Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Good   /gʊd/  /gɪd/   Listen
Good

adjective
(compar. better; superl. best)
1.
Having desirable or positive qualities especially those suitable for a thing specified.  "A good report card" , "When she was good she was very very good" , "A good knife is one good for cutting" , "This stump will make a good picnic table" , "A good check" , "A good joke" , "A good exterior paint" , "A good secretary" , "A good dress for the office"
2.
Having the normally expected amount.  Synonym: full.  "Gives good measure" , "A good mile from here"
3.
Morally admirable.
4.
Deserving of esteem and respect.  Synonyms: estimable, honorable, respectable.  "Ruined the family's good name"
5.
Promoting or enhancing well-being.  Synonym: beneficial.  "The beneficial effects of a temperate climate" , "The experience was good for her"
6.
Agreeable or pleasing.  "Good manners"
7.
Of moral excellence.  Synonyms: just, upright.  "A just cause" , "An upright and respectable man"
8.
Having or showing knowledge and skill and aptitude.  Synonyms: adept, expert, practiced, proficient, skilful, skillful.  "An adept juggler" , "An expert job" , "A good mechanic" , "A practiced marksman" , "A proficient engineer" , "A lesser-known but no less skillful composer" , "The effect was achieved by skillful retouching"
9.
Thorough.  "Gave the house a good cleaning"
10.
With or in a close or intimate relationship.  Synonyms: dear, near.  "My sisters and brothers are near and dear"
11.
Financially sound.  Synonyms: dependable, safe, secure.  "A secure investment"
12.
Most suitable or right for a particular purpose.  Synonyms: right, ripe.  "The right time to act" , "The time is ripe for great sociological changes"
13.
Resulting favorably.  Synonym: well.  "It is good that you stayed" , "It is well that no one saw you" , "All's well that ends well"
14.
Exerting force or influence.  Synonyms: effective, in effect, in force.  "A warranty good for two years" , "The law is already in effect (or in force)"
15.
Capable of pleasing.
16.
Appealing to the mind.  Synonym: serious.  "A serious book"
17.
In excellent physical condition.  Synonym: sound.  "I still have one good leg" , "A sound mind in a sound body"
18.
Tending to promote physical well-being; beneficial to health.  Synonym: salutary.  "A good night's sleep" , "The salutary influence of pure air"
19.
Not forged.  Synonym: honest.
20.
Not left to spoil.  Synonyms: undecomposed, unspoiled, unspoilt.
21.
Generally admired.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Good" Quotes from Famous Books



... person like Jukie. Of course he's very popular, because he's very attractive. And, of course, it's spoilt him a little. I never knew a very popular and attractive person who wasn't a little spoilt by it; and in Jukie's case it's a pity, because he's too good for that sort of thing, but it hasn't ...
— Potterism - A Tragi-Farcical Tract • Rose Macaulay

... Captains Barnes and Coxon, submitted at Port Royal under the terms of the Act against Privateers, and delivered up the Bishop of Santa Marta to Lord Vaughan. Vaughan took care to lodge the bishop well, and hired a vessel to send him to Cartagena, at which "the good old man was exceedingly pleased." He also endeavoured to obtain the custody of the Spanish governor and other prisoners, but without success, "the French being obstinate and damnably enraged the English had left them" ...
— The Buccaneers in the West Indies in the XVII Century • Clarence Henry Haring

... There is no good portrait of the Queen, save that by Werthmuller, chief painter to the King of Sweden, which was sent to Stockholm, and that by Madame Lebrun, which was saved from the revolutionary fury by the commissioners for the care of ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... could answer for what I meant? She could always answer, she replied, for my meaning nothing wrong. I thanked her, but said I would prefer to answer for myself and to myself. Her other servants would probably be grateful for good characters, ...
— Little Dorrit • Charles Dickens

... "Good for you!" called the delighted Tim, "let him have another broadside, Billy, and we'll ...
— The Young Ranchers - or Fighting the Sioux • Edward S. Ellis

... you would feel a trifle shy about it," she said, good-naturedly, "it would be pleasanter and easier for you, no doubt, if I were here, so I will come for you when I get ...
— The Masked Bridal • Mrs. Georgie Sheldon

... in itself is an object not of concupiscence but of horror, since it has not in itself the aspect of good. On the other hand, adultery has the aspect of a certain kind of good, i.e. of something pleasurable, and theft has an aspect of good, i.e. of something useful: and good of its very nature has the aspect of something concupiscible. ...
— Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae) • Thomas Aquinas

... change in the disposition or behaviour of the inhabitants. I saw nothing that could induce me to think that they were displeased with our return, or jealous of the intention of our second visit. On the contrary, that abundant good-nature, which had always characterised them, seemed still to glow in every bosom, and to animate every countenance.[2] The next day, February the 12th, the ships were put under a taboo by the chiefs; a solemnity, ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16 • Robert Kerr

... boys had such care, and such food. The girl kept me supplied with gumbo soup and milk punch until I could eat heartier food, and in a couple of days I got so I could walk around the hospital. At home I had never been much of a hand to be around with the sick, but experience had been a good teacher, and I found that going around among the boys, and talking cheerfully did them good and me too. I found men from my own regiment, that I did not know had been sick. The custom was to make just ...
— How Private George W. Peck Put Down The Rebellion - or, The Funny Experiences of a Raw Recruit - 1887 • George W. Peck

... like a good man, with an honest, benevolent face, frank and simple in his manners, and not at all like a hero. His conversation was not brilliant, indeed I do not know apropos to what, I suppose to the climate, but it ...
— Life in Mexico • Frances Calderon De La Barca

... has at present no vessel which can sink this Merrimac. (They were not, for state reasons, to know what the sly fox had up his sleeve.) The government is pretty poor; its credit is not good; its legal-tender notes are worth only forty cents on your Wall Street; and we have to pay you a high rate of interest on our loans. Now, if I were in your place, and had as much money as you represent, and was as badly skeered as you say you are—I'd go ...
— The Lincoln Story Book • Henry L. Williams

