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Have   /hæv/   Listen
Have

verb
(past & past part. had; pres. part. having; indic. present I have, you have, he she it has; we have, you have, they have)
1.
Have or possess, either in a concrete or an abstract sense.  Synonyms: have got, hold.  "He has got two beautiful daughters" , "She holds a Master's degree from Harvard"
2.
Have as a feature.  Synonym: feature.
3.
Go through (mental or physical states or experiences).  Synonyms: experience, get, receive.  "Experience vertigo" , "Get nauseous" , "Receive injuries" , "Have a feeling"
4.
Have ownership or possession of.  Synonyms: own, possess.  "How many cars does she have?"
5.
Cause to move; cause to be in a certain position or condition.  Synonyms: get, let.  "This let me in for a big surprise" , "He got a girl into trouble"
6.
Serve oneself to, or consume regularly.  Synonyms: consume, ingest, take, take in.  "I don't take sugar in my coffee"
7.
Have a personal or business relationship with someone.  "Have an assistant" , "Have a lover"
8.
Organize or be responsible for.  Synonyms: give, hold, make, throw.  "Have, throw, or make a party" , "Give a course"
9.
Have left.  "I don't have any money left" , "They have two more years before they retire"
10.
Be confronted with.  "Now we have a fine mess"
11.
Undergo.  Synonym: experience.
12.
Suffer from; be ill with.
13.
Cause to do; cause to act in a specified manner.  Synonyms: cause, get, induce, make, stimulate.  "My children finally got me to buy a computer" , "My wife made me buy a new sofa"
14.
Receive willingly something given or offered.  Synonyms: accept, take.  "I won't have this dog in my house!" , "Please accept my present"
15.
Get something; come into possession of.  Synonym: receive.  "Receive a gift" , "Receive letters from the front"
16.
Undergo (as of injuries and illnesses).  Synonyms: get, suffer, sustain.  "He had an insulin shock after eating three candy bars" , "She got a bruise on her leg" , "He got his arm broken in the scuffle"
17.
Achieve a point or goal.  Synonyms: get, make.  "The Brazilian team got 4 goals" , "She made 29 points that day"
18.
Cause to be born.  Synonyms: bear, birth, deliver, give birth.
19.
Have sex with; archaic use.  Synonym: take.



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"Have" Quotes from Famous Books



... NAUTIQUE, and joined in the talk. They were all very polite, voluble, and enthusiastic; and their discourse was interlarded with English boating terms, and the names of English boat-builders and English clubs. I do not know, to my shame, any spot in my native land where I should have been so warmly received by the same number of people. We were English boating-men, and the Belgian boating-men fell upon our necks. I wonder if French Huguenots were as cordially greeted by English Protestants when they came across the Channel out of great tribulation. ...
— An Inland Voyage • Robert Louis Stevenson

... been with us a week, and she still fascinates me. She is installed in the annex, and seems calmly satisfied with her surroundings. She brought everything she owns tied up in an oat-sack. I have given her a few of my things, for which she seems dumbly grateful. She seldom talks, and never laughs. But I am teaching her to say "yes" instead of "yaw." She studies me with her limpid blue eyes, and if she is silent she is never sullen. She hasn't the heavy forehead and jaw ...
— The Prairie Wife • Arthur Stringer

... goal. A good deal of heading afterwards occurred near the home goal—the ball getting close on the lines several times, and even passing them. Many considered before the game began that the Americans would never have a 'look in' at all, and great was their dismay when they actually beheld their champions hotly pressed on their own ground, and look like losing the day. With a brilliant charge the Yankee forwards crowded round the Scotch sticks like a hive of bees on a June morning, and a straight ...
— Scottish Football Reminiscences and Sketches • David Drummond Bone

... desperately hungry brute; he may, possibly, have gone several days without food. He winds a camp of human beings, creatures he knows to be edible but which, I firmly believe, he hates the idea of eating as much as the ordinary man would hate the idea of eating a monkey. But the lion has been prowling all night, ...
— Reminiscences of a South African Pioneer • W. C. Scully

... you can use, Mr. Thwaite! But this young man is good. You yourself have said that you have ...
— Lady Anna • Anthony Trollope

... life to our fainting heart. So much is this the case that a salutation of praise is to be our first taste of heaven itself. It will wipe all tears off our eyes when we hear our Lord saying to us, "Well done!" when all our good works that we have done in the body shall be found unto praise and honour and glory in the great day ...
— Bunyan Characters (Second Series) • Alexander Whyte

... the master in a tone of savage incredulity; although not only was it plain that she was gone, but he must have known well enough, from former experience, how her escape had ...
— Alec Forbes of Howglen • George MacDonald

... disappointment that Arthur hasn't done more in his profession," she said presently, "but, as I was saying to Mr. Wrenn only the other day, I have always felt that dear Gabriella was to blame ...
— Life and Gabriella - The Story of a Woman's Courage • Ellen Glasgow

