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Fin   /fɪn/   Listen
Fin

noun
1.
The cardinal number that is the sum of four and one.  Synonyms: 5, cinque, five, fivesome, Little Phoebe, pentad, Phoebe, quint, quintet, quintuplet, V.
2.
One of a pair of decorations projecting above the rear fenders of an automobile.  Synonyms: tail fin, tailfin.
3.
One of a set of parallel slats in a door or window to admit air and reject rain.  Synonyms: louver, louvre.
4.
A shoe for swimming; the paddle-like front is an aid in swimming (especially underwater).  Synonym: flipper.
5.
A stabilizer on a ship that resembles the fin of a fish.
6.
Organ of locomotion and balance in fishes and some other aquatic animals.



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"Fin" Quotes from Famous Books



... tail and quivering fin Through the wave the sturgeon flew, And like the heaven-shot javelin He sprung above the waters blue. Instant as the star-fall light, He plunged him in the deep again, But left an arch of silver bright, The rainbow of the moony ...
— Selections From American Poetry • Various

... wistfully. Bryce knew what he was thinking of. "I'll attend to the flowers for Mother," he assured Cardigan, and he added fiercely: "And I'll attend to the battle for Father. We may lose, but that man Pennington will know he's been in a fight before we fin—-" ...
— The Valley of the Giants • Peter B. Kyne

... Earl's head, and buries itself up to the shaft in the wood. "Who shot that bolt?" says the Jarl. Another flies between his hand and side, and enters the stuffing of the chief's stool. Then said the Jarl to a man named Fin, "Shoot that tall archer by the mast!" Fin shoots; the arrow hits the middle of Einar's bow as he is in the act of drawing it, and the bow ...
— Letters From High Latitudes • The Marquess of Dufferin (Lord Dufferin)

... of a cow—Ovigerous frena, in certain cirripedes, are nascent branchiae—in [illegible] the swim bladder is almost rudimentary for this purpose, and is nascent as a lung. The small wing of penguin, used only as a fin, might be nascent as a wing; not that I think so; for the whole structure of the bird is adapted for flight, and a penguin so closely resembles other birds, that we may infer that its wings have probably been modified, and reduced by natural ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume II • Francis Darwin

... called my gallantry; and I was so taken up by her words that I hardly noticed the scowl Garcia gave as he came in. In fact, just then my heart felt so large that in my joy I could have shaken hands with him so warmly that I should have made the bones of that fishy fin of his crack again. ...
— The Golden Magnet • George Manville Fenn

... handsome a youngster as you would wish to see, slender, gracefully tapering to the base of the broad, powerful tail, wide-finned, radiant in silver and blue-green, and with a splendid crest-like dorsal fin of vivid ultramarine extending almost the whole length of his back. His eyes were large, and blazed with a savage fire. Hanging poised a few feet above the tops of the waving, rose-and-purple sea-anemones and the bottle-green trailers of seaweed, every fin tense and quivering, ...
— Children of the Wild • Charles G. D. Roberts

... shuffled up, and, just waving his fin, Requested permission a word to put in. "Though the beauties of plain and of forest you know, Yet who can describe all the wonders below? On a soft bed of sponge in the deep sea I lie, And watch the huge shark and the grampus glide by; Or amidst groves of coral I play at bo-peep, Or ...
— The Quadrupeds' Pic-Nic • F. B. C.

... talk w'en yo' get gale enough in yo' lungs," grinned the negro. "In dat case Ah gwine lay yo' down on de groun' to fin' yo' breff." ...
— The Young Engineers on the Gulf - The Dread Mystery of the Million Dollar Breakwater • H. Irving Hancock

... free from sediment or impurities of any kind, that it had a new look, as if it had just come from the hand of its Creator. I tramped along its margin upward of a mile that afternoon, part of the time wading to my knees, and casting my hook, baited only with a trout's fin, to the opposite bank. Trout are real cannibals, and make no bones, and break none either, in lunching on each other. A friend of mine had several in his spring, when one day a large female trout gulped down one of her male friends, ...
— Locusts and Wild Honey • John Burroughs

... surety fiados, book debts fidedigno, trustworthy fiel, faithful fielato, octroi office fiesta del comercio, bank holiday fijar, to fix fijo, fixed, firm filosofia, philosophy firma, signature firmar, to sign firmeza, firmness (el) fin, the end fino, shrewd fletar, to charter, to freight flete, freight flojedad, slackness flojo, slack flor, flower floreciente, flourishing folleto, leaflet fomento, development, encouragement fonda, ...
— Pitman's Commercial Spanish Grammar (2nd ed.) • C. A. Toledano

... d'Arlequin n'est rien autre que le fantastique costume du representant de la Mort.... Et, si ce que je viens de dire est fonde, on ne repetera plus apres Menage (Gilles), que le mot Arlequin fut pris d'abord, sur la fin du XVI siecle, par un certain bouffon italien que le President Harlay avoit accueilli. Il est certain que le mot Arlequin se trouve tres-anciennement dans un grand nombre ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 76, April 12, 1851 • Various

... goin' all offer de vorld? Vat you got by dot? Spen' money—dot vot you got. Me, I stay here. I fin' heem; you not got heem all offer de vorld. I tol' you, of a man he keel somebody, he run vay, bot he goin' coom back where he done it. He not know it vot for he do it, bot he do ...
— The Eye of Dread • Payne Erskine

... has thrown his hand across our path; and in this place where there no traffic except by night—for the trench is blocked just there by the earth-fall and inaccessible by day—every one treads on that hand. By the searchlight's shaft I saw it clearly, fleshless and worn, a sort of withered fin. ...
— Under Fire - The Story of a Squad • Henri Barbusse

... cried, passionately. "When you go, Ol' Sophy'll go; 'n' where you go, Ol' Sophy'll go: 'n' we'll both go t' th' place where th' Lord takes care of all his children, whether their faces are white or black. Oh, darlin', darlin'! if th' Lord should let me die firs', you shall fin' all ready for you when you come after me. On'y don' go 'n' leave poor Ol' Sophy all 'lone in ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... become colder we always fished with bait, if any were available, and so, when after a few minutes a small trout took Hubbard's fly, he made his next cast with a fin cut from his first catch. Before he cast the fly, George and I ran the canoe through the rapid to a point just below the pool where we had decided to camp. Then, leaving George to finish the work of making camp, I took my rod ...
— The Lure of the Labrador Wild • Dillon Wallace

