Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




European country   /jˌʊrəpˈiən kˈəntri/   Listen
European country

noun
1.
Any one of the countries occupying the European continent.  Synonym: European nation.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"European country" Quotes from Famous Books



... the Union, the Catholic clergy in their schools and colleges have propagated the traditional usage of their Church. Hence a Babel of pronunciations and systems existing and practised side by side, in a picturesque confusion such as no European country ever knew; and hence the general willingness to accept a single method, especially one that is ...
— Latin Pronunciation - A Short Exposition of the Roman Method • Harry Thurston Peck

... boys in Ohio, organized in clubs, increased the average yield of corn from 35 bushels to 81 bushels per acre. The average returns per acre from the soil of the United States were lower before the war than in any European country, except Russia. The following table gives the production per acre of four cereals in the United States and five European countries in 1913. The same relative position of the United States would be shown if we took the average production of these countries ...
— Community Civics and Rural Life • Arthur W. Dunn

... inability of the Soviet-style economy to modernize capital plant and motivate workers. GNP grew about 1% in 1988 and declined by 1% in 1989. Since 1985 external debt has more than doubled, to nearly $20 billion. In recent years Hungary has moved further than any other East European country in experimenting with decentralized and market-oriented enterprises. These experiments have failed to jump-start the economy because of: limitations on funds for privatization; continued subsidization ...
— The 1990 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... protection as against free trade, and so on. Strange, by-the-bye, that Cuba, the last place to foster the slave trade, was of all spots of the earth the first to carry free-trade principles into practical effect, long before they were recognised in any European country.' ...
— Phantom Fortune, A Novel • M. E. Braddon

... influence of the new models both of thought and style which it gave to the world in the writers of Greece and Rome was at first felt only as a fresh check to the revival of English poetry or prose. Though England shared more than any European country in the political and ecclesiastical results of the New Learning, its literary results were far less than in the rest of Europe, in Italy, or Germany, or France. More alone ranks among the great classical scholars of the sixteenth century. Classical learning indeed ...
— History of the English People, Volume V (of 8) - Puritan England, 1603-1660 • John Richard Green

... Mediterranean was the basis of Roman power, and a short journey in almost any direction from it would have taken the traveller completely from under the protection of the eagles. Not so is it with British India. From no European country is India so remote as from England. The two regions are separated by the ocean, by seas, by deserts, and by some of the most powerful nations. Their sole means of union are found in the leading cause of their separation. England owes her Indian empire to her empire of the sea. India ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. I, No. 1, Nov. 1857 • Various

... line (chiefly State railways), 57,000 m. of telegraph line, while excellent roads, canals, and navigable rivers facilitate communication; 65 per cent. of the people are Protestants; education is compulsory and more highly developed than in any other European country; the energies of the increasing population have in recent years found scope for their action in their growing colonial possessions; the military system imposes upon every German a term of seven years' service, three in active service, and the remainder in the ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... resembles the present condition of our British commonwealth. It is a platitude, indeed, to say that "this is an age of transition." But it would be truer and more graphic perhaps to put it that this is an age in which England, and for the matter of that every other European country as well, is passing through something like the ...
— Post-Prandial Philosophy • Grant Allen

... their school. Free-traders have at times attempted to deny the truth of the statement; but every impartial investigation thus far has conclusively proved that labor is better paid, and the average condition of the laboring man more comfortable, in the United States than in any European country. ...
— Twenty Years of Congress, Vol. 1 (of 2) • James Gillespie Blaine

... location between Greenland and Europe; westernmost European country; Reykjavik is the northernmost national capital in the world; more land covered by glaciers than in ...
— The 2002 CIA World Factbook • US Government

