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Ga   /gɑ/  /dʒˈiˈeɪ/  /dʒˈɔrdʒə/   Listen
Ga

noun
1.
The first known nerve agent, synthesized by German chemists in 1936; a highly toxic combustible liquid that is soluble in organic solvents and is used as a nerve gas in chemical warfare.  Synonym: tabun.
2.
A rare silvery (usually trivalent) metallic element; brittle at low temperatures but liquid above room temperature; occurs in trace amounts in bauxite and zinc ores.  Synonyms: atomic number 31, gallium.
3.
A state in southeastern United States; one of the Confederate states during the American Civil War.  Synonyms: Empire State of the South, Georgia, Peach State.






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"Ga" Quotes from Famous Books



... "Ah, ga-am!" said the youth, whose head scarcely reached to Folly's waist. "Course you won't give me no ...
— Through stained glass • George Agnew Chamberlain

... to our readers four pictures giving different views of the Ballard Normal School at Macon, Ga., and add here a description ...
— The American Missionary, Vol. 44, No. 5, May 1890 • Various

... Written for KAH-GE-GA-GAI-BOWH, a representative from the Northwest Tribes of American Indians to the Peace Convention in Frankfort-on-the- Maine, Germany; and recited by him on board the British steamship Niagara, at the hour of sailing from Boston, ...
— Town and Country, or, Life at Home and Abroad • John S. Adams

... call your attention to an earthenware burial-urn and cover, Nos. 27976 and 27977, National Museum, but very recently received from Mr. William McKinley, of Milledgeville, Ga. It was exhumed on his plantation, ten miles below that city, on the bottom lands of the Oconee River, now covered with almost impassable canebrakes, tall grasses, and briers. We had a few months ago from the same source one of the covers, ...
— An introduction to the mortuary customs of the North American Indians • H. C. Yarrow

... long form: Republic of The Gambia conventional short form: The Gambia Digraph: GA Type: republic under multiparty democratic rule Capital: Banjul Administrative divisions: 5 divisions and 1 city*; Banjul*, Lower River, MacCarthy Island, North Bank,, Upper River, Western Independence: 18 February 1965 (from UK; The Gambia and Senegal signed an agreement on 12 December 1981 that ...
— The 1993 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... crumbling to dust, but still gave out a faint perfume, which Eloise detected. While she was looking at these mementos of a past, Jack was running his eyes over the almost illegible directions on the letters, making out "Miss Lucy Brown, Atlanta, Ga." ...
— The Cromptons • Mary J. Holmes

... he said to himself, when he found he was stepping gingerly, "I ga'e my feet a turn at the auld accomplishment. It's a pity to grow nae so fit for onything suner nor ye need. I wad like to lie doon ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... the forest, then, waking in the dark, went farther and farther astray. The treatment of the slaves witnessed by my men certainly did not raise slaveholders in their estimation. Their usual exclamation was "Ga ba na pelu" (They have no heart); and they added, with reference to the slaves, "Why do they let them?" as if they thought that the slaves had the natural right to rid the world of such heartless creatures, and ought ...
— Missionary Travels and Researches in South Africa - Journeys and Researches in South Africa • David Livingstone

... down the broken hill-side in spring, when like the Bacchanals, all who can, wander out of the town to enjoy the earliest heats. "Let us go out into the fields," we say; a strange madness seems to lurk among the flowers, ready to lay hold on us also; autika ga pasa choreusei—soon the whole ...
— Greek Studies: A Series of Essays • Walter Horatio Pater

... for the dance!" Waddles bellowed from the makeshift platform at one end of the room. "Go get your ga-a-als!" ...
— The Settling of the Sage • Hal G. Evarts

... and hard as the gnarled branches of a tree, began whipping her. Sasha cried with pain and terror, while the gander, waddling and stretching his neck, went up to the old woman and hissed at her, and when he went back to his flock all the geese greeted him approvingly with "Ga-ga-ga!" Then Granny proceeded to whip Motka, and in this Motka's smock was torn again. Feeling in despair, and crying loudly, Sasha went to the hut to complain. Motka followed her; she, too, was crying on a deeper note, without wiping ...
— The Witch and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... stands an order of ascetics, originally Nirgrantha "they, who are freed from all bands," now usually called Yatis—"Ascetics", or Sadhus—"Holy", which, among the ['S]vetambara also admits women, [Footnote: Even the canonical works of the ['S]vetambara, as for example, the Achara[.n]ga (Sacred Books of the East, Vol. XXII, p. 88-186) contain directions for nuns. It seems, however, that they have never played such an important part as in Buddhism. At the present time, the few female orders among the ['S]vetambara consist entirely of virgin widows, whose husbands ...
— On the Indian Sect of the Jainas • Johann George Buehler

... Confederate Trans-Mississippi Army, May 26, the war was at an end. The Confederate Government had fled from Richmond when Lee withdrew his army, and on May 10, Jefferson Davis was captured near Irwinsville, Ga., and sent as ...
— The Land We Live In - The Story of Our Country • Henry Mann

... not require all the whisky there is in it'; and he unfolded his plan. It was to gain possession of Slavin's saloon and the bar of the Black Rock Hotel, and clear out all the liquor to be found in both these places. I did not much like the idea; and Geordie said, 'I'm ga'en aifter the lad; I'll hae naethin' tae dae wi' yon. It's' no' that easy, ...
— Black Rock • Ralph Connor

... Dharmamitra in A.D. 424-441. Furthermore, Mahayana books closely related to the doctrine of Zen were not unknown to China before Bodhidharma. Pratyutpanna-buddhasammukhavasthita-samadhi was translated by K' Leu Cia Chan (Shi-ru-ga-sen) in A.D. 164-186; Vimalakirttinirdeca-sutra, which is much used in Zen, by Kumarajiva in A.D. 384-412; Lankavatara-sutra, which is said to have been pointed out by Bodhidharma as the best explanation of Zen, by Gunabhadra in A.D. 433; Saddharma-pundarika-sutra, in its ...
— The Religion of the Samurai • Kaiten Nukariya