... vanished darling he could not, for some extraordinary reason, conceive of as being his wife. She was pictured in his imagination as an intellectual vision, that he could neither lose nor win. Oh! to be immanent in his beloved intellectually for ever! never to have her and own her physically! But Dorina was often in his thoughts as his dearly loved wife; and as often as he contemplated the idea of again binding himself in the indissoluble bonds of betrothal,[10] he felt a delicious ...
— Weird Tales. Vol. I • E. T. A. Hoffmann

... termed either rounding or heaping tablespoons that it must be remembered that we can only estimate. Patients who are instructed how to feed themselves on leaving the hospital are cautioned carefully to take about the quantity of an article of food they have been served while in the hospital when the diet is weighed. Any written advice is always given in quantities known to be under the carbohydrate or protein tolerance of the patient. However, if they will boil the vegetables ...
— The Starvation Treatment of Diabetes • Lewis Webb Hill

... of view I believe that it is necessary to say plainly what we here at the seat of action consider the war to be for and what part we mean to play in the settlement of its searching issues. We are the spokesmen of the American people, and they have a right to know whether their purpose is ours. They desire peace by the overcoming of evil, by the defeat once for all of the sinister forces that interrupt peace and render it impossible, and they wish to know how closely ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... incidents temporarily painful; but, after all, those incidents will be fewer and less intense with than without the system. If two friends aspire to the same office it is certain that both cannot succeed. Would it not, then, be much less painful to have the question decided by mutual friends some time before, than to snarl and quarrel until the day of election, and then both be beaten ...
— The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Complete - Constitutional Edition • Abraham Lincoln

... was led to attempt a metrical version of the Antigone, and, by and by, of the Electra and Trachiniae.[1] I had the satisfaction of seeing this last very beautifully produced by an amateur company in Scotland in 1877; when Mrs. Fleeming Jenkin may be said to have 'created' the part of Deanira. Thus encouraged, I completed the translation of the seven plays, which was published by Kegan Paul in 1883 and again by Murray in 1896. I have now to thank Mr. Murray for consenting ...
— The Seven Plays in English Verse • Sophocles

... he laughed. "You see I am a sort of revolutionist and have my hiding-places. To-morrow—I will be a martyr." He spoke as quietly as though his words but ...
— The Courage of Captain Plum • James Oliver Curwood

... his inward endeavor are one: when we can name him Artist; not earthly Craftsman only, but inspired Thinker, who with heaven-made Implement conquers Heaven for us! If the poor and humble toil that we have Food, must not the high and glorious toil for him in return, that he have Light, have Guidance, Freedom, Immortality?—These two, in all their degrees, I honor: all else is chaff and dust, which let the wind ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Vol. V (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland III • Various

... may have gooey, very fine clay topsoils, almost inevitably with gooey, very fine clay subsoils as well. Though incorporation of extraordinarily large quantities of organic matter can turn the top few inches into ...
— Gardening Without Irrigation: or without much, anyway • Steve Solomon

... when we visited York and Westminster, and walked through the long avenues of stone palms and pines, with their overarching boughs, and gazed at the marvellous rose-windows in which all the jewels of the world seemed to have been set, and saw the colours streaming through the gorgeous lancets and high many-lighted casements. After that it was delightful to turn over engravings and photographs of ruined abbeys and famous old ...
— A Child's Book of Saints • William Canton

... when he run the hotel cept I was born at the hotel and Mistress Thursday lived there then too. He had all Negro overseers. Each overseer had a certain lot of hands to do what he told them. He didn't have no trouble. He told them if they made something for them and him too it would be fine, if they didn't work they would have to do without. They had ...
— Slave Narratives: Arkansas Narratives - Arkansas Narratives, Part 6 • Works Projects Administration

... upbringing lived a good deal at the ranch. You could tell by the low, green bungalow with wide, screened porches and light cream trim, that was almost an exact reproduction of the bungalow in Los Angeles. A man and woman who have lived long together on a ranch like the Rolling R would have gone on living contentedly in the adobe house which was now abandoned to the sole occupancy of the boys. It is the young lady of the family ...
— Skyrider • B. M. Bower

... right!" said Letty, composedly. "She declared we should get into difficulties at once, that I could have no idea of the value of money, that you always had been extravagant, that everybody would be astonished at our doing such a thing, etcetera, etcetera. I think—you don't mind?—I think she cried a little. But she ...
— Sir George Tressady, Vol. I • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... Friesland, Over-Yssel, and Gueldres; and another great one of the Rhine, in 1855, which invaded Gueldres and the province of Utrecht, and covered a great part of North Brabant. Beside these great catastrophes, there happened in different centuries innumerable smaller ones, which would have been famous in any other country, but which in Holland are scarcely remembered: like the rising of the lake of Haarlem, itself the result of an inundation of the sea; flourishing cities of the gulf of Zuyder ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 1 • Charles Dudley Warner

