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D

noun
1.
A fat-soluble vitamin that prevents rickets.  Synonyms: calciferol, cholecalciferol, ergocalciferol, viosterol, vitamin D.
2.
The cardinal number that is the product of one hundred and five.  Synonyms: 500, five hundred.
3.
The 4th letter of the Roman alphabet.



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"D" Quotes from Famous Books



... and she might therefore hope to find her at home and alone. As she approached, a great dog began a formidable barking, and his voice brought out the good woman in person. "Down, Bouncer! A won't hurt'ee, my lass. What d'ye lack ...
— Love and Life • Charlotte M. Yonge

... country's first act would be to recruit for the navy, so as to get this branch of the service into a state of preparedness. He therefore secured Franklin D. Roosevelt, assistant secretary of the navy, to write an article explaining to mothers why they should let their boys volunteer for the Navy and what ...
— The Americanization of Edward Bok - The Autobiography of a Dutch Boy Fifty Years After • Edward William Bok (1863-1930)

... the Persecuting Edict and restored the Vaudois to all their former privileges, nothing more was to be done. Cromwell, it is true, did not conceal that he was disappointed. He had looked forward to a Treaty at Turin in which his own envoys, Morland and Downing, and D'Ommeren, as envoy from the United Provinces, would have taken the leading part, and he somewhat resented Mazarin's too rapid interference and the too easy compliance of the envoys of the Cantons. The Treaty of Pignerol contained conditions that might occasion farther ...
— The Life of John Milton, Volume 5 (of 7), 1654-1660 • David Masson

... another rapid, arrived at the Cassette Portage of four hundred and sixty paces, over which the cargoes and canoes were carried in about twenty-six minutes. We next passed through a narrow channel full of rapids, crossed the Portage d'Embarras of seventy yards; and the portage of the Little Rock, of three hundred yards, at which another accident happened to one of the canoes, by the bowman slipping and letting it fall upon a rock, ...
— Narrative of a Journey to the Shores of the Polar Sea, in the Years 1819-20-21-22, Volume 1 • John Franklin

... lucky stroke—my getting partly dressed overnight! No, hold on, you little chaps—don't get uppy! I'll explain, honest I will! You see, I got up after a while and put the money there for safe-keeping. I'd like to see the thief that would look there for it! He'd get a good ...
— Three Young Knights • Annie Hamilton Donnell

... ladder, just scraping the steps with his heels, and was in the mizzen rigging with the light, in half a minute. That saved us. So near was the stranger, that we plainly heard the officer of the deck call out to his own quarter-master to "port, hard a-port—hard a-port, and be d——d to you!" Hard a-port it was, and a two-decker came brushing along on our weather beam—so near, that, when she lifted on the seas, it seemed as if the muzzles of her guns would smash our rails. The Sterling did not behave well on this ...
— Ned Myers • James Fenimore Cooper

... about judgin' other folks by yourself, Amos Burr," retorted his wife sharply. "'Tain't likely you'd ever pull anybody out o' the poorhouse 'thout slippin' in yourself, seein' as I've slaved goin' on twenty years to keep you from land-in' thar at last. The less you say about some things the better. Now, you'd jest as well set down ...
— The Voice of the People • Ellen Glasgow

... a peu de riches; presque tous les Americains ont donc besoin d'exercer une profession. Or, toute profession exige an apprentissage. Les Americains ne peuvent donc donner a la culture generale de l'intelligence que les premieres annees de la vie: a quinze ans ils entrent dans une carriere: ainsi leur education ...
— American Institutions and Their Influence • Alexis de Tocqueville et al

... little mice sat down to spin, Pussy passed by and she peeped in. What are you at, my fine little men? Making coats for gentlemen. Shall I come in and cut off yours threads? Oh, no, Miss Pussy, You'd bite off ...
— The Great Big Treasury of Beatrix Potter • Beatrix Potter

... there is a group of twenty six mounds in one inclosure an engraving of one of which taken from Mr. Squier's paper is shown in Fig 49. It is seven feet high by fifty five feet base and contained the artificial clay basin in question. 'F' is the basin which is round, and measures from c to d nine feet, and from a to e five feet. The height from b to e is twenty inches, and the dip of the curve a to e is nine inches. "The body of the altar," Mr. Squier remarks, "is burned throughout, though in a greater ...
— Houses and House-Life of the American Aborigines • Lewis H. Morgan

