Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Go   /goʊ/   Listen
Go

verb
(past went; past part. gone; pres. part. going)
1.
Change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically.  Synonyms: locomote, move, travel.  "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus" , "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect" , "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell" , "News travelled fast"
2.
Follow a procedure or take a course.  Synonyms: move, proceed.  "She went through a lot of trouble" , "Go about the world in a certain manner" , "Messages must go through diplomatic channels"
3.
Move away from a place into another direction.  Synonyms: depart, go away.  "The train departs at noon"
4.
Enter or assume a certain state or condition.  Synonyms: become, get.  "It must be getting more serious" , "Her face went red with anger" , "She went into ecstasy" , "Get going!"
5.
Be awarded; be allotted.  "Her money went on clothes"
6.
Have a particular form.  Synonym: run.  "As the saying goes..."
7.
Stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point.  Synonyms: extend, lead, pass, run.  "His knowledge doesn't go very far" , "My memory extends back to my fourth year of life" , "The facts extend beyond a consideration of her personal assets"
8.
Follow a certain course.  Synonym: proceed.  "How did your interview go?"
9.
Be abolished or discarded.  "These luxuries all had to go under the Khmer Rouge"
10.
Be or continue to be in a certain condition.
11.
Make a certain noise or sound.  Synonym: sound.  "The gun went 'bang'"
12.
Perform as expected when applied.  Synonyms: function, operate, run, work.  "Does this old car still run well?" , "This old radio doesn't work anymore"
13.
To be spent or finished.  Synonyms: run low, run short.  "Gas is running low at the gas stations in the Midwest"
14.
Progress by being changed.  Synonyms: move, run.  "Run through your presentation before the meeting"
15.
Continue to live through hardship or adversity.  Synonyms: endure, hold out, hold up, last, live, live on, survive.  "These superstitions survive in the backwaters of America" , "The race car driver lived through several very serious accidents" , "How long can a person last without food and water?"
16.
Pass, fare, or elapse; of a certain state of affairs or action.  "The day went well until I got your call"
17.
Pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life.  Synonyms: buy the farm, cash in one's chips, choke, conk, croak, decease, die, drop dead, exit, expire, give-up the ghost, kick the bucket, pass, pass away, perish, pop off, snuff it.  "The children perished in the fire" , "The patient went peacefully" , "The old guy kicked the bucket at the age of 102"
18.
Be in the right place or situation.  Synonym: belong.  "Let's put health care where it belongs--under the control of the government" , "Where do these books go?"
19.
Be ranked or compare.
20.
Begin or set in motion.  Synonyms: get going, start.  "Ready, set, go!"
21.
Have a turn; make one's move in a game.  Synonym: move.
22.
Be contained in.
23.
Be sounded, played, or expressed.
24.
Blend or harmonize.  Synonyms: blend, blend in.  "This sofa won't go with the chairs"
25.
Lead, extend, or afford access.  Synonym: lead.  "The road runs South"
26.
Be the right size or shape; fit correctly or as desired.  Synonym: fit.
27.
Go through in search of something; search through someone's belongings in an unauthorized way.  Synonym: rifle.
28.
Be spent.
29.
Give support (to) or make a choice (of) one out of a group or number.  Synonym: plump.
30.
Stop operating or functioning.  Synonyms: break, break down, conk out, die, fail, give out, give way, go bad.  "The car died on the road" , "The bus we travelled in broke down on the way to town" , "The coffee maker broke" , "The engine failed on the way to town" , "Her eyesight went after the accident"



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Go" Quotes from Famous Books



... in all Scotland for the cleanly but sick servant maid to go till, until health be restored? Alas! there ...
— Sunny Memories Of Foreign Lands, Volume 1 (of 2) • Harriet Elizabeth (Beecher) Stowe

... how it humiliates me for you to see me like this—you, who knew me in the old days at home, when I was rich and petted and loved. And now I haven't a friend in the world. My husband left me. If you will tell them to let me off, they will do it for your sake. I swear to you I will leave New York, go back to my old home and try to begin life over again." She buried ...
— The One Woman • Thomas Dixon

... under a black and hopeless sky, from which the rain was dismally falling. The road became very slippery and our progress was very slow. To make matters worse, a bridge was missing and we were obliged to go ...
— See America First • Orville O. Hiestand

... Guitton may be Offended that he is the latter named: Behold both Guidos for their learning famed: Th' honest Bolognian: the Sicilians first Wrote love in rhymes, but wrote their rhymes the worst. Franceschin and Sennuccio (whom all know) Were worthy and humane: after did go A squadron of another garb and phrase, Of whom Arnaldo Daniel hath most praise, Great master in Love's art, his style, as new As sweet, honours his country: next, a few Whom Love did lightly wound: both Peters ...
— The Sonnets, Triumphs, and Other Poems of Petrarch • Petrarch

... Lockwood. "Um—there's nobody round outside there? Take a look, Chino, by the window there. All clear, eh? Well, here's the point. That brick ought to go in to-night ...
— A Deal in Wheat - And Other Stories of the New and Old West • Frank Norris

... not far away. He had selected it that morning. It was clean, somewhat, yet not too clean. The fare was far from princely, but it would do, and the locality was none too respectable. Michael was enough of a slum child still to know that his guest would never go with him to a really respectable restaurant, moreover he would not have the wardrobe nor the manners. He waited Sam's ...
— Lo, Michael! • Grace Livingston Hill

... to a restless night, and rose early, after only an hour or so of sleep. One thing I was determined on—to find out, if possible, the connection between the terror and the telephone. I breakfasted early, and was dressing to go to the village when I had a visitor, no other than Miss Emily herself. She looked fluttered and perturbed at the unceremonious hour of her visit—she was the soul of convention—and explained, between breaths as it were, that she had come to apologize for the day before. She had hardly ...
— The Confession • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... master sent me to another farm, several miles from my parents, brothers, and sisters, which was a great trouble to me. At last I grew so lonely and sad I thought I should die, if I did not see my mother. I asked the overseer if I might go, but being positively denied, I concluded to go without his knowledge. When I reached home my mother was away. I set off and walked twenty miles before I found her. I staid with her for several days, and we returned together. Next day I was sent back to my new place, ...
— Memoir of Old Elizabeth, A Coloured Woman • Anonymous

... now turned to go to his study, and as he was turning, said, "I know that I will do justice to that turkey, after delivering my long sermon, and I am very thankful to Deacon Phillips, and to God, for having given it ...
— The Pastor's Son • William W. Walter

