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Dicky   /dˈɪki/   Listen
Dicky

adjective
1.
(British informal) faulty.  Synonym: dickey.



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"Dicky" Quotes from Famous Books



... it is grandiferous," replied Polly, squirming out of his grasp. "But you'd better behave yourself, Mr. Dicky-Pig, or I'll tell ...
— Three Little Cousins • Amy E. Blanchard

... round at that with greater agility than I expected, seeing that by his own account he was still feeling pretty dicky. The mist was lifting in truth, and yellow spears of sunlight were thrusting themselves through like hat ...
— The Lost Valley • J. M. Walsh

... polite He never would pronounce aright; An orator with whom a host Of those which Rome and Athens boast, In all their pride might not contend; Who, with no powers to recommend, 1030 Whilst Jackey Hume, and Billy Whitehead, And Dicky Glover,[240] sat delighted, Could speak whole days in Nature's spite, Just as those able versemen write; Great Dulman from his bed arose— Thrice did he spit—thrice wiped his nose— Thrice strove ...
— Poetical Works • Charles Churchill

... this sense of superiority came not from my being a member of the Church, but from feeling myself more civilized than they were. Looking back now at the conversation, I can remember that actually at the very moment I was talking of the Holy Ghost I was noticing how Mr. Bullock's dicky would keep escaping from his waistcoat. I wonder if the great missionary saints of the middle ages had to contend with this accumulation of social conventions with which we are faced nowadays. It seems to me that in everything—in ...
— The Altar Steps • Compton MacKenzie

... three ways of contemplating a letter written by a young lady, according to whether the recipient be a friend, is in love, or being in love, loves without hope. Skippy used all three methods. That night he placed four pairs of trousers to press under his mattress, discarded the dicky (a labor saving device formed by the junction of two cuffs and a collar which snapped into place and fulfilled the requirements of table etiquette), and painted the ends of his fingers with iodine to break himself of the habit of ...
— Skippy Bedelle - His Sentimental Progress From the Urchin to the Complete - Man of the World • Owen Johnson

... it was all quiet and everybody was staring their 'ardest at little Dicky Weed, the tailor, who was sitting with his head in his 'ands, thinking, and every now and then taking them away and looking up at the ceiling, or else leaning forward with a start and looking as if 'e saw ...
— Sailor's Knots (Entire Collection) • W.W. Jacobs

... must have been pretty popular with the ladies, because I can't think of him to this day without wanting to punch his head. At the church sociables he used to hop around among them, chipping and chirping like a dicky-bird picking up seed; and he was a great hand to play the piano, and sing saddish, sweetish songs to them. Always said the smooth thing and said it easy. Never had to choke and swallow to fetch it up. Never stepped through his partner's ...
— Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son • George Horace Lorimer

... paintings, or removing to short distances, right and left, to catch them in the most judicious lights, and making remarks on his catalogue with a pencil; and Mrs. Roundabout, from Leadenhall, who had brought her son Dicky to see the show, as she called it, declared it was the 'most finest sight she ever seed, lifting up her hand and eyes at the same time as Dicky read over the list, and charmed her by reciting the various scraps of poetry inserted in the catalogue to ...
— Real Life In London, Volumes I. and II. • Pierce Egan

... who has passed a day and night here. It was not from my being a fellow-scholar of Vestris, but from his being turned antiquary; the last passion I should have thought a macaroni would have taken. I am as proud of such a disciple as of having converted Dicky Bateman from a Chinese to a Goth. Though he was the founder of the Sharawadgi taste in England, I preached so effectually that his every pagoda took the veil. The Methodists say, one must have been very wicked before one can be of the elect—yet is that extreme more distant from the ton, which ...
— Letters of Horace Walpole, V4 • Horace Walpole