... for our lodging and our clothes. But I should mind not at all our labor nor our poverty, did I not hear from so many that my husband is so wild and violent in his preaching, and when he disputes with the gentiles, as he will call them. I am sure it is a good cause to suffer in, if one must suffer; but if our dear Macer would only work half the time, there would be no occasion to suffer, which we should now were it not for Demetrius the jeweler—who lives hard by, ...
— Aurelian - or, Rome in the Third Century • William Ware

... this letter she told me how much good Stepping Heavenward had done her and how sorry she felt on hearing of Mrs. P.'s death, that she had never written, as she longed to do, to thank her for it. "Dear soul! (she added) perhaps she knows now how many hearts she has lifted up and comforted by her wonderful words."—From ...
— The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss • George L. Prentiss

... sent dismay into the hearts of the Athenians, greater than had before been felt. The bloody victory at Delium, and the conquests of Brasidas, more than balanced the capture of Sphacteria. Sparta, under the victorious banner of Brasidas, a general of great probity, good faith, and moderation, now proclaimed herself liberator of Greece. Athens, discouraged and baffled, lost all the prestige she ...
— Ancient States and Empires • John Lord

... the burden still: Murther and incest! but to hear them named My soul starts in me: The good sentinel Stands to her weapons, takes the first alarm To guard me from such crimes.—Did I kill Laius? Then I walked sleeping, in some frightful dream; My soul then stole my body out by night; And brought me back to bed ere morning-wake It cannot be even this remotest way, But some dark hint ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Vol. 6 (of 18) - Limberham; Oedipus; Troilus and Cressida; The Spanish Friar • John Dryden

... admission, common country school education; graduates of, equal to sophomores in leading colleges; no instruction in strategy or grand tactics; little French; mental furnishing for field work not superior to that of any well-educated man; physical training and drill, good; but no opportunity for most to exercise command; battalion evolutions the highest known; graduates of, not fitted—by ...
— Military Reminiscences of the Civil War V2 • Jacob Dolson Cox

... Irish second would say. You're the son of a poor Welsh squire—good blood, I admit. But I chance to be heir to twice ten thousand a year, with an uncle in the Admiralty. I have asked leave for both of us. So, don't be uneasy about our getting it. Captain Bracebridge is no snob; but he knows his own interests, and won't refuse such fair ...
— The Flag of Distress - A Story of the South Sea • Mayne Reid

... "Good-bye to ye, my bonnie bairn. Be a guid lass, and ye'll be ta'en care o'. Dinna forget that. Min' and say ...
— Alec Forbes of Howglen • George MacDonald

... dressed herself as if for a party, with a large brooch, enclosing a curl of various coloured hair cut from the heads of her children in early life, which fastened a large worked collar over a dress of copper-coloured silk, and she rustled and shook a good deal as she came downstairs into the garden to meet her grandchild, with some excitement and sense of the "difference" which could not but be felt on one side as well as on the other. She, too, was somewhat ...
— Phoebe, Junior • Mrs [Margaret] Oliphant

... administration, the entire commercial control of the Mediterranean basin. They had been trained in thrift and economy, in abhorrence of debt, in strictest habits of close and careful management. Their frugal education, their early lessons in the value of money, good and excellent as those lessons were, led them, as a matter of course, to turn to account their extraordinary opportunities. Governors with their staffs, permanent officials, contractors for the revenue, negotiators, bill-brokers, bankers, merchants, ...
— Caesar: A Sketch • James Anthony Froude

... other of those two opinions provokes their hatred against thee; and because thou canst not stand disarmed, thou must then turn thy self to mercenary Soldiery, whereof we have formerly spoken what it is, and when it is good; it can never be so much as to defend thee from powerful enemies, and suspected subjects; therefore as I have said, a new Prince in a new Principality hath alwaies ordaind them armes. Of examples ...
— Machiavelli, Volume I - The Art of War; and The Prince • Niccolo Machiavelli

... require. The oak is a fairer symbol of the German nation than the German postboy, from which original most foreigners appear to judge of us. A postilion in the north, however, is the true representative of Phlegma. Bad or good roads, bad or good weather, bad or good horses and coach, curses or flattery from the traveller—nothing moves him if his pipe-stump be but smoking, ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 14, Issue 398, November 14, 1829 • Various

... aristocracy, of which the Thenardier tavern formed a part, paid half a farthing a bucketful to a man who made a business of it, and who earned about eight sous a day in his enterprise of supplying Montfermeil with water; but this good man only worked until seven o'clock in the evening in summer, and five in winter; and night once come and the shutters on the ground floor once closed, he who had no water to drink went to fetch it for ...
— Les Miserables - Complete in Five Volumes • Victor Hugo

... "have little significance, yours amongst them. I did the best I could for you, Thayer. Remember that. What's the good word, Amy?" ...
— Left Tackle Thayer • Ralph Henry Barbour

... bad at all," said Albert when he bit into his portion. "Now, if we only had something good ...
— The Last of the Chiefs - A Story of the Great Sioux War • Joseph Altsheler

... not be able to call on you for some time, but you can be very good to me by coming to see me. I'll be stopping at St. Luke's Hospital for ...
— The Day of the Dog • George Barr McCutcheon

... Great Kaan sits at table on any great court occasion, it is in this fashion. His table is elevated a good deal above the others, and he sits at the north end of the hall, looking towards the south, with his chief wife beside him on the left. On his right sit his sons and his nephews, and other kinsmen of the Blood Imperial, ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo Volume 1 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... manage comfortable homes for Valentine, and make good arrangements for him, as fast as he ...
— Fated to Be Free • Jean Ingelow

... yet, and the most replete with toads, adders, and stench. "This," said my guide, "is the place of the men who expect to get to heaven because they have no ill intentions, that is, for being neither good nor bad." Next to this pool of ill savour, I beheld a place where a vast crowd were sitting, and without any thing visible to torment them, groaning more piteously than any that I had hitherto heard in Hell. "Mercy upon us," said ...
— The Sleeping Bard - or, Visions of the World, Death, and Hell • Ellis Wynne