... others go to the left and try to find a way down the cliff before us. When they have descended to the level of the valley—path or no path—let them advance cautiously and secretly, keeping their guns in readiness. But they must not fire till need. Remember, my brothers," said, turning to those who stepped ...
— The Lady of the Shroud • Bram Stoker

... instant the river of lava, after having broken a passage through the noble trees it devoured in its course, reached the borders of the lake. At this point there was an elevation of the soil which, had it been greater, might have sufficed to arrest ...
— The Secret of the Island • W.H.G. Kingston (translation from Jules Verne)

... Raven, sitting lonely on that placid bust, spoke only That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour. Nothing further then he uttered; not a feather then he fluttered— Till I scarcely more than muttered, "Other friends have flown before— On the morrow he will leave me, as my Hopes have flown before." Then ...
— Le Corbeau • Edgar Allan Poe

... south of the Osage, and that he will come by the Buffalo road: he has not reported for some time. Price is at Neosho, fifty-four miles to the southwest. Should he advance rapidly, it will need energetic marching to bring up our reinforcements. Price and McCulloch have joined, and there are rumors that Hardee has reached their camp with ten thousand men. The best information we can get places the enemy's force at thirty thousand men and thirty-two pieces of artillery. Deserters ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. IX., March, 1862., No. LIII. - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics, • Various

... the limbs; they generally consisted of a loose flowing robe, reaching to the ankles, occasionally fastened tight at the waist; and round the hips was a small narrow girdle, adorned with beads, or ornaments of various colors. Sometimes the dancing figures appear to have been perfectly naked; but this is from the outline of the transparent robe having been effaced; and, like the Greeks, they represented the contour of the figure as if seen ...
— Museum of Antiquity - A Description of Ancient Life • L. W. Yaggy

... that trade was never in a more alarming state than at present. A general strike for wages has taken place amongst the smiths. The carpenters have been dreadfully cut up; and the shoemakers find, at the last, that it is impossible to make both ends meet. The bakers complain that the pressure of the times is so great, that they cannot get the bread to rise. The bricklayers swear that the monopolists ought to be brought to the ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 1, Complete • Various

... collections, notably in that of Mr. Loder, of Northampton, who has cultivated this and several other species from the same region in a sunny sheltered position out of doors, where, for several years, they have withstood winter's cold with no other protection than that afforded by an over-hanging wall. Mr. Loder says of C. Fendleri that it is the best of all Cactuses for cool treatment, as the flowers last ...
— Cactus Culture For Amateurs • W. Watson

... more dependence was placed in a bludgeon than a pistol; and that the man who registered a vote without a cracked pate was regarded as a kind of natural phenomenon,—some faint idea may be formed how much such a scene must have contributed to the peace of the county, and the happiness and welfare of all concerned ...
— Charles O'Malley, The Irish Dragoon, Volume 1 (of 2) • Charles Lever

... the shares, or parts of the parish, Aston manor from Erdington, now Sawford-bridge) which implies a degree of unkindness; because William could not amuse himself in his own manor of Birmingham, for he might as well have angled in one of his streets, as in the river Rea. The two lords had, probably, four years before been on friendly terms, when they jointly lent their assistance to the hospital of St. Thomas, ...
— An History of Birmingham (1783) • William Hutton

... here," shouted Dr. Bird. "There must be a dozen guns firing at us. One of them will have the range directly." ...
— The Solar Magnet • Sterner St. Paul Meek

... with an unutterable look of trust and love. Once only she was disturbed, and indignation gave her strength to protest against the guilty suggestions of some friends of the family, who, according to the notions of that time, persisted in believing that a spell had been cast upon her, and proposed to have recourse to some persons in Rome who dealt, or pretended to deal, in magic arts. Francesca declared herself ready to die, rather than countenance so impious a proceeding. After all medical resources had been exhausted, ...
— The Life of St. Frances of Rome, and Others • Georgiana Fullerton

... ancient Britons, intrusive Saxons, unheard-of bards, Owen Glendower, mountain raiders and a thousand fascinating things. Or is it a Danish name? He leaves the individual in all his modern commonplace while he flies off to huge skulls at Hythe (in parenthesis I may remark that I have examined the said skulls with some care, and they seemed to me to be rather below the human average), to Vikings, Berserkers, Varangians, Harald Haardraada, and the innate wickedness of the Pope. To Borrow ...
— Through the Magic Door • Arthur Conan Doyle

... lbs.; (that made of olive oil is best,) common salt, 9 lbs.; mix and boil for 2 hours, run it into bars, or as you want it, and you will have 7-1/2 lbs. of soap. Add a little resin when you melt it over. Scent with fragrant oil if ...
— Young's Demonstrative Translation of Scientific Secrets • Daniel Young