... Ga-oh is the Spirit of the Winds. He moves the winds, but he is chained to a rock. The winds trouble him, and he tries very hard to get free. When he struggles the winds are forced away from him, and they blow upon the earth. Sometimes he suffers terrible pain, and then ...
— The Algonquin Legends of New England • Charles Godfrey Leland

... unpunischeit, sall one day declair; and unto him we feir nott to committ oure cause. Nether yitt feir we in this presentt to say, that against us sche makis ane maist maliciouse ley. [SN: THE LEY TO THE QUENE REGENT.] Quhair that sche sayis, that it is na religioun that we ga about, bot ane plane usurpatioun of the Authoritie, God forbid that sick impietie sould enter into oure hartis, that we sould mak his holie religioun ane cloik and covertour of oure iniquitie. Frome the begynning of this contraversie, it is evidentlie knawin ...
— The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6) • John Knox

... service again; beautiful moon; glorious singing; "Ik ga heen om u plaats te bereiden" (I go to prepare a place for you); told about Lenie's deathbed; she is now in the mansion ...
— Woman's Endurance • A.D.L.

... Hamilton, When she rade on the brown, That she was ga'en to Edinburgh town, And a' to be ...
— A Collection of Ballads • Andrew Lang

... of the girls I met whose fathers are mayors of towns. I've got forty-seven for Providence, R.I., fifteen for Peoria, Ill., ten for Atlanta, Ga., and your two makes seven for Emporia. I've got fifty-three for chief of police, twenty-one fire captains, and ...
— The Sorrows of a Show Girl • Kenneth McGaffey

... of Chattanooga, Tenn., who achieved quite a reputation as manager of Lulu Hurst, the young lady who possessed such marvellous magnetic powers, was married to that lady a few days ago at her home near Cedartown, Ga. Miss Hurst, since her wonderful power deserted her, has been attending school, and graduated in December last. It is reported that the fortune of $200,000 she amassed while on the stage has been trebled since by ...
— Buchanan's Journal of Man, June 1887 - Volume 1, Number 5 • Various

... je vous donne ma parole d'honneur la plus sacree, que c'est vrai. Ils ne sont pas d'autres, ces terribles Ga'gans. You must know that Monsieur gained the battle of Delhi as certainly as I did that of Austerlitz. In this way:—Ce belitre de Lor Lake, after calling up his cavalry, and placing them in front of Holkar's batteries, qui balayaient la plaine, ...
— Burlesques • William Makepeace Thackeray

... and this felicitous analogy will, we feel sure, be triumphantly vindicated by the contents of this epoch-making work, which by the way is dedicated to Dr. Emery Cawker, of the University of Brashville, Ga. ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, September 2nd, 1914 • Various

... spirit of nature. His inspired madness was the presence of the god who descended upon him,—the god of the vine, of spring; the rising sap, the rushing stream, the bursting leaf, the rippling song, all the life of flowing things, they were he! "Autika ga pasa zoreusei," was the cry,—"soon the whole earth ...
— The Psychology of Beauty • Ethel D. Puffer

... old Mrs. Fairfield, but the way at that moment she tossed the boy up and said "a-goos-a-goos-a-ga!" to him meant that she felt the same. The little girls ran into the paddock like chickens let ...
— The Garden Party • Katherine Mansfield

... twa best herds in a' the wast, [pastors, west] That e'er ga'e gospel horn a blast [gave] These five an' twenty simmers past— Oh, dool to tell! [sorrow] Hae had a bitter black out-cast ...
— Robert Burns - How To Know Him • William Allan Neilson

... sold his house and lots in Charlotte, and moved with his family to Wilkes county, Ga. Here he is represented, by those who knew him, as being a "model farmer," with barns well filled, and surrounded with all the evidences of great industry, order and abundance. Here, too, he was blest in enjoying for many ...
— Sketches of Western North Carolina, Historical and Biographical • C. L. Hunter

... Macon (Ga.) court the other day a lawyer was cross-examining a negro witness, and was getting along fairly well until he asked the witness what his occupation was. "I'se a carpenter, sah." "What kind of a carpenter?" "They calls me a jackleg carpenter, sah." "What is a jackleg carpenter?" "He is ...
— Toasts - and Forms of Public Address for Those Who Wish to Say - the Right Thing in the Right Way • William Pittenger

... I stammers, and with that he climbs me. Dave, I was weak with shame and surprise, and all I could do was hold him off. Sure enough, the man I'd pinched was a long, ga'nt woman with a little black mustache, and here ...
— Heart of the Sunset • Rex Beach

... between ourselves and them. And if we appear to care nothing for the things of this world, they conclude we are rich, and when they beg, our refusal is ascribed to niggardliness, and our property, too, is wantonly destroyed. 'Ga ba tloke'they are not in need, is the phrase employed when our goods are allowed to go to destruction by the neglect of servants.... In coming among savage people, we ought to make them feel we ...
— The Personal Life Of David Livingstone • William Garden Blaikie

... that it is compatible with the most fraternal regard to the good of the servants whom God has committed to our charge."—Within the last few months, as we learn from a late No. of the Charleston Courier, the late Synod of the Presbyterian Church, in Augusta, (Ga.) passed resolutions declaring "That slavery is a CIVIL INSTITUTION, with which the General Assembly [the highest ecclesiastical tribunal] ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... they said to her again, "Well, Cap o' Rushes, you should ha' been there to see the lady. There she was again, gay and ga', and the young master he never took his eyes ...
— English Fairy Tales • Joseph Jacobs (coll. & ed.)