... popularly believed in London that the plague came from Holland; but the sanitary (or rather unsanitary) conditions of London itself were quite sufficient to account for the plague's originating there. Andrew D. White tells us, that it is difficult to decide to-day between Constantinople and New York as candidates for the distinction of being the ...
— History of the Plague in London • Daniel Defoe

... [Footnote d: As there are no "naked crags" with "half-inch fissures in the slippery rocks" in the "cultured vale" of Esthwaite, the locality referred to is probably the Hohne Fells above Yewdale, to the north of Coniston, and only a few miles from Hawkshead, where a crag, now named Raven's Crag, ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, Vol. III • William Wordsworth

... has made such a big, comfortable "He-who-runs-may-read" bill-poster for doing right as Roosevelt. Other men have done things that were good to do, but the very inmost muscle and marrow of goodness itself, goodness with teeth, with a fist, goodness that smiled, that ha-ha'd, and that leaped and danced—perpetual motion of goodness, goodness that reeked—has been reserved for Theodore Roosevelt. We have had goodness that was bland or proper, and goodness that was pious or sentimental and sang, "Nearer My God to Thee," or goodness that was kind and ...
— Crowds - A Moving-Picture of Democracy • Gerald Stanley Lee

... too—several times." He laughed, glancing at Roderick in a shamefaced manner. "I think when you go home, if you'll take me, I'll go along as travelling physician. I'd like most awfully well to see that town ...
— The End of the Rainbow • Marian Keith

... Van Riper. You may think to ride in a carriage is like being the Pope of Rome; but there's some that knows better. And if you'd set up your carriage," went on the undaunted Mrs. Van Riper, "and gone over to Greenwich Street two years ago, as I'd have had you, and made yourself friendly with those people there, I'd have been on the Orphan Asylum Board at this very minute; and ...
— The Story of a New York House • Henry Cuyler Bunner

... tickets? Oh, auntie, that's just the thing! That's capital!" cried Edith and Kyzie. "You'd do ...
— Jimmy, Lucy, and All • Sophie May

... that this bit of romance has been suffered to remain hidden away for so long a time. D'Artagnan's manner of winning the hermit kingdom contains enough thrills to repay a careful reading. The story ...
— Led Astray and The Sphinx - Two Novellas In One Volume • Octave Feuillet

... into a fit of laughter very terrifying to see. Since her own sister wouldn't take her word for it, she supposed she'd have to prove that it ...
— The Helpmate • May Sinclair

... NOVA SCOTIA.—All failed till De Monts (d'mawng) and Champlain (sham-plan') [1] came over in 1604 with two shiploads of colonists. Some landed on the shore of what is now Nova Scotia and founded Port Royal. The others, led by De Monts, explored the Bay of Fundy, and on an island ...
— A Brief History of the United States • John Bach McMaster

... latter is quite possible, Captain,—but not the former. I managed quite easily to get from the second cabin to the first. You'd be surprised to know how simple it was. Running without lights as you do, sir, simplified things tremendously. I found a very sick and dejected Jewish gentleman trying to die in the least exposed corner of the promenade deck. At least, he said ...
— West Wind Drift • George Barr McCutcheon

... the city and county of Harrison, in the state of Rhode Island, being of sound and disposing mind and memory, do make and declare the following, as and for, my last will and testament.' ... I wish you'd take your head out of that barrel, Nancy, and listen to the document that is going to make you rich ...
— Outside Inn • Ethel M. Kelley

... my Gill, you may surmise The sun was just about to rise) And that be-feathered, crook-billed harbinger, The rosy-wattled herald of the dawn, Red comb aflaunt, bold-eyed and spurred for strife, Brave Chanticleer, his strident summons raised (By which fine phrase I'd have you know, The cock had just begun to crow) And gentle Zephyr, child of Boreas, Stole soft the hush of dewy leaves, And passing kissed the flowers to wakefulness. Thus, laden with their sweetness, Zephyr came O'er hill and dale, o'er battlement and wall, Into the sleeping town of Canalise, Through ...
— The Geste of Duke Jocelyn • Jeffery Farnol