... I learned this I notified Weitzel and directed him to keep up close to the enemy and to have Hartsuff, commanding the Bermuda Hundred front, to do the same thing, and if they found any break to go in; Hartsuff especially should do so, for this would separate Richmond ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... Morriston protested, her clear-cut face showing no trace of annoyance. "I thought you had hold of the cup, and I let it go too soon. Ring the ...
— The Hunt Ball Mystery • Magnay, William

... mother would let me go to work," Amy sighed, on more than one occasion, and to Janice's sympathetic ear. "I declare! I'd go out as a servant in somebody's home, if mother would let me. ...
— Janice Day, The Young Homemaker • Helen Beecher Long

... circumstance you have so thoughtfully and so courteously reminded me.' This, somehow, seemed of good import to Leonard. If he could show her that his intention to marry her was antecedent to Harold's confidence, she might still go back to her old affection for him. He could not believe that it did not still exist; his experience of other women showed him that their love outlived their anger, whether the same had been ...
— The Man • Bram Stoker

... Commoners (who, at Cambridge, bear the name of Fellow Commoners) wear a peculiar dress, and have some privileges which naturally imply some corresponding increase of cost; but why this increase should go to the extent of doubling the total expense, as it is generally thought to do, or how it can go to that extent, I am unable to explain. The differences which attach to the rank of "Gentlemen Commoners" are these: ...
— Memorials and Other Papers • Thomas de Quincey

... Portenderrick, gave Mr. Cumming to understand, that she could not at present spare any troops to join the English in their expedition against Senegal; but she assured him, that, should the French be exterminated, she and their subjects would go thither ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... Bonnie Lassie, "your appellant prays that you be a dear, good, stern, forbidding Dominie and go over to Number 37 and ask him what he means by it, anyway, and tell him he's got to ...
— From a Bench in Our Square • Samuel Hopkins Adams

... taken in sail, and the men upon the decks waited to see how the Mohawk would behave in the coming squall. At that moment although there was hardly a breath on deck, a wind smote the upper sails, and the sailing-master gave orders to let go the fore-sheet, the jib-sheets, and the fore-topsail. The order had only been obeyed in respect to the fore-topsail, when the squall struck the yacht with such fury that she careened, ...
— The Medallic History of the United States of America 1776-1876 • J. F. Loubat

... the objects she most loved—free to go and come unattended by a train of attendants—those were the least unhappy days in the life of Marie ...
— The Story of Versailles • Francis Loring Payne

... which you steep them in must be four Pints, and when it is half boiled away, then add to it one Pound of fine Sugar, and boil it to a Syrup, and take two spoonfuls at a time every night when you go to rest. ...
— The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet • Hannah Wolley

... probable, we are led to build up a constructive philosophy. Consciousness says we have a body, body a brain, and pressure on the brain stops consciousness; hence a close connection between the brain and consciousness. The two go together, and in the brain we must lay the foundation of our philosophy. The mental faculties create the world of individual consciousness, it the outside world. We know only what is revealed in consciousness. Matter ...
— George Eliot; A Critical Study of Her Life, Writings & Philosophy • George Willis Cooke

... her debts like a man," says an exchange. Like a man? Not so. Not one man in a thousand but would have "squealed," "laid down" and settled at ten or twenty cents on the dollar. As people go in this wicked world, it is no more than fair to say in good faith that Miss Anthony is a very admirable person. She is in business, as in other matters, one of the few—the select few—who steer by their own compass and not ...
— The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 1 of 2) • Ida Husted Harper

... I am homesick," she said. "I cannot care for this place. I should have had a better chance of taking to it kindly if my grandfather had let me go home for a little while. Everything is an effort here." And it is to be feared that she gave way again, and fretted in a manner that Madame Fournier would have grieved to see. But there was no help for it; her heart was sore, and ...
— The Vicissitudes of Bessie Fairfax • Harriet Parr

... some, whose immediate companions here may encourage them in all good far more than may be the case with, others? So, then, there may be some to whom this great blessing has been denied, whilst others enjoy it. What then? Shall we say, that, because we have it not, we will refuse to go in to our Father's house; that we will not walk as our brother walks, unless we have his advantages? Then must we remain cast out; vessels fashioned to dishonour; rejected of God, and cursed. Nay rather let us put a Christian sense on Esau's prayer, ...
— The Christian Life - Its Course, Its Hindrances, And Its Helps • Thomas Arnold

... middle channel. An arbitrator will, of course, decide upon any conditions laid down; but is it not much more difficult to understand why we should have imposed such conditions on the arbitrator, on the demand of America, when we had the simple words of the Treaty to go by? ...
— Canada and the States • Edward William Watkin

... war Brantome once stopped to pay his respects to Renee, and saw in the castle over 300 Huguenots that had fled there for security. In a letter of May 10, 1563, Calvin speaks of her as "the nursing mother of the poor saints driven out of their homes and knowing not whither to go," and as having made her castle what a princess looking only to this world would regard almost an insult to have it called—"God's hostelry" or "hospital" (ung hostel-Dieu). God had, as it were, called upon her by these trials to pay arrears for the ...
— History of the Rise of the Huguenots - Volume 2 • Henry Baird

... on the King's government. As for his solitary colleague, he listened and smiled, and then in his musical voice asked them questions in return, which is the best possible mode of avoiding awkward inquiries. It was very unfair this; for no one knew what tone to take; whether they should go down to their public dinners and denounce the Reform Act or praise it; whether the Church was to be re-modelled or only admonished; whether Ireland was to be conquered ...
— Coningsby • Benjamin Disraeli

... have you to propose, sir?" was my reply. "I am the superintendent," he said, "of a German Sunday-school in the upper part of the city, and I should like you to come and address the children this afternoon." I promised to go, and he to send to my "lodgings" for me. We both kept our appointment. The number of scholars was about 100. This effort to bring the Germans under a right religious influence is very laudable; for there are about 10,000 of that people in Cincinnati. One quarter of the city is entirely ...
— American Scenes, and Christian Slavery - A Recent Tour of Four Thousand Miles in the United States • Ebenezer Davies

... of this before daybreak," cried old Cary. "Eight hundred men landed! We must call out the Posse Comitatus, and sail with them bodily. I will go myself, old as I am. Spaniards in Ireland? not a dog of them must go ...
— Westward Ho! • Charles Kingsley

... to return to Washington until after the election. I shall go very soon after that event, however. My family are all well and join me in respects to ...
— Recollections of Forty Years in the House, Senate and Cabinet - An Autobiography. • John Sherman