... gat the lights, on cam the mist Ladies nor mannie mair could see, I turned about, and ga'e a look Just ...
— A Bundle of Ballads • Various

... stiddie; as da, la, pa; and behind, be stryking the hammer on the stiddie; as ad, al, ap. And quhen the hammer and the stiddie are ane, the difference is in the hardnes and softnes of the tuich; as may be seen in ca and ga, ta and da. But w and y maekes sae soft a mynt that it is hard to perceave, and therfoer did the latines symboliz them with the symbol of the vouales. They are never used but befoer the voual; as we, ye, wil, you; ...
— Of the Orthographie and Congruitie of the Britan Tongue - A Treates, noe shorter than necessarie, for the Schooles • Alexander Hume

... given as well as their ideographic representation. Thus the Babylonian rispu and di kate are stated to be the equivalents not only of the ideographic gaz-gaz, but also of the phonetically written ga-az-ga-az. This confirms the Page 110 views of Professors Sayce and Oppert, expressed long ago, as to the comparatively late date at which Accado-Sumerian ceased to be a ...
— The American Journal of Archaeology, 1893-1 • Various

... at Crete (now known as Can'di-a) where they remained a considerable time and built a city which AEneas called Per'ga-mus, the name of the famous citadel or fort of Troy. But here a new misfortune came upon the exiles in the shape of a plague, which threatened destruction to man and beast and the fruits ...
— Story of Aeneas • Michael Clarke

... Missionary Association, the ordained agency of the Congregational Churches for this work, could do much more of it if the means were forthcoming. The marked success of the domestic training in our schools at Tougaloo, Miss., Talladega, Ala., Thomasville, Ga., Memphis, Tenn., and other points, shows the advantage gained in the twenty-five years' experience which the A.M.A. has had in its work ...
— The American Missionary, Vol. XLII. April, 1888. No. 4. • Various

... of the hero is invariably written in the Assyrian version, the form which was at first read dIz-tu-bar or dGish-du-bar by scholars, until Pinches found in a neo-Babylonian syllabary [45] the equation of it with Gi-il-ga-mesh? Pinches' discovery pointed conclusively to the popular pronunciation of the hero's name as Gilgamesh; and since Aelian (De natura Animalium XII, 2) mentions a Babylonian personage Gilgamos (though what he tells us of Gilgamos does ...
— An Old Babylonian Version of the Gilgamesh Epic • Anonymous

... sad year—all the cattle are dead, the Nile is now as low as it was last July, and the song of the men watering with the shadoofs sounds sadly true as they chant Ana ga-ahn, etc. 'I am hungry, I am hungry for a piece of dourrah bread,' sings one, and the other chimes in, Meskeen, meskeen 'Poor man, poor man,' or else they sing a song about Seyyidna Iyoob 'Our master Job' and his patience. ...
— Letters from Egypt • Lucie Duff Gordon

... her pathway, began to roar at her. "I ain' ga no money!" he shouted, in a dismal voice. He lurched on up the street, wailing to himself: "I ain' ga no money. Ba' luck. Ain' ...
— Maggie: A Girl of the Streets • Stephen Crane

... are not repelled, a charm all its own. I know of no other poem in the language which is at once so wearisome and so seductive. How can one explain paradoxes? There is a charm, or there is none: that is what it amounts to, for each individual. Tutti ga, i so gusti, e mi go i mii—"everybody follows his taste, and I follow mine," as the Venetian saying, quoted by Browning at the head of his Rawdon Brown sonnet, ...
— Life of Robert Browning • William Sharp

... high up the Mogollons A prospect man did swear That moon dreams melted down his bones And hoisted up his hair: A ribby cow-hawse thundered by, A lion trailed along, A rider, ga'nt, but chin on high, Yelled out ...
— Songs of the Cattle Trail and Cow Camp • Various

... has charming natural impulses. See how she tosses her dimpled arms. She looks longingly at her mother. She has a language of her own. She says, "goo, goo," and "ga, ga." ...
— The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Tales • Bret Harte

... us that it seems desirable briefly to recount the chief incidents of his life. This task is much lightened by Dr. Wm. Hayes Ward's 'Memorial',* upon which, as stated in the Preface, is based this section of my essay. Born at Macon, Ga., February 3, 1842, Sidney Lanier came of a family noted for their love and cultivation of the fine arts. From the time of Queen Elizabeth to the Restoration, several of his paternal ancestors were connected with the English court ...
— Select Poems of Sidney Lanier • Sidney Lanier

... prisoner in a battle near Chattanooga. Attempting to escape she was shot through one of her limbs. The rebels in searching her person for papers, discovered her sex. They respected her as a woman, giving her a separate room while she was in prison at Atlanta, Ga. During her captivity, Jeff. Davis wrote her a letter, offering her a lieutenant's commission if she would enlist in the rebel army, but she preferred to fight as a private soldier for the stars and stripes, rather than accept a commission from the rebels. ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... remember his refined, gentlemanly appearance, and how profoundly sorry I felt for him. He was young, lithely built, of sandy complexion, and wore a comparatively new uniform of Confederate gray, on which was embroidered the insignia of the "5th Ga.,[B] C. S. A." He said, "You have killed all my brave boys; they are there in the road." And they were, I saw them next day lying four deep in places as they fell, a most awful picture of battle carnage. This lull was of very short duration, and like the lull of a storm presaged a renewal of ...
— War from the Inside • Frederick L. (Frederick Lyman) Hitchcock

... line from Philadelphia to Pittsburgh, and soon after extended the railway portion to cover the whole. A traveller from Boston to the West could get to Rochester by rail in 1841. Next year he could go on to Buffalo by the same means. In 1842, Augusta, Ga., was connected by rail with Atlanta, Savannah with Macon, and the Boston & Maine Railway ...
— History of the United States, Volume 3 (of 6) • E. Benjamin Andrews

... On-on-da-ga was the name of an Indian chief, who died about the year 1830, near Elbridge, a town lying north of Auburn, in the State of New York. This Indian belonged to the Onondagas, one of the tribes called "the Six Nations of the IROQUOIS" (E-ro-kwa), a confederacy ...
— Three Years on the Plains - Observations of Indians, 1867-1870 • Edmund B. Tuttle

... the terrible state of immorality which exists there, involving white men and colored women, is something upon which the papers of that region are silent as a rule. Not so the grand jury that met recently at Madison, Ga., which thus spoke out in its presentment with all plainness of ...
— Black and White - Land, Labor, and Politics in the South • Timothy Thomas Fortune

... the State of New York (Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, Senecas, and Tuscaroras), in 1830, it passed into the hands of his nephew the Seneca chief So-sa-wa (Corpulent man), James Johnson. It now belongs to James Johnson's grand-nephew, Do-ne-ho-ga-wa (Open door), General Ely S. Parker, who served during the Civil War on the staff of General U.S. Grant. He was afterward for some time commissioner of Indian Affairs, and is now living in the city of New York. It is owing to the politeness of ...
— The Medallic History of the United States of America 1776-1876 • J. F. Loubat