... tree, Touch not a single bough— In youth it shelter'd me, And I'll protect it now. Twas my forefather's hand That placed it near his cot. There, woodman, let it stand, Thy axe shall harm it not. That old familiar tree, Whose glory and renown Are spread o'er land and sea, Say, ...
— Old Ballads • Various

... he was saying, "that was devised by Dr. Fournier d'Albe, lecturer on physics at Birmingham University, to aid the blind. It is known as the optophone. What I am literally doing now is to HEAR light. The optophone translates light into sound by means of that wonderful little element, selenium, which in darkness is a poor conductor of electricity, ...
— The Dream Doctor • Arthur B. Reeve

... earth have you been? I've been hunting all over creation for you. I didn't suppose you'd be out here, on this day of all others, with—with that critter," indicating David, ...
— Mary-'Gusta • Joseph C. Lincoln

... come upon thy languid eyes Before each daily action thou hast scann'd; What's done amiss, what done, what left undone; From first to last examine all, and then Blame what is wrong, in what is ...
— A Selection from the Discourses of Epictetus With the Encheiridion • Epictetus

... to know," she said, having brought the matter up, "whether he would have thought it was such a light matter if it had been his own children. Do you suppose he'd have been so ready to act on his own advice if ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... some of my creek properties," he said. "I heard you fellows had made a good strike, and I thought I'd come down and congratulate you. It is pretty good, ...
— The Trail of '98 - A Northland Romance • Robert W. Service

... oldish man, sir," said the Captain; "p'raps you'd better let me stay, 'cause why, I knows ...
— The Lifeboat • R.M. Ballantyne

... surprised at this, considering how well suited for them the temperate and damp upper woods appeared to be. It recalled to my mind the remark made by Bory St. Vincent, namely, that none of this family are found on any of the volcanic islands in the great oceans. (17/3. "Voyage aux Quatres Iles d'Afrique." With respect to the Sandwich Islands see Tyerman and Bennett's "Journal" volume 1 page 434. For Mauritius see "Voyage par un Officier" etc. Part 1 page 170. There are no frogs in the Canary Islands, Webb et Berthelot "Hist. Nat. des Iles Canaries." I saw none at St. Jago in the ...
— A Naturalist's Voyage Round the World - The Voyage Of The Beagle • Charles Darwin

... She look'd across the sea; She look'd across the water, And long and loud laugh'd she; 'The locks of six princesses Must be my marriage-fee, So hey bonny boat, and ho bonny boat! Who comes ...
— Westward Ho! • Charles Kingsley

... a bunsen burner and a little practice in the manipulation of glass (Fig. 171). From the center of the cork is attached a rubber band by means of a staple driven through the cork, the other end of which (D) is attached to the center of a disk of rubber (E) such as dentists use. This disk is held to the edge of the chimney by a wide elastic band (F). There is a string (G) also attached to the center of the rubber disk by means of which the diaphragm ...
— A Practical Physiology • Albert F. Blaisdell

... fixed; but I lost that part of my journal. It is doubtless the fear of danger that causes the remora not to loose his hold when he feels that he is pulled by a cord or by the hand of man. The sucet spoken of by Columbus and Martin d'Anghiera was probably the Echeneis naucrates and not the Echeneis remora.) The fisher-fish, formerly employed by the Cubans by means of the flattened disc on his head, furnished with suckers, fixed himself on the shell of the sea-turtle, which is so common in the narrow and winding channels ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America V3 • Alexander von Humboldt

... guess," replied Blacky. "I told you I was just talking foolishness. You see, I'm so hungry that I just got to thinking what I'd have if I could have anything I wanted. That made me think of eggs, and I tried to think just how I would feel if I should suddenly see a great big egg right in front of me. I guess I must have said ...
— Blacky the Crow • Thornton W. Burgess

... say so. The Judge—the friend I was speaking of,—said so much of the same kind that the minute I thought of coming to Europe, right after I'd said, 'I'll go to Paris,' I said to myself, ...
— Aurora the Magnificent • Gertrude Hall