... trunk-hose; go to church, or, which will be better, to meeting, at least once a month; protest only upon your faith and conscience; lay aside your swashing look, and never touch the hilt of your sword but when you would draw the carnal weapon in good earnest." ...
— Kenilworth • Sir Walter Scott

... reason, we shall, from the constant uniform method of our sensations, collect the goodness and wisdom of the Spirit who excites them in our minds; but this is all that I can see reasonably concluded from thence. To me, I say, it is evident that the being of a spirit infinitely wise, good, and powerful is abundantly sufficient to explain all the appearances of nature. But, as for inert, senseless Matter, nothing that I perceive has any the least connexion with it, or leads to the thoughts of it. And I would fain see any one explain any the meanest phenomenon in nature by it, or show ...
— A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge • George Berkeley

... Prince who had befriended me, and I had the good fortune to hear that the division, of which I was in search, lay a half mile up the river. I never spoke to the Bourbon afterward, but saw him often; and that he was as chivalrous as he ...
— Campaigns of a Non-Combatant, - and His Romaunt Abroad During the War • George Alfred Townsend

... tauld me now, Our hearts an' fortunes we 'll entwine, An' I 'll aye come every night to woo; For O, I canna descrive to thee The feeling o' love's and nature's law, How dear this world appears to me Wi' Bessie, my ain for good an' ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... ever offended you since. At nine years old you made people, alas! responsible for their faces, as you do still in a measure, though you think you do not. You severely made them answer for their clothes, in a manner which you have seen good reason, in later life, to mitigate. Upon curls, or too much youthfulness in the aged, you had no mercy. To sum up the things you hated inordinately, they were friskiness of manner and of trimmings, and curls combined with rather bygone ...
— The Children • Alice Meynell

... suffering Cuban and the duty of the United States, the black iniquity of the Speaker and the timidity of the President, were wearying to the more evenly balanced members of the community. "You say that we need a war," said Betty contemptuously one day, "that it will shake us up and do us good. If we had fallen as low as that, no war could lift us, certainly not the act of bullying a small country, of rushing into a war with the absolute certainty of success. But we need no war. American manhood is where ...
— Senator North • Gertrude Atherton

... fixed bayonet of his pointed finger darted full at the object. Yes, said I, we have just signed the articles. Anything down there about your souls? About what? Oh, perhaps you hav'n't got any, he said quickly. no matter though, i know many chaps that hav'n't got any, —good luck to 'em; and they are all the better off for it. A soul's a sort of a fifth wheel to a wagon. What are you jabbering about, shipmate? said I. He's got enough, though, to make up for all deficiencies of that sort in other chaps, ...
— Moby-Dick • Melville

... He must pay higher money wages to his laborers [if they retain the same quantity of real wages]. This necessity, being common to him with all other capitalists, forms no ground for a rise of price. The price will rise, until it has placed him in as good a situation, in respect of profits, as other employers of labor; it will rise so as to indemnify him for the increased labor which he must now employ in order to produce a given quantity of food; but the increased wages of that labor are a burden common to all, and for which no one can be indemnified. ...
— Principles Of Political Economy • John Stuart Mill

... went on soothingly. "It's good Wall Street cash—got it exactly like they got theirs—got it because I was quicker and smarter than the fellow that had it. I use a jimmy, they use a ticker—that's all ...
— The Foolish Virgin • Thomas Dixon

... I ask Of thee, Spirit serene: Strength for the daily task, Courage to face the road, Good cheer to help me bear the traveller's load, And, for the hours of rest that come between, An inward joy in all things heard and seen. These are the sins I fain Would have thee take away: Malice, and cold disdain, Hot anger, sullen ...
— The Poems of Henry Van Dyke • Henry Van Dyke

... be able to do some good if most of us belonged to it; but after all, that's another matter. Whether we could help ourselves or not, the fact remains that we don't. But you must admit that this competition of the employers is ...
— The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists • Robert Tressell

... at present. I had when I first entered on it, and a good man he was. But he has been dead some years; and as I could not easily take to the notion of another when I lost him, I bought his share for myself and have gone on by myself ever since. And here's another thing,' he said, stopping for a moment with a good-humoured laugh in his eyes, and ...
— Little Dorrit • Charles Dickens

... reiterated: "That fella Soosie he bin go long way—more far. You fella make'm Soosie no good." ...
— Tropic Days • E. J. Banfield

... a coat that he might debauch thee and delude thee. But now hath its devil departed; so do thou worship Allah and testify that there is no god but He and that none is worshipful nor worshipworth but Himself; neither is there any good but His good. As for this thy god, it cannot ward off hurt from it; so how shall it ward off harm from thee? See with thine own eyes its impotence.' So saying, he went up to the idol and dealt it a cuff on the neck, that it fell ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 9 • Richard F. Burton

... said I, "going to fill the kettle, as it is possible that Miss Berners may arrive this night." "Kos-ko," drawled out Tawno, and replaced the curtain. "Good, do you call it?" said the sharp voice of his wife; "there is no good in the matter! if that young chap were not living with the rawnee in the illegal and uncertificated line, he would not be getting up in the middle of the night to fill her kettles." ...
— The Romany Rye • George Borrow

... an image of the Virgin, which Muratori speaks of as existing in the Church of Vercelli in the seventeenth century. Bock says it is still there, and he quotes an ancient inventory of the treasures of Phillip the Good, of Burgundy, which names a "Riche et ancienne table d'autel de brodeure que on dit que la premiere Emperriez Christienne Fist."[500] The Empress Helena died ...
— Needlework As Art • Marian Alford

... as an astronomer, and who from the first astonished all by his wonderful facility in all branches of mathematics. We meet now and then some of our old pupils, middle-aged men and women, and are proud to see them filling their places in the world as good wives and mothers or useful, earnest men. We watched the growth of the University of Michigan from its infancy, and rejoiced when Chancellor Tappan took it in hand and gave it an impetus which changed ...
— 'Three Score Years and Ten' - Life-Long Memories of Fort Snelling, Minnesota, and Other - Parts of the West • Charlotte Ouisconsin Van Cleve