... Disco, with enthusiasm; "why, man alive, you'd make yer fortin' as a harpooner if ye was to go to the whale-fishin'.— Hallo! there's somethin' else; w'y, the place is swarmin'. It's for all the world like a zoological ga'rdings let loose." ...
— Black Ivory • R.M. Ballantyne

... REVIVAL.—Rev. Mr. Wharton, writes from Atlanta, Ga.: "The Lord has graciously blessed His work here, and the Gospel is still the power of God unto salvation. I have held services at Storrs School, Atlanta University, and the First Congregational ...
— The American Missionary - Volume 50, No. 4, April 1896 • Various

... Southern gentlemen form these left-handed connections, and rear two sets of differently colored children; but it is not often that the two families occupy the same domicil. The only other case within my personal knowledge was that of the well-known President of the Bank of St. M——, at Columbus, Ga. That gentleman, whose note ranked in Wall Street, when the writer was acquainted with that locality, as "A No. 1," lived for fifteen years with two "wives" under one roof. One, an accomplished white woman, and the mother of several children—did the honors of his table, ...
— Among the Pines - or, South in Secession Time • James R. Gilmore

... brain, though intelligent, was not mathematical, and computation was beyond her. She never got farther than "last Michaelmas," "the Michaelmas before that," and "the Michaelmas before the Michaelmas before that." After this her head, which was small, became confused, and she said, "Ga, ga!" and changed ...
— Jackanapes, Daddy Darwin's Dovecot and Other Stories • Juliana Horatio Ewing

... the 30th of July, the bill being before the Senate, a resolution offered by Senator BRADBURY, of Maine, was pending, authorizing the appointment of Commissioners by the United States and Texas, for the adjustment of the boundary line between Texas and New Mexico. To this Mr. DAWSON, of Ga., offered an amendment, providing that until the boundary should have been agreed to, no territorial government should go into operation east of the Rio Grande, nor should any state government be established to include that ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 1, No. 4, September, 1850 • Various

... in English. "What's the big idea? You've got the old girl ga-ga. Trying to vamp her into letting us ...
— The Copper-Clad World • Harl Vincent

... to 1752, when Georgia surrendered her charter and became a Royal Colony, the holding of slaves within its limits was expressly prohibited by law; and the Darien (Ga.) resolutions of 1775 declared not only a "disapprobation and abhorrence of the unnatural practice of Slavery in America" as "a practice founded in injustice and cruelty, and highly dangerous to our ...
— The Great Conspiracy, Complete • John Alexander Logan

... themselves Ho-tcan'-ga-ra', "First or parent speech." While they have gentes, they have no camping circle, as their priscan habitat was in a forest region. The following names were obtained from James Alexander, a full-blood of the Wolf gens, and from ...
— Siouan Sociology • James Owen Dorsey

... keeping my hands in the flour by taking the top from a small tin lard can and placing it on top of the flour with its sharp edges down. When the sieve is shaken, the can top will round up the flour and press it through quickly. —Contributed by L. Alberta Norrell, Augusta, Ga. ...
— The Boy Mechanic: Volume 1 - 700 Things For Boys To Do • Popular Mechanics

... and that it was a fort on the sea coast. He said that the guard had told him that we were to be taken to a point near that place, and we agreed that it was probably a new place of exchange. A little later we passed through the town of Macon, Ga, and turned upon a road that led ...
— Andersonville, complete • John McElroy

... of the class has been in the school from its organization. In the class history she gave quite a vivid description of those trying days when the building at Quitman, Ga., where the school was first gathered, was burned to the ground, as the result of hostile feeling on the part of the citizens of the place. Certainly there has been progress toward a just appreciation of the work of the American Missionary Association in the communities where its work has been ...
— American Missionary, Volume 50, No. 8, August, 1896 • Various

... in some of the villages, and seen in a cocoa-nut-leaf basket. It is said that during a battle between the gods of Samoa and those of Tonga the former crouched about the trunks of the cocoa-nut trees; but Ga'e fefe hid in a cocoa-nut-leaf basket, and escaped while many others were killed. Hence the basket became a sign of the god, and no one would step over such a thing, supposing the god might be in it. Hence, also, if ...
— Samoa, A Hundred Years Ago And Long Before • George Turner

... had fine horses, which he kept for racing, and he owned two very noted ones, named Capt. Miner and Inspector. Perhaps some of my readers have already heard of Capt. Miner, for he was widely known, having won many races in Charlestown and Columbia, S.C., also in Augusta, Ga., and New York. He was a dark bay, with short tail. Inspector was a chestnut sorrel, and had the reputation of being a very great horse. These two horses have won many thousand dollars for the the colonel. I rode these two horses a great many times in their practice ...
— My Life In The South • Jacob Stroyer

... kage, ichi-ga no nagare, tasho no en. Even [the experience of] a single shadow or a single flowing of water, is [made by] the karma-relations of a ...
— In Ghostly Japan • Lafcadio Hearn

... time that Robert Toombs was fitted out for Franklin College—now the State University—located in Athens, Ga., forty miles from Washington. ...
— Robert Toombs - Statesman, Speaker, Soldier, Sage • Pleasant A. Stovall

... his home at Pall Mall he reported to the local recruiting station at Jamestown, the county seat. He was sent to Camp Gordon near Atlanta, Ga., and reached there the night of November 16, 1917. ...
— Sergeant York And His People • Sam Cowan

... you—as they say in Clapham. I've come 'ight down he' fo' good. I've taken a little house—oh! a sweet little house that will be all over 'oses next month. I'm living f'om 'oom to 'oom and having the othas done up. It's in that little quiet st'eet behind you' ga'den wall. And he' ...
— Soul of a Bishop • H. G. Wells

... as we were about to ride away and looked over the sweaty horses. "Sakes alive," she said, "you little whelps ride like Jehu. You'll git them horses ga'nted before you know it." ...
— Dwellers in the Hills • Melville Davisson Post