... of course—but what's thy weight? On either side 'tis said thou hast a fin, A crest, too, on thy neck, deponents state, A saw-shaped ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... fellah is de fellah what done tuk my job. Hit was des dis-a-way: when I t'ink dat white man gwine catch me, sholy, I des drap down in de darkes' cawneh I kin fin'; dat's what I done, yas, suh. He des keep on agoin', spat, spat, spat, an' when he come out front de Gineral Jackson over yondeh, one dem boys what's wukkin' on her, he tuk out, an' dat white man des tu'n hisself ...
— The Price • Francis Lynde

... bands; the ventral, caudal, and anal fins being bluish-black. The female, or sordid dragonet, was considered by Linnaeus, and by many subsequent naturalists, as a distinct species; it is of a dingy reddish-brown, with the dorsal fin brown and the other fins white. The sexes differ also in the proportional size of the head and mouth, and in the position of the eyes (12. I have drawn up this description from Yarrell's 'British Fishes,' vol. i. 1836, pp. 261 and 266.); but the most striking difference ...
— The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex • Charles Darwin

... vous voir aimee Est une douce liaison, Que dans notre coeur s'est formee De concert avec la raison. D'une amoureuse sympathie, Il faut pour arreter le cours Arreter celui de nos jours; Sa fin est celle de la vie. Puissent les destins complaisants, Vous donner encore trente ans D'amour et ...
— Life, Letters, and Epicurean Philosophy of Ninon de L'Enclos, - the Celebrated Beauty of the Seventeenth Century • Robinson [and] Overton, ed. and translation.

... Nothing could be more obsequiously civil than the earl's demeanour, now that the matter was decided. Every thing was to be done just as Lord Ballindine liked; his taste was to be consulted in every thing; the earl even proposed different visits to the Curragh; asked after the whereabouts of Fin M'Coul and Brien Boru; and condescended pleasantly to inquire whether Dot Blake was prospering as usual with ...
— The Kellys and the O'Kellys • Anthony Trollope

... not be so far out. They hug pretty close to the shore, where the water is more shallow, and the fish come in to feed. Still, it may have been the fin of a shark cutting the water like that one—" started Frank, when ...
— The Outdoor Chums on the Gulf • Captain Quincy Allen

... dans le salon, je trouvai Mistriss B. assise sur son divan, pres d'un natif Syrien Chretien. Ils tenaient a eux deux une Bible, suspendue a une grosse cle par un mouchoir fin. Mistriss B. ne se rappelait pas avoir recu un bijou qu'un Aleppin affirmait lui avoir remis. Le Syrien disait une priere, puis prononcait alternativement les noms de la dame et de l'Aleppin. La Bible pivota au nom de la dame ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 32, June 8, 1850 • Various

... fin, Through the wave the sturgeon flew, And, like the heaven-shot javelin, He sprung above the waters blue. Instant as the star-fall light, He plunged him in the deep again, But left an arch of silver bright The rainbow of the moony main. It was a strange and lovely sight ...
— The Culprit Fay - and Other Poems • Joseph Rodman Drake

... that the arm and hand of a monkey, the foreleg and foot of a dog and of a horse, the wing of a bat, and the fin of a porpoise, are fundamentally identical; that the long neck of the giraffe has the same and no more bones than the short one of the elephant; that the eggs of Surinam frogs hatch into tadpoles with as good tails for swimming as any of their kindred, although as tadpoles they never ...
— Darwiniana - Essays and Reviews Pertaining to Darwinism • Asa Gray

... is said to preserve a decidedly spruce appearance at the State Dinners. Fish is nothing if not Fin-ical. ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 6, May 7, 1870 • Various

... expenditure of skill proved to be of no avail. She could not move a fin; nor had Robert any better luck, when, they having come to a shallow reach, she allowed the old man, who was encased in waders, to get into the water and fish along the opposite bank. When he came ashore again, his young ...
— Prince Fortunatus • William Black

... boss dis farm, dat's all," said Isham. "She tole me so herse'f, an' ef she's lef' alone she's gwine ter do it city fashion. But one thing's sartin shuh, Letty, if ole miss do fin' out wot's gwine on, she'll be back h'yar in no time! She know well 'nuf dat dat Miss Null ain't got no right to come an' boss dis ...
— The Late Mrs. Null • Frank Richard Stockton

... I'll take off ma clothes, so yo' won't have ter tear 'em," and Lizzie began to hurriedly unfasten her bodice. "Yo've got ter search me right," she continued, throwing off piece after piece; "yo'll fin' I am jes' like yo' sisters an' mammies, yo' po' tackies." "That'll do," growled one of the men, as Lizzie was unbuttoning the last piece. "Oh, no," returned the girl, "I'm goin' ter git naked; ...
— Hanover; Or The Persecution of the Lowly - A Story of the Wilmington Massacre. • David Bryant Fulton

... seems to have diversified the forms of their bodies and the colour of them; these consist in the means of escaping other animals more powerful than themselves. Hence some animals have acquired wings instead of legs, as the smaller birds, for purposes of escape. Others, great length of fin or of membrane, as the flying fish and the bat. Others have acquired hard or armed shells, as the ...
— Evolution, Old & New - Or, the Theories of Buffon, Dr. Erasmus Darwin and Lamarck, - as compared with that of Charles Darwin • Samuel Butler

... such a subject, with notes illustrative of all that is clear, and all that is dark, and all that is neither dark nor clear, but hovers in dusky twilight in the region of Caledonian antiquities. I would have made the Celtic panegyrists look about them. Fingal, as they conceitedly term Fin-Mac-Coul, should have disappeared before my search, rolling himself in his cloud like the spirit of Loda. Such an opportunity can hardly again occur to an ancient and grey-haired man; and to see it lost by the madcap spleen of ...
— The Antiquary, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... green of the water something moved, something pale and long—a ghastly form. It vanished; and yet another came, neared the surface, and displayed itself more fully. Lestrange saw its eyes, he saw the dark fin, and the whole hideous length of the creature; a shudder ran through him as ...
— The Blue Lagoon - A Romance • H. de Vere Stacpoole