... the war, George Davis, a mulatto, son of his master and a black servant girl, was in Cincinnati and was accosted by two white men who offered to use the good offices of the "Underground Railroad" to help him to get away to Canada. Being well treated, as a trusted servant of his white father and master, he did not avail himself of this opportunity to escape and stayed on as a slave until Freed by the war, after which he went ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - From Interviews with Former Slaves - Kentucky Narratives • Works Projects Administration

... water. A branch is now inserted through the aperture, and its ends are rested across the opening in the ice. No sooner does the fish bite than the long end tips straight in the air, and thus betrays its captive. Ten or fifteen of these contrivances will often keep one pretty busy, and do good service. By some an ordinary cut fish pole, arranged on a crotch, is used instead of the tip-ups just described. Pickerel fishing through the ice is a favorite winter sport in many localities. The line should be about thirty feet in length, and the bait should consist of ...
— Camp Life in the Woods and the Tricks of Trapping and Trap Making • William Hamilton Gibson

... oblige," conceded Waldron, inwardly stirred by an interest he took good care not to divulge in word or look. "Give me just time for a cold plunge, a few minutes with my masseur and my barber, a ...
— The Air Trust • George Allan England

... should be so great a scholar as Blackburne certainly was? he who had so perfect a knowledge of the classics, as to be able to read them with the same ease as he could Shakspeare, must have taken great pains to have acquired the learned languages, and have had both leisure and good masters." He is allowed to have been a remarkably pleasant man; and it was said of him, that "he gained ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume 1 • Horace Walpole

... the advantage of a good spot of soil in the vicinity of our wooding-place to sow every sort of seed that we possessed, namely, peach, apricot, loquat (a Chinese fruit), lemon, seventeen sorts of culinary seeds, tobacco, roses, and a variety of other European ...
— Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia - Performed between the years 1818 and 1822 • Phillip Parker King

... the 1st of April (1884) approached he concluded it would be a good time to pay off his debt of gratitude for his recent entertainment in the Clemens's home. He went to work at it systematically. He had a "private and confidential" circular letter printed, and he mailed it to one hundred and fifty of Mark Twain's literary friends in Boston, Hartford, Springfield, ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... these was at Ardoch, seated so as to command the entrance into two valleys, Strathallan and Strathearn. A description and plan of its remains, still in good preservation, are given by Mr. Pennant in his Tour in Scotland in 1772, ...
— The Germany and the Agricola of Tacitus • Tacitus

... that?" he interrupted in no way discomposed. "It is my request which opens the golden gates. The good Hugo here but looks on at a frivolity for which he cares nothing. 'Tis the young who dance. And you, Monsieur de Artigny, am I to meet you there also, or perchance ...
— Beyond the Frontier • Randall Parrish

... likeness and its unlikeness, by its sins of omission and commission, of a similar event in correct society. In other words, it would be a parody on a proper dinner, even if the man who described the event knew nothing about the usages of good society, and with no ulterior motive in mind set down accurately the doings of his upstart characters. For instance, when Trimalchio's chef has three white pigs driven into the dining-room for the ostensible purpose of allowing the guests to pick one out for the next course, ...
— The Common People of Ancient Rome - Studies of Roman Life and Literature • Frank Frost Abbott

... boiler he may purchase, is wholly at the mercy of the boilermaker, and must run it until it explodes or time proves it to have been honestly made. Then, again, there are boilermakers who, although making boilers of good iron and of the proper thickness, finish them off so badly that the farmer is put to great inconvenience and expense to put them in working order. Two years ago I purchased a straw-burning engine and boiler made by an Eastern firm. Before ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 433, April 19, 1884 • Various

... before them, they all had respect for the man who best expressed their aspirations and their ideas. Every community had its hero. In the War of 1812 and the subsequent Indian fighting Jackson made good his claim, not only to the loyalty of the people of Tennessee, but of the whole West, and even of the nation. He had the essential traits of the Kentucky and Tennessee frontier. It was a frontier free from the influence of European ideas and institutions. ...
— The Frontier in American History • Frederick Jackson Turner

... governments to keep their action as distinct as possible. The general government should not seek to operate where the States can operate with more advantage to the community; nor should the States encroach on ground which the public good, as well as the Constitution, refers to the ...
— The Great Speeches and Orations of Daniel Webster • Daniel Webster

... tell them a jolly good opportunity, as safe as the bank, and paying six or seven per cent.—none of your fabulous risky ten or twelve businesses, but a solid steady—— How could it be to my interest to mislead you? It would be Nell who would be the loser. I should ...
— The Marriage of Elinor • Margaret Oliphant

... knowing that all ships bound for Cape Horn must touch at Conception, or some places thereabout, for provisions. La Jonquiere, having thus the start of his commodore, had all the advantage to himself of so many good passengers in his ship; for, as the king of Spain had no officer at Conception to register the money shipped at that place, these passengers and missionaries put astonishing sums of money on board the Ruby. ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 11 • Robert Kerr

... more regarded her with grave kindliness. "Folks of that kind can be very nasty prettily. I've met one or two of them. Well, you're one of the smartest business ladies I've come across yet in this country, and I should figure that's quite as good as the other. Now—well, of course, we held back a little when we engaged you, and you can tell the cashier to hand you out another ...
— Alton of Somasco • Harold Bindloss

... Edward the Third had less good fortune. Recalled from Calais by their seizure of Berwick, the king induced Balliol to resign into his hands his shadowy sovereignty, and in the spring of 1356 marched upon Edinburgh with an overpowering army, harrying and burning as he marched. But the Scots refused an engagement, a fleet ...
— History of the English People, Volume II (of 8) - The Charter, 1216-1307; The Parliament, 1307-1400 • John Richard Green