... I ran away Like any ass, and had my day. They drag me round, a prishoner, As if they 'd found a ...
— The Little Clay Cart - Mrcchakatika • (Attributed To) King Shudraka

... great number of valuations, that I saw the relative intensity of the light of the great stars decrease in the following manner: Sirius, Canopus, a Centauri, Acherner, b Centauri, Fomalhaut, Rigel, Procyon, Betelgueuse, e of the Great Dog, d of the Great Dog, a of the Crane, a of the Peacock. These experiments will become more interesting when travellers shall have determined anew, at intervals of forty or fifty years, some of those changes which the celestial bodies seem to undergo, ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America • Alexander von Humboldt

... few: the guilty Hippolytus of "La Curee," the poor girl in "La Fortune des Rougon," the Abbe Mouret, the artist in "L'Oeuvre," and the half idiotic girl of the farm house, and Helene in "Un Page d'Amour." They are not amongst M. Zola's most prominent creations, and it must be some accident that makes them most memorable and recognisable to ...
— Old Friends - Essays in Epistolary Parody • Andrew Lang

... say, Martin, tell us about it! My pater wrote to me that you'd done no end of heroic things, and saved Bullace senior from being killed. His pater told him, so I know it's all right. But wasn't it a joke you two should ...
— Brave and True - Short stories for children by G. M. Fenn and Others • George Manville Fenn

... peoples among their visitors are to their own specific level. As a rule the Frenchman clings to the road through the passes, the American pauses at the end of the mule-track, the German stops at the chalet in the pine-forest. It is only at the Alpine table d'hote, with a proud consciousness of being seven thousand feet above the sea-level, that one gets the Englishman pure. It is a very odd sensation, in face of the huge mountain-chains, and with the ...
— Stray Studies from England and Italy • John Richard Green

... of the future to consider!" he said anxiously. "I'm getting old—sixty-four next birthday, precious near the allotted span of life, but she is twenty years younger—she may have a long life before her still. It would break my heart to let her go on working, but she'd be too proud to take money from me, unless— unless— Mrs Trevor, you are a sensible woman! I can trust you to give me a candid answer. Would you consider me a madman if I asked the girl a second time to marry ...
— Betty Trevor • Mrs. G. de Horne Vaizey

... whirlwind; past the great gap in the woods, to stand open God knows how long. I was glad to turn my face to the south shore, for in Canada there was now a cold welcome for most Yankees, and my fists were sore with resenting the bitter taunt. I crossed in a boat from Iroquois, and D'ri had been waiting for me half a day at the landing. I was never so glad to see a man—never but once. Walking home I saw corn growing where the forest had ...
— D'Ri and I • Irving Bacheller

... Mudge, triumphantly, "what do you say to your favorite now? Turned out well, hasn't he? Didn't I always say so? I always knew that boy was bad at heart, and that he'd come ...
— Paul Prescott's Charge • Horatio Alger

... indigenous to this country, and nearly all have a greater or less economic or commercial value. The 26 varieties needed to complete the collection will arrive before winter sets in, a number of specimens being now on their way to this city from the groves of California. Mr. S. D. Dill and a number of assistants are engaged in preparing the specimens for exhibition. The logs as they reach the workroom are wrapped in bagging and inclosed in cases, this method being used so that the ...
— Scientific American Supplement No. 360, November 25, 1882 • Various

... says, addressing everybody. "Joyful surprise, isn't it? Inez, how do? Baronet, your humble servant. Sorry to intrude, but I've been told my wife is here, and I've come after her, naturally. And here she is. Ethel, my darling, who'd have thought of seeing you at Catheron Royals, an honored guest? Give us a kiss, my angel, and say you're glad to see your ...
— A Terrible Secret • May Agnes Fleming

... ta'en the table wi' his hand, He garr'd the red wine spring on hie— 'Now Christ's curse on my head,' he said, 'But avenged of Lord Scrope I'll be! O, is my basnet a widow's curch? Or my lance a wand o' the willow-tree? Or my arm a ladye's lilye hand, That an English ...
— Stories of the Border Marches • John Lang and Jean Lang

... practice. You'd think if he were interested in jungle life he'd go out and live it. There it is, waiting for him, and that's what he really is here for. But he makes a cave and shuts himself off from it—and then ...
— The Crow's Nest • Clarence Day, Jr.

... Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done, The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won, The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting, While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring; But O heart! heart! heart! O the bleeding drops of red, Where on the ...
— Our American Holidays: Lincoln's Birthday • Various

... as the case may be. The Archbishop, much as he reveres the opinion of his distinguished colleagues, would never put them to the inconvenience of giving a decision on any matter not concerning them. Linz's fate was settled when the handwriting of my predecessor, prelate of 1250 A.D., convinced me that this Rhine town belonged to the House of Sayn. Restitution has already been accomplished in due legal form, and when next the Countess Hildegunde rides through Linz, she rides through her ...
— The Sword Maker • Robert Barr

... bodies; she wishes that the cross should rise in its midst, that her children may rest in peace in its shade while awaiting the grand awaking; even as a temple and a sanctuary, she banishes from it games, noise of all kinds, and even all that savors of levity or irreverence."—Dictionnaire d'Anecdotes Chretiens, p. 993. ...
— Purgatory • Mary Anne Madden Sadlier

... crops are then attended to by large bodies of men, under skilful use of the weather, such as is to-day impossible. Large drying houses and sheds allow crops being gathered even in unfavorable weather, and save losses that are to-day unavoidable, and which, according to v. d. Goltz, often are so severe that, during a particularly rainy year, from eight to nine million marks worth of crops were ruined in Mecklenburg, and from twelve to fifteen in the ...
— Woman under socialism • August Bebel

... and Wenden, writing from the Deccan, remark:—"Very common along tops of ghats. D. got a nest ...
— The Nests and Eggs of Indian Birds, Volume 1 • Allan O. Hume

... I trust, permit me to continue them for the benefit of our young friend, Paul Violaine. You will feel compassion when the Alsatian tells you of his sufferings, at the boys' description of him, and his subsequent prosperity in the Rue d'Arras. You had better listen to the old man as long as he continues to grumble on, the more so as you will detect in the rancor and bitterness of his remarks all the vexation of a disappointed speculator. He will confess to you besides that he subsists entirely ...
— The Champdoce Mystery • Emile Gaboriau

... that no lives were lost, Tom proposed a move, and Sparkle gladly seconded the motion—"for," said he, "I am so wet, though I cannot complain of being 151cold, that I think I resemble the fat man who seemed something like two single gentlemen roll'd into one,' and 'who after half a year's baking declared he had been so cursed hot, he was sure he'd caught ...
— Real Life In London, Volumes I. and II. • Pierce Egan

... she saw. Billy began to see, in fact, before Class Day. Young Hartwell was a popular fellow, and he was eager to have his friends meet Billy and the Henshaws. He was a member of the Institute of 1770, D. K. E., Stylus, Signet, Round Table, and Hasty Pudding Clubs, and nearly every one of these had some sort of function planned for Class-Day week. By the time the day itself arrived Billy was almost as excited as was young ...
— Miss Billy • Eleanor H. Porter

... the case, of course," said Roland, after a pause. "Sir, I wish you would set me to work to find out," he impulsively continued. "I'd ...
— The Channings • Mrs. Henry Wood

... rid of that boy and the dog, I suppose," he went on. "If it wasn't for the noise I'd shoot the dog; but it won't do to arouse the neighborhood. As for the lad, I reckon the sight of a pistol ...
— True to Himself • Edward Stratemeyer

... lurk on the Via Cassia, near to old Veii. Only three days since, did these lawless fellows beset me and my companions, with our flocks, on the highway, and cruelly rob and maltreat us. I pray thee, let the cohortes vigilum[D] search out and punish these robbers; and let me, too, be fully satisfied for the sheep they did ...
— Historic Boys - Their Endeavours, Their Achievements, and Their Times • Elbridge Streeter Brooks