... of equipment; and the shortest man of them rises, I think, towards seven feet, some are nearly nine feet high. Men from all countries; a hundred and odd come annually, as we saw, from Russia,—a very precious windfall: the rest have been collected, crimped, purchased out of every European country, at enormous expense, not to speak of other trouble to his Majesty. James Kirkman, an Irish recruit of good inches, cost him 1,200 pounds before he could be got inveigled, shipped and brought safe to hand. ...
— History Of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Volume V. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... anxious to become a sailor; but a single voyage cured him of his desire for a seafaring life, although not of his love for travel. For some years afterwards he was a rolling stone, sometimes soldier and sometimes engineer, visiting one European country after another. In 1771 he obtained a government appointment in Mauritius, a spot which was the subject of his first book (see TRAVEL AND ADVENTURE, Vol. XIX), and which was afterwards made the scene of "Paul and Virginia." In his "Nature Studies," 1783, he showed an enthusiasm for nature that contrasted ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol VII • Various

... must be aware that in every country in the world there is now bitter suspicion of and keen hostility towards merely diplomatic representatives. One of the most significant features of the time is the evident desire of the Labour movement in every European country to take part in a collateral conference of Labour that shall meet when and where the Peace Congress does and deliberate and comment on its proceedings. For a year now the demand of the masses for such a Labour conference has been growing. It marks a distrust of officialdom whose intensity ...
— In The Fourth Year - Anticipations of a World Peace (1918) • H.G. Wells

... year 1468 a hundred and fifty merchant vessels were counted entering the harbor of Sluys it one time. Besides the rich factories of the Hanseatic League, there were here fifteen trading companies, with their countinghouses, and many factories and merchants' families from every European country. Here was established the market of all northern products for the south, and of all southern and Levantine products for the north. These passed through the Sound, and up the Rhine, in Hanseatic vessels to Upper Germany, or were transported by ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... been assimilated by the French manufacturing world, as food is assimilated by a living body. Thanks to the introduction of materials other than rags, France can produce paper more cheaply than any other European country. Dutch paper, as David foresaw, no longer exists. Sooner or later it will be necessary, no doubt, to establish a Royal Paper Manufactory; like the Gobelins, the Sevres porcelain works, the Savonnerie, and the ...
— Eve and David • Honore de Balzac

... sharp line of division in politics corresponds with the sharp line of division in religion. On the one side there is Freethought and Republicanism, and on the other Catholicism and Monarchy. Even in England, which at present knows less of the naked despotism of the Catholic Church than any other European country, we are gradually approximating to a similar state of things. Freethougnt is appearing upon the public stage, and will play its peculiar part as naturally as religion does. Those who fancy that theology and politics have no necessary relations, that you may operate in the ...
— Flowers of Freethought - (First Series) • George W. Foote

... Dracaena draco is mentioned as growing in the vicinity of Gadeira, the Greek name of the city. Now, some of these trees still exist in certain public and private gardens, and attract so much the more attention in that they are not met with in any other European country. However, although historically Cadiz finds her title to nobility on every page of the Greek and Latin authors, and although her Phenician origin is averred, nowhere has such origin, in a monumental and epigraphic sense, left ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 832, December 12, 1891 • Various

... creation of his Northern capital was a piece of work that might have been done by some Eastern despot; and in the preceding century something like it had been done by Shah Jehan, when he created the new city of Delhi. In no European country could such an undertaking have been attempted. It pleased Catharine II., in after-days, to say of Peter, that "he introduced European manners and European costumes amongst a European people"; but this was only a piece ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 8, Issue 45, July, 1861 • Various

... monarchies, as before said. Aristocrats, members of privileged classes, are less patient of restriction, and more prone to take the righting of what they call their wrongs into their own hands, than are other men. Violence of all kinds was for centuries more common in Scotland than in any other European country that had made the same advances in civilization; and the troubles that overtook so many of her monarchs were the natural consequences of their position. The House of Stuart has been called "the Fated Line"; and it deserved the name, because it stood nominally at the head of a ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 16, No. 93, July, 1865 • Various

