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Head-on   /hɛd-ɑn/   Listen
Head-on

adverb
1.
In direct opposition; directly.
2.
With the front foremost.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Head-on" Quotes from Famous Books



... something to remember him by, he goes down to the station at traintime with a bucket. Under the headlining system of the English newspapers the derailment of a work-train in Arizona, wherein several Mexican tracklayers get mussed up, becomes Another Frightful American Railway Disaster! But a head-on collision, attended by fatalities, in the suburbs of Liverpool or Manchester is a Distressing Suburban Iincident. Yet the official Blue Book, issued by the British Board of Trade, showed that in the three months ending March ...
— Europe Revised • Irvin S. Cobb

... beginning to grip the little shipmaster by the heart that was deep enough to cause him a physical nausea. The burning steamer ahead grew every minute more clear as they raced toward her. She was on fire forward, and she lay almost head-on toward them, keeping her stern to the seas, so that the wind would have no help in driving the flames aft, ...
— A Master of Fortune • Cutcliffe Hyne

... Then, racing again to the key, he made the operator at Castle Springs repeat the order and assure him it had been delivered. Of this there could be no question. The freight crew had ignored or forgotten it, and were now past Point of Rocks running head-on against the passenger train. If the heavens had fallen the situation would have seemed better to Bucks. A head-on collision on the first night of his promotion meant, he felt, his ruin. As he sat overwhelmed with despair, trying to ...
— The Mountain Divide • Frank H. Spearman

... more and more as a very precious little thing. She gave herself terrible airs on rehearsal day; thought the stage too slippery, or too small. Lily wanted a stage thirty feet wide, no less; she who, in the old days, at a gesture from Pa, would have performed her whole turn, including the head-on-the-saddle, on the top of a cab or on the Stoke Newington pavement. Formerly, she used to think everything good, did not know what fatigue meant; now, in the middle of her turn, she would say to herself, sometimes with ...
— The Bill-Toppers • Andre Castaigne



Words linked to "Head-on" :   frontal, front, hostile



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