... 1750 and 1760, and dealt in general admiration of virtue. They were all tenderness in words; their finer feeling evaporated in the moment of expression, for they had no connection with their practice.' Prior's Malone, p. 427. See ante, ii. 129. This fashion seems to have reached Paris a few years later. Mme. Riccoboni wrote to Garrick on May 3, 1769:—'Dans notre brillante capitale, ou dominent les airs et la mode, s'attendrir, s'emouvoir, s'affliger, c'est le bon ton du moment. La bonte, la ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 3 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... middle-class propriety, shown as much in the dry New England asperity of voice that stung even through her drawling of the Castilian speech, as in anything she said,—"I am thinking that, unless Mr. Brimmer comes soon, I and Miss Chubb shall have to abandon the hospitality of your house, Don Ramon. Without looking upon myself as a widow, or as indefinitely separated from Mr. Brimmer, the few words let fall by Mr. Brace show me what might be the feelings ...
— The Crusade of the Excelsior • Bret Harte

... principles, and a rigid disciplinarian in the army. He was like the grave and fearless Puritan soldier, somewhat after the type of 'Stonewall Jackson' of your Civil War, though not as fanatical. In his last moments he said: 'For more than forty years I have so ruled my life that when death came I might face it without fear.' This he did; and England will never cease to remember the Christian hero, Sir Henry Havelock. In Trafalgar Square, in London, you may see the statue erected to him by the people of ...
— Across India - Or, Live Boys in the Far East • Oliver Optic

... sense has been rarely exhibited in fewer lines than in the preceding ones. We have next a vigorously drawn character which has the ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... my mind in this Volume on every subject which has come before me; and therefore I am bound to state plainly what I feel and have felt, since I was a Catholic, about the Anglican Church. I said, in a former page, that, on my conversion, I was not conscious of any change in me of thought or feeling, as regards matters of doctrine; this, however, was not the case as regards some matters ...
— Apologia Pro Vita Sua • John Henry Cardinal Newman

... Bass, pickerel or haddock, sprinkle with salt, stuff and sew with No. 8 cotton thread. Cut four or five diagonal gashes on each side of backbone and lay in strips of fat salt pork. Have the gashes on one side come between gashes on the other. The fish may be skewered in the shape of the letter S, or placed in an upright position on a well-greased fish sheet, laid in the bottom of a dripping-pan. Brush over with melted butter and sprinkle with salt and pepper, dredge ...
— Fifty-Two Sunday Dinners - A Book of Recipes • Elizabeth O. Hiller

... do." His face was in the shadow, but had it been visible a slightly puzzled frown might have been seen on his forehead. "I suppose they still make all you fellows on joining go to the regimental tailor, ...
— No Man's Land • H. C. McNeile

... reasonable and simple, that one is apt to underestimate the difficulties which he had to face, and the courage and skill which alone enabled him to overcome them. Seldom has an undertaking been more remorselessly dogged by an adverse fate than that of Anson. Seldom have plain common sense, professional knowledge, and unflinching resolution achieved ...
— Anson's Voyage Round the World - The Text Reduced • Richard Walter

... that, no matter what a man's opportunities are, he only learns what is congenial with his nature and circumstances. Living under the influence of this learned judge, Henry Clay might have become a man of learning. George Wythe was a "scholar" in the ancient acceptation of the word. The whole education of his youth consisted in his acquiring the Latin language, which his mother taught him. Early inheriting a considerable fortune, he squandered it in dissipation, ...
— Famous Americans of Recent Times • James Parton

... to an end. In political conflicts, in social misunderstandings, in labour troubles he is invaluable. In the church he is a treasure. In the Sunday school his price is above rubies. In the pulpit he enjoys an immeasurable advantage. Happy the congregation whose preacher "has a way with him." We have known such men and envied them. Their gift defies analysis. It ...
— The Message and the Man: - Some Essentials of Effective Preaching • J. Dodd Jackson

... life but more like a fire in a theatre! Any one who falls down or screams with terror, or rushes about, is the worst enemy of good order; one must stand up and look sharp, and not stir a hair! There's no time for whimpering and busying oneself with trifles. When you have to deal with elemental forces you must put out force against them, be firm and as unyielding as a stone. Isn't that right, grandfather?" He turned to Ivan Ivanitch and laughed. "I am no better than ...
— The Wife and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... tables indicate the rank, during the period between October, 1919, and September, 1920, inclusive, by number and percentage of distinctive stories published, of the twenty-one periodicals coming within the scope of my examination which have published an average of 15 per cent in stories of distinction. The lists exclude ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1920 - and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... more and more: either they have improved wonderfully lately, or else the criticisms on them have been cruelly exaggerated. They are particularly courteous and obliging; and seem, I think, amiably anxious that foreigners should carry away a favorable impression of them. As for me, let other travelers ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 2, No. 12, May, 1851. • Various