... lasted all through the night, and late into the next morning. It almost seemed as if he would never waken, the sleep was so like death; but the doctor who watched him carefully quieted Jerrie's fears and told her it would do her father good, and that in all probability he would awake with a clearer mind than he had had in years, for as a great and sudden shock sometimes produces insanity, so, contrarywise, it sometimes restored a shattered mind ...
— Tracy Park • Mary Jane Holmes

... "Good. Put this cloak on. Let only your bare neck show above it and the tips of your shoes beneath. Button it from top to bottom, as if you felt cold. Then we shall need but the presence of yourself and Karl, here in this room, to solve ...
— The Devil - A Tragedy of the Heart and Conscience • Joseph O'Brien

... remark, that the wooden ark in Deuteronomy x. 1, is by no means very similar to that of Exodus xxv., which, to judge by the analogy of the golden table and altar, must rather have been called a golden ark. It takes even more good will to regard the statement about Aaron's death and burial in Mosera and the induction of Eleazar in his place (Deuteronomy x. 6, 7) as a reminiscence of Q (Numbers xx. 22 seq.), where Aaron dies and is buried on Mount Hor. In JE also the priests Aaron and Eleazar stand by the side of Moses ...
— Prolegomena to the History of Israel • Julius Wellhausen

... than this to do. He had told Beatrice that he would make no secret of his love, and he fully resolved to be as good as his word. To his father he owed an unreserved confidence; and he was fully minded to give it. It was, he knew, altogether out of the question that he should at once marry a portionless girl without his father's consent; ...
— Doctor Thorne • Anthony Trollope

... well as the flowers and new leaves; and he struck the chariot with all his force, whereat it reeled, like a ship in a tempest beaten by the waves now to starboard, now to larboard.[1] Then I saw leap into the body of the triumphal vehicle a she fox,[2] which seemed fasting from all good food; but rebuking her for her foul sins my Lady turned her to such flight as her fleshless bones allowed. Then, from there whence he had first come, I saw the eagle descend down into the ark of ...
— The Divine Comedy, Volume 2, Purgatory [Purgatorio] • Dante Alighieri

... over Langholm How, yonder; past the Bottom; and oop th' hill on far side. Yo'll come on th' house o' top. And happen yo'll meet Th' Owd Un on the road. Good-day to ...
— Bob, Son of Battle • Alfred Ollivant

... old-fashioned. She still clung to her trees. It is true, the more progressive members of our horde lived in the caves above the river. But my mother was suspicious and unprogressive. The trees were good enough for her. Of course, we had one particular tree in which we usually roosted, though we often roosted in other trees when nightfall caught us. In a convenient fork was a sort of rude platform of twigs and branches and creeping things. It was more like a huge bird-nest than anything ...
— Before Adam • Jack London

... had come in with his guide and the mules, and having satisfied his appetite, was in as good humor as usual. If he worried about the disappearance of his companions, he kept his trouble well to himself. Nevertheless he was waiting for Tad and the rescue party ...
— The Pony Rider Boys in the Ozarks • Frank Gee Patchin

... Sull. Good holiness declare, What had the danger been, if being bare I had embrac'd her, tell me by your Art, What coming wonders ...
— The Faithful Shepherdess - The Works of Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher (Vol. 2 of 10). • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... of the Lord are in every place, beholding the evil and the good." That verse again, coming back to him with great force, beholding the evil and the good. Which was this? Was it good? Tode's uneducated, undisciplined conscience had to say nay to this. ...
— Three People • Pansy

... soul of the nightingale is filled with love and that of the lap dog with bark." It will be apparent therefore, that the study of the art of singing should devote itself to developing in the singer the best elements of his nature—all that is good, pure and elevating. We have no right to transfer to others any feeling that is impure or unwholesome. The technic of an art is of small moment compared with its subject matter. An unworthy poem cannot be purified by setting ...
— The Head Voice and Other Problems - Practical Talks on Singing • D. A. Clippinger

... came nearer to him, I saw something hanging over his shoulders, which was a creature that he had shot, like a hare, but different in colour, and longer legs; however, we were very glad of it, and it was very good meat; but the great joy that poor Xury came with, was to tell me that he had found good water, and seen ...
— The Life and Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1808) • Daniel Defoe

... In truth, good sirs, My wife and I are somewhat strangers here, And things that are of moment to the minds That long have dwelt on them, to ...
— Count Alarcos - A Tragedy • Benjamin Disraeli

... good plan to dig out the bottoms of the stalls in a circular or gutter-like form, three or four feet deep in the middle, cement the ground, or make it nearly water-tight, by a plastering of stiff clay, and fill them up with prepared muck. The appearance of a cross section of the floor thus arranged ...
— The Elements of Agriculture - A Book for Young Farmers, with Questions Prepared for the Use of Schools • George E. Waring

... added the uncle. "But here is wine on the table," he continued, as he turned his eye in the direction of a decanter of good claret, just as if Rachel had, by her art of love, anticipated what he wished at this moment. "Ah, Walter, if she shall watch your wants as she has done mine, you will live to feel that you cannot want her, and live; so fill up a glass for me, and one for yourself, ...
— Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, XXII • various

... "Come, that's good," said Raynal. "Why, you are the very one he warned me against the most; said you were as curious as Mother Eve, and as sharp as ...
— White Lies • Charles Reade

... sneered at my pretense of ignorance, when I asked why this was. But they were bound to please me in all practicable ways, so they informed me, although somewhat pettishly. It seems that in Skitzland, ladies who possess and have cultivated only their good looks, lose at the age of twenty-one all other endowments. So they become literally dolls, but dolls of a superior kind; for they can not only open and shut their eyes, but also sigh; wag slowly with their heads, and sometimes ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 2, July, 1850. • Various

... Futurist school pretty much as the Home Secretary regards the militant suffragists. Knows as much about the murder as I do about the rings of Saturn. But he ought to provide a touch of humor in an affair that promises little else than heavy tragedy. And it will do Miss Sylvia Manning some good if she is made to see that there are others than Fenleys in the world. ...
— The Strange Case of Mortimer Fenley • Louis Tracy