... rapturous a thing that they ran the risk of making the pursuit of such sensations the one object and business of their existence; of sweeping the waters of life with busy nets, in the hope of entangling some creature "of bright hue and sharp fin"; of considering the days and hours that were unvisited by such perceptions barren and dreary. This is, I cannot help feeling, a dangerous business; it is to make of the soul nothing but a delicate instrument for registering aesthetic perceptions; and the result is a loss of balance and proportion, ...
— From a College Window • Arthur Christopher Benson

... in number, as is usual in the genus: on the back are two fins, and before each stands a strong spine, much as in the Prickly Hound, or Dog, fish: it has also two pectoral, and two ventral fins; but besides these, there is likewise an anal fin, placed at a middle distance between the last and the tail: the tail itself, is as it were divided, the upper part much ...
— The Voyage Of Governor Phillip To Botany Bay • Arthur Phillip

... never would be missed! Then the idiot who praises, with enthusiastic tone, All centuries but this, and every country but his own; And the lady from the provinces, who dresses like a guy, And who "doesn't think she waltzes, but would rather like to try"; And that FIN-DE-SIECLE anomaly, the scorching motorist - I don't think he'd be missed - I'm SURE he'd not ...
— Songs of a Savoyard • W. S. Gilbert

... thing, then," was the reply. "I'll drive you there instead; it will be better for your scorched fin (pointing to my injured arm) than jolting about outside a horse, and you shall tell me what to say as we go along; you seem to understand the sex, as they call the petticoats, better than I do, and can put a fellow up to a few of the right dodges. I only wish they were all horses, ...
— Frank Fairlegh - Scenes From The Life Of A Private Pupil • Frank E. Smedley

... est si loin de sa fin! Je pars, et des ormeaux qui bordent le chemin J'ai passe le premiers a peine. Au banquet de la vie a peine commence, Un instant seulement mes levres ont presse La coupe en mes mains ...
— Shirley • Charlotte Bronte

... her on the bank here. She'll be all right when de day breaks, and fin' the house herself. There's as good as she without a ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 16, No. 96, October 1865 • Various

... si oscura, E in fin la terra Il sen disserra Per grand dolor; Morto e il Signore! O Peccatore, Se tu non piangi, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846 • Various

... as vat he tink," she confided to the girl. "To-morrow somebody go to de leetle shack an' fin' 'ow he is. One dog heem ...
— The Peace of Roaring River • George van Schaick

... breakers were washing over the reefs. The other yachts all headed for the "gate," or opening in the reefs, but the Guardsman, a keen hunting man, knowing that alone of the competitors the old Lady of the Isles had no "fin-keel," had determined to try and jump the reef. In spite of the frantic protests of the black pilot, he headed straight for the reef, and, watching his opportunity, put her fairly at it as a big sea swept along, and got over without a scrape, thus gaining six miles. It was a horribly ...
— Here, There And Everywhere • Lord Frederic Hamilton

... interior framework; but a proper enough one to the under side of a heavy swimmer, that, like the flat fishes, kept close to the bottom;—a character which, as shown by the massive bulk of its body, and its small spread of fin, must have belonged to the Pterichthys. Sir Philip followed up his observations on the central plate by a minute examination of the other parts of the creature's armature; and the survey terminated in a recognition of the earlier restoration,—set aside so long ...
— The Testimony of the Rocks - or, Geology in Its Bearings on the Two Theologies, Natural and Revealed • Hugh Miller

... that species called by whalers fin-backs were playing about us all day, and during the morning two or three were seen near the vessel lashing the water with their enormous fins and tails, and leaping at intervals out of the sea, which foamed around them for a ...
— Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia] [Volume 2 of 2] • Phillip Parker King

... fin' heaps an' heaps o' gol',' he'd say as he pulled at his stubby gray whiskers. 'Marse Spruce-tree, yondah, he done tole me to jes' keep a diggin' an' I'd sho fin' gol'. When I 'se jes' 'bout to gib up, an' I does sometimes, yes, sah, I does, ole ...
— Buffalo Roost • F. H. Cheley

... is to be seen—smacking his lips—thirsting, ravening, for BLOOD. A live rabbit will be offered him; he will roll his eyes, look at the human beings present, try the bars of his cage—he cannot reach them. En fin, a rabbit is better than nothing! Mesdames, je vous implore! Do not bring your babes within. A stern necessity—a care for the consequences would prevent me from admitting them. The sight of a human babe rouses in the vampire the sanguinary passion ...
— In Troubadour-Land - A Ramble in Provence and Languedoc • S. Baring-Gould

... Lamb had been reading these verses when he wrote to his friend Dibdin, in June, 1896, and called him "Peter Fin Junior."] ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood

... innocent. Voila le motif de ma confiance, mon coeur et ma raison me crient qu'elle ne me trompera pas. Laissons donc faire les hommes et la destinee; apprenons a souffrir sans murmure; tout doit a la fin rentrer dans Fordre, et mon tour viendra tot ou tard.' Rousseau's Works, ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 2 • Boswell, Edited by Birkbeck Hill

... —LEIBNIZ, 1688, ed. Rommel, ii. 197. Il y a toujours eu de la malignite dans la grandeur, et de l'opposition a l'esprit de l'Evangile; mais maintenant il y en a plus que jamais, et il semble que comme le monde va a sa fin, celui qui est dans l'elevation fait tous ses efforts pour dominer avec plus de tyrannie, et pour etouffer les maximes du Christianisme et le regne de Jesus-Christ, voiant qu'il s'approche.—GOIDEAU, Lettres, ...
— Lectures on Modern history • Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton

... occur so suddenly that they are a continual surprise. Along the coast, out in the water, they push up their backs in isolated heaps like immense hippopotami lying in the water, or petrified sharks with only a tall serrated back fin visible. There would occur a strip of bare brown sand, and outside of that row upon row of sharp, thin, jagged rocks like the jaw teeth of pre-Adamite monsters. In other places they were piled on one another in such a sudden way, grass growing ...
— The Letters of "Norah" on her Tour Through Ireland • Margaret Dixon McDougall

... que solide. Apres le coup d'Etat, la dame vint a Paris faire un petit voyage, et elle s'attendait a ce que ses politesses lui fussent rendues. Aucune invitation ne venait, l'empereur oubliait les bienfaits recus par le prince. A la fin, pourtant, Lady Blessington reussit a le rencontrer au cours d'une reception quelconque. Il ne put eviter de la voir et l'interpella: "Ah! milady Blessington, restez-vous longtemps a Paris?" "Et vous, ...
— Collections and Recollections • George William Erskine Russell