... My bonny laddy, Dance to your ninny, My sweet lamb; You shall have a fishy In a little dishy, And a ...
— Harry's Ladder to Learning - Horn-Book, Picture-Book, Nursery Songs, Nursery Tales, - Harry's Simple Stories, Country Walks • Anonymous

... would have been heavenly refreshment, but they would not come. Another moment and Angela felt herself sinking back into her chair, and when she opened her eyes the Mother Superior was at the table, half seated, half lying across it, on the heaps of papers and account-books, and her outstretching hands clasped ...
— The White Sister • F. Marion Crawford

... a thin earthenware box with the lug of the electrode projecting from one end. The negatives consist of sheet lead covered by active material. On assembling the plates, each negative is held between two positive "boxes,'' the outsides of which have protecting vertical ribs. These press against the active material on the negative plates, and help to keep it in position. At the same time, the clearance between the ribs allows room for acid to circulate freely ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... for it! Mark Forepaugh kicked the pile of hydrogen cylinders. Only a moment ago he had broken the seals—the mendacious seals that certified to the world that the flasks were fully charged. And the flasks were empty! The supply of this precious power gas, which in an emergency should have been sufficient for six years, simply did ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, August 1930 • Various

... No one could have wished for a better day than that of the parade and picnic. It was a trifle warm, but it would be cool in the grove near the lake. The boys were up early, attired in their new uniforms, and after an early breakfast headed for one or the other of the ...
— The Young Firemen of Lakeville - or, Herbert Dare's Pluck • Frank V. Webster

... the burden of the cry from young readers of the country over. Almost numberless letters have been received by the publishers, making this eager demand; for Dick Prescott, Dave Darrin, Tom Reade, and the other members of Dick & Co. are the most popular high school boys in the land. Boys will alternately thrill and chuckle when ...
— Grace Harlowe's Golden Summer • Jessie Graham Flower

... was too much out of humour to read his nephew the lecture he might otherwise have done upon the impropriety of his simile; for Mr. Templeton was one of those men who hold it vicious to talk of vice as existing in the world; he was very much shocked to hear anything called ...
— Ernest Maltravers, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... addressing myself, in this work, to persons in the middle ranks of life; and here a knowledge of domestic affairs is so necessary in every wife, that the lover ought to have it continually in his eye. Not only a knowledge of these affairs—not only to know how things ought to be done, but how to do them; not only to know what ingredients ought to be put into a pie or a pudding, but to be able to make the ...
— The Young Man's Guide • William A. Alcott

... me," he said, gently and very gravely. "I have kept your secret twelve years; I will keep it still. Be happy—be as happy as you can. All I bid of you in return is so to live that in your future ...
— Under Two Flags • Ouida [Louise de la Ramee]

... lords it by his strength, Our praises now have loud proclaimed; His generous gifts a thousand are, Aye, even more than ...
— The Religions of India - Handbooks On The History Of Religions, Volume 1, Edited By Morris Jastrow • Edward Washburn Hopkins

... amused the king, and M. de Richelieu assured him that he had never told it before. A thousand considerations had induced him to keep it to himself until the present time. "But now," said he, "the third generation of madame l'intendante is no longer young, and I have no fear of being called out to fight a duel." Next day there was a general rumor of my presentation. My friends asserted that I had the king's promise. This was imprudent on their part, and they injured my interest ...
— "Written by Herself" • Baron Etienne Leon Lamothe-Langon

... first word of it—that is to say, Colonel, I think you have been misinformed—and I'll bet you two to one on it. If he was nothing more than a minister, how did ...
— The Brigade Commander • J. W. Deforest

... with such offhand promptitude that I was certain the answer would have been the same had I asked him ...
— From a Bench in Our Square • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... Mollegladium. This nickname is no doubt a translation of one which must have been applied to John in French, though unluckily its vernacular form is lost. It has been suggested that "if the phrase had any English equivalent, it would probably be something embracing a more direct ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume VI. • Various

... much better than I should have expected, for toward evening, after the day had passed, with the scouts relieved twice over without having seen the slightest token of Indians being near, all at once ...
— Mass' George - A Boy's Adventures in the Old Savannah • George Manville Fenn

... "You have my very humblest apologies," I said meekly. "If I can be of any service—" Mr. Selwyn stopped me with a wave ...
— My Lady Caprice • Jeffrey Farnol

... p. 943. They have never been directly approved by the church, (Tillemont. Mem. Eccles. tom. xiv. p. 368—372.) I almost pity the agony of rage and sophistry with which Petavius seems to be agitated in the vith ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 4 • Edward Gibbon

... rose laurel, with the golden rake I have raked thee, with the golden bucket I have watered thee, with a silken towel I have dried thee. Dress ...
— The Red Fairy Book • Various

... the boy, quickly, "if it hurts people to drink, it must be wrong to give them liquor. Now I've been thinking how much better it would be to have a nice cup of coffee. I am sure that four out of five would like it a great deal better than wine or brandy. And nobody could possibly receive any harm. Didn't you hear what father said about Mr. Lewis? That he had been rather wild? I am sure I ...
— After a Shadow, and Other Stories • T. S. Arthur