... probably," said Jeanne's father, putting on his spectacles as he took the letter from his wife, "a pet—gu—ga—and then comes another word beginning with 'p.' It almost looks like 'pig,' but it could not be a pet pig. No, I cannot read it either; we must wait to ...
— The Tapestry Room - A Child's Romance • Mrs. Molesworth

... don't see no use, Ner no reason ner excuse Fer his pore relations to Hang round like they allus do! Thare 'bout onc't a year—and SHE— She jest GA'NTS 'em, folks tells me, On spiced pears!—Pass Mylo one, He says "No, he don't chuse none!" Workin'men like Mylo they 'D ort to have ...
— Riley Farm-Rhymes • James Whitcomb Riley

... the Liberty left New York with J. P., his youngest son, Herbert, and the usual staff. We headed south, with nothing settled as to our plans except that we might spend some time at Mr. Pulitzer's house on Jekyll Island, Ga., and might pass part of the winter cruising in the ...
— An Adventure With A Genius • Alleyne Ireland

... order from the king, you would not put Mr. J. to death. What crime has he committed to deserve such additional punishment? The old man's hard heart was melted, for he wept like a child. 'I pity you, Tsa-yar-ga-dau, (a name by which he always called me) I knew you would make me feel; I therefore forbade your application. But you must believe me when I say, I do not wish to increase the sufferings of the ...
— Fox's Book of Martyrs - Or A History of the Lives, Sufferings, and Triumphant - Deaths of the Primitive Protestant Martyrs • John Fox

... Credit Household Superstitions Opera Lions Women and Wives The Italian Opera Lampoons True and False Humour Sa Ga Yean Qua Rash Tow's Impressions of London The Vision of Marraton Six Papers on Wit Friendship Chevy-Chase (Two Papers) A Dream of the Painters Spare Time (Two Papers) Censure The English Language The Vision of Mirza Genius Theodosius and Constantia Good Nature ...
— Essays and Tales • Joseph Addison

... Wyandot tribes, are so friendly that he has felt safe to remain with his family unguarded in his own home. They have always called him Shaw-nee-aw-kee, the Silver-man, and trust him as much as he trusts them. He is, besides, a great friend of Sau-ga-nash, the half-breed Wyandot; and that friendship is a great protection. His house is across the river, a little to the east of the Fort; it can easily be seen from the summit of the stockade. But we have had no direct communication for several ...
— When Wilderness Was King - A Tale of the Illinois Country • Randall Parrish

... Koshi ga nuk['e]ru (to have one's loins taken out) means to be unable to stand up by reason of fear. The suggestion is that while the captain was trying to knock out the bottom of a dipper, before giving it to the ghost, he ...
— The Romance of the Milky Way - And Other Studies & Stories • Lafcadio Hearn

... Hawkins, Pickens, Martin, and McIntosh, to the President of the Continental Congress, Dec. 2, 1785. (Given in Senate documents, 33d Congress, 2d session, Boundary between Ga. and Fla.) They give 14,200 "gun-men," and say that "at a moderate calculation" there are four times as many old men, women, and children, as there are gun-men. The estimates of the numbers are ...
— The Winning of the West, Volume One - From the Alleghanies to the Mississippi, 1769-1776 • Theodore Roosevelt

... Klook. Black Liz is our hen. She lays eggs for us. When she lays her egg she is so glad. Gara. Klook Klook Klook. Then comes good uncle Leo. He puts his hand under black Liz and takes her fresh egg. Ga ga ga ga ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... to the Secretary of War for permission for Messrs. Frank and Gernot, a Jew firm of Augusta, Ga., to bring through the lines a stock of goods they have just purchased of the Yankees in Memphis. Being a member of Congress, I think his request will be granted. And if all such applications be granted, I think money-making will soon absorb the war, and bring down the prices ...
— A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital • John Beauchamp Jones

... is still in the first stage of faith. (aloud) As you see, there are many villages here: Zorii, Awohaka, and Akasaka. But the tall grass of Awo-no-ga-kara grows round the roads between them, and the forest is thick at Koyasu and Awohaka, and many robbers come out under the rains. They attack the baggage on horseback, and take the clothing of maids and servants who pass here. So I go out with ...
— Certain Noble Plays of Japan • Ezra Pound

... entered the Confederate army as a chaplain, and served in that capacity up to the close of the civil war. He was then stationed at Nashville, afterwards at Clarksville, Tenn., and still later at Augusta, Ga., where he founded the Banner of the South, which exercised great influence over the people of that section, and continued about five years, when Father Ryan was obliged to suspend its publication. He then removed to Mobile, Ala., where he was appointed pastor of St. Mary's ...
— Poems: Patriotic, Religious, Miscellaneous • Abram J. Ryan, (Father Ryan)

... scholars who had discovered that one of the names of the god of love in Bengali was Dipuc, i.e. the inflamer, derived from it by inversion the name of the god of love in Latin, Cupid. Sir William Jones identified Janus with the Sanskrit Ga{n}e{s}a, i.e., lord of hosts,[9] and even later scholars allowed themselves to be tempted to see the Indian prototype of Ganymedes in the Ka{n}va-medhtithi or Ka{n}va-mesha of ...
— Chips from a German Workshop - Volume IV - Essays chiefly on the Science of Language • Max Muller

... at the age of twelve years and went to Charleston, South Carolina. I worked with a family there as waitin' boy for one year. I then went to Savannah, Ga. I had no particular job and I hoboed everywhere I went. I would wait all day by the side of the railroad to catch a train at night. I rode freight trains and passenger trains. I rode the blind baggage on passenger trains and the rods on freight trains. ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves, North Carolina Narratives, Part 2 • Works Projects Administration

... amount of interest, and which perhaps went further than anything else in giving me a reputation that in a sense might be called National. I refer to the address which I delivered at the opening of the Atlanta Cotton States and International Exposition at Atlanta, Ga., September 18, 1895. . ...
— Stories of Achievement, Volume III (of 6) - Orators and Reformers • Various