... monuments—he'd have done better to go to Cornwall with Timmy Durrant. ... "O—h," Jacob protested, as the darkness began breaking in front of him and the light showed through, but the man was reaching across him to get something—the fat Italian man in his dicky, unshaven, crumpled, obese, was opening the door and going ...
— Jacob's Room • Virginia Woolf

... domains, and much entertained Gertrude by his knowledge of them, Ethel set him down to write a letter to his father, and her own to Meta being engrossing, she did not look much more after him till Dr. May came in, and said, 'I want you to sketch off a portrait of her dicky-bird for Meta;' and he put before her a natural history with a figure of that tiny humming-bird which is endowed with ...
— The Trial - or, More Links of the Daisy Chain • Charlotte M. Yonge

... where he was, so I went back for him. I asked him if he could move. 'No,' he said, 'I think I'm hurt in the leg.' I knelt down and bandaged him up as well as I could. He was simply bleeding like a pig; and meanwhile brother Boer potted at us for all he was worth. 'How d'you feel?' I asked. 'Bit dicky; but comfortable. I didn't funk it, did I?' 'No, of course not, you juggins!' I said. 'Can you walk, d'you think?' 'I'll try.' I lifted him up and put my arm round him, and we got along for a bit; then he became awfully white and groaned, ...
— The Hero • William Somerset Maugham

... point; but in later, and perhaps less robust, days there were to be found some who took a degenerate pride in getting by craft what their fathers would have taken by force. Of such, in the early days of the eighteenth century, was Dicky of Kingswood. Had he lived a hundred or a hundred and fifty years earlier, Dicky would no doubt have been a first-class reiver, one of the "tail" of some noted Border chieftain, for he lacked neither pluck nor strength. But in his own day he preferred the suaviter in modo to the ...
— Stories of the Border Marches • John Lang and Jean Lang

... remember Dodd, many yet living will not easily forget the pleasant creature, who in those days enacted the part of the Clown to Dodd's Sir Andrew.—Richard, or rather Dicky Suett—for so in his life-time he delighted to be called, and time hath ratified the appellation—lieth buried on the north side of the cemetery of Holy Paul, to whose service his nonage and tender years ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Volume 2 • Charles Lamb

... perhaps two. Think not more than two. Strong man, but he look devilish dicky this morning. Think he ...
— The Yellow God - An Idol of Africa • H. Rider Haggard

... there he is growling and grumbling from morning to night, declaring that he'll cut the service, and go and join the Russians, and make his country rue the day; but he doesn't, and I believe he wouldn't, if they would make him an admiral and a count off-hand. My chief friend they call Dicky Snookes. His real name, though, is Algernon Godolphin Stafford, on which he rather prides himself. This was found out, so it was voted that he should be re-christened, and not be allowed under dreadful pains and penalties to assume his proper appellation in the berth; so no one thinks of calling ...
— My First Cruise - and Other stories • W.H.G. Kingston

... Thackeray and Dickens, not to mention the exquisite paintings, of which we shall have more to say presently, exhibited in the Grosvenor Gallery, and to be found in many a country mansion as a lasting memorial of Dicky Doyle." Does the writer seriously mean to tell us that Doyle could not illustrate Thackeray and Dickens at the same time and side by side with his illustrations for Punch or any other serial of a satirical character? Granted that Punch is a periodical appealing to English tastes and sympathies, ...
— English Caricaturists and Graphic Humourists of the Nineteenth Century. - How they Illustrated and Interpreted their Times. • Graham Everitt

... shaking his 'ead at him; 'it ain't to my credit. I dessay if Sam Jones and Peter Gubbins, and Charlie Stubbs and Dicky Weed 'ad been brought up the same as I was they'd 'ave been a lot ...
— Ship's Company, The Entire Collection • W.W. Jacobs

... a ripping sprinter. The captain of the track team 'll be on the lookout for you when you get to Plato. Course you're going to go there. The U. of Minn. is too big.... You'll do something for old Plato. Wish I could. But all I can do is warble like a darn' dicky-bird. Have a cigarette?... They're just starting to dance. Come on, old man. Come ...
— The Trail of the Hawk - A Comedy of the Seriousness of Life • Sinclair Lewis