... friends came into place, they not only adopted all the measures of Mr. Pitt, but they even followed up the most obnoxious of those measures towards the people with an unfeeling and arbitrary severity. This being the case, I shall take leave, as I go along, to represent public events in their true colours, in such as they must strike every rational, ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 2 • Henry Hunt

... tell you who, I think, will be a capital one to take with you, and I believe he would go," said Iola. ...
— Iola Leroy - Shadows Uplifted • Frances E.W. Harper

... toil. They are healthier than their husbands, whose laziness goes so far that, careless of cold or heat, they are capable of spending a whole night in the open air on a bed of stones rather than take the trouble to go to bed. ...
— The Unknown Life of Jesus Christ - The Original Text of Nicolas Notovitch's 1887 Discovery • Nicolas Notovitch

... is past which turned from thee his heart, Ahaz and Ammon have now no more ado, Jechonias with other, which did themselves avert From thee to idols, may now no farther go. The two false judges, and Baal's wicked priests also, Phassur and Shemias, with Nebuchadnezzar, Antiochus and Triphon, shall thee displease no more. Three score years and ten thy people into Babylon Were captive ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume I. • R. Dodsley

... "I'll go," Roy declared; "I'll take that twenty two rifle and Peggy can carry that light twenty-gauge shotgun. It's just the thing for ...
— The Girl Aviators on Golden Wings • Margaret Burnham

... went to Paris to prosecute his studies; and there, two years after, was awarded a prize, founded by his province, which enabled him to go to Rome. It is characteristic of the man that, in the competition for this prize, he was so touched by the despair of one of his comrades competing with him that he repainted completely his friend's picture—with such ...
— McClure's Magazine, January, 1896, Vol. VI. No. 2 • Various

... may that be?" inquired this very sensible man. "Surely her mother must be crazy to let her go out in such bitter weather as it has been to-day, with only that flimsy white ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17) - Folk-Lore, Fables, And Fairy Tales • Various

... Samantabharda, one of the four great Boddhisatvas of the Tantra School. Wen Dschu, the Buddha on the Golden-haired Mountain Lion, (Hou), is the Indian Mandjusri. The old Buddha of the Radiance of the Light, Jan Dong Go Fu, is the ...
— The Chinese Fairy Book • Various

... chow kitchen is in a bad place, all men coming down sick. I had an arrangement with the doughboys that they might come in my dugout any hour in the night, whenever they wanted. I visited infantry officers to-day, Capt. Cribbs and Capt. Crisp. I had a lovely talk with them. I offered to go to the trenches with my goods, but Capt. Cribbs said I would just be killed without doing what he knew I wanted to do, namely, serve the boys ...
— The War Romance of the Salvation Army • Evangeline Booth and Grace Livingston Hill

... for a little while in our room, and John's headache got worse and worse. I persuaded him to go to bed, and I put out the candle (the fire giving sufficient light to undress by), so that he might the sooner fall asleep. But he was too restless to sleep. He asked me to read him something. Books always made him drowsy at the best ...
— Little Novels • Wilkie Collins

... intimated by himself, he dreaded the force of public opinion in France. "Aha, look at your King of Prussia again. Gone to conquer Bohemia; and, except the Three Circles he himself is to have of it, lets Bohemia go to the winds!" This sort of thing, Friedrich admits, he dreaded too much, at that young period; so loud had the criticisms been on him, in the time of the Breslau Treaty: "Out upon your King of Prussia; call you that an honorable ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XV. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... Clandon and the Horsleys to Leatherhead; a smaller road travels south-west by St. Martha's Chapel to Chilworth; almost due south a road runs through Shalford to Wonersh, or breaks off at Shalford to go east to Dorking; another southern road is to Godalming; the great west road passes over the Hog's Back to Farnham, and north-west lie Worplesdon and Bisley. And the railways can be joined north, east, south, ...
— Highways and Byways in Surrey • Eric Parker

... bringing into the world a share in the general government of the country; and the rapid evaporation of their sentimental liberalism, which began as soon as they undertook practical reforms, made them less and less conciliatory. When the vigorous young child, therefore, showed a natural desire to go beyond the humble functions accorded to it, the stern parents proceeded to snub it and put it into its proper place. The first reprimand was administered publicly in the capital. The St. Petersburg Provincial Assembly, having shown a desire to play a political part, was promptly closed ...
— Russia • Donald Mackenzie Wallace

... acting for the first time in higher positions. Captain Lawrence himself was of course new to all, both officers and crew. [Footnote: On the day on which he sailed to attack the Shannon, Lawrence writes to the Secretary of the Navy as follows: "Lieutenant Paige is so ill as to be unable to go to sea with the ship. At the urgent request of Acting-Lieutenant Pierce I have granted him, also, permission to go on shore; one inducement for my granting his request was his being at variance with ...
— The Naval War of 1812 • Theodore Roosevelt

... not quite serene in his humour to night, after supper; for he spoke of hastening away to London, without stopping much at Edinburgh. I reminded him, that he had General Oughton and many others to see. JOHNSON. 'Nay, I shall neither go in jest, nor stay in jest. I shall do what is fit.' BOSWELL. 'Ay, sir, but all I desire is, that you will let me tell you when it is fit.' JOHNSON. 'Sir, I shall not consult you.' BOSWELL. 'If you are to run away from us, as soon as you get loose, we will keep you confined in an island.' He ...
— The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D. • James Boswell

... complained of having been deserted by those, with whom he formerly acted, in his old age, and Mr. Fox, with tears in his eyes and strong emotion, declared that he would esteem and venerate Burke to the end of time. The same cries of "order," "order," "chair," "chair," "go on," "go on," that are heard in our most tumultuous debates, in the Assembly, were frequent in the course of the debate, and Mr. Burke was unable, on account of the tumult, to proceed with his account of "the horrible and nefarious consequences flowing from the French idea of the rights ...
— The Rise of Canada, from Barbarism to Wealth and Civilisation - Volume 1 • Charles Roger

... took it must have thrown the car away because it was too heavy to carry," said Bunny. "It was a pretty heavy toy, and I always carried it in two parts myself. Besides the car wasn't any good to make the train go. The electric locomotive pulled itself and the cars. I guess they just threw this ...
— Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue in the Big Woods • Laura Lee Hope

... go to the trouble," McAllen said. "The property isn't in my name. And the nearest neighbor lives across the lake. I never come here except by the Tube so I ...
— Gone Fishing • James H. Schmitz

... special advantages of birth or education, opens a law-office in Kingston, at that time a place of less than five thousand inhabitants. Two lads come to him to study law. The three work together for a few years. They afterwards go into politics. One drifts away {8} from the other two, who remain closely allied. After the lapse of twenty-five years the three meet again, at the Executive Council Board, members of the same Administration. Another ...
— The Day of Sir John Macdonald - A Chronicle of the First Prime Minister of the Dominion • Joseph Pope