... Furthermore, the grammatical structure of Japanese is being influenced; and though I cannot agree with a clergyman who lately declared that the use of the passive voice by Tokyo street-urchins announcing the fall of Port Arthur—("Ryojunko ga senryo sera-reta!") represented the working of "divine providence," I do think it afforded some proof that the Japanese language, assimilative like the genius of the race, is showing capacity to meet all demands made upon it by ...
— Kokoro - Japanese Inner Life Hints • Lafcadio Hearn

... seats, 18 frs.; with two horses and four seats, 22 frs. After passing the Bocca and St. Cassien, the carriage crosses the Siagne, having on the right or north Mandelieu nestling in the sun, at the foot Mt. le Duc, 1265 ft., a little to the east of the flat peak La Gate, 1663 ft. Afterwards the Riou is crossed at the village of Le Tremblant, 167 ft. above the sea, whence the ascent is continued by an excellent road amidst picturesque scenery to the Inn and Gendarmerie of Estrel. The inn is situated to the N. of Mt. Vinaigre, having to ...
— The South of France—East Half • Charles Bertram Black

... water. He explained that the soldier with the bandaged head had been shot in the mouth, and could take only soft food. I said, "Don't give him that. I will bring him some mush and milk, or some chicken soup." He set down the cup, looked at me with queer, half-shut eyes, then remarked, "Yer ga-assin' now, ain't ye?" ...
— Memories - A Record of Personal Experience and Adventure During Four Years of War • Fannie A. (Mrs.) Beers

... of The Madison (Ga.) Visitor, promises to "sit in the corner and be a good girl," if we will admit her to our next "editorial soiree." Indeed we will, and brother Lamb, of The Greenfield Democrat, shall sit in the other corner and "cast sheep's (Lamb's) eyes" at her; for ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... his purpose to put his forces into winter quarters,—A. J. Smith's corps with most of the cavalry at Eastport, where the Mississippi and Alabama line reaches the Tennessee River; the Fourth Corps at Huntsville, Ala., and the Twenty-third at Dalton, Ga. Steedman's and Granger's divisions were already at Decatur, and would hold that important position, with which direct railway communication from Nashville would be opened as quickly as the road could be repaired from Pulaski southward. Thomas also outlined for the spring a concerted ...
— Military Reminiscences of the Civil War V2 • Jacob Dolson Cox

... render his account," added Ga-hogan. "An' whativer he's done wrong, he's made it square to-day. Let um ...
— The Brigade Commander • J. W. Deforest

... in a twinkling. The ice lay extended everywhere, as far as the eye could reach through the fog, which had lifted a little. There was no small quantity of ice, but it was tolerably open, and there was nothing for it but to be true to our watchword and "ga fram"—push onward. For a good while we picked our way. But now it began to lie closer, with large floes every here and there, and at the same time the fog grew denser, and we could not see our way at all. To go ahead in difficult ice and in a fog is not very prudent, ...
— Farthest North - Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration of the Ship 'Fram' 1893-1896 • Fridtjof Nansen

... introduction of better forms of church life than do those mission schools which awaken the desire for something better in religion than the senseless and corrupt "old-time" ways. Such a school as that in Andersonville, Ga., is the initiative of a church mission. School education is of little advantage unless it is linked with moral training; and there is no moral training comparable with that of a pure and true Christian church. Our mission school teachers call for and need the re-enforcement ...
— The American Missionary — Volume 50, No. 05, May, 1896 • Various

... He ga-zdupon. He gazed upon. Here res tsis sed. Here rests his head. Whattis sis sname? What is his name? For ranninstantush. For an instant hush. Ther ris sa calm, There is a calm. For tho stha tweep. For those that weep. God sglorou simage. ...
— McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... the Negro Congress, at the Cotton States and International Exposition, Atlanta Ga., November 11 to ...
— Masterpieces of Negro Eloquence - The Best Speeches Delivered by the Negro from the days of - Slavery to the Present Time • Various

... wealth and pride disown'd me, A' views were dark around me, And sad and laigh she found me, As friendless worth could be; When ither hope gaed frae me, Her pity kind did stay me, And love for love she ga'e me; And that ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... runs to 'im and finds my same old scalp a hangin' to his belt. Well, I lifted off his hair with my knife, and untied mine from the belt, and then I had both scalps, he! he! he! You ask Simon Kenton when ye see 'im. He was along at the same time, and they made 'im run the ga'ntlet and pretty nigh beat the life out o' ...
— Alice of Old Vincennes • Maurice Thompson

... in the atoms o' the gig, and glowering frae them! When young Gourlay slid hame at dark he was in such a state that his mother had to hide him frae the auld man. She had that, puir body! The twa women were obliged to carry the drunk lump to his bedroom—and yon lassie far ga'en in consumption, too, they tell me! Ou, he was in a ...
— The House with the Green Shutters • George Douglas Brown

... the Colorado foot-hills stood the lodge of Ta-in-ga-ro (First Falling Thunder). Though swift in the chase and brave in battle, he seldom went abroad with neighboring tribes, for he was happy in the society of his wife, Zecana (The Bird). To sell beaver and wild sheep-skins he often went with her to a post on the New Mexico frontier, and it was ...
— Myths And Legends Of Our Own Land, Complete • Charles M. Skinner

... returned with a young coconut, unhusked. "Behold, Tialli. This nut is a UTO GA'AU (sweet husk). When thou hast drunk the juice give it me back, that I may chew the husk which is sweet as the sugar-cane of Samoa," and he squatted down again ...
— By Reef and Palm • Louis Becke

... names from the Zoroastrian, health rules from the Hindoos, laws from the Confucians—price ten dollars per volume. Would you like to discover your seventeen senses, to develop them according to the Ga-Llama principle, and to share the "expansion of the magnetic circles"? Here is the way to ...
— The Profits of Religion, Fifth Edition • Upton Sinclair

... of two seedling trees sent to a private grower by the Department. He was Mr. James Hobson, Jasper, Ga., in whose honor it was named in 1930. It was later taken up by commercial nurserymen and widely distributed for several years. It has much in its favor as it is easy to graft, precocious, prolific, annual in bearing, and the nuts ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Report of the Proceedings at the Thirty-Seventh Annual Report • Various