... that only a woman could have said she was just the least little bit in the world below it. This happened a month before he came out to India, and five days after his one-and-twentieth birthday. The girl was nineteen—six years older than Dicky in the things of this world, that is to say—and, for the time, twice as ...
— The Works of Rudyard Kipling One Volume Edition • Rudyard Kipling

... Dicky Dore smiled his radiant smile. "Their last name's Clark. Say, ain't they the dead ringers for each other? I can't tell Dorothy from Mabel or ...
— Maida's Little Shop • Inez Haynes Irwin

... drums we'll be beating that day—not drums, but the heads of Papists. But mind what I'm saying to you now. If we lend you the instruments, you'll have to promise that you'll not carry them beyond the cross-roads this side of Dicky's Brae. You'll leave the whole of them there beyond the cross-roads, drums and all. It wouldn't do if any of the instruments got broke on us or the drums lost—which is what has happened more than once when there's been a bit of a fight. And it'll be at Dicky's Brae that ...
— Lady Bountiful - 1922 • George A. Birmingham

... I have a friend over in Wisconsin; he is a laboratory professor in mechanics, and he writes books on the side. He says a book is a pure gamble. If you win, you have that much more money to throw to the dicky-birds. If you lose, you've merely drawn the ...
— The Price • Francis Lynde

... Is there anything in the first description of Dicky Darrell that gives you a slight ...
— Americans All - Stories of American Life of To-Day • Various

... Davies in his "Dramatic Miscellanies," and from Curl in his "History of the Stage," a very unworthy production. Mrs. Norris was an actress of small note attached to Davenant's company; she was the mother of Henry Norris, a popular comedian, surnamed "Jubilee Dicky," from his performance of the part of Dicky in Farquhar's "Constant Couple." Chetwood correctly describes her as "ONE of the first women that came on the stage as an actress." To her, as to Mrs. Betterton, the objection applies that she was ...
— A Book of the Play - Studies and Illustrations of Histrionic Story, Life, and Character • Dutton Cook

... "I know you would, Dicky, I know you would," he at length uttered, grasping the hand of Barnstable with a portion of his former strength; "I know you would give the old woman one of your own limbs, if it would do a service—to the mother of a messmate—which it would not—seeing that ...
— The Pilot • J. Fenimore Cooper

... Belief in ancient Greece and elsewhere. Examples in Lapland. Early evidence as to Scotch second sight. Witches burned for this gift. Examples among the Covenanting Ministers. Early investigations by English authors: Pepys, Aubrey, Boyle, Dicky Steele, De Foe, Martin, Kirk, Frazer, Dr. Johnson. Theory of visions as caused by Fairies. Modern example of Miss H. Theory of Frazer of Tiree (1700). 'Revived impressions of sense.' Examples. Agency of Angels. Martin. Modern cases. Bodily condition of ...
— Cock Lane and Common-Sense • Andrew Lang

... the paper was printed as the case was an urgent one. He made a special call, carrying nearly a pint of the liver pills in a paper collar box. (Harrison always wore paper collars and a dicky.) ...
— Watch Yourself Go By • Al. G. Field

... here, old Dicky," he said, "you've come here to manage the dinghy for me, and not to preach and drive away all the fishes. So just light your pipe and sit still and hold your tongue, and if I find you are not strong enough to do that, I'll hail the ...
— Middy and Ensign • G. Manville Fenn

... over in this way; myself in the middle, and Dicky at the end of the beam. We did not say a word to each other; for, as I spoke no other language but my own, and he seemed about as clever as myself, we merely talked with ...
— The Adventures of a Dog, and a Good Dog Too • Alfred Elwes