... marriage (with Anne Boleyn) was already made, either by a dispensation of the English legate or otherwise, provided it was not by his authority, or in diminution of his power as to dispensation and limitation of Divine law."[775] Later in the year he made his suggestion that Henry should have two wives without prejudice to the legitimacy of the children of either. Henry, however, would listen to neither suggestion.[776] He would be satisfied with nothing less than the sanction of the highest authority recognised ...
— Henry VIII. • A. F. Pollard

... the Apostolic city was on the morning of one of those golden days in early autumn, any one of which might have inspired Longfellow's little poem, "A Day of Sunshine," they were ...
— Minnesota; Its Character and Climate • Ledyard Bill

... her drop on the damp floor," said Farnham, who was astonished to find himself positively blushing under the amused scrutiny of his mother-confessor. "Consider, if you please, my dear madam, that this is the first offer I have ever received, and I was naturally somewhat awkward about declining it. We shall learn better manners ...
— The Bread-winners - A Social Study • John Hay

... story; for a person as badly frightened as was the steward would not have stopped to put the gun back in its place; and, in his heart, Frank despised the man who could be ...
— Frank on a Gun-Boat • Harry Castlemon

... difficulty may arise in determining an aggressor under its provisions (for there might in any case be a disputed or doubtful question of fact; and the Council under the provisions of the Covenant would in general have to act unanimously) the Protocol provides a solution of any such difficulty by saying that if the Council does not immediately determine the aggressor, it must {62} (the language is mandatory) proceed to enjoin an armistice, to fix its terms and to supervise ...
— The Geneva Protocol • David Hunter Miller

... Equality, and the rest of those broad generalizations that served to keep together so many men of good intention in the age that has come to its end, there has been much hasty running to obvious shelters, and many men have been forced to take refuge under this echoing patriotism—for want of a better gathering place. It is like an incident during an earthquake, when men who have abandoned a cleft fortress will shelter in a drinking bothy. But the very upheavals ...
— Mankind in the Making • H. G. Wells

... case again. That bit of paper, he knew well, had not been on the suit case when he had left the stateroom. It had been put there as he had made his way through the crowd of passengers along the rail. Who could have ...
— The Brand of Silence - A Detective Story • Harrington Strong

... Jane, but not one of your favorites," he replied. "Only—will you let me have Black Star now an' ride him over there an' head off them fellers ...
— Riders of the Purple Sage • Zane Grey

... revenge on you, Koj Burton. Here is the end of the passage, below is the Cave of Doom, but you have not got me yet," and, to the astonishment of Burton and Tom, Appoyas shouted a fierce cry of "Revenge!" and sprang into ...
— Adventures in Many Lands • Various

... shelling distance from the gunboats, and the solitary instance of prudence that the dervishes had so far shown was to keep far enough inland to render the assistance of the flotilla of as little help as possible to us. Some there were who thought that Jebel Surgham should have been made the central stronghold of our camp, and that the army ought to have slept behind it on the previous night. The wisdom of that suggestion was most doubtful. Where we were the gunboats could more easily cover ...
— Khartoum Campaign, 1898 - or the Re-Conquest of the Soudan • Bennet Burleigh

... tell. Nor am I very much surprised. I thought how it would be when I didn't announce it all in the old-fashioned way. It's lucky that I have the certificated proof of the date of my ...
— Is He Popenjoy? • Anthony Trollope

... have gone this afternoon," he said, with a glance at the clock; "but I'm afraid I can't get away. Have you got much ...
— At Sunwich Port, Complete • W.W. Jacobs

... I thought. "If Leider's done this thing, it means—it must mean—that he's juggled his atomic structures through production in terrific quantities of the quondarium light which I theorized about last year! But he can't have done that without playing hell with the action of magnetic forces from beginning to end! I believe if we take the gun ...
— The Winged Men of Orcon - A Complete Novelette • David R. Sparks

... 'Saturday Evening' is. Plenty of the girls who are not 'out' belong, and a good many of last year's debutantes come, as well as the older girls of three or four seasons' standing. You could call it representative couldn't you? Well, they always serve punch; and you know yourself that you have seen men there who have taken more than ...
— Blix • Frank Norris

... have been selected to settle Nova Scotia than these American immigrants. The majority were descendants of the Puritans who settled in New England, and some were actually sprung from men and women who had landed from "The Mayflower" in ...
— Canada under British Rule 1760-1900 • John G. Bourinot

... forgiveness melts me, and if you forgive me like chucking a pennyworth of coppers at a beggar, I shan't be melted. Now, then: "Georgy"—say it like that, just a bit throaty and quivery—"I loved you so that I'd have laid down my life for you!" Try it like that. That's better. Now, give me your eyes, large and mournful, for just five ticks. Now turn, three steps up stage, hand to forehead. That's it, but not quite so woodeny. Turn. Eyes again. ...
— Despair's Last Journey • David Christie Murray