... la Croix into France, and cursorily visited the old Vaudois district of Val Fressinieres and Val Queyras, of which an account will be given in the following chapters. It was while on this journey that Dr. Gilly became acquainted with the self-denying labours of the good Felix Neff among those poor outlying Christians, with whose life and character he was so fascinated that he afterwards wrote and published the memoir of Neff, so well known ...
— The Huguenots in France • Samuel Smiles

... by with her baby in her arms. One man was smoking a long pipe, and his wife was carrying a basket of eggs. But the man and woman were good skaters. They flew along, laughing; and no one could get near enough ...
— The Dutch Twins • Lucy Fitch Perkins

... Women in Economics, In This Our World, A Man Made World, Concerning Children—All: Small and Maynard. The most brilliant American writer on the woman movement. Sound economics and good ...
— Scouting For Girls, Official Handbook of the Girl Scouts • Girl Scouts

... show that under the priest's frock beats yet the gallant heart of the French gentleman. Maxima solemnly promises. The good father sits under the vines, ...
— The Little Lady of Lagunitas • Richard Henry Savage

... another way; but if you're of the admir'd sort of men, that have the thriving qualifications of lying and cheating, you're in the direct path to business; for in this city no learning flourisheth, eloquence has not a room here; temperance, good manners, nor any virtue can meet a reward; assure your selves of finding but two sorts of men, and they are the cheated, and those that cheat. A father takes no care of his children, because the having of heirs is ...
— The Satyricon • Petronius Arbiter

... good reasons for supposing that the ruins recently discovered in Central America are of very great ...
— Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Debate Index - Second Edition • Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

... in a science to which these are the merest bagatelles! You know as little of the tides that control the heart of a girl as you do of the personal history of the inhabitants of Jupiter! Your powers of description are good; those of invention feeble. Either throw yourself into a love affair, till you have learned it root and branch, or never again try to ...
— A Black Adonis • Linn Boyd Porter

... words, "A certain notable man of letters ("grammaticus"), a Zealander by birth, named Saxo, wrote," etc. It is almost certain that this general term, given only to men of signal gifts and learning, became thus for the first time, and for good, attached to Saxo's name. Such a title, in the Middle Ages, usually implied that its owner was a churchman, and Saxo's whole tone is devout, though ...
— The Danish History, Books I-IX • Saxo Grammaticus ("Saxo the Learned")

... stalls. The horses did not like the unfamiliar hands; the soldiers were puzzled by their horses being taken from them. In some cases much delay and confusion occurred, and, indeed, it needed all the tact and good-fellowship of the navy and army officers to adjust things satisfactorily. Relatively to other matters the incident was a small one, but it illustrates the importance of a thorough understanding between the ...
— History of the War in South Africa 1899-1902 v. 1 (of 4) - Compiled by Direction of His Majesty's Government • Frederick Maurice

... to have been a furniture remover by profession. Give me wood and nails, and a litter of straw and sawdust, and I'm in my element. Better take 'em down to the hall and unpack them there, I suppose? Safest plan with breakables. Jolly good crockery you get from abroad! I was at winter sports with my sister, and she fell in love with a green pottery cruse business, half a franc, and as big as your head. I argued with her for an hour, but it was no good, buy it she would, and cuddled it in ...
— The Love Affairs of Pixie • Mrs George de Horne Vaizey

... fly, but they are not plentiful. I have never seen one over 2lb. A small fish, like a grayling, but without any adipose fin, sometimes takes the fly; it has a bright orange tinge on its side, and has white flesh, which is firm and very good eating. The chub is very common, and will take the fly, but is regarded as vermin, being very poor eating; it runs up to 4lb. and over. The squaw fish, also, will take the fly sometimes, but more often the minnow or grasshopper; its flesh is white and tasteless. It is a large-mouthed ...
— Fishing in British Columbia - With a Chapter on Tuna Fishing at Santa Catalina • Thomas Wilson Lambert

... "I'm not so good at such things as White Buffalo is," answered Sam Barringford bluntly. "He is born to it, and, White Buffalo, it ...
— On the Trail of Pontiac • Edward Stratemeyer

... and though to our proprietors the outlay will no doubt be considerable, yet we can afford it, gentlemen. John Brough can afford it himself, for the matter of that, and not be very much embarrassed; and we must learn to bear ill- fortune as we have hitherto borne good, and show ourselves to ...
— The History of Samuel Titmarsh - and the Great Hoggarty Diamond • William Makepeace Thackeray

... our chance. We'll plunge in those three lines before they start to rise, and be in on the ground floor." "Now don't you be rash! That Shepler's old enough to suck eggs and hide the shells. I heard a man say the other day copper was none too good at no." ...
— The Spenders - A Tale of the Third Generation • Harry Leon Wilson

... about his early love; but you see, son, Peets stops his nose-paint; won't let him drink so much as a drop; an' bein' cut off short on nourishment like I says, it makes Enright—at least so I allers figgers—some childish an' light-headed. That's right; you remove that good old Valley Tan from the menu of a party who's been adherin' an' referrin' to it year after year for mighty likely all his days, an' it sort o' takes the stiffenin' outen his dignity a lot; he begins to onbend an' wax easy an' confidenshul. Is seems then like he goes about cravin' ...
— Wolfville Days • Alfred Henry Lewis

... away, for McTee was chuckling in a deep bass rumble, and Henshaw was smiling in a way that boded no good. ...
— Harrigan • Max Brand

... and fire-lighting Roll Call Reading and accepting tally of last Council Reports of Scouts (things observed or done) Left-over business New business Honours Honourable mention (For the good of the Tribe) Complaints and suggestions. (Here business ends and entertainment begins.) Challenges Games, contests, etc. Close by singing ...
— Woodland Tales • Ernest Seton-Thompson

... gentlemen," said he, when he had got sufficiently near, "is a melancholy business, make the best of it. Now, here is Sergeant Dunham, a very good soldier, I make no question, about to slip his cable; and yet he holds on to the better end of it, as if he was determined it should never run out of the hawse-hole; and all because he loves his daughter, it seems to me. For my part, ...
— The Pathfinder - The Inland Sea • James Fenimore Cooper