... such confusion, that I was almost squeezed to death.—But if their operas are thus delightful, their comedies are in as high a degree ridiculous. They have but one play-house, where I had the curiosity to go to a German comedy, and was very glad it happened to be the story of Amphitrion (sic). As that subject has been already handled by a Latin, French, and English poet, I was curious to see what an Austrian author would make of it. I understand enough ...
— Letters of the Right Honourable Lady M—y W—y M—e • Lady Mary Wortley Montague

... telegraph still acted, he might be warned! But that is impossible now! As to leaving Pencroft and Herbert here alone, we could not do it! Well, I will go alone ...
— The Mysterious Island • Jules Verne

... sinking with panic, with a sort of awe-struck horror, I rushed back, and running down the lane, almost letting go my hold of Electric, went back to the bank of the river. I could not think clearly of anything. I knew that my cold and reserved father was sometimes seized by fits of fury; and all the same, I could never comprehend what I had just seen.... But ...
— The Torrents of Spring • Ivan Turgenev

... very time when the prospect of help from without was so small, the most dangerous symptoms appeared within the Papacy itself. Living as it now did, and acting in the spirit of the secular Italian principalities, it was compelled to go through the same dark experiences as they; but its own exceptional nature gave a peculiar color ...
— The Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy • Jacob Burckhardt

... rest left to the lender; for if the abatement be but small, it will no whit discourage the lender. For he, for example, that took before ten or nine in the hundred, will sooner descend to eight in the hundred than give over his trade in usury, and go from certain gains to gains of hazard. Let these licensed lenders be in number indefinite, but restrained to certain principal cities and towns of merchandising; for then they will be hardly able to color ...
— Usury - A Scriptural, Ethical and Economic View • Calvin Elliott

... said, "I recommend our beloved children to your care: bring them up in the fear of God. You must go to Chartres, you will there see the bishop, on whom I had the honour of waiting when I was there last, and who has always been kind to me; I believe he has thought well of me, and that I may hope he will take pity on you and ...
— CELEBRATED CRIMES, COMPLETE - DERUES • ALEXANDRE DUMAS, PERE

... go as you please, sometimes every little rule fussed about. Clothes and food are not in any way satisfactory, but one is getting a rest, and that is what one should remember.... Suspense. Waiting with, oh, how many hopes and fears, for ...
— The 23rd (Service) Battalion Royal Fusiliers (First Sportsman's) - A Record of its Services in the Great War, 1914-1919 • Fred W. Ward

... told May to stand still. Then she bruised that serpent with her whole foot, for she stood on it, and swatted it until she broke its neck. Then she turned ready for the other one, but when it saw what happened to its mate, it decided to go back. Even snakes, it doesn't seem right to break up families like that; so by the time Candace got the mammy killed, loose from May's hem, and stretched out with the back up, so she wouldn't make it rain, when Candace wasn't sure ...
— Laddie • Gene Stratton Porter

... James ("Spider") Buffin was pocket-picking. His hobby was revenge. James had no objection to letting the sun go down on his wrath. Indeed, it was after dark that he corrected his numerous enemies most satisfactorily. It was on a dark night, while he was settling a small score against one Kelly, a mere acquaintance, that he first fell foul ...
— Death At The Excelsior • P. G. Wodehouse

... seen; there is only the great sea." And he pushed away the lute upon which he was playing and said, "They are lying deities which have spoken to you." Then the deity was very angry and spoke again through the empress. "This empire is not a land over which thou art fit to rule. Go thou ...
— Japan • David Murray

... sufficient authority for forming such a conclusion. Still I felt quite a curiosity about the picture—the more so as I could foresee no possible chance of my ever beholding it. I certainly should not go to Rome on purpose, and in a few days it would be in the possession of Prince N——, a personage whom in all probability I should never know. I put the newspaper carefully by, and then turned my mind to the consideration of quite another subject—namely, ...
— A Romance of Two Worlds • Marie Corelli

... voice was strangely altered from the gruff, hearty tone which had greeted his guest fifteen minutes before. "Minister, I ain't a man that's used to hearin' much talk, and it confuses my mind a bit. There's things inside my head that seems to go round and round, sometimes, and put me out. Now, if it isn't askin' too much, I'll git you to go over them p'ints again. Slow, like! slow, Minister, bearin' in mind that I'm a slow man, and not used to it. This—this lady, she come ...
— Captain January • Laura E. Richards

... With the chain it will bring four-thousand francs. My rings, my wedding-ring. Everything goes into the cash-box, everything. We have a hundred thousand francs to pay this morning. As soon as it is daylight we must go to work, sell out and pay our debts. I know some one who wants the house at Asnieres. That can be ...
— Fromont and Risler, Complete • Alphonse Daudet

... on a padded chair and talk about law and order. By God, no! He went out with a six-gun and made them. No gamer, whiter man ever strapped a forty-four to his hip. He niver talked about what it would cost him to go through for his friends. He just went ...
— The Sheriff's Son • William MacLeod Raine

... affections. I should not fancy that constancy would be one of her strong points; at any rate I do not see that I can do any good by meddling in the matter, though if Dampierre spoke to me about it, I should certainly express my opinion frankly. It is much the best that things should go on between us as they are now doing. He is a hot-headed beggar, and the probabilities are strong in the favor of our having a serious quarrel if the subject were ever broached ...
— A Girl of the Commune • George Alfred Henty

... madness, and with reason. I intend to take as much trouble to make myself beautiful for him every day as other women do for society. My dress in the country, year in, year out, will cost twenty-four thousand francs, and the larger portion of this will not go in day costumes. As for him, he can wear a blouse if he pleases! Don't suppose that I am going to turn our life into an amorous duel and wear myself out in devices for feeding passion; all that I want is to have a conscience free from reproach. Thirteen years still lie before me as a ...
— Letters of Two Brides • Honore de Balzac

... to worry their patients into Catholicism. We know what happens when a hospital is under the charge of nuns, and it can easily be understood that many of these poor people preferred to embrace a crucifix than forego their broth when half dead of exhaustion. Some would go through a mock conversion, others would endure a martyrdom till the last; but the position alike of weak and obstinate was unbearable. Now there is a home, not only for the indigent sick and aged, but for those who can afford ...
— Holidays in Eastern France • Matilda Betham-Edwards