... the Bureau, Miss Rose Kinney, of Oberlin, O., for many years engaged in the Southern work, and recently located in one of the dark corners of the field, McIntosh, Ga., was detailed for service in the North. She spent about six weeks in Ohio, Michigan, Illinois and Iowa, addressing ladies' meetings at the General Associations, and with good results. In June the Secretary ...
— The American Missionary — Volume 38, No. 01, January, 1884 • Various

... relics of the old slavery days is these childless, friendless, companionless old people, childless because slavery separated them from their children; husbands and wives were parted, and all family life rendered impossible. Two old people in the region of McIntosh, Ga., have recently died, each alone in a little cabin, and the tragedy was not discovered until the buzzards were seen circling around ...
— The American Missionary — Volume 54, No. 3, July, 1900 • Various

... going home," Sally said brightly. Then, looking at him, she saw that there was nothing to disturb the impression that he was a gentleman of leisure. "Oh Mr. Ga— Mr. Bertram ... you haven't ...
— Coquette • Frank Swinnerton

... photograph of a young Jersey bull, the property of Mr. John L. Hopkins, of Atlanta, Ga., and called "Grand Mirror." This we have caused to be engraved and the mirror is clearly shown. A larger mirror is rarely seen upon a bull. We hope in a future number to exhibit some cows' mirrors of different forms and ...
— Scientific American Supplement No. 275 • Various

... note "an entire absence of the belligerent spirit," it found that "Germany is asking us to abridge certain of our rights on the high seas." To the Denver Post the reply was the "extreme of arrogance, selfishness, and obstinacy," while The Atlanta (Ga.) Constitution remarks that German words and German deeds are separate matters: "The all-important fact remains that since President Wilson's first note was transmitted to that country, Germany has given us no single reasonable cause of complaint." ...
— New York Times Current History; The European War, Vol 2, No. 5, August, 1915 • Various

... "We've got quite a ga'den-patch back of the house," replied the girl, "and we should have had moa, but fatha wasn't very well, this spring; he's eva so much better than when we fust ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... Twigs. Fensalir (fen sa ler'). The home of Frigga. forget-me-not (for get'-me-not). A small herb bearing a blue flower, and considered the emblem of fidelity. Frigga (frig' ga). The supreme goddess of ...
— Classic Myths • Retold by Mary Catherine Judd

... Algonkin lineage can also count some respectable writers. The Rev. William Apess (or Apes), a member of the Pequod tribe of Massachusetts, wrote and published five or six small books and pamphlets, on questions relating to his people, between 1829 and 1837. The book of George Copway, or Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh, a chief of the Ojibways, on The Traditional History of the Ojibway Nation (London, 1850), is a good authority on the topic, and so well written that we can scarcely suppose that it was his unaided effort. ...
— Aboriginal American Authors • Daniel G. Brinton

... and while still at Cumberland Gap, Burnside received a dispatch from General Crittenden with the news that he was in possession of Chattanooga, that Bragg had retreated toward Rome, Ga., and that Rosecrans hoped with his centre and right to intercept the enemy at Rome, which was sixty miles south of Chattanooga. [Footnote: Official Records, vol. xxx. pt. iii. p. 523.] Everything was therefore most promising on the south, and Burnside had only to provide ...
— Military Reminiscences of the Civil War V1 • Jacob Dolson Cox

... the mind," but it was to be overcome by proof. In this case the presumption was overruled. The implication, however, never applied to the deaf not born so. At present there is no presumption in connection with wills, deeds, witnessing, or guardianship. See 3 Conn., 299; 27 Gratt. (Va.), 190; 6 Ga., 324; 3 Ired. (N. C.), 535. In the Missouri case, quoted above, it was said: "Presumption of idiocy does not seem to obtain in modern practice, at least not ...
— The Deaf - Their Position in Society and the Provision for Their - Education in the United States • Harry Best

... be said that we know the meaning of the class names only in exceptional cases. The Kiabara, Kamilaroi, Annan River, Kuinmurbura, Narrang-ga, and two of the West Australian names can be translated (see Table I). But with these exceptions we have no certain knowledge of the meaning of the single ...
— Kinship Organisations and Group Marriage in Australia • Northcote W. Thomas

... as did the voice from the wilderness, inadequately translated, "REPENT ye, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand". (Metanoei^te h'/ggike ga h' Basilei/a tw^n ou'ranw^n.) Rather, be transformed, or, as De Quincey puts it, "Wheel into a new centre your spiritual system; GEOCENTRIC has that system been up to this hour—that is, having earth and the earthly for its starting-point; henceforward make ...
— Introduction to Robert Browning • Hiram Corson

... California came when a treaty was signed at the Rancho de Cahuenga. (Ca-wen-ga). The next act will be the Californians and Fremont at the ...
— History Plays for the Grammar Grades • Mary Ella Lyng

... for the first time in his life he laughed, a hoarse, absurd, yet gay and joyous laughter. It sounded like the cackling of a goose, Ga-ga-ga! The warden looked at him in astonishment, then knit his brow sternly. This strange gayety of a man who was to be executed was an offence to the prison, as well as to the very executioner; it made them appear absurd. And suddenly, for the briefest instant, ...
— The Seven who were Hanged • Leonid Andreyev

... came one biting day, in the winter of 1607, an Indian runner, whose name was Ra-bun-ta. He came as one that had important news to tell, but he paused not for shout or question from the inquisitive boys who were tumbling about in the light snow, in their favorite sport of Ga-wa-sa or the "snow-snake" game. One of the boys, a mischievous and sturdy young Indian of thirteen, whose name was. Nan-ta-qua-us, even tried to insert the slender knob-headed stick, which was the "snake" in the game, between the runner's legs, and trip him up. But Ra-bun-ta was too ...
— Historic Girls • E. S. Brooks

... Dorchester Academy, McIntosh, Ga., was built by the gifts of Northern Endeavorers. This school, with its church and Endeavor societies, is located in Liberty County, in the black belt of southeast Georgia. This is one of the most needy sections of darkest America. ...
— The American Missionary — Volume 54, No. 4, October, 1900 • Various