... so sound to prevent my hearing my best end of the ship whispering to someone to put more coals on the fire, and roast a chicken for my supper, and then she added, with her dear, musical, soft voice, "Dear fellow! How sound he sleeps. I hope he will awake quite refreshed, and eat his supper with a good appetite. How rejoiced I am he is once more at home." I could have jumped up and hugged her, but I thought it better to enjoy my sleep. If this narrative meets the eye of a bachelor sailor I could wish him to splice himself to such ...
— A Sailor of King George • Frederick Hoffman

... time, therefore, that man should learn about himself and others, and especially about those things which are vital to even a moderate enjoyment of the good things of life. ...
— Analyzing Character • Katherine M. H. Blackford and Arthur Newcomb

... Ruby," said Dove, interrupting; "the sooner we dive too the better, for there's no end to that story when Dumsby get off in full swing. Good night!" ...
— The Lighthouse • Robert Ballantyne

... it has been well said: "Nothing is so small that we do not honour God by asking His guidance of it, or insult Him by taking it out of His hands." The need of guidance is a very real one in every Christian life, and the certainty of guidance is just as real. "The steps of a good man are ordered by the Lord" (Ps. xxxvii. 23); and this is as true now as ever. "I will guide thee with Mine eye" (Ps. xxxii. 8) is a promise for all time, and we may confidently seek guidance in prayer whenever it is needed. The answer to our prayer will come in a threefold way. ...
— The Prayers of St. Paul • W. H. Griffith Thomas

... good days gone," she said, weeping, "for you will wed some king's daughter as all men say, and I shall certainly die ...
— Legends & Romances of Brittany • Lewis Spence

... mast holds good against the storm. The sail spreads out and fills like a soap bubble about to burst. The raft rushes on at a pace impossible to estimate, but still less swiftly than the body of water displaced beneath it, the rapidity ...
— A Journey to the Centre of the Earth • Jules Verne

... either lost his way by rambling to too great a distance, or, what is more likely, perhaps, been destroyed by the male wolves. Some time after, a large dog of mine, which was also getting into the habit of occasionally remaining absent for some time, returned on board a good deal lacerated and covered with blood, having no doubt maintained a severe encounter with a male wolf, which we traced to a considerable distance by the tracks on the snow. An old dog, of the Newfoundland breed, that we had on board ...
— Three Voyages for the Discovery of a Northwest Passage from the • Sir William Edward Parry

... a flight of steps, and soon were in front of a good, though not showy hotel. In spite of the fact that it was not one of the most fashionable in New York, the magnificence of the entrance, with its rich hangings, the marble ornamentation, the electric lights and the stained glass, made Roy wonder if his friend had not ...
— The Boy from the Ranch - Or Roy Bradner's City Experiences • Frank V. Webster

... poor shift I would not throw away my chance of heaven, And meeting one who made earth heaven to me. So I came home and forged these chains about me: Full well I know no human hand can rend them, And now am safe from harming those I love. Keep off, good friends! Should God prolong my life, Throw me such food as nature may require. Look to my babes. This you are bound to do; For by my deadly grasp on that poor hound, How many of you have I saved ...
— Successful Recitations • Various

... the best limited, the best expressed: there is the most warmth without fanaticism, the most rational transport. There is one part of it which I disapprove, and I'd have him correct it; which is, that "he who does not feel joy in religion is far from the kingdom of heaven!" There are many good men whose fear of GOD predominates over their love. It may discourage. It was rashly said. A noble sermon it is indeed. I wish Blair would come over to the Church ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 3 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... "Good-by," he called as they rode away. "Don't forget to notice the statue of Athena just within the gate. It's a recent gift from ...
— Virginia of Elk Creek Valley • Mary Ellen Chase

... the offices irritably. It did not matter if Earthlings chose to waste their time in artificial ecstasy, but it was different to see a good Belt ...
— The Man Who Staked the Stars • Charles Dye

... and spent her days in the churches, leaving Torfrida to do and learn what she would. Her nurse, moreover, was a Lapp woman, carried off in some pirating foray, and skilled in all the sorceries for which the Lapps were famed throughout the North. Her uncle, partly from good-nature, partly from a pious hope that she might "enter religion," and leave her wealth to the Church, had made her his pupil, and taught her the mysteries of books; and she had proved to be a strangely apt scholar. ...
— Hereward, The Last of the English • Charles Kingsley

... sent for me. He was in mighty good humor too. Tickled to death. He might well be—he's got 60,000 shares of Pennsylvania Central. And there's going to be from 50 to 60 points profit ...
— The Tipster - 1901, From "Wall Street Stories" • Edwin Lefevre

... the good of past study, unless this leaven—unless the wild fig-tree which has once struck its root into the breast, break ...
— Post-Augustan Poetry - From Seneca to Juvenal • H.E. Butler

... is any hardship to earn your own living, though perhaps she is too pretty; anyway, it's being made easier for her than for many a girl who is just as good,' ...
— A City Schoolgirl - And Her Friends • May Baldwin

... "Very good, Chink; the next time you so much as glance in Miss Vost's direction, you're going to walk away with a pair of the dam'dest black eyes in China! ...
— Peter the Brazen - A Mystery Story of Modern China • George F. Worts

... said Willet, "it seems to me that the masts increase in number. Truly it is a good town, and an ...
— The Shadow of the North - A Story of Old New York and a Lost Campaign • Joseph A. Altsheler

... perspective to which our sense-data belong, we may regard this perspective as being the position of our mind in perspective space. If, therefore, this perspective is, in the above defined sense, inside our head, there is a good meaning for the statement that the mind is in the head. We can now say of the various appearances of a given thing that some of them are nearer to the thing than others; those are nearer which belong to perspectives that are nearer to "the ...
— Mysticism and Logic and Other Essays • Bertrand Russell