... sight of the 'cellist's advancing figure and rose from her seat. "I must go now," she said, "they want to play it again." She moved a step forward, gave a glance at her side-curls in the oval mirror over the mantel, stopped hesitatingly, and then bending over Mrs. Horn said, thoughtfully, her hand on her companion's shoulder, "Sallie, don't try to make water run uphill. ...
— The Fortunes of Oliver Horn • F. Hopkinson Smith

... Jerusalem, or at any other of the sacred cities of the world. There are more than 500,000 idols established in permanent places for worship in Benares, representing every variety of god in the Hindu pantheon, so that all the pilgrims who go there may find consolation and some object of worship. There are twenty-eight sacred cows at the central temples, and perhaps 500 more at other places of worship throughout the city; the trees around the temple gardens ...
— Modern India • William Eleroy Curtis

... and Mary was left to discuss the prospects of her future life with Mr Whittlestaff. "You had better both of you come and live here," he said. "There would be room enough." Mary thought probably of the chance there might be of newcomers, but she said nothing. "I should go away, of ...
— An Old Man's Love • Anthony Trollope

... migration of a people, either as individuals or in organized groups, may be compared to the swarming of the hive. Peoples migrate in search of better living conditions, or merely in search of new experience. It is usually the younger generation, the more restless, active, and adaptable, who go out from the security of the old home to seek their fortunes in the new. Once settled on the new land, however, immigrants inevitably remember and idealize the home they have left. Their first disposition is to reproduce as far as possible in ...
— Introduction to the Science of Sociology • Robert E. Park

... boat-woman. The clouds which had here gathered among the hills now came over the river, and the rain cleared the deck of its crowd of admiring tourists. As we were approaching Lorelei Berg, I did not go below, and so enjoyed some of the finest scenery on the Rhine alone. The mountains approach each other at this point, and the Lorelei rock rises up for four hundred and forty feet from the water. This is the haunt of the ...
— Seeing Europe with Famous Authors, Volume V (of X) • Various

... he was in any other service, Sir; but as I cannot control him, I must submit, if he insist upon following that profession. He is a gallant, clever boy, and as soon as I can, I will try to procure him a situation in a king's ship. At present he must go to sea in some way or the other, and it were, perhaps, better that he should be in good hands (such as Captain Levee's for instance) on board of a privateer, than mix up with those who might ...
— The Privateer's-Man - One hundred Years Ago • Frederick Marryat

... to go to England. All right, I'll change the course. They want to leave me. I know they do. ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... much pleasure if you will remain on board then," said Harry. Charles Tilston, greatly to my satisfaction, at once accepted the invitation; for I had taken a great fancy to him, and was unwilling also to lose Dick. Harry arranged with him to go on shore to purchase some clothing and other necessaries at the store, in case his own portmanteau should not be recovered. The natives had, in the meantime, been collecting the goods thrown upon the beach from the wrecked ...
— The Cruise of the Dainty - Rovings in the Pacific • William H. G. Kingston

... a shrug. "I don't think so. She is too pale, and proud, and cold, and too far up in the clouds altogether. She ought to go and be a nun; she ...
— Kate Danton, or, Captain Danton's Daughters - A Novel • May Agnes Fleming

... old father Gleim to Wieland, who sat near him. To which the 'Great I of Osmannstadt' replied; 'It is both, for he has the Devil in him to-night; and at such times he is like a wanton colt, that flings out before and behind, and you will do well not to go ...
— Hyperion • Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

... reverenced him, and served him as his teacher. If he went to inquire for and greet him, the king did not presume to sit down alongside of him; and if, in his love and reverence, he took hold of his hand, as soon as he let it go, the Brahman made haste to pour water on it and wash it. He might be more than fifty years old, and all the kingdom looked up to him. By means of this one man, the Law of Buddha was widely made known, and the followers of other doctrines did not find ...
— Record of Buddhistic Kingdoms • Fa-Hien

... of such,—but let them go - They came like truth, and disappeared like dreams; And whatsoe'er they were—are now but so; I could replace them if I would: still teems My mind with many a form which aptly seems Such as I sought for, and at moments found; Let these too go—for waking reason ...
— Childe Harold's Pilgrimage • Lord Byron

... peninsula was preparing a grand struggle for independence, Lord Byron had shown himself ready to make any sacrifice, to aid in throwing off Austrian chains. But, owing to subsequent events, his extreme devotedness could not then go beyond the offer made. Two years later it was accepted; an enslaved nation, eager for redemption, asked Lord Byron's assistance toward regaining its liberty. In this sacrifice on his part, no single feature of greatness is wanting. Lord Byron would ...
— My Recollections of Lord Byron • Teresa Guiccioli

... ice. Thar wa'n't no hope for 'em, for no dory could 'a' lived a moment in that awful gale, and thar wa'n't no lifeboat here. Lissy an' me made haste to build a fire on the pint, to show the poor critturs we had feelin' for 'em, an' then we just stood an' waited an' watched for 'em to go down. It might 'a' been an hour, there's no tellin', when I saw a big bundle tossin' light, an' comin' ashore. I ran over to the cove where I keep my boats, and grabbed a piece o' rope an' boat hook, and made ready. The Lord must 'a' steered that bundle, for it kept workin' along, headin' ...
— Uncle Terry - A Story of the Maine Coast • Charles Clark Munn

... by saying that while we are ready at the college and at the experiment station to go ahead we are not ready to plunge into any extensive experiments. It requires money and the money does not come in such quantities that we can plunge into anything in fact. But we are ready to begin to build a foundation on which we expect later on to experiment, and I hope that in ten more ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Sixth Annual Meeting. Rochester, New York, September 1 and 2, 1915 • Various

... what I meant. And Dame Phyllis appeared to appreciate my ready flow of humor. She informs me Grandfather Satan is of a cold dry temperament, with very little humor in him, so that they go for months without exchanging any pleasantries. Well, I am willing to taste any drink once: and for the rest, remembering that my host had very enormous and intimidating horns, I was at particular ...
— Jurgen - A Comedy of Justice • James Branch Cabell

... feel, and triumphantly she exclaimed, "My goodness, what a country." Then the husband blew his nose with discomfort, and, her attention attracted, his good wife exclaimed, "My dear, you have a cold, let us go to bed," and they went. X., and possibly others, found satisfaction in the thought that people might go to bed after partaking of such a concoction as that couple had done, but that they certainly would not sleep. ...
— From Jungle to Java - The Trivial Impressions of a Short Excursion to Netherlands India • Arthur Keyser