... 'tis detaines me here, and why— I hide my selfe from every eye. How in so poore a house I spend My houres, y'have often ask'd me, friend; When the free Courts of free-borne men, Fall out, which first shall let me in. I enjoy my selfe, what need I more? Of every sense I lock the dore; And close shut up, a taske I find In the retyring house ...
— The Odes of Casimire, Translated by G. Hils • Mathias Casimire Sarbiewski

... one denizen of the jungle had paid the boat a visit was ground for looking for a call from another. Jack remained, therefore, on the alert, and though under ordinary circumstances he would have fallen asleep he kept wide awake until the growing light in the sky told of the coming day. Before the sun was fairly above the horizon all were astir. They bathed faces and hands in the roiled water and greeted one another with thankfulness that the night had ...
— The Jungle Fugitives • Edward S. Ellis

... of the existence of an Omnipotent God came with the development of the mental faculties; and although there does exist such a belief in the minds of men whose conscience is in a normal condition, still there are temptations to unbelief, and these have led men to atheism. I cannot think of an atheist unless I associate in ...
— Was Man Created? • Henry A. Mott

... orators are very well; but as I said, how is the revenue? And the point is, not be led away, and to be moderate, and not to go to an extreme. As soon as it seems very clear, then I begin to doubt. I have been many years in Parliament, and that is my experience." We may laugh at such speeches, but there have been plenty of them in every English Parliament. A great English divine has been described as always leaving out the principle upon which his arguments rested; even ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 3 • Various

... white men. In 1853 I saw nearly one hundred of them, naked to the waist, sinking shafts for gold on Bendigo, and no Cousin Jacks worked harder. We could not, of course, make them Englishmen—the true Briton is born, not made; but could we not have kept them alive if we had used reasonable means to do so? Or is it true that in our inmost souls we wanted them to die, that we might ...
— The Book of the Bush • George Dunderdale

... the bravest things I ever heard of. And I know the rest—your encounter with Kirby in the library. I overheard all of that through the open window, and how you learned from him that certain legal papers would have to be served on Eloise Beaucaire before any of the slaves could be touched, or removed from the estate. That knowledge only brought you new courage to play out your part. But why did you trust me enough to go with me? And, after trusting me so ...
— The Devil's Own - A Romance of the Black Hawk War • Randall Parrish

... the Texians had asked for a hundred sheep, either for money or in barter (a sheep is worth about sixpence), they would have been supplied directly; but as soon as the flock was perceived, one of the Texian leaders exclaimed, with an oath, "Mexicans' property, and a welcome booty; upon it my boys, upon it, and no mercy." One of the poor Mexicans who had charge was shot through the head, the others succeeded ...
— Travels and Adventures of Monsieur Violet • Captain Marryat

... optical qualities of the telescope is the manner of its mounting. The most admirable performance of the optician can render but unsatisfactory service if its mechanical accessories are ill-arranged or inconvenient. Thus the astronomer is ultimately dependent upon the mechanician; and so excellently have his needs been served, that the history of the ingenious contrivances by which discoveries have been prepared would supply a subject (here barely glanced at) not far inferior in extent and instruction to the history of ...
— A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century - Fourth Edition • Agnes M. (Agnes Mary) Clerke

... tried her with some of the short poems at the end of the Paradise Regained, which I doubt if he had ever even read, she would at least have allowed that they were not devoid of song. But it was better perhaps that she should be left free to follow her own instincts. The true teacher is the one who is able to guide those instincts, strengthen them with authority, and illuminate them with revelation of their ...
— Alec Forbes of Howglen • George MacDonald

... who goes to demand money of me—of a man of science. Ha! ha! It pleases me. I was seven weeks perfecting my Dun Suppressor. Did you know"—he whispered exultingly—"did you know that there is a hole through the earth's centre? Physicists have long suspected it; I was the first to find it. You have read how Rhuyghens, the Dutch navigator, discovered in Kerguellen's Land an abysmal pit which fourteen hundred fathoms of plumb-line failed to sound. Herr Tom, that hole has ...
— Stories by American Authors, Volume 5 • Various

... the Hut were afoot, and armed also. Notwithstanding the deserted appearance of the valley, this experienced frontier warrior distrusted the signs of the times; and he looked forward to the probability of an assault, a little before the return of day, with a degree of concern he would have been sorry to communicate to his ...
— Wyandotte • James Fenimore Cooper

... returned Cosmo. "I give you warning I'm very hungry; only on the other hand, I don't care what I have ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... immediately to still the memory of her sorrows. It is touching to see how, now that she could no longer doubt that Imlay was made of common clay, she began to find excuses for him. She represented to herself that it was her misfortune to have met him too late. Had she known him before dissipation had enslaved him, there would have been none of this trouble. She was, furthermore, convinced that his natural refinement was not entirely destroyed, and ...
— Mary Wollstonecraft • Elizabeth Robins Pennell