... after made his Britannic majesty, who was then at Hanover, an offer of sparing, if he would agree to certain conditions of neutrality for that electorate, which he rejected with disdain. Then the count d'Aubeterre, envoy-extraordinary from France at the court of Vienna, proposed a secret negotiation with the ministers of the empress-queen. The secret articles of the treaty of Petersburgh, between the two empresses, had stipulated ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... all that which is requisite.—And now, dear believing reader, rejoice and praise with me. About an hour, after I had prayed thus, there was given to me the sum of Two Thousand Pounds for the Building Fund. Thus I have received altogether 9,285l. 3s. 9 1/2 d. towards this work.—I cannot describe the joy I had in God when I received this donation. It must be known from experience, in order to be felt. 447 days I have had day by day to wait upon God, before the sum reached the above amount. How great is the blessing which the soul obtains by ...
— A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Mueller - Written by Himself, Fourth Part • George Mueller

... of an ambitious man hastened the destruction of this honeyed life. The Duc d'Herouville, an old warrior in wiles and policy, had no sooner passed his word to his physician than he was conscious of the voice of distrust. The Baron d'Artagnon, lieutenant of his company of men-at-arms, ...
— The Hated Son • Honore de Balzac

... Suddenly I was seized roughly, and a cloth whipped over my face before I could even scream. I heard a voice say: 'Damned if it ain't the girl! What will we do with her?' and then Dupont's voice answered gruffly: 'Hell, there ain't anything to do, but take the little hussy along. She 'd queer the whole game, an' we 've got an extra horse. They jerked me forward so roughly, and I was so frightened that—that I must have fainted. At any rate I remember nothing more distinctly until we had crossed the river, and I was on horseback ...
— Molly McDonald - A Tale of the Old Frontier • Randall Parrish

... You see they're very luxurious, and these progressive ideas are about their biggest luxury. They make them feel moral and yet don't damage their position. They think a great deal of their position; don't let one of them ever persuade you he doesn't, for if you were to proceed on that basis you'd be pulled up ...
— The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1 (of 2) • Henry James

... and a quarter, the latter but three quarters, the size of the terrestrial moon, and the travellers immediately recognized them by their sizes and relative positions as Tethys and Dione, discovered by J. D. Cassini in March, 1684. The sad face was turned slightly towards that of its companion, and it looked as if some tale of the human heart, some romance, had been engraved and preserved for all time on the features of these dead bodies, as ...
— A Journey in Other Worlds • J. J. Astor

... The Jeanne d'Arc, a beautiful, long, curving craft manned by twelve oarsmen, came like a white bird over the blue waters of the Bay of Traitors one Saturday afternoon, bringing Pere Victorien to Atuona. He was from Hatiheu, on the island of Nuka-hiva, seventy miles to the north. ...
— White Shadows in the South Seas • Frederick O'Brien

... "Those d—-d women rob me," he said, "for the benefit of my son; and they do it so cleverly that I can't find out how. They have an understanding with the shop-keepers, who are but licensed thieves; and nothing is eaten here that they don't make me pay ...
— Other People's Money • Emile Gaboriau

... matron, and blow Sir Deryck," said Dr. Rob breezily. "If you want her as a permanency, make sure of her. Marry her, my boy! I'll warrant she'd have you!" ...
— The Rosary • Florence L. Barclay

... knew in the company to the young unfortunate, and then, in order to escape from the weight of the present, began to unfold great plans and undertakings for the future. She endeavoured to induce her new acquaintance to give her her parole d'honneur that she would sometime conduct a social theatre with her, which would assist greatly to make social life more interesting; and further than that, that they should establish together a society of Sisters of Charity ...
— The Home • Fredrika Bremer

... said to surpass the amphitheatre in dimensions, the wonderful state of preservation of the latter renders it more interesting; and the Maison Carree, it must be allowed, stands without a competitor. Well might the Abbe Barthelemy, in his Voyage d'Anacharsis, call it the masterpiece of ancient architecture and the ...
— The Idler in France • Marguerite Gardiner

... a vast territory in Yuen-nan before its conquest by the Mongol emperors of China in the thirteenth century A.D., and at one time actually subdued Burma and established a dynasty of their own, at present the only independent kingdom of the race is that of Siam. By far the greatest number of Shans live in semi-independent states tributary to Burma, China, and Siam, and in Yuen-nan ...
— Camps and Trails in China - A Narrative of Exploration, Adventure, and Sport in Little-Known China • Roy Chapman Andrews and Yvette Borup Andrews