... make neither head nor tail of it. So far as I can see, it is just as tangled a business as ever I handled, and yet at first it seemed so simple that one couldn't go wrong. There's no motive, Mr. Holmes. That's what bothers me—I can't put my hand on a motive. Here's a man dead—there's no denying that—but, so far as I can see, no reason on earth why anyone should wish ...
— The Return of Sherlock Holmes • Arthur Conan Doyle

... an end by the treaty of Limerick (1691), when about ten thousand Irish soldiers who had fought for James, and who no longer cared to remain in their own country after their defeat, were permitted to go to France. "When the wild cry of the women, who stood watching their departure, was hushed, the silence of death settled down upon Ireland. For a hundred years the country remained at peace, but the peace was that of despair."[1] In violation ...
— The Leading Facts of English History • D.H. Montgomery

... so much for them, (though really, we think, 6s. 8d. might have settled his claim,) what, says Fire, setting her arms a-kimbo, would they do for him? Slaughter replies, rather crustily, that, as far as a good kicking would go—or (says Famine) a little matter of tearing to pieces by the mob—they would be glad to take tickets at his benefit. "How, you bitches!" says ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 57, No. 351, January 1845 • Various

... from workin'. It 'ud help you to do more, though Pratt says as it's usin' your voice so constant as does you the most harm. Now, isn't it—I'm no scholard, Mr. Tryan, an' I'm not a-goin' to dictate to you—but isn't it a'most a-killin' o' yourself, to go on a' that way beyond your strength? We mustn't fling ower ...
— Scenes of Clerical Life • George Eliot

... proceeded to subsidize the newspapers themselves, both editors and proprietors. I went to the country through which the road would pass, and called on many of the inhabitants. I visited the priests and made friends of them, and I employed agents to go among the principal people and talk it up. I then began to hold public meetings, and attended to them myself, making frequent speeches in French to them, showing them where their true interests lay ... and I formed a committee to influence the members of the ...
— The Railway Builders - A Chronicle of Overland Highways • Oscar D. Skelton

... children in the house, desperately poor; for the father is dead and has left his family nothing and everything,—nothing that makes life rich, everything in the way of ideals and blessed memories to make life wealthy. The mother works as only a poor woman can from morning till night. The children go to school by day; but instead of playing after school-hours they run errands for the neighbors, drive cows from pasture, shovel snow, pick huckleberries, earn an honest penny. In the evening they read together before the open fire. When they are hungry, as they often are, a Puritan aunt who ...
— Outlines of English and American Literature • William J. Long

... her. "Well, I'll just sit over here." She went to a chair at the back of the room, in a corner on a line with the door. "I won't give any trouble. The minute he begins to—to live I'll go." ...
— The Dust Flower • Basil King

... be wise and dutiful, Phoebe," he said. "Will Blauchard's a plucky fellow to go off and face the world. And perhaps he'll be one of the ...
— Children of the Mist • Eden Phillpotts

... go over to the other side, and the game goes on until one side has won all the children. The sides take it in turns to give the name of the flower. This game may also be ...
— My Book of Indoor Games • Clarence Squareman

... I. "We'll hire a wagon and go on, or—we'll pass the sign which forbids us to proceed, too quickly to see it. Such things happen; and the road's too narrow to turn or even ...
— The Chauffeur and the Chaperon • C. N. Williamson

... Eugene," said Kate, in reproving tones. "Admiration for a saint is not madness. Shall we go in, Claudia, and leave these men to ...
— Father Stafford • Anthony Hope

... the two officials as Shirley continued: "I must go to see Cronin—deserted there like a run-over mongrel on the street. Can I leave this house by the rear, so that none shall know of my assistance in the case, or follow me to the hospital? If you can secure an old hat and ...
— The Voice on the Wire • Eustace Hale Ball

... had no wish to go home. She would rather stay with the knight in the forest than go back to the cottage, for there, so she said, no one would ...
— Undine • Friedrich de la Motte Fouque

... the field I saw my two gentlemen striding over the fallows towards the shepherd, whom they had approached within about two hundred yards. Though I had made up my mind not to interfere with their scheme but go direct to the magistrate, yet, as they were not a quarter of a mile out of my road, I could not resist the inclination I felt to check their progress. I therefore galloped up to them, to demand where they were going over ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 1 • Henry Hunt

... Office forms are available on the Copyright Office Website in fill-in version. Go to http://www.loc.gov/copyright/forms/ and follow the instructions. The fill-in forms allow you to enter information while the form is displayed on the screen by an Adobe Acrobat Reader product. You may then print the completed form ...
— Copyright Basics • Library of Congress. Copyright Office.

... mongrel race—a combination, in varying proportions, of a dark-brown or red race with a white race; the characteristics of the different nations depending upon the proportions in which the dark and light races are mingled, for peculiar mental and moral characteristics go with these complexions. The red-haired people are a distinct variety of the white stock; there were once whole tribes and nations with this color of hair; their blood is now intermingled with all the races of men, from Palestine to Iceland. ...
— The Antediluvian World • Ignatius Donnelly

... ordered the saints to be exposed quite naked on the ice.[1] And in order to tempt them the more powerfully to renounce their faith, a warm bath was prepared at a small distance from the frozen pond, for any of this company to go to, who were disposed to purchase their temporal ease and safety on that condition. The martyrs, on hearing their sentence, ran joyfully to the place, and without waiting to be stripped, undressed themselves, encouraging one another in the same manner as is usual among soldiers in military ...
— The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints - January, February, March • Alban Butler

... their wives, as I hope, move along with them. How one old set must have influenced them a long time ago. Bice, who speaks Mota very well, was very energetic during his fortnight here. He is now gone on with Mr. Brooke and Mr. Atkin that he may see the work in the Solomon Isles. I meant to go; but there seemed to be a special reason why I should stay here just now, vessels seeking labourers for Fiji and Queensland are very frequently ...
— Life of John Coleridge Patteson • Charlotte M. Yonge

... none the worse. At last, by sheer impatience bold, The man a crowbar seizes, His idol breaks in pieces, And finds it richly stuff'd with gold. "How's this? Have I devoutly treated," Says he, "your godship, to be cheated? Now leave my house, and go your way, And search for altars ...
— A Hundred Fables of La Fontaine • Jean de La Fontaine

... call the Universal Principle of Humanity, and having now traced the successive steps by which it is reached from the first cosmic movement of the Spirit in the formation of the primary nebula, we need not go over the old ground again, and may henceforward take this Divine Principle of Humanity as our Normal Standard and make it the starting point for our further evolution. But how are we to do this? Simply by using the one method ...
— The Creative Process in the Individual • Thomas Troward