... The Decretal Ad abolendam (De Haereticis, cap. ix) says that "those who are found to have relapsed into the error which they had already abjured, must be left to the secular tribunal." Therefore they should not be received ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... current issues: air polluted with sulfur dioxide from oil-shale burning power plants in northeast; however, the amount of pollutants emitted to the air have fallen steadily, the emissions of 2000 were 80% less than in 1980; the amount of unpurified wastewater discharged to water bodies in 2000 was one twentieth the level of 1980; in connection with the start-up of new water purification ...
— The 2007 CIA World Factbook • United States

... caused the name of "hypnotism" to eject that of "mesmerism" in England. He was never properly appreciated during his lifetime. But if he was not, he was only one of numerous examples which are always being brought up before our eyes (among those of our countrymen who have rendered their country signal services), who illustrate the famous English quotation, "Thus angels walked the earth unknown, and when they flew ...
— Memoir and Letters of Francis W. Newman • Giberne Sieveking

... surmise must have been legible in his face because March then said earnestly and quite as if the doctor had spoken his thought aloud, "Oh, it isn't that. I mean, I haven't done anything disgraceful. It's only that I know too many musicians as it is—professional pianists and such. ...
— Mary Wollaston • Henry Kitchell Webster

... of the greater part of the author's "Hand-book of Legendary Art,"—of which seventeen large editions have been exhausted. The clear and beautiful explanation of the expressive symbols by which men's minds are helped to reverent contemplation of the mysteries of revealed religion, leaves nothing to be desired. The "Stories ...
— The Olden Time Series, Vol. 1: Curiosities of the Old Lottery • Henry M. Brooks

... caught the style?—have I used 'in our midst' correctly?" she asked Solon. And he protested that her style was faultless but that her ...
— The Boss of Little Arcady • Harry Leon Wilson

... asked what he deemed had become of those men who had vanished; and Grettir said that he thought they would have gone into the gulf: the priest said that he might not trow that, if no signs could be seen thereof: then said Grettir that later on that should be known more thoroughly. So ...
— The Story of Grettir The Strong • Translated by Eirikr Magnusson and William Morris

... you, aunt; but I have no nice bit of gossip to report. Miss Burton is an orphan, and so any friend of hers has a right to protect her. I would have taken this matter into my own hands were it not out of consideration for you and Ida, who unfortunately have permitted yourselves to be identified with ...
— A Face Illumined • E. P. Roe

... And as she pressed her son to eat, Raised reverent bands, and, touched with shame, Made answer to the royal dame: "Dear lady, thou hast yet to know That danger threats, and heavy woe: A grief that will with sore distress On Sita, thee, and Lakshman press. What need of seats have such as I? This day to Dandak wood I fly. The hour is come, a time, unmeet For silken couch and gilded seat. I must to lonely wilds repair, Abstain from flesh, and living there On roots, fruit, honey, hermit's food, Pass twice seven years in solitude. To Bharat's hand the ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... I have made numerous extracts from these interesting documents, and notes thereon, which I shall at some future time be happy to lay before your readers, if you should consider them ...
— Notes and Queries 1850.02.23 • Various

... doubts," he said. "He had a scheme to import a lot of stun-pistols and arm his retainers with them. Then he meant to rush the spaceport and have me set up a broadcast-power unit that'd keep them charged all the time. Then he'd sit back and enjoy life. Holding the spaceport, nobody else could get stun-weapons, and nobody could resist his retainers who had 'em. So he'd ...
— The Pirates of Ersatz • Murray Leinster

... duty to humanity which that accepted declaration implies, so that in time the weakest and most unfortunate of our Republics may come to march with equal step by the side of the stronger and more fortunate. Let us help each other to show that for all the races of men the liberty for which we have fought and labored is the twin sister of justice and peace. Let us unite in creating and maintaining and making effective an all-American public opinion, whose power shall influence international conduct and prevent international wrong, and narrow the causes of war, ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... between the Treasury and the Federal Reserve Board have helped to encourage inflation. Henceforth, I expect that their single purpose shall be to serve the whole Nation by policies designed to stabilize the economy and encourage the free play of our people's genius for ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... business, I have freely confessed, I believe, that I was unco solicitous of custom, though less from sinful, selfish motives, than from the, I trust, laudable fear I had about becoming in a jiffy the father of a small family, every one ...
— The Life of Mansie Wauch - tailor in Dalkeith • D. M. Moir

... to fear?' said Trotty. 'It's a church! Besides, the ringers may be there, and have forgotten to shut the door.' So he went in, feeling his way as he went, like a blind man; for it was very dark. And very quiet, for the Chimes ...
— The Chimes • Charles Dickens



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