... bower, and set his feathers all to rights at his looking-glass; then he bowed to himself once or twice (fancying all the while he saw another canary in the glass); then he polished his bill upon the perch to complete his toilet; and then he sang himself a delightful song. His name was Dicky. He was quite ...
— The Goat and Her Kid • Harriet Myrtle

... "Nay, Dicky Bowyer, not so," returned the knight. "It likes me not. Y' are sly indeed, but not speedy. Ye ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 8 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... of a blow, sir," said one of them. "It's too bad, for they is Dicky Jones, as has seven young 'uns, and they says he is mortal sick. The woman o' he she were bawlin' terrible fer us to go an' fetch yer, an' we resked it, but now 'tain't no use, for there ain't no boat could ever get out o' th' cove ...
— Sweetapple Cove • George van Schaick

... "don't say anything about buying the island or marrying the girl. Donovan's heart is dicky, or he thinks it is, which comes to the same thing—and any sort of worry ...
— The Island Mystery • George A. Birmingham

... you," said Nellie, "and here's a penny for Dicky," patting a little five-year-old on the head, "and here's one to buy some milk ...
— The Workingman's Paradise - An Australian Labour Novel • John Miller

... "Why, Dicky!" cried the Captain, "where have you sprung from?" and, forgetful of Barnabas, they hurried forward to greet the Viscount, who, having beaten some of the dust from his driving coat, sprang down from his high seat ...
— The Amateur Gentleman • Jeffery Farnol et al

... as the binnacle. There he stopped again, exhausted and bored. From under the lifted glass panes of the cabin skylight near by came the feeble chirp of a canary, which appeared to give him some satisfaction. He listened, smiled faintly muttered "Dicky, poor Dick—" and fell back into the immense silence of the world. His eyes closed, his head hung low over the hot brass of the binnacle top. Suddenly he stood up with a jerk and said sharply ...
— The Rescue • Joseph Conrad

... at some nobler places, Amongst the Leaders 'twas decreed Time to begin the DICKY RACES; More fam'd for laughter ...
— Rural Tales, Ballads, and Songs • Robert Bloomfield

... rage in my heart. What a cursed fool I had been not to wire from Groningen! I had fully intended to, but the extraordinary conversation I had had with Dicky Allerton had put everything else out of my head. At every hotel I had tried it had been the same story—Cooman's, the Maas, the Grand, all were full even to the bathrooms. If I had ...
— The Man with the Clubfoot • Valentine Williams

... an ungainly man, who turned twice and threatened them with a stick. The Town Councillors did not interfere, and the rabble passed bawling by the Pack-horse. Long before it came the Emigrant had recognised the ungainly man. It was Dicky Loony, the town butt. He had chivvied the imbecile a hundred times in just the same fashion, yelling "Black Cat!" after him as these young imps were yelling—though why "Black Cat" neither he nor the imps ...
— Old Fires and Profitable Ghosts • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... doin', Bill, with your a dicky, now?" Ed suddenly asked, observing that Bill Campbell was also drawing on his adicky. "Goin'," ...
— The Gaunt Gray Wolf - A Tale of Adventure With Ungava Bob • Dillon Wallace

... town, not a village, not a solitary cottage during the English Middle Ages was unvisited by him who frightened the children; they had a name for him as for the wild birds—Robin Redbreast, Dicky Swallow, Philip Sparrow, Tom Tit, Tom-a-Bedlam. And after him came the "Abram men," who were sane parodies of the crazed, and went to the fairs and wakes in motley. Evelyn says of a fop: "All his body was dressed like a maypole, or a Tom-a-Bedlam's cap." ...
— Essays • Alice Meynell

... name of seventeen little dicky-birds did you think you were up to!" we howled. "Were you going to ride ahead until dark in the childlike faith that that mare might show up somewhere? Here's a nice state of affairs. The trail is all tracked up now with our horses, and heaven knows whether she's ...
— The Mountains • Stewart Edward White