... if you go on improving, we must have you appointed valentine-manufacturer-general for the town ...
— The Lost Hunter - A Tale of Early Times • John Turvill Adams

... or your vessel is cast away, they will make good allowance for you, knowing that you are a loser as well as they, and that at all times you have thought as much of them as of yourself. Lay this always to heart, lad. It is unlikely that I shall go to sea much more, and ere long you will be in command of the Good Venture. Always think more of the interests of those who trust you ...
— By Pike and Dyke: A Tale of the Rise of the Dutch Republic • G.A. Henty

... he said to himself. "If it is true that in the moment of agony and nearness to death she is genuinely penitent, and I, taking it for a trick, refuse to go? That would not only be cruel, and everyone would blame me, but it would ...
— Anna Karenina • Leo Tolstoy

... God is the death of His Saints." As they have lived for Christ, they gladly welcome the summons that calls them home to rest. Calmly and fearlessly they go down to death; joyously and with feelings of exultation they hail the coming of Him on whom their thoughts have rested throughout life, of Him whom they have ever seen by faith, whom they have loved, whom they have trusted, whom they have chosen for their own. Confident of the power and goodness ...
— The Shepherd Of My Soul • Rev. Charles J. Callan

... go, then, to Kentucky? For 'twas there the man named Audubon once saw them come in flocks to roost at night. They kept coming from sunset till after midnight, and their numbers were so great that their wings, even while still a long way off, made a sound like a gale ...
— Bird Stories • Edith M. Patch

... can 'be composed of the whole militia of all the States.' The militia may be called forth in whole or in part into the Confederate service, but do not thereby become part of the 'armies raised' by Congress. They remain militia, and go home when the emergency which provoked their call has ceased. Armies raised by Congress are of course raised out of the same population as the militia organized by the States, and to deny to Congress the power to draft a citizen into the army, or to receive his voluntary offer of services, ...
— The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government • Jefferson Davis

... refers when he says in the Short Preface to the Large Catechism: "For I well remember the time, indeed, even now it is a daily occurrence that one finds rude old persons who knew nothing and still know nothing of these things, and who, nevertheless, go to Baptism and the Lord's Supper, and use everything belonging to Christians, notwithstanding that those who come to the Lord's Supper ought to know more and have a fuller understanding of all Christian doctrine than children and new scholars." (575, 5.) In his "Admonition ...
— Historical Introductions to the Symbolical Books of the Evangelical Lutheran Church • Friedrich Bente

... made him sit by himself, and said into his princes, Go with him into the midst of the city, and make proclamation, that no man complain against him of any matter, and that no man trouble him ...
— Deuteronomical Books of the Bible - Apocrypha • Anonymous

... The committee was dead. O, friends, this is not irreverence. It is joyful reverence. It is the message to all of us, Go on south to the greater things, and get so enthused and absorbed in our going that ...
— The University of Hard Knocks • Ralph Parlette

... ever was madder in all my life." He walked unsuspectingly into her trap. "I driv' away soon after or I don't know what would have happened. The more I thought about it the madder I got. Once I started to turn round and go back. I would, if I hadn't thought he was such a weak fool. It ain't done with; I can't think about it without wanting to mash something. I reckon me 'n him ...
— Dixie Hart • Will N. Harben

... buffalo, and when their chief took to his lodge, and refused to leave it, they came to ask him why. And they were told. They were for making trouble, but the old chief said the quarrel was his own: he would settle it in his own way. He would not go to the hunt. Konto, he said, should take his place; and when his braves came back there should be great feasting, for then the matter would ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... these disasters Enciso was at a loss what to do, or where to go, when Balboa advised him to continue his course along the ...
— Peter Parley's Tales About America and Australia • Samuel Griswold Goodrich

... feel that you are striving to solace his declining years, and to requite that love which was shed upon you, the earliest moment of your consciousness. Can you do less for him, now that desire fails and the grasshopper has become a burden and he must soon go to his long home? Of ...
— The Young Maiden • A. B. (Artemas Bowers) Muzzey

... being discharged, seriously, because he is a Freeholder. It's a qualification easily attained: a single house at Wapping would ship a first-rate man-of-war. If a Freeholder is exempt, eo nomine, it will be impossible to go on with the pressing service. [Footnote: It would have been equally impossible to go on with the naval service had the fleet contained many freeholders like John Barnes. Granted leave of absence from ...
— The Press-Gang Afloat and Ashore • John R. Hutchinson

... that I should have a fainting fit in the street. Poor Jamie would not let my hand go when they carried me into a shop. When I came to myself I saw his dear, frightened little face looking up at me. He is not yet four years old—and I am getting ...
— A Vanished Hand • Sarah Doudney

... a certain class of radical thinkers in Russia, whose theory of society, like that of the eighteenth-century philosophers in France, was based upon a negation of the principle of authority. All institutions, social and political, however disguised, were tyrannies, and must go. In the newly awakened Russian mind, this first assumed the mild form of a demand for the removal of legislative tyranny, by a system of gradual reforms. This had failed—now the demand had become a mandate. ...
— A Short History of Russia • Mary Platt Parmele

... "Go on with the trial. We will see that the court is sustained," and a man stepped out from the surrounding cordon ...
— The Cave of Gold - A Tale of California in '49 • Everett McNeil

... received this announcement with an expression of great feeling, and after a moment's silence said: "There is nothing left but to go to General Grant, and I would rather die ...
— A Life of Gen. Robert E. Lee • John Esten Cooke

... lion still nearer to them; and, by the imperfect light of the stars, they could now distinguish the beast at about one hundred yards' distance. Omrah put the bridles of their two horses in their hands, and motioned them to go on in the direction opposite to where the lion was. They did so without reflection; mechanically obeying the directions of the man-child; and not perceiving that Omrah did not follow them. They had advanced about one ...
— The Mission; or Scenes in Africa • Captain Frederick Marryat

... are to go, we may as well go by enthusiasm as by calculation; it is a sensation pleasanter to the nerves, and leads to just as good a result when there is only ...
— The Hand of Ethelberta • Thomas Hardy

... about that," said Sir Timothy. "If you've said it to me once, you've said it a dozen times, and last year I did alter my docks. But this year—hang it all! They're sticking another twenty-five minutes on it. If they go on at this rate, moving us back an extra half hour every May, we'll be living in the middle of the night ...
— Our Casualty And Other Stories - 1918 • James Owen Hannay, AKA George A. Birmingham

... to be a very cheap funeral," said the same speaker; "for, upon my life, I don't know of anybody to go to it. Suppose we make up a ...
— A Christmas Carol • Charles Dickens

