, Celosia argentea, golden seal, Dicentra canadensis, gum plant, boneset, Eupatorium capillifolium, gumbo, heal all, ginger, edible asparagus, Anthemis nobilis, gumweed, galaxy, carnivorous plant, drypis, butterweed, ginseng, costusroot, Eruca vesicaria sativa, false saffron, chamomile, andryala, Collinsonia canadensis, garden balm, fraxinella, agrimony, flame flower, alumroot, devil's apples, black salsify, globe thistle, asparagus fern, blueweed, fleabane, brinjal, esparcet, dog mercury, German chamomile, American pennyroyal, Apium graveolens dulce, American gentian, agrimonia, Asparagus officinales, Antennaria dioica, cupflower, Aspidistra elatio, Anthriscus cereifolium, dandelion, cardamon, Atropa belladonna, Ethiopian banana, foamflower, bloodwort, Dutchman's breeches, dog's mercury, burning bush, Coptis groenlandica, Eupatorium aya-pana, devil nettle, garden egg, hawkweed, Guinea grains, bar-room plant, camomile, dayflower, black horehound, geranium, fumewort, cat's foot, Egyptian henbane, Cassia marilandica, cultivated celery, Cacalia lutea, Daucus carota sativa, basil thyme, bush pea, Frasera speciosa, anise plant, false nettle, calamint, Galega officinalis, bellflower, green gentian, celandine, flame nettle, Cynoglossum officinale, Celosia argentea cristata, arnica, Diplotaxis tenuifolia, crotalaria, burnet bloodwort, bible leaf, blue pimpernel, Cuminum cyminum, canna, Abyssinian banana, boys-and-girls, Darmera peltata, cumfrey, feverfew, bloodroot, California yellow bells, common cockscomb, cultivated carrot, globe flower, benni, Cynoglossum amabile, blue devil, bergenia, Eupatorium cannabinum, climbing onion, bee balm, graminaceous plant, blue skullcap, Emilia coccinea, false mitrewort, Dracocephalum parviflorum, Glaux maritima, common amsinckia, American columbo, garden forget-me-not, elephant-tusk, flannel leaf, halogeton, Borago officinalis, beebalm, Fumaria officinalis, button snakeroot, coolwart, Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Cape dagga, carrion flower, false miterwort, Elettaria cardamomum, garden rocket, black lovage, chaenactis, columbo, chicory plant, Descurainia pinnata, breakstone, Fagopyrum esculentum, Amsinckia intermedia, bog rhubarb, cast-iron plant, eggplant, American liquorice, evening primrose, bedstraw, Chinese forget-me-not, fumitory, gypsywort, asparagus pea, Eruca sativa, bird's foot trefoil, Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium, black henbane, buttercup, Emilia javanica, golden ragwort, goldcup, dwarf nipplewort, common devil's claw, golden thread, alumbloom, cushion calamint, Dalmatia pyrethrum, Anethum graveolens, barilla, forget-me-not, ground cherry, Alexander, feabane mullet, feverroot, flameflower, dragon's head, goat rue, Carum carvi, Amaranthus spinosus, crucifer, Curcuma domestica, bishop's hat, Catharanthus roseus, Halogeton souda, Cephalotus follicularis, Cichorium endivia, Crambe maritima, Apium graveolens, cow parsley, aubergine, fumeroot, apple of Peru, Carthamus tinctorius, clover, Emilia sagitta, creeping zinnia, bells of Ireland, butter-flower, Aureolaria pedicularia, basil balm, Cape periwinkle, corn salad, gipsywort, blessed thistle, Cakile maritima, Eupatorium maculatum, foxglove, deer's-ears, Eryngium aquaticum, common unicorn plant, Aureolaria virginica, American ginseng, gas plant, dog fennel, butterbur, deer's-ear, deadly nightshade, cottonweed, globeflower, Asarum shuttleworthii, Antennaria plantaginifolia, anchusa, goosefoot, cat's feet, digitalis, Cacalia javanica, elephant's-foot, chickweed, false foxglove, Armoracia rusticana, false rue anemone, Dicentra spectabilis, cayenne jasmine, Galeopsis tetrahit, false bugbane, astilbe, arugula, beefsteak plant, Apium graveolens rapaceum, bishop's cap, Guinea pepper, bleeding heart, Anemopsis californica, catnip, belladonna, aspidistra, bladderpod, goldthread, Eupatorium purpureum, Emilia flammea, false gromwell, dagga, crowfoot, coltsfoot, arum, goat's rue, banana, Greek clover, Ballota nigra, Cynoglossum virginaticum, Ensete ventricosum, amaranth, blue thistle, Chamaemelum nobilis, cardamom, elsholtzia, bur reed, benny, cleome, fiesta flower, balsamroot, dock, coral necklace, Asparagus setaceous, cow parsnip, Conopodium denudatum, Alexanders, alpine coltsfoot, goldenseal, Australian sword lily, breadroot, Clinopodium vulgare, golden groundsel, bugle, American licorice, bog hemp, clammy chickweed, Glycyrrhiza glabra, giant hyssop, acanthus, fetid horehound, cumin, Dictamnus alba, Australian pitcher plant, coriander plant, Epimedium grandiflorum, Haastia pulvinaris, devil's fig, Aframomum melegueta, draba



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