... countries! If our conditions with their ordered activities and their assured future at home and abroad constitute a "hopeless confusion," how shall we characterize the conditions of many another country? I can see in no European country a condition of safety and an assured outlook into the future similar to that prevailing in the German empire. I have already said on the former occasion that my position as minister of foreign affairs made it impossible for me to be specific. But everyone who ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. X. • Kuno Francke

... War, had begun to spin their own cotton and to send the finished product to all parts of the world. American shoe manufacturers had developed their art to a point where "American shoes" had acquired a distinctive standing in practically every European country. ...
— Modern American Prose Selections • Various

... desperate cures for the fundamental disorganization of society. The issue of a revolutionary struggle shows what is the true sovereign power in the revolutionized state. So strong is the interest of mankind, at least in any European country, in favour of some sort of settled rule, that civil disturbance will, if left to itself, in general end in the supremacy of some power which by securing the safety at last gains the attachment of the people. The ...
— Handbook of Home Rule (1887) • W. E. Gladstone et al.

... translation of Professor Haeckel's work, the English reader has access to the latest doctrines of the Continental school of evolution, in its application to the history of man. It is in Germany, beyond any other European country, that the impulse given by Darwin twenty years ago to the theory of evolution has influenced the whole tenor of philosophical opinion. There may be, and are, differences in the degree to which the ...
— Freedom in Science and Teaching. - from the German of Ernst Haeckel • Ernst Haeckel

... its feet, however, a well-manned American watch concern has all it can do. It need have no qualms about foreign rivalry, for no European country has ever yet been able to build up a factory system that could touch that of the United States, either in quality or quantity of output. As a result most nations have given over trying to. Our watches can be made cheaper and hence in greater numbers than those of other ...
— Christopher and the Clockmakers • Sara Ware Bassett

... exists only in one of the MSS. of the Bodleian Library at Oxford. But they very soon received the care of M. Paulin Paris, the most indefatigable student that in a century of examination of the older European literature any European country has produced, and after more than half a century of enthusiastic resuscitation by M. Paris, by his son M. Gaston, and by others, the whole body of them has been thoroughly overhauled and put at the disposal of those who do not care to read the original, in ...
— The Flourishing of Romance and the Rise of Allegory - (Periods of European Literature, vol. II) • George Saintsbury



Words linked to "European country" :   Balkans, Finland, Republic of Croatia, Scandinavian country, Espana, Principality of Andorra, German Democratic Republic, Swiss Confederation, Schweiz, Scotland, Republic of Iceland, Romania, FRG, Slovenija, Kingdom of Belgium, Polska, Belgique, Republic of Belarus, Hungary, Iceland, Holy See, Bosna i Hercegovina, Republic of Slovenia, Byelarus, Serbia and Montenegro, Slovakia, Slovenia, Kingdom of The Netherlands, Austria, Republic of San Marino, Yugoslavia, Andorra, Suisse, land, Svizzera, Republic of Finland, East Germany, Principality of Monaco, Nederland, Monaco, White Russia, Poland, Luxembourg, Oesterreich, Hrvatska, Europe, Italian Republic, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Switzerland, Czech Republic, state, Liechtenstein, Slovak Republic, Kingdom of Spain, Scandinavian nation, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, Italia, Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Portuguese Republic, Portugal, Balkan state, San Marino, Principality of Liechtenstein, Deutschland, West Germany, Republic of Moldova, Republic of Austria, Italy, Northern Ireland, Belarus, Spain, The Netherlands, Holland, Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Eire, England, Moldova, Balkan country, Moldavia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Balkan nation, Luxemburg, Federal Republic of Germany, Bosnia, Union of Serbia and Montenegro, State of the Vatican City, Republic of Hungary, Suomi, Netherlands, Roumania, Ireland, France, Byelorussia, Rumania, Belgium, Jugoslavija, Republic of Poland, Irish Republic, Belorussia, French Republic, Magyarorszag, The Holy See, country, Germany, Republic of Ireland, Flanders



Copyright © 2019 Free-Translator.com