... Richard, and Friar Tuck, the latter of whom has by far the most taking song in the Opera, and which would have received a treble [or a baritone] encore, had Barkis—meaning Sir ARTHUR—"been willin'." The contest between Richard and the Friar is decidedly "Dicky." Nor must I forget the magnificent property supper in the first scene, at so much a head, where not a ham or a chicken is touched; nor must "the waits" between some of the sets be forgotten,—"waits" being so suggestive of music ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100. February 14, 1891. • Various

... would speak to any one around so early—his bailiff, as might be, or sometimes his agent, or even the foreman of the workshop or the carpenter, or any hedger or ditcher that might be there, and point out bits of the wood, and say, "That branch looks pretty dicky. No harm to cut that off short and parcel and serve the end and cap it with a zinc cap;" or, "Better be cutting the Yartle Bush for the next fallow, it chokes the gammon-rings, and I don't like to see so much standard ivy about, it's the death of trees." I am not sure ...
— Hills and the Sea • H. Belloc

... hurting a loved one, because they are loved, and will not speak the things one wants them to say, which if said might add to one's vanity and sense of importance. "So ye'll just be by yoursel' the morn, unless they put Dicky Tamson owre aside you," ...
— The Underworld - The Story of Robert Sinclair, Miner • James C. Welsh

... kind of you, Dicky dear," she called back to him mockingly, "but I think I'll practise a little self-denial ...
— Winding Paths • Gertrude Page

... been at one opera, and| instead of other spectacles, I propose to go for the first part of the evening to Ranelagh, quand la presse n'y sera pas. Lady Craufurd's new chair is, as Sir C. Williams said of Dicky's, the charming'st thing in town, et les deux laquais qui la precedent attirent les yeux de ...
— George Selwyn: His Letters and His Life • E. S. Roscoe and Helen Clergue

... West, very loyal and proven friends of Nigel Merriton, had arrived the evening before. Dacre Wynne was coming down by the seven o'clock train, Dicky Fordyce, Reginald Lefroy—both fellow officers of Merriton's regiment, and home on leave from India—and mild old Dr. Bartholomew, whom everyone respected and few did not love, and who was in attendance at most of the bachelor ...
— The Riddle of the Frozen Flame • Mary E. Hanshew

... dicky shirt- fronts belonging to Tom Titmouse —most terrible particular!" said Mrs. Tiggy-winkle. "Now I've finished my ironing; I'm going ...
— A Collection of Beatrix Potter Stories • Beatrix Potter

... have to change a word in that last paragraph. I forgot that I am no longer Margaret Spencer, but Margaret Graham, Mrs. Richard Graham, or, more probably, Mrs. "Dicky" Graham. I don't believe anybody in the world ever called ...
— Revelations of a Wife - The Story of a Honeymoon • Adele Garrison

... in his movements, glum and churlish of manner, and unpolished of speech; also I had a suspicion that he was more addicted to drink than was at all desirable in a man occupying such a responsible position in such a ship. He would doubtless have done well enough as "dicky" in an ordinary wind-jammer, but on the quarterdeck of such a craft as the Stella Maris I considered he was distinctly ...
— The First Mate - The Story of a Strange Cruise • Harry Collingwood

... empty tables toward a deserted dressing-room. In there she slid into black-velvet slippers and a dark-blue walking-skirt, pulled on over the pink silk, tucking it up around the waist so that it did not sag from beneath the hem, squirmed into a black-velvet jacket with a false dicky made to emulate a blouse-front, and a blue-velvet hat hung ...
— Gaslight Sonatas • Fannie Hurst

... appeared in the doorway, with Harry, Dicky, and Theophila clinging to her skirts, fresh from their ride, ...
— The White Wolf and Other Fireside Tales • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... bore thee, Dicky, Or some devil in hell been thy daddy. I would not swam that wan water, double-horsed, For a' the gold ...
— Sir Walter Scott and the Border Minstrelsy • Andrew Lang