... the yarns after all. Isabel King started them and probably she exaggerated a lot. I suppose he's had some notion like as not of bringing the Captain over to the church. But that's foolish, for he'd never manage it, and meanwhile was giving occasion for gossip. It's just as well to stop it. He's a good pastor and he works hard—too hard, mebbe. He looked ...
— Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1907 to 1908 • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... look there!" She pointed excitedly to Benjulia and Ovid, walking on again slowly in the direction of the aviaries. "There's the big doctor who tickles me! He says he'll see the poor monkey, as soon as he's done with Ovid. And what do you think he said besides? He said perhaps he'd take the monkey home ...
— Heart and Science - A Story of the Present Time • Wilkie Collins

... here I'd wash your face!" cried Betty, her cheeks flaming more than before—for, be it known, she did not reciprocate the feeling that "burned in Percy's manly bosom," to quote the rather jeering ...
— The Outdoor Girls in a Winter Camp - Glorious Days on Skates and Ice Boats • Laura Lee Hope

... wander'd east, I 've wander'd west, Through mony a weary way, But never, never can forget The luve o' life's young day! The fire that 's blawn on Beltane e'en, May weel be black gin Yule; But blacker fa' awaits the heart Where first fond luve ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume III - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... Sexual-Probleme, April, 1908). Aletrino of Amsterdam pushes the view that inversion is a non-morbid abnormality to an undue extreme by asserting that "the uranist is a normal variety of the species Homo sapiens" ("Uranisme et Degenerescence," Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle, Aug.-Sept., 1908); inversion may be regarded as (in the correct sense of the word here adopted) a pathological abnormality, but not as an anthropological human variety ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 2 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... tree, O'ershadowing with gloom, Seems to cover thee Secret, dark, love-still'd, In a ...
— Phantastes - A Faerie Romance for Men and Women • George MacDonald

... the captain, with some warmth, "they've not, or I wouldn't have been here. But they d—d soon will if you don't keep ...
— Looking Seaward Again • Walter Runciman

... be careful. If one had followed us in here, we'd have been forced to keep an eye on him. Me, I want to see ...
— The Egyptian Cat Mystery • Harold Leland Goodwin

... indeed! I'd like to know if they're not every whit's good's an old shark of a lawyer like Hugh White was! I'll be bound, if poor old granny Jacobs hadn't lost what little wit she ever had, it 'ud be very soon seen whether Madam White's got the right to say who's to come and who's to go in that house. ...
— Mercy Philbrick's Choice • Helen Hunt Jackson

... is. A 'Heart Talk' is a little book in which I started, about five years ago, to write down what I had discovered were the principal reasons for a man's failure and the principal reasons for a man's success—from John D. Rockerfeller back to John D. Napoleon (laughter), and before that, back in the days when Abel sold his birthright for a mess of pottage. There are now one hundred of these 'Heart Talks.' Those of you who are sincere, who are interested in our proposition, above all who are dissatisfied ...
— The Beautiful and Damned • F. Scott Fitzgerald

... myself for my stupidity. I'm not sure but I'd rather you'd think me wicked than stupid," she continued, with the smile in her eyes that most men found attractive. "I confess—is that very bad?—that I feel it more for you than for her. But" ( she thought she saw a shade in his ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... ain't massa Leland," exclaimed the negro, turning toward the approaching Indians. "High! whar'd you come from, George? What did you let ...
— The Ranger - or The Fugitives of the Border • Edward S. Ellis

... heard of a picnic unless Phebe went along to do all the fussing and mussing that everybody else shirks? Don't tell me there's any fun in a picnic,—going off in the woods like that, to do for yourself what you'd sell the clothes off your back to have somebody else do for you at home, and eating all kinds of heathenish messes with your fingers because you've forgotten the forks. But what people like let them have. They'll get experience out of it if ...
— Only an Incident • Grace Denio Litchfield

... method of attack was devised by a French engineer of the highest reputation for skill in his profession, the Chevalier D'Arcon. The plan offered by him was so original and ingenious as to fill the besiegers with hopes of sure success, and the necessary preparations were diligently made. Ten powerful floating batteries were constructed, which were ