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Flier   /flˈaɪər/   Listen
Flier

noun
1.
Someone who travels by air.  Synonym: flyer.
2.
Someone who operates an aircraft.  Synonyms: aeronaut, airman, aviator, flyer.
3.
An advertisement (usually printed on a page or in a leaflet) intended for wide distribution.  Synonyms: bill, broadsheet, broadside, circular, flyer, handbill, throwaway.



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"Flier" Quotes from Famous Books



... be no prophet: in these days of electricity, concentrated and accumulative after the fashion of M. Faure, aided perhaps by some lighter gas, some condensed form of tamed dynamite,—these elevating and motive powers being helped by exquisite mechanism either as attached to the human form (if the flier be an athlete) or quickening a vehicle with flapping wings impelled by electricity, in which he might sit (if said flier is as burdened with "too solid flesh" as some of us)—these mixed potencies, I say, of electricity ...
— My Life as an Author • Martin Farquhar Tupper

... mission and obtains the same results. An American is a combination of the two, but neither better nor worse. Though there is a large number of expert German airmen I do not believe the average Teuton makes as good a flier as a ...
— Flying for France • James R. McConnell

... out of the headquarters tent. Just beyond the entrance flap was one of the two gyrocopters used for flying within the Dome. He leaped into the cockpit and drove home the starter-piston. The flier buzzed straight up, ...
— The Great Dome on Mercury • Arthur Leo Zagat

... action, taking the crop in the most favorable manner—that is, leaning toward the knife. Passing along the field (which was from two to three hundred yards in length) it cut down a breadth of little more than four feet. The corn being laid, the flier, of course did not come into practical operation; nor was it necessary that it should do so—the elements having already done its work. The corn was well cut—the stubble ...
— Obed Hussey - Who, of All Inventors, Made Bread Cheap • Various

... master pilots of both armies, English and French, perform soul-shaking gyrations high in air, feats quite impossible hitherto and never attempted until lately. There is now a course of aerial gymnastics which every flier must pass successfully before he may call himself a "chasing" pilot; and, from what I have observed, it would seem that to become a pilot one must be either all nerve or possess no nerve ...
— Great Britain at War • Jeffery Farnol

... man's obvious desire to avoid him, and naturally obstinate in all his resolutions, Mowbray pursued for a considerable way, until he fairly lost breath; and the flier having been long out of sight, he recollected at length that his engagement with the Earl of Etherington required his ...
— St. Ronan's Well • Sir Walter Scott

... you to Pompey," said he. "Pompey is the pride of the local draghounds, no very great flier, as his build will show, but a staunch hound on a scent. Well, Pompey, you may not be fast, but I expect you will be too fast for a couple of middle-aged London gentlemen, so I will take the liberty of fastening this leather leash to your collar. Now, boy, come along, and show what you ...
— The Return of Sherlock Holmes - Magazine Edition • Arthur Conan Doyle

... th' air of thy own building. That's thy element, Ned. Well, as high a flier as you are, I have a lure may make you ...
— The Comedies of William Congreve - Volume 1 [of 2] • William Congreve

... Helium had come all unannounced to the court of his father's friend that day. He had come alone in a small flier, sure of the same welcome that always awaited him at Ptarth. As there had been no formality in his coming there was no need of ...
— Thuvia, Maid of Mars • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... non-stop Swallowtail; runs into Town three minutes ahead of time every trip. Habitues of the line often turn an honest penny by laying odds on its punctuality with people who are strangers to the reputation of this flier." ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, May 7, 1919. • Various

... one."—Ib., p. 311. "Both these Tenses may represent a Futurity implyed by the dependence of the Clause."—Ib., p. 332. "Cry, cries, crying, cried, crier, decrial; Shy, shyer, shyest, shyly, shyness; Fly, flies, flying, flier, high-flier; Sly, slyer, slyest, slyly, slyness; Spy, spies, spying, spied, espial; Dry, drier, driest, dryly, dryness."—Cobb's Dict. "Cry, cried, crying, crier, cryer, decried, decrier, decrial; Shy, shyly, shily, shyness, shiness; Fly, flier, flyer, high-flyer; Sly, slily, ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... on May 8th, when the French squadron met three German two-seater airplanes coming toward them in arrow formation. Signaling to his companions, Lieutenant Fonck dived at the leading German plane and, with a few shots sent it down in flames. Fonck turned to the left, and the second enemy flier followed in an effort to attack him from behind, but the Frenchman made a quick turn above him and, with five shots, sent the second German to death. Ten seconds had barely elapsed ...
— History of the World War - An Authentic Narrative of the World's Greatest War • Francis A. March and Richard J. Beamish

... call Number Five for the High Flier at half-past six," she said, turning to Boots. "Could not you take up word at ...
— The Carbonels • Charlotte M. Yonge

... police have sent to Baltimore two detectives who are looking up the survivors of the ill-fated Washington Flier. It has transpired that Simon Harrington, the Wood Street merchant of that city, was not killed in the wreck, but was murdered in his berth the night preceding the accident. Shortly before the collision, John Flanders, the conductor of the Flier, ...
— The Man in Lower Ten • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... breakage of either one of the strands, if the machine was running two into one, from the creel to the roller, would cause the stoppage of the machine, or the breaking or tangling of ends between the front roll and the nose of the flier. ...
— Scientific American Suppl. No. 299 • Various

... josh I did a half-page special about Virgie, called him the sculptor poet, threw in some views of him in his studio, and quoted some of his verse that I'd fixed up. It got by. Virgie was so pleased he wanted to give a banquet for me; but I got him to go in on a little winter wheat flier instead. He didn't drop much. After that I'd slip in a paragraph about him now and then, always calling him the sculptor poet. The tag stuck. Other papers began to use it; until, first thing I knew, Virgie was getting away with it. ...
— On With Torchy • Sewell Ford

... apparently specially reserved for us. Not to cleave to one's own liberation, to the voluptuous distance and remoteness of the bird, which always flies further aloft in order always to see more under it—the danger of the flier. Not to cleave to our own virtues, nor become as a whole a victim to any of our specialties, to our "hospitality" for instance, which is the danger of dangers for highly developed and wealthy souls, who deal prodigally, almost indifferently with themselves, ...
— Beyond Good and Evil • Friedrich Nietzsche

... that your exchange Of Heaven for earth expands your range E'en as a flier, And that your mother, you and I, If we do what we should, ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 1 (of 4) • Various

... riders on the flat, of nerve and pluck and pace, Not one in fifty has the nerve to ride a steeplechase. It's right enough while horses pull and take their fences strong, To rush a flier to the front and bring the field along; But what about the last half-mile, with horses blown and beat— When every jump means all you know to keep him on ...
— Saltbush Bill, J.P., and Other Verses • A. B. Paterson

... spirits who war against or torment the child and its mother are the Hebrew Lilith, the long-haired night-flier; the Greek Strigalai, old and ugly owl-women; the Roman Caprimulgus, the nightly goat-milker and child-killer, and the wood-god Silvanus; the Coptic Berselia; the Hungarian "water-man," or "water-woman," who changes children for criples ...
— The Child and Childhood in Folk-Thought • Alexander F. Chamberlain

... upward as they continued to move along. The aeroplane did not seem to be disturbed, as far as they could make out. If there were French birdmen in the vicinity they had other work cut out for them besides chasing a hostile flier. Possibly they were over the fighting armies, finding out valuable statistics for the use of the French commanders, and which might affect the ...
— The Big Five Motorcycle Boys on the Battle Line - Or, With the Allies in France • Ralph Marlow

... capital city of hoboes. Have you ever hit the sage-brush trail, hiked the milk-and-honey route from Ogden through the Mormon country, decked the Overland Express, beaten the blind baggage on the Millionaires' Flier? Hey?" ...
— The Landloper - The Romance Of A Man On Foot • Holman Day

... lady, it was important something should be known about the thug who wanted to carry her off, and, when my eyes lit on a workmanlike motor bicycle with a side-car rig standing close to the curb, and well clear of the arena, said I to myself: 'George T. Handyside, this is where you take a flier, and maybe Illinois will score one.' The man who owned the outfit was watching the commotion when I dug him in the ribs. 'Take me after that car,' I said, 'and I'll pay you a shilling a mile with five pounds on account if it's only a 100 yards.' I pressed a note into ...
— Number Seventeen • Louis Tracy

... a music-box with wings," Mr. Crow often croaked. "As a flier he couldn't even beat crazy ...
— The Tale of Bobby Bobolink - Tuck-me-In Tales • Arthur Scott Bailey

... defiances of the most violent and abusive sort exchanged. Yet there are traces of a singular civilisation in the rules which the leaders draw up to be observed in the war. Thus, no stratagems are to be used; the fighting men are to fraternise, if they will, after each combat; none may slay the flier, the unarmed, the charioteer, or the beater of the drum; horsemen are not to attack footmen, and nobody is to fling a spear till the preliminary challenges are finished; nor may any third man interfere when two combatants are engaged. ...
— Indian Poetry • Edwin Arnold



Words linked to "Flier" :   advert, Howard Robard Hughes, traveller, Bennett, traveler, Charles Lindbergh, Floyd Bennett, Jimmy Doolittle, Wiley Post, advertizing, stuffer, advertising, Mitchell, Charles A. Lindbergh, airwoman, Amelia Earhart, ad, Bleriot, aviatress, Doolittle, Howard Hughes, Hughes, Charles Augustus Lindbergh, post, Cochran, fly, Jacqueline Cochran, advertisement, Lucky Lindy, airplane pilot, aviatrix, Louis Bleriot, pilot, skilled workman, James Harold Doolittle, Earhart, trained worker, skilled worker, Billy Mitchell, advertizement, Lindbergh, William Mitchell



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