... painted by five hundred when you aren't at work, of course. But while you are at work you'll work. You won't half-stop and think and talk about rare plants and dicky-birds and farinaceous fiduciary interests. You'll continue to revolve, and this new head of water will see that you ...
— Traffics and Discoveries • Rudyard Kipling

... Really I must protest against your accrediting me with such a possession. But look here, don't disappoint us all; and you won't be dull either, there are lots of people coming. Dicky Brown, for one." ...
— April's Lady - A Novel • Margaret Wolfe Hungerford

... no great matter— Letting alone more rational patter— Only to hear a parrot chatter: Not to mention that feather'd wit, The Starling, who speaks when his tongue is slit; The Pies and Jays that utter words, And other Dicky Gossips of birds, That talk with as much good sense and decorum, As many Beaks who ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood

... the boy say what he wants to, Marian," broke in her husband easily. "So, Dicky, my lad, you don't think I did just the ...
— Five Little Peppers Grown Up • Margaret Sidney

... a tree by a river a little tom-tit Sang "Willow, titwillow, titwillow!" And I said to him, "Dicky-bird, why do you sit Singing Willow, titwillow, titwillow'?" "Is it weakness of intellect, birdie?" I cried, "Or a rather tough worm in your little inside?" With a shake of his poor little head, he replied, "Oh, willow, ...
— The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan - The 14 Gilbert And Sullivan Plays • William Schwenk Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan

... Windy with vast surprise, "me mournful? Why, I sing at my work like a little dicky bird. I'm so plumb cheerful bull frogs ain't in it. You ain't ...
— The Killer • Stewart Edward White

... DICKY WYATT writes, in answer to HELVELLYN, that the word "Kettledrum" means a large social party. Among the Tartars a "kettle" represents a family, or as many as feed from one kettle; and on Tweedside it signifies a "social party," ...
— Little Folks - A Magazine for the Young (Date of issue unknown) • Various

... pot of boiling pot-liquor over my right foot, scalding it rather severely. Aunt Helen and grannie put me to bed, where I yelled with pain for hours like a mad Red Indian, despite their applying every alleviative possible. The combined forces of the burn and influenza made me a trifle dicky, so a decree went forth that I was to stay in bed until recovered from both complaints. This effectually prevented me from running in the way ...
— My Brilliant Career • Miles Franklin

... Sunday-school) the bosoms of his perverted brethren. (Hugh Fraley will leave those strings at home, and, William Grove, stop climbing over the bench.) Alas! what sorrow can evil and disobedient sons, too little conscious (Dicky Taylor, bring that insect to me) of the sacrifices and prayerful struggles of their venerable parents (no, Henry, not another drink), call down ...
— Not Pretty, But Precious • John Hay, et al.

... home in Lewisham, and went to live at the Blackheath house of our Indian uncle, which was replete with every modern convenience, and had a big garden and a great many greenhouses. We had had a lot of jolly Christmas presents, and one of them was Dicky's from father, and it was a printing-press. Not one of the eighteenpenny kind that never come off, but a real tip-topper, that you could have printed a whole newspaper out of if you could have been clever enough to make up all the stuff there is in newspapers. I don't know how people ...
— Oswald Bastable and Others • Edith Nesbit

... Poor Dicky's dead!—The bell we toll, And lay him in the deep, dark hole. The sun may shine, the clouds may rain, But Dick will never pipe again! His quilt will be as sweet as ours— Bright buttercups ...
— Under the Window - Pictures & Rhymes for Children • Kate Greenaway

... title—these all make up an agreeable pot-pourri with an old-world fragrance which ought to be able to charm you out of the preposterous nightmare of the present. But it makes one feel old to see that the conscientious author thinks that DICKY DOYLE now needs a footnote to let the present ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, February 23, 1916 • Various

... got hold of the dicky now!" exclaimed Nares, and turning round from my perquisitions, I found he had drawn forth a heavy iron box, secured to the bulkhead by chain and padlock. On this he was now gazing, not with the triumph that instantly ...
— The Wrecker • Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne

... different kinds. Monckton Milnes was a social power in London, possibly greater than Londoners themselves quite understood, for in London society as elsewhere, the dull and the ignorant made a large majority, and dull men always laughed at Monckton Milnes. Every bore was used to talk familiarly about "Dicky Milnes," the "cool of the evening"; and of course he himself affected social eccentricity, challenging ridicule with the indifference of one who knew himself to be the first wit in London, and a maker of men — of a great many ...
— The Education of Henry Adams • Henry Adams

... room. He saw Smithy's birdcage, walked over to it and stared for a moment quietly at Dicky, ...
— When I Grow Up • Richard E. Lowe

... Dicky replied that he had been snow-balling, of which there were sufficient marks on his person. His countenance was flushed and heated, and he proceeded to say that he was tired, and wanted ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, January 1844 - Volume 23, Number 1 • Various

... lodged in Carlisle Castle, and this was a breach of the day's truce. Buccleugh, as warder, tried to obtain Willie's release by peaceful means. These failing, Buccleugh did what the ballad reports, April 13, 1596. Harden and Goudilands were with Buccleugh, being his neighbours near Branxholme. Dicky of Dryhope, with others, Armstrongs, was also true to the call of duty. A few verses in the ballad are clearly by aut Gualterus aut diabolus, and none the worse for that. Salkeld, of course, was not really slain; and, if the men were "left for dead," probably they were not long in that debatable ...
— A Collection of Ballads • Andrew Lang

... were very puffy; there were a couple of blue blisters on his fingers, and across each wrist an angry-looking white wheal. The boys were sufficiently impressed, and, in spite of his wrath against Joel Ham, Dicky could not resist a certain gratification on that account. Boys take much pride in the sufferings they have borne, and their scars are always exhibited with a grave conceit. Ted displayed his hands, still betraying evidence of the morning's caning, ...
— The Gold-Stealers - A Story of Waddy • Edward Dyson

... them almost anything, Dicky Mutton, since they have made our Captain Smith the head of the government in ...
— Richard of Jamestown - A Story of the Virginia Colony • James Otis

... as a servant from a distance—as a creature seen poised on the dicky of a bowling chaise. He will pass at hand as a smart, civil fellow one meets in the inn corridor, and looks back at, and asks, and is told, "Gentleman's servant in Number 4." He will pass, in fact, all round, except with his personal ...
— St Ives • Robert Louis Stevenson

... side a nurse often carried little Dicky Bassett, the heir; but neither of the promenaders could see each other for ...
— A Terrible Temptation - A Story of To-Day • Charles Reade

... for the dicky-bird at my aunt's. There's no lack of it at the Terrace; but it is an old habit, and there always was an illusion that Ormersfield ...
— Dynevor Terrace (Vol. I) - or, The Clue of Life • Charlotte M. Yonge

... her eyebrows into the smallest possible compass, and then she drew a deep breath, folded her small hands, and started off at a terrific pace, "Gaw bess parver yan muvver yan nannie yan hughyan betty yan dicky an aunt woggles yan ellen yan emma yan croft—yan blusby yan all ve vitty children yan make dem velly good boys yan make my nastyole bunnyagoodgirl. May Yaya ...
— The Professional Aunt • Mary C.E. Wemyss

... has proved my bane,— A harder case you never heard, My wife (in other matters sane) Pretends that I'm a Dicky bird! ...
— The Bab Ballads • W. S. Gilbert

... pay it," said T-S, "it's his, and he can feed it to de dicky-birds if he vants to. ...
— They Call Me Carpenter • Upton Sinclair