... Church. (Italian edition.) Rome, Loescher, 1890.—Greppo: Trois memoires relatifs a l'histoire ecclesiastique.—Doellinger: Christenthum und Kirche.—Champagny (Comte de): Les Antonins, vol. i.—Gaston Boissier: La fin du paganisme, etc., 2 vols. Paris, Hachette, 1891.—Giovanni Marangoni: Delle cose gentilesche trasportate ad uso delle chiese. Roma, Pagliarini, 1744.—Mosheim: De rebus Christianis ante Constantinum.—Carlo Fea: Dissertazione sulle rovine di Roma, in Winckelmann's Storia delle arti. ...
— Pagan and Christian Rome • Rodolfo Lanciani

... "Tip us your fin, then," said Jack, darting into the room; "do you think I'd leave you, you d——d old fool? What would become of you, I wonder, if I wasn't to take you in to dry nurse? Why, you blessed old babby, what do you mean ...
— Varney the Vampire - Or the Feast of Blood • Thomas Preskett Prest

... sommons conjointement la garnison Francoise de la ville et ports de Malte de nous remettre la ville et les ports et dependances, ainsi que les vaisseaux, fregates, et batimens de quelques especes qu'ils soyent et qui peuvent s'y trouver, a fin que les habitans de l'isle de Malte puissent se mettre en possession de leurs villes et ports, et rentrer dans leurs droits de proprietes. En consequence, le Contre-Amiral Marquis de Niza, au nom de sa ...
— Memoirs and Correspondence of Admiral Lord de Saumarez. Vol II • Sir John Ross

... to elapse before I heard the order to put the helm down, and I even fancied that the ship was running away altogether from where little Paul and Rochford were floating. But what was my horror just then to see a black fin come gliding by. On the previous day we had passed several huge monsters of the deep. What if the shark should discover our fellow-passenger! I longed to be able to shout out to him to keep his legs moving; but ...
— In the Wilds of Florida - A Tale of Warfare and Hunting • W.H.G. Kingston

... terra firma; for, they tumbled about on the shingle and apparently with difficulty assumed the normal position which is their habit when on land—that of standing upright on their feet. These latter are set too far back for their bodies to hang horizontally; so, with their fin-like wings hanging down helplessly by their sides, they look ashore, as Fritz said to Eric, "just the very image of a parcel of rough recruits" going through their first drill ...
— Fritz and Eric - The Brother Crusoes • John Conroy Hutcheson

... eighty-ninth genus of fishes, classed by Lacepede, belonging to the second lower class of bony, characterised by opercules and bronchial membranes, I remarked the scorpaena, the head of which is furnished with spikes, and which has but one dorsal fin; these creatures are covered, or not, with little shells, according to the sub-class to which they belong. The second sub-class gives us specimens of didactyles fourteen or fifteen inches in length, with yellow rays, and heads of a most fantastic ...
— Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea • Jules Verne

... graceful steeds had Fin, Within lost Almhaim's fairy hall, A thousand steeds as sleek of skin As ever graced a chieftain's stall. With gilded bridles oft they flew, Young eagles in their lightning speed, Strong as the cataract of Hugh,[88] So ...
— Poems • Denis Florence MacCarthy

... maintain an attitude of fin gourmet, unable to refrain from comment upon the courses as they succeeded ...
— The Octopus • Frank Norris

... sea-steed by his bristling fin And vaulted on his shoulders; the fleet fish Swift sought the shallows ...
— Legends & Romances of Brittany • Lewis Spence

... Florida while the pond pickerel is found from middle Maine to Florida, and west to Louisiana and Arkansas. In spring the pond pickerel goes up into the ready margins as far even as the brook pickerel will and often I see him in water so shallow that his back fin sticks up, looking like the sail of a miniature Chinese junk. There he seeks the lovely little coppery swamp tree-frogs that are but an inch long and look like talismans carved from metal. These are his tidbits, but he will take most anything alive that is small enough for ...
— Old Plymouth Trails • Winthrop Packard

... nervously because of the look in the black, unreadable eyes of this straight, slim Indian girl who was so beautiful—and so silent. "They go muy fas', Ramon an' Beel. Poco tiempo—sure, we fin' dem little soon." ...
— The Heritage of the Sioux • B.M. Bower

... the product of the marriage of Art and Fashion of this fin-de-siecle age. Other ages have given us wit, beauty allied with esprit, dignity of demeanor, and a nobility of principle; this end of the nineteenth century has bestowed upon ...
— Nell, of Shorne Mills - or, One Heart's Burden • Charles Garvice

... ashore) he attempted to get some swans, but met with none that could not fly. He saw several large fish, or animals that came up to the surface of the water to blow, in the manner of a porpoise, or rather of a seal, for they did not spout, nor had they any dorsal fin. The head also strongly resembled the bluff-nosed hair seal, but their size was greater than any which Mr. Flinders had seen before. He fired three musket balls into one, and Bong-ree threw a spear into another; but they sunk, and were ...
— An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 2 • David Collins

... is followed in Irish tradition by the cycle of the heroes. The Gods still mingled with them and presumably taught them, for many of these heroes are Druids. Fin, the hero of a hundred legends, Cuchullin, Dairmud, Oisin and others are wielders of magical powers. One of the most beautiful of these stories tells of Oisin in Tir-na-noge. Oisin with his companions journeys along by the water's ...
— AE in the Irish Theosophist • George William Russell

... and another long flash of bluish light, and this time it was alongside the boat, and might almost have been reached with an oar. The correspondent saw an enormous fin speed like a shadow through the water, hurling the crystalline spray and leaving ...
— Men, Women, and Boats • Stephen Crane

... jammed a fin in his haste to escape from his cubby, but I see him often, and always with that sideways gait. I hope he is cured forever of making of himself a ...
— Lord Dolphin • Harriet A. Cheever

... and often to explain her troubles and griefs, and devise means of rescue for her adored Captain. Many a meal did Finucane furnish for her and the child there. It was an honour to his little rooms to be visited by such a lady; and as she went down the staircase with her veil over her face, Fin would lean over the balustrade looking after her, to see that no Temple Lovelace assailed her upon the road, perhaps hoping that some rogue might be induced to waylay her, so that he, Fin, might have the pleasure of rushing to her rescue, and breaking the ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray

... back to her sea. But it was a strange, monstrous thing he saw. From her gleaming neck down to the ground was dank, shapeless form. So a walrus or huge seal might appear, could it totter about erect upon low, fin-like feet. There was no grace of shape, no tapering tail, no shiny scales, only an appearance of horrid quivering on the skin, that here and there seemed glossy ...
— The Mermaid - A Love Tale • Lily Dougall

... submarine creeping along under the surface," he told the others jokingly. "Then wouldn't we wish we'd brought along a few bombs—the kind they dropped on that Hun bridge the night we went with the raiders. Right now I could almost imagine that shark's dorsal-fin was a periscope belonging to ...
— Air Service Boys Over the Atlantic • Charles Amory Beach

... careful, son," said Billy Williams to Jesse, who had raised three fine grayling and lost them all. "The mouth of a grayling is very tender. You can't fight him as hard as you can a trout. Let him run. When he gets that big black fin up crossways of the stream he pulls like a ton. After a while he will begin to go deep; then you want to lift him gently all the time, until in a few minutes you can get the net under him. I would rather fish grayling than trout, although some think trout ...
— The Young Alaskans on the Missouri • Emerson Hough

... "'F the Police ever suspect me an' make a search, they'll not fin' me holdin' a prayer-meetin', same's they did you not so very long ago. Le'me see—how much was yer fine, anyway?" with ...
— A Man of Two Countries • Alice Harriman

... beside the man just as he set one foot on the bottom rung of the ladder, and skittered away past one fin of the ship before exploding. Two others burst against the hull, scattering metal fragments, and another puffed on the upright of the ladder just ...
— Exile • Horace Brown Fyfe

... and after the line had been given twice and hauled in again, there was a gleam of orange and gold, then a flash as the captive turned upon its side, and before it could give another beat with its powerful caudal fin, Shaddy deftly thrust the big hook in one of its gills, and the next moment the dorado was dragged over the gunwale to lay for a moment in the bright sunshine a mass of dazzling orange and gold, apparently astonished or half stunned. The next it was beating the bottom heavily with its tail, leaping ...
— Rob Harlow's Adventures - A Story of the Grand Chaco • George Manville Fenn

... had just picked up a small copper coin in his own avenue, and had been observed by one of the itinerating mendicant race, who, grudging the transfer of the piece into the peer's pocket, exclaimed, "O, gie't to me, my lord;" to which the quiet answer was, "Na, na; fin' a fardin' for ...
— Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character • Edward Bannerman Ramsay

... is a savage cetacean, probably the same with the "thrasher," about fifteen feet in length, blunt-nosed, strong of jaw, with cruel teeth. On its back is a fin beginning about two thirds the way from tip to tail, running close to the latter, and then sloping away to a point, like the jib of a ship. In the largest this is some five feet long on the back, and eight or ten feet in height,—so large, that, when the creature ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 87, January, 1865 • Various

... quiet after rain, and have all manner of pains and pleasures that we know not of now. Consciousness, and ganglia, and suchlike, are after all but theories. And who knows? This God may not be cruel when all is done; he may relent and be good to us a la fin des fins. Think of how he tempers our afflictions to us, of how tenderly he mixes in bright joys with the grey web of trouble and care that we call our life. Think of how he gives, who takes away. Out of the bottom of the miry clay I ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 23 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... occasionally detect a faint something that might possibly be the sails of the longboat, although he was by no means sure even as to that, opining that what he had seen, if indeed he had seen anything at all, might be the distant fin of a prowling shark. ...
— Turned Adrift • Harry Collingwood

... can judge from what remains of his works, he was distinguished rather by elegance than by force. A considerable fragment on the Blessings of Peace has been translated by Mr. J. A. Symonds in his work on the Greek poets. He is made the subject of a very bitter allusion by Pindar (Ol. ii. s. fin. c. Schol.) We may suppose that the stern and lofty spirit of Pindar had little sympathy with the "tearful" (Catullus, xxxviii.) strains of Simonides or ...
— On the Sublime • Longinus

... the body diminishing rapidly behind. The short fore-leg terminated abruptly without fingers or nails, but was overgrown with a number of short thickly placed brush-hairs, the hind-leg was replaced by a tail-fin resembling a whale's. The animal wanted teeth, but was instead provided with two masticating plates, one in the gum the other in the under jaw. The udders of the female, which abounded in milk, were placed between the fore-limbs. The flesh and milk resembled those ...
— The Voyage of the Vega round Asia and Europe, Volume I and Volume II • A.E. Nordenskieold

... Linnaeus. French. "Bec-fin rouge-gorge," "Rouge gorge." The Robin, like the Hedgesparrow, is a common resident in all the Islands, and I cannot find that its numbers are increased at any time of year by migration. But on the other hand I should think a good ...
— Birds of Guernsey (1879) • Cecil Smith

... of his imagination; and then no matter what the age, beauty, or wit of the charmer may be—no matter whether it be Lady Delacour or Belinda Portman. I think I know Clarence Hervey's character au fin fond, and I could lead him where I pleased: but don't be alarmed, my dear; you know I can't lead him into matrimony. You look at me, and from me, and you don't well know which way to look. You are surprised, perhaps, after all that passed, all that I felt, and all that I still ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. III - Belinda • Maria Edgeworth

... who would clutch the mane— There's no spell to help and no charm to save! Who rides him will never return again, Were he as strong, O were he as brave As Fin-mac-Coul, of whom they'll tell— He thrashed the devil and ...
— Elves and Heroes • Donald A. MacKenzie

... on diff'rent farms till I marries and my fust wife am Emma Williams and a cullud preacher marries us at her house. Us picked cotton after dat and den I rents a place on de halvers for five year and after sev'ral years I buys eighty acres of land. Fin'ly us done paid dat out and done some repairs and den us sep'rate after livin' twenty-three year together. So I gives dat place to her and de six chillen and I walks out ready to ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves - Texas Narratives, Part 1 • Works Projects Administration

... O Emir, not so fast, I pray you! Better a double mouthful of stale porpoise fat, with a fin bone in it, than so many questions ...
— The Prince of India - Or - Why Constantinople Fell - Volume 2 • Lew. Wallace

... the eyes of an ordinary observer, our dinner would seem to be at an end. But no—strictly speaking, it is just going to begin. About an hour ago did we, standing on the very beautiful bridge of Perth, see that identical salmon, with his back-fin just visible above the translucent tide, arrowing up the Tay, bold as a bridegroom, and nothing doubting that he should spend his honeymoon among the gravel-beds of Kinnaird or Moulinearn, or the rocky sofas of the Tummel, or the green marble couches ...
— Recreations of Christopher North, Volume 2 • John Wilson

... sorts of vegetables were for sale, and the groper-fish, shark-fin soup, meats minced with herbs and onions, poultry cut up and sold in pieces, stewed goose, bird's-nest soup, rose-leaf soup with garlic—heaven with the other place, Scott called it—and scores of other eatables for native palates, and ...
— Four Young Explorers - Sight-Seeing in the Tropics • Oliver Optic

... behin' me," remarked Quintana carelessly. "If Sanchez fin' us, it is well; if he shall not, that also is ...
— The Flaming Jewel • Robert W. Chambers

... Nest Bud-ball Yet-bean War; and Shark's Fin, Loung-fong Chea; and Duck, Gold-silver Tone Arp; eggs with Shrimp Yook; cake called Rose Sue; and Ting Moy, which was a Canton preserve; and various other things that I picked out from the names Mr. ...
— Lady Betty Across the Water • Charles Norris Williamson and Alice Muriel Williamson

... suddenly in the very midst of the boats, and, as he rolls from side to side, he strikes one of them with his fin, staving it in and making it a wreck upon the water. The drowning men are picked up by their companions, and the whale is again pursued. He is now in the death-flurry, spinning round and round, ...
— The Bushman - Life in a New Country • Edward Wilson Landor

... que je souffre; et il sait que je suis innocent. Voil le motif de ma confiance, mon coeur et ma raison me crient qu'elle ne me trompera pas. Laissons donc faire les hommes et la destine; apprenons souffrir sans murmure; tout doit la fin rentrer dans Fordre, et mon tour viendra tt ou tard.' Rousseau's Works, ...
— Life Of Johnson, Vol. 2 • Boswell

... Thereupon wild Lemminkainen Looked beneath the magic vessel, Peering through the crystal waters, Spake and these the words be uttered: "Does not rest upon a sand-bar, Nor upon a rock, nor tree-snag, But upon the back and shoulders Of the mighty pike of Northland, On the fin-bones of the monster." Wainamoinen, old and trusty, Spake these words to Lemminkainen: "Many things we find in water, Rocks, and trees, and fish, and sea-duck; Are we on the pike's broad shoulders, On the fin-bones of the monster, Pierce the waters with thy broadsword, Cut the monster into ...
— The Kalevala (complete) • John Martin Crawford, trans.

... beast. fiesta feast, festivity. figle m. ophicleide (wind instrument). figura figure, shape. figurar to figure, represent, imagine. fijar to fix, fasten. fijo fixed, firm. fila line of soldiers. filiacion f. description. fin m. end; en ——, por —— finally, lastly, in fine; a fin (de) in order. fingir to feign. fino fine, delicate, polite. firmamento firmament, sky. firmar to sign, subscribe. firme firm, strong. fisco fisc, exchequer. fisico physical. fisonomia physiognomy. flaco ...
— Novelas Cortas • Pedro Antonio de Alarcon

... Barra was suddenly in a wood, looking across a wide field. Grain waved in the breeze and here and there, the silhouettes of both long-neck and fin-back could be seen, half hidden by ...
— The Weakling • Everett B. Cole

... of their short spears. The very otter scarcely exceeds them in power over the finny race, and so true is the aim of these savages, even under water, that all the fish we procured from them were pierced either close behind the lateral fin, or in the very centre of the head, It is certain, from their indifference to them, that the natives seldom eat fish when they can get anything else. Indeed, they seemed more anxious to take the small turtle, which, sunning themselves on the trunks ...
— Two Expeditions into the Interior of Southern Australia, Complete • Charles Sturt

... acharya. (M.) Supra note[155] in fin. The injunction evidently has reference to one whose office or character entitles him to the respect and obedience of those about him, pupils ...
— Hindu Law and Judicature - from the Dharma-Sastra of Yajnavalkya • Yajnavalkya

... to have heard the saying, whether of Talleyrand or of any one else, That all the world is a wiser man than any man in the world. Had it been said even by the Devil, it would nevertheless be false. I have often indeed heard the saying, On peut etre plus FIN qu'un autre, mais pas plus FIN que tous les autres. But observe that 'fin' means cunning, not wise. The difference between this assertion and the one you refer to is curious and worth examining. It is quite certain, there is always some one ...
— The Life of John Sterling • Thomas Carlyle

... admirable, & vn desir enrager d'y aller & d'y estre, trouuat les iours trop reculez de la nuict pour faire le voyage si desire, & le poinct ou les heures pour y aller trop lentes, & y estant, trop courtes pour vn si agreable seiour & delicieux amusement.—En fin il a le faux martyre: & se trouue des Sorciers si acharnez a son seruice endiable, qu'il n'y a torture ny supplice qui les estonne, & diriez qu'ils vont au vray martyre & a la mort pour l'amour de luy, aussi gayement que s'ils alloient a ...
— The Witch-cult in Western Europe - A Study in Anthropology • Margaret Alice Murray

... little ignorant countrywoman know of Platonism? Faugh! there is more than one woman we see in society smiling about from house to house, pleasant and sentimental and formosa superne enough; but I fancy a fish's tail is flapping under her fine flounces, and a forked fin ...
— The Newcomes • William Makepeace Thackeray

... wanted to see how Georges got on. It was early spring then. Hope and love and the April sunshine agreed with the young man. He was much stronger by June, and did well at the hospital and at his work. He had reached the end of his fin d'aunee examinations; a year's respite was before him now before beginning to pass for his doctorate. Le Noir thought that if he could pass the next winter in the south of France he would be quite set up, and lost no time in imparting this idea to Georges. But Georges ...
— Dreams and Dream Stories • Anna (Bonus) Kingsford

... they chose To deck their tails by way of hose (They never thought of shoon), For such a use was much too thin, - It tore against the caudal fin, And ...
— Fifty Bab Ballads • William S. Gilbert