... first to the proud porter, And he open'd an' let him in; He ga'e the next to the butler-boy, And he has ...
— Ballads of Mystery and Miracle and Fyttes of Mirth - Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - Second Series • Frank Sidgwick

... in the pretentious nomenclature as gods, appear to have been real historic personages. [3] The name Gilgamish was originally written dGi-bil-aga-mis, and means "The fire god (Gibil) is a commander," abbreviated to dGi-bil-ga-mis, and dGi(s)-bil-ga-mis, a form which by full labialization of b to u was finally contracted to dGi-il-ga-mis. [4] Throughout the new text the name is written with the abbreviation dGi(s), [5] whereas the standard Assyrian text ...
— The Epic of Gilgamish - A Fragment of the Gilgamish Legend in Old-Babylonian Cuneiform • Stephen Langdon

... Ga.—This invention relates to improvements in pipe couplings, and consists in forming a dovetailed groove across the end of one part, with an annular recess in the bottom around the bore for a packing ring, and fitting on the other part ...
— Scientific American, Vol.22, No. 1, January 1, 1870 • Various

... 't is time, According to the ancient epic laws, To slacken sail, and anchor with our rhyme. Let this fifth canto meet with due applause, The sixth shall have a touch of the sublime; Meanwhile, as Homer sometimes sleeps, perhaps You'll pardon to my muse a few short naps.[ga] ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 6 • Lord Byron

... Billy Caldwell was a half-breed, and a chief of the nation. In his reply, "I am a Sau-ga-nash," or Englishman, he designed to convey, "I am a white man." Had he said, "I am a Pottowattamie," it would have been interpreted to mean, "I belong to my nation, and am prepared to ...
— Wau-bun - The Early Day in the Northwest • Juliette Augusta Magill Kinzie

... College as President. He next served as Editor of Zion's Herald, in Boston, then was President of our College in Tennessee, and at the last General Conference he was elected editor of the Advocate at Atlanta, Ga. But his work was soon finished, and he passed on to join the great and good who have entered ...
— Thirty Years in the Itinerancy • Wesson Gage Miller

... Upper Hawgthief. It's rained a heap, an' bein' as I'm on low ground anyhow, it gets that soft an' swampy where I be it would bog a butterfly. For once I'm took sick; has a fever, that a-way. An' lose flesh! shorely you should have seen me! I falls off like persimmons after a frost, an' gets as ga'nt an' thin as a cow in April. So I allows I'll take a lay-off for a couple of months ...
— Wolfville Days • Alfred Henry Lewis

... pictures of the sacred Beaver of the Tegumais for the B-sound (25, 26, 27, 28); and because it was a nasty, nosy noise, they just drew noses for the N-sound, till they were tired (29); and they drew a picture of the big lake-pike's mouth for the greedy Ga-sound (30); and they drew the pike's mouth again with a spear behind it for the scratchy, hurty Ka-sound (31); and they drew pictures of a little bit of the winding Wagai river for the nice windy-windy Wa-sound (32, 33); and so on and so forth and so following till they had done ...
— Just So Stories • Rudyard Kipling

... very inquisitive about these his Lodgers, brought him some time since a little Bundle of Papers, which he assured him were written by King Sa Ga Yean Qua Rash Tow, and, as he supposes, left behind by some Mistake. These Papers are now translated, and contain abundance of very odd Observations, which I find this little Fraternity of Kings made during their Stay in the Isle of Great Britain. I shall present my Reader with ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... Dr. Crawford W. Long was born in Danielsville, Madison County, Ga., on the 1st of November, 1815. He graduated at the University of Georgia, studied medicine, and graduated at the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania. He then went to Jefferson, Jackson County, where he opened an office, and ...
— Stories Of Georgia - 1896 • Joel Chandler Harris

... seen in some of the old Pali books in regular notation; the gamut, which was termed septa souere, consisting of seven notes, and expressed not by signs, but in letters equivalent to their pronunciation, sa, ri, ga, me, qa, de, ni.[8] At the present day, harmony is still superseded by sound, the singing of the Singhalese being a nasal whine, not unlike that of the Arabs. Flutes, almost insusceptible of modulation, ...
— Ceylon; an Account of the Island Physical, Historical, and • James Emerson Tennent

... the lads an' the land I hae left, An' how love has been lifted, an' friendship been reft; How the hinnie o' hope has been jumbled wi' ga', Then I sigh for the lads ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume V. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... baby of our kin puts its hands upon our knees and looks up into our eyes with eyes full of unutterable meaning. It has so much to say! It can only say "ga-ga" and "ba-ba"; but with oh! how searching a voice, how touching a look—that is, if one is fond of babies! We are moved to the very core; we want to understand, for it concerns us all; we were once like that ourselves—the individual and the race—but for the life ...
— Peter Ibbetson • George du Marier et al

... the esprit de corps of the men of Kershaw's Brigade on the eve of battle. En route from Petersburg to Chickamauga by train, the men of the Eighth Regiment passed through Florence, just ten miles from their homes in Darlington. Upon arrival at Dalton, Ga. on September ...
— History of Kershaw's Brigade • D. Augustus Dickert

... the inhabitants of which are in a constant state of warfare with the other tribes, in which they are sometimes joined by the people of Moo-doo When-u-a, Tettua Whoo-doo, and Wangaroa; but these tribes are oftener united with those of Choke-han-ga, Teer-a-witte, and Ho-do-doe against T'Souduckey (the bounds of which district Governor King inclines to think is from about Captain Cook's Mount Egmont, to Cape Runaway). They are not, however, without long intervals of peace, at which times ...
— An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 1 • David Collins



Words linked to "Ga" :   Augusta, Atlanta, U.S., Confederate States, south, confederacy, capital of Georgia, metal, tabun, oxford, Okefenokee Swamp, bauxite, Tallapoosa, Coosa, gallium, Confederate States of America, United States of America, United States, dixie, Chattahoochee, Albany, the States, flint, US, savannah, metallic element, Deep South, macon, Athens, Coosa River, Georgia, Dixieland, America, Tallapoosa River, USA, Flint River, American state, U.S.A., Vidalia, Valdosta, Kennesaw Mountain, Chattahoochee River



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