... history we can recall no similar event. All preceding parliaments came into existence through revolution or gradual growth, in no other instance through the voluntary abdication of autocratic power and the adoption of parliamentary rule by an emperor moved alone by a desire for the good of his people and the reform of the ...
— Historic Tales, Vol. 12 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... bonefires in the streets, every man bestowing wood or labour towards them. The wealthier sort, also, before their doors, near to the said bonefires, would set out tables on the vigils, furnished with sweet bread and good drink; and on the festival days, with meat and drink, plentifully; whereunto they would invite their neighbours and passengers also, to sit and be merry with them in great familiarity, praising God for his benefits bestowed on them. These were called Bonefires, as well of good amity ...
— Old and New London - Volume I • Walter Thornbury

... often to resent his illness bitterly; he had never known anything but an almost savage strength. Now he lay watching his illness with a curious mixture of fierce resentment and proprietorial pride. He spent a good deal of his time trying to think of ways in which he could circumvent the choking sensation that often came to him. Marcella brought some comfort by placing the kitchen ironing board across the bed, resting on the backs of two chairs so that he could lean forward ...
— Captivity • M. Leonora Eyles

... mouth of a cavern near the Dent d'Oche, on the other side of the Lake of Geneva, they caught the communal forester at once, and put themselves under his guidance. The distance from Biere is two hours' good walking, and an hour and a half for the return. There was no ladder for the final descent, and the neighbouring chalet could provide nothing longer than 15 feet, the drop being 30 feet. Two Frenchmen had attempted to make their way to the cave a week before; ...
— Ice-Caves of France and Switzerland • George Forrest Browne

... "if you get yours before they learn to like you, it'll probably be James Jamison on the headboard, but if you make good, it'll be Jim Jimison on Sundays an' jest plain Jim for every day." "That suits me," sez he. "I'm entered for the whole race, an' I'm glad to get off as soon ...
— Happy Hawkins • Robert Alexander Wason

... or no chance of the same good fortune at Hugli. The prize was so valuable that every effort would certainly be made to stop them. A whole day or more might pass before the reason of Coja Solomon's absence was discovered. But when the discovery was made fast runners would be sent to Khulna and Hugli, and ...
— In Clive's Command - A Story of the Fight for India • Herbert Strang

... exploded and added their contribution to the already stupendous concentration of force. They were not close enough to the flitter to wreck it of themselves, but they were close enough so that they didn't do her—or her pilot—a bit of good. ...
— The Vortex Blaster • Edward Elmer Smith

... keep right on Saying them like the heathen? We could drop them. Only—there was the bonnet in the pew. Such a phrase couldn't have meant much to her. But suppose she had missed it from the Creed As a child misses the unsaid Good-night, And falls asleep with heartache—how should I feel? I'm just as glad she made me keep hands off, For, dear me, why abandon a belief Merely because it ceases to be true. Cling to it long enough, and not a doubt It will turn true again, ...
— North of Boston • Robert Frost

... "Good evening, then," said Horace, and walked out of the shop; rather to bring Mr. Dilger to terms than because he really meant to abandon the bottle, for he dared not go back without it, and he had nothing about him just then on which he could raise the extra ...
— The Brass Bottle • F. Anstey

... shewed me the earlier printed volumes of the Public Library; of which, having unluckily lost the few memoranda I had taken—but which I believe only included the notice of a first Caesar, first Suetonius, and first Tacitus—I am not able to give any particular details. M. Schlosser conversed a good deal, and very earnestly, about Lord Spencer's library—and its probable ultimate destination; seeming to dread its "dispersion" as ...
— A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume Three • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... came, then shot and killed them, so that not one escaped. Having got this man, they took him to the king, who secretly charged him, "You must make a square enclosure with high walls. Plant in it all kinds of flowers and fruits; make good ponds in it for bathing; make it grand and imposing in every way, so that men shall look to it with thirsting desire; make its gates strong and sure; and when any one enters, instantly seize him and punish him as a sinner, not allowing ...
— Chinese Literature • Anonymous

... the Grange when she was eighteen, just after she graduated from our university here. Had a good deal of your enthusiasm, I should judge. Expected to revolutionize things some way. I don't take very much interest in her public work, but I thoroughly appreciate her literary perception." He had got back to his ...
— A Spoil of Office - A Story of the Modern West • Hamlin Garland

... pretty far with you, Florence," Julia interposed, "but we'd better leave him a loophole. You know he's a constant attendant at church and contributes liberally to many good causes." ...
— Gentle Julia • Booth Tarkington

... from Mary of Burgundy and from Maximilian were allowed to lapse in his favour. He was not asked to ratify the Great Privilege nor the various promises made by Maximilian. His "Joyous Entry of Brabant" was very much on the same lines as those sworn previously by Philip the Good and Charles the Bold. The prince's commissaries were restored to their offices and had again the power to choose communal magistrates, thus removing them from the direct influence of the corporations. The Ducal Council was ...
— Belgium - From the Roman Invasion to the Present Day • Emile Cammaerts



Words linked to "Good" :   reputable, basic, angelic, importation, merchandise, not bad, acceptable, exportation, salvage, operative, benefit, saintly, ware, worthiness, favourable, nice, vantage, righteous, benignity, solid, morality, redemptive, beatific, welfare, sainted, ill, bang-up, healthful, fresh, fortunate, dandy, colloquialism, staple, angelical, well-behaved, badness, intellectual, entrant, middling, groovy, quality, virtuousness, slap-up, artefact, saving, pleasing, echt, swell, import, bad, well behaved, commonweal, moral, smashing, keen, better, satisfactory, advantageous, favorable, ample, bully, combining form, healthy, saintlike, redeeming, soundness, optimum, neat, export, desirableness, virtue, kindness, complete, desirability, wisdom, graciousness, best, genuine, hot, virtuous, summum bonum, superb, wiseness, product, worldly possession, beneficence, evilness, evil, corking, shopping, nifty, cracking, peachy, saintliness, future, close, discriminating, great, white, skilled, opportune, benignancy, obedient, moral excellence, fungible, advantage, worthy, artifact



Copyright © 2018 Free-Translator.com