... Endridson, Gudbrand Johnson and many of the Cup-bearers. In general, there were four men on every half rowers' seat. With King Haco, Magnus Earl of Orkney left Bergen; and the King gave him a good galley. These Barons were also with the King, Briniolf Johnson, Fin Gautson, Erling Alfson, Erlend Red, Bard of Hestby, Eilif of Naustadale, Andrew Pott, Ogmund Krekidants, Erling Ivarson, John Drotning. Gaut of Meli, and Nicholas of Giska were behind with Prince Magnus ...
— The Norwegian account of Haco's expedition against Scotland, A.D. MCCLXIII. • Sturla oretharson

... fin' it slow, so she ax de boy to go Somet'ing better dan a mile on fifteen minute, An' he's touch heem up, Guillaume; so dat horse he lay for home, An' de nex' t'ing Victorine she ...
— Humour of the North • Lawrence J. Burpee

... this morning an immense number of fin-backed whales, some of which were quite close to the vessel. In the course of half an hour I counted thirty of them. Could they have been feeding on the phosphorescent ...
— Journals Of Two Expeditions Of Discovery In North-West And Western Australia, Vol. 1 (of 2) • George Grey

... bottom, and the stream is quick and clear, conditions such as this famous fish, described by Dr. Fleming as the "grey salmon," has a liking for. It has grey longitudinal lines—hence its name—and a violet-coloured dorsal fin barred with brown; it is best in the winter and early spring months, and spawns in those of April and May. The French, who denounce the chub as "un villain," pronounce the grayling "un chevalier." And Gesner says, that in his country, ...
— Handbook to the Severn Valley Railway - Illustrative and Descriptive of Places along the Line from - Worcester to Shrewsbury • J. Randall

... references to his usage of terre, mentioned in Todd's Dictionary, but not given (Collier's Shakspeare, vol. iv. p. 65., note), namely, 6th cap. of Epistle to Ephesians, prop. init.; and 3rd of that to Colossians, prop. fin. ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 188, June 4, 1853 • Various

... not in a shop-window with any mountebank. Oh, Gerty, do you know who is your latest rival in the stationers' windows? The woman who dresses herself as a mermaid and swims in a transparent tank, below water—Fin-fin they call her. I suppose you have not been reading ...
— Macleod of Dare • William Black

... the same fundamental elements as the fore-leg of the Horse or the Dog, or the Ape or Man; and here you will notice a very curious thing,—the hinder limbs are absent. Now, let us make another jump. Let us go to the Codfish: here you see is the forearm, in this large pectoral fin—carrying your mind's eye onward from the flapper of the Porpoise. And here you have the hinder limbs restored in the shape of these ventral fins. If I were to make a transverse section of this, I should find just the same organs that we have before noticed. So ...
— The Present Condition of Organic Nature • Thomas H. Huxley

... that he possessed more skill, industry, or even luck, than his fellow-workmen, but that the spirits of the mine had directed him to the treasure. The employment and apparent occupation of these subterranean gnomes or fiends, led very naturally to identify the Fin, or Laplander, with the Kobold; but it was a bolder stretch of the imagination which confounded this reserved and sullen race with the livelier and gayer spirit which bears correspondence with the British fairy. Neither can we be surprised that the duergar, ...
— Letters On Demonology And Witchcraft • Sir Walter Scott

... invested and padded animal as the insect does to the chrysalis that so roundingly envelopes it. This peculiarity is strikingly evinced in the head, as in some part of this book will be incidentally shown. It is also very curiously displayed in the side fin, the bones of which almost exactly answer to the bones of the human hand, minus only the thumb. This fin has four regular bone-fingers, the index, middle, ring, and little finger. But all these are permanently lodged in their fleshy covering, as the ...
— Moby-Dick • Melville

... tape, Or lace for your cape, My dainty duck, my dear—a? Any silk, any thread, Any toys for your head, Of the new'st and fin'st, fin'st wear—a? Come to the pedlar, Money's a meddler, That doth ...
— Old Roads and New Roads • William Bodham Donne

... meeting the Squalla he knew his ground. Also he knew something of Sam Carr's undertaking. The main camp was four miles up the stream. The deep fin-keel of the yawl barred him from crossing the shoals at the river mouth except on a twelve-foot tide. So he lay at the boom, planning to go up the river next morning in the canoe he towed astern in lieu ...
— Burned Bridges • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... certain impassivity of features and manner which some fin de siecle oracle of the cities had pronounced good form, but he was not wholly able to conceal his relief. Such an arrangement was entirely to his liking. It solved the situation satisfactorily ...
— Jeanne of the Marshes • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... heaps an' heaps o' gol',' he'd say as he pulled at his stubby gray whiskers. 'Marse Spruce-tree, yondah, he done tole me to jes' keep a diggin' an' I'd sho fin' gol'. When I 'se jes' 'bout to gib up, an' I does sometimes, yes, sah, I does, ole Marse Spruce-tree he jes' stan' up yondah on de hillside an' laff an' say, "Why, Rufus, yuse is altogedder wufless." Ole Brer Rabbit, he nod he haid an' 'spress heself ...
— Buffalo Roost • F. H. Cheley

... Yankees come in here 'bout July of de year and dey had a big scrap in Helena wid 'em and us could hear de cannons fifteen miles off and den dey would make dere trips out foragin' for stuff, corn and sich, and dey would take all de cotton dey could fin', but our mens, dey would hide de cotton in de thickets an' canebrakes iffen dey had time or either dey would burn it up 'fore de Yankees come if dey could. I 'member one day we had on han' 'bout hundred bales at de gin ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves - Arkansas Narratives Part 3 • Works Projects Administration

... a corpulent carp Who wanted to play on a harp, But to his chagrin So short was his fin That he couldn't reach ...
— The Jingle Book • Carolyn Wells

... Jackson, this Ma'tine's a cur'ous chap—mo cur'ous than I be, I reckon. He's been actin' cur'ous ever since he seed me in the horspital. It's all cur'ous. 'Fore he come, doctors en folks was trying ter fin' out 'bout me, en this Ma'tine 'lows he knows all 'bout me. Ef he wuzn't so orful glum, he'd be a good chap anuff, ef he is cur'ous. Hit's all a-changin' somehow, en yet' tisn't. Awhile ago nobody knowd 'bout me, en they ...
— Taken Alive • E. P. Roe