... Pompadour at Versailles, where he would pass the whole of his time absorbed in schemes of political economy. Quesnai, however, did not want for friends, as he could boast of the esteem of all the most illustrious philosophers of the day. For those persons who did not go to court would come once a month to dine with the court physician. Marmontel, in his Memoirs, relates that he has dined there in company with Diderot, D'Alembert, Duclos, Helvetius, Turgot, and Buffon,—a goodly array of intellect. Thus on the ground floor ...
— International Miscellany of Literature, Art and Science, Vol. 1, - No. 3, Oct. 1, 1850 • Various

... to the Mount to-day, to pay my respects to Mr. Wordsworth on his birthday. I found him and dear Mrs. Wordsworth very happy, in the arrival of their four grandsons. The two elder are to go to Rossall next week. Some talk concerning schools led Mr. Wordsworth into a discourse, which, in relation to himself, I thought very interesting, on the dangers of emulation, as used in the way of help to school progress. Mr. Wordsworth thinks that ...
— The Prose Works of William Wordsworth • William Wordsworth

... protest from Frank. "I don't exactly know the way," she said, "but now that we've lost the rudder there's nothing very much can happen to us. We can keep the centreboard up as we're running, and if we do go on a rock, the tide will lift us off again. It's rising now. Besides, it saves us miles to go this way, and it really won't do for you to ...
— Priscilla's Spies 1912 • George A. Birmingham

... my side, Thy father's first-born, and his shame; Unstable as the rolling tide, A blight has fall'n upon thy name. Decay shall follow thee and thine. Go, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 55, No. 340, February, 1844 • Various

... Co., which were not always trips of comfort or of pleasure, were things of the past. In place of the crack of the whip and the rumble of the coach were heard the whistle and snorting of the engine. We were now within civilisation, so far as convenience might go, but whether we were morally and socially better or worse is a very open question. The great distances, the open plains, and the loneliness and monotony which is generally characteristic of the western country, even in these days of comparative closer settlement, ...
— Reminiscences of Queensland - 1862-1869 • William Henry Corfield

... shall I regret That I return'd ere I had slain in fight 125 Achilles, or that, by Achilles slain, I died not nobly in defence of Troy. But shall I thus? Lay down my bossy shield, Put off my helmet, and my spear recline Against the city wall, then go myself 130 To meet the brave Achilles, and at once Promise him Helen, for whose sake we strive With all the wealth that Paris in his fleet Brought home, to be restored to Atreus' sons, And to distribute to the Greeks at large 135 All hidden treasures of the town, ...
— The Iliad of Homer - Translated into English Blank Verse • Homer

... fancy that way, if Mr Clare says yes. That's my business here this fine Saturday. Yes, Mr Clare? Thank you! the youngsters are mad for a trip under canvas. You will go with us, sir, I hope? Thank you again!—Scamper, boys, for your caps! Ha! ha! ha!—With your permission, Mr Clare, I will fill my pipe.—Juno! Juno! Ah! there you are. Do, like a good old woman, get me a coal out of your wood-fire— ...
— Captain Mugford - Our Salt and Fresh Water Tutors • W.H.G. Kingston



Words linked to "Go" :   plunk, leave, tick, thud, drive, joint, draw back, be adrift, double, drag out, buy it, snarl, come, descend, swosh, lift, cease, prance, beat, ping, circle, settle, whiz, ticktock, pass by, blow, pop, wheel, sing, clang, bounce, pitter-patter, embark, swoosh, shove along, flock, shuttle, search, buzz, whizz, caravan, squelch, rise, cast, round, toot, get off the ground, change, be born, attempt, move back, trail, beetle, belt along, shack, drift, vibrate, bombilate, clink, rush, move around, act, wing, choose, castle, reverberate, automobile, betake oneself, venture, billow, hurtle, get out, bubble, Nihon, tap, noise, precess, ascend, abort, whish, retire, crash, race, drag on, push, cash in one's chips, drag, clump, boom out, hotfoot, recede, fall, weave, ramble, get along, stalemate, outflank, steamroller, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, get around, hie, crank, pelt along, pull away, move on, splat, ring, motor, circuit, pursue, snap, career, come about, wind, blare, asphyxiate, zip, ghost, fare, shift, retreat, travel by, sit, spirt, vanish, swish, be, take, thump, ticktack, move up, stand up, come down, do, rove, function, happen, hiss, compare, slush, accompany, swim, seek, swan, suffocate, trundle, swing, hurry, beep, steam, sober up, duty period, misfunction, circulate, steamer, propagate, sentry go, sober, bleep, uprise, ferry, ting, manoeuvre, cruise, slither, pull back, walk, thrum, resonate, overfly, cause to be perceived, burn out, follow, whine, finish, ray, a-okay, forge, speed, consort, roll, travel rapidly, honk, travel along, slide, take off, end, birr, starve, step on it, live out, yield, bombinate, pass over, no-go, draw, lance, shove off, blow out, glide, island hop, manoeuver, angle, harmonize, wend, wander, creep, stifle, claxon, Nippon, stop, guggle, chink, return, rattle, spurt, roam, accord, splash, step, steamroll, purr, zoom, displace, tramp, come up, pan, whirr, plough, ease, tink, march on, journey, pink, sift, bang, drown, take effect, famish, fall out, misfire, try, disappear, radiate, rumble, glug, precede, transfer, rap, go-between, cut, trump, whisk, swap, back, continue, malfunction, effort, arise, whoosh, taxi, make out, derail, pass off, agree, ripple, clop, spread, lap, float, tessellate, repair, burble, jump, terminate, concord, board game, exist, progress, tram, patter, work shift, stray, take place, fly, perennate, maneuver, come on, gurgle, change state, echo, get about, din, withdraw, peal, pick out, die, boom, drone, vagabond, raft, retrograde, pip out, drum, grumble, tinkle, subsist, check, snowshoe, pace, click, harmonise, clunk, range, slice into, select, skirl, ride, hap, advance, MDMA, hold water, knock, endeavour, jounce, bluff out, tread, let go, service, breeze, ski, travel purposefully, pass on, hasten, resort, bluff, hum, make noise, open, twirp, japan, swash, ruff, make a motion, play, predecease, endeavor, take the air, occur, scramble, slice through, surpass, rush along, slosh, fit in, chatter, serve, tweet, a-ok, rustle, carry, resound, get-go, cannonball along, meander, whir, lurch, chime, crawl, stay in place, thread, twang, babble, succumb, plow, splosh, clank, whistle, zigzag, chug, err, bucket along



Copyright © 2019 Free-Translator.com