... during his lifetime, it is notable that three were "Royal Academicians,"—Stanfield, Maclise, and Landseer,—one an "Associate of the Royal Academy," and, besides those already mentioned, there were in addition Richard (Dicky) Doyle, John Leech, and (now Sir) John Tenniel, Luke Fildes, and Sir Edwin Landseer, who did one drawing only, that for "Boxer," the carrier-dog, in "The Cricket on the Hearth." Onwyn, Crowquill, Sibson, Kenney Meadows, ...
— Dickens' London • Francis Miltoun

... Thank you, sir!" his visitor exclaimed. "You see I'm a smoker," he added, holding up his yellow-stained forefinger. "That is, I smoke when I can afford to. Things have been pretty dicky out in South Africa lately, you know. Terrible hard it has been ...
— The Avenger • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... their whaling neighbours. As a rule, each station was held by license from the chief of the proprietary tribe. He and tenants would stand shoulder to shoulder to resist incursions by other natives. Dicky Barrett, head-man of the Taranaki whaling-station, helped the Ngatiawa to repulse a noteworthy raid by the Waikato tribe. Afterwards, when the Ngatiawa decided to abandon their much-harried land, Barrett moved with ...
— The Long White Cloud • William Pember Reeves

... favourites; and, about 1800, Elliston and Fawcett became occasional stars. But Quick and Suett were the king's especial delight. When Lovegold, in the "Miser," drawled out "a pin a day's a groat a year," the laugh of the royal circle was somewhat loud; but when Dicky Gossip exhibited in his vocation, and accompanied the burden of his song, "Dicky Gossip, Dicky Gossip is the man," with the blasts of his powder-puff, the cachinnation was loud and long, and the gods prolonged the chorus of laughter, ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 13, No. 355., Saturday, February 7, 1829 • Various

... the Springtown wag, had once remarked that Peckham's back was more expressive than his face. On this occasion he nudged Dicky Simmons, with a view to reminding him of the fact; but Dicky, a handsome youth with a sanguine light in his blue eyes, was intent on what Harry ...
— Peak and Prairie - From a Colorado Sketch-book • Anna Fuller

... could get Dickie away from Varos he insisted on being photographed by Stephen, astride a huge cask in front of a shop, but the cask refused to keep steady—so Dicky asserted, although to all appearances it was most solidly fixed to a substantial stand. Plainly Dickie was feeling weak after his ...
— The Incomparable 29th and the "River Clyde" • George Davidson

... as I votes we try at the same time, and that's the sodger-officer as got poor Dicky Rudd his flogging," ...
— The Voyage of the Aurora • Harry Collingwood

... kissed her. "Oh, well, I won't bother about it for a while, anyway," said she. "Now I think of it, Betty is sure to be off to Newport by now, and Sally must be about to sail for Paris to buy her trousseau. She is going to marry Dicky van Snyde in the autumn (whatever she sees in him)! So I doubt if either of them could do anything about a maid for me. I won't bother at all now, but I am not going to let you wait upon me. I am ...
— The Shoulders of Atlas - A Novel • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... wouldn't hurt you, Teresa," he said. "Any one with that name would be light as a fly and awf'ly gentle—a regular dicky sort of chap!" ...
— The Human Chord • Algernon Blackwood

... Wellington take a post in the new Cabinet?" asked Dicky Sheil of O'Connell.—"Bathershin!" replied the head of the tail, "the Duke is too old a soldier to lean on a ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 1, September 12, 1841 • Various

... said Tom. "I declare Dicky always has the right thing at the right time! Good for you, boy! Fix ...
— Marjorie at Seacote • Carolyn Wells

... your apprehensive wives to see whether Dicky is well used at that school or not, don't draw Dicky into a corner of the playground, and with tender kisses and promises of inviolable secrecy coax him to open his little heart to you, and tell you whether he is really happy; leave such folly to women—it is a weakness to wriggle into ...
— It Is Never Too Late to Mend • Charles Reade



Words linked to "Dicky" :   inset, insert, colloquialism, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Britain, United Kingdom, backseat, Great Britain, UK, shirt, impaired, dickey-seat, dicky-bird, U.K.



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