... him closer. Reluctantly he came, not yet broken in spirit, though his strength had sped. He rolled at times with a shade of the old vigor, with a pathetic manifestation of the temper that became a hero. I could see the long, slender tip of his dorsal fin, then his broad tail and finally the gleam of his silver side. Closer he came and slowly circled around the boat, eying me with great, accusing eyes. I measured him with a fisherman's glance. What a great fish! Seven feet, I calculated, at the ...
— Tales of Fishes • Zane Grey

... the senseless hands afloat or spread on the waters, as if in ghastly benediction. And then, as I put up helm, as if hauled down on a line, the trunk and head disappeared from view and a bloody smear came up, oozing and spreading. Jarvis called out that he had seen a shark's fin. ...
— Foe-Farrell • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... more trouble; it certainly looks remarkably like a fish. But the fin of its tail is horizontal, not vertical. Its front flippers differ altogether from the corresponding fins of fish; their bones are the same as those occurring in the forelegs of mammals, only shorter and more crowded ...
— The Whence and the Whither of Man • John Mason Tyler

... is found in Addison's Tatler (No. 86), but "to tip" in the sense of to gratify is not common before Smollett, who uses it more than once or twice in this sense (cf. Roderick Random, chap. xiv. ad fin.) ...
— Travels Through France and Italy • Tobias Smollett

... principle that the most intimate cognizance of the spectator's existence is a characteristic of the lowest types of dramatic production (v. Part I, ASec. 1, fin.). The use of soliloquy, aside and monologue all indicate the effort of the lines to put the player on terms of intimacy with his public. But even this is transcended by the frequent recurrence in jocular vein of deliberate, conscious and direct address of the audience, ...
— The Dramatic Values in Plautus • William Wallace Blancke

... and fossil, exposed to the most diverse conditions, living in the most distant climes, and at immensely remote periods, fitted to wholely different ends, yet to find large groups united by a similar type of structure. When we for instance see bat, horse, porpoise-fin, hand, all built on same structure{145}, having bones{146} with same name, we see there is some deep bond of union between them{147}, to illustrate this is the foundation and objects what is called the Natural System; and which is foundation of distinction of true and adaptive ...
— The Foundations of the Origin of Species - Two Essays written in 1842 and 1844 • Charles Darwin

... knowing his fine taste for sculpture and painting, sent him to Italy, and the Nouv. Dict. Hist. gives this anecdote: "La Pape instruit de son merite, voulut le voir, et lui donna une assez longue audience, sur la fin de laquelle le Notre s'ecria en s'adressant au Pape: J'ai vu les plus grands hommes du monde, Votre Saintete, et le Roi mon maitre. Il y a grande difference, dit le Pape; le Roi est un grand prince victorieux, je suis un pauvre pretre ...
— On the Portraits of English Authors on Gardening, • Samuel Felton

... animals in the water which he had never seen before. He swam under them and sniffed at their tarry trousers, until they landed on the rocks: all but one, Olav Pedersen, a strong man but a slow swimmer. A fin arose above the water between Olav and the shore. He knew what that meant, and his heart failed him. Three times he called for help and Wishart threw off his wet clothes and plunged into the sea. ...
— The Book of the Bush • George Dunderdale

... my liege; and gramercy, the air of England sharpens the scent; for in this villein and motley country, made up of all races,—Saxon and Fin, Dane and Fleming, Pict and Walloon,—it is not as with us, where the brave man and the pure descent are held chief in honour: here, gold and land are, in truth, name and lordship; even their popular name for their national assembly of the Witan is, 'The Wealthy.' ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... excellent bathing places, where the salt water can be washed off the skin. The sea is delightfully tepid, but it is not without risk,—it becomes deep within biscuit-toss, there is a strong under-tow, and occasionally an ugly triangular fin may be seen cruizing about in unpleasant proximity. As our naked feet began to blister, we suddenly turned to the left, away from the sea; and, after crossing about 100 yards of prairillon, one of the prettiest of its kind, we found ourselves at Bwamange, the village of King Langobumo. ...
— Two Trips to Gorilla Land and the Cataracts of the Congo Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... marble staircase if his porter had not been on the point of vanishing with his bags. That night on reaching home he stayed in the bathtub for an hour, just lying there in the warm, soothing liquid, only moving to dapple his fingers now and then as a lazy fish moves a languid fin. God's country! ...
— Gigolo • Edna Ferber

... to die, Bet; Fin going back to the good God," panted Mrs. Granger." he doctor have been, and he says mebbe it'll last till morning, mebbe not. I'm going back to Him as knows best,—it's a rare sight of good ...
— A Girl of the People • L. T. Meade

... snake-like neck of the monster sweeping about madly among the men. In the water his vast tail was lashing the surface of the sea, and churning it into foam. Here I once more took aim immediately under the fore-fin, where there was no scaly covering. Once more I fired. This time it was with fatal effect; and after one or two convulsive movements the monster, with a low, deep bellow, let his head fall and gasped out ...
— A Strange Manuscript Found in a Copper Cylinder • James De Mille

... "Je vis Milord Rochester comme il sortoit de conseil fort chagrin; et, sur la fin du souper, il lui en echappe quelque chose." Bonrepaux, Feb. 18/28. 1656. See also Barillon, ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 2 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... sperm whales," said Larry, "their spouts ar'n't bushy enough; they ar'n't Sulphur-bottoms, or they wouldn't stay up so long; they ar'n't Hump-backs, for they ar'n't got any humps; they ar'n't Fin-backs, for you won't catch a Finback so near a ship; they ar'n't Greenland whales, for we ar'n't off the coast of Greenland; and they ar'n't right whales, for it wouldn't be right to say so. I tell ...
— Redburn. His First Voyage • Herman Melville

... Ga-lant-ly they respondid, battherin' the sides av the mysterious locomotive containin' the bloody an' rapacious soldiery av threacherous England wid nickel-plated Mauser bullets, ontil she hiccoughs indacintly, an' wid a bellow to bate St. Fin Barr's bull, kicks herself ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves



Words linked to "Fin" :   equip, ornamentation, jalousie, fit out, swim, water sport, aquatics, machine, figure, ship, digit, ornament, spline, decoration, stabilizer, automobile, outfit, stabiliser, pectoral fin, fit, member, car, ray, extremity, auto, fish, motorcar, vane, shoe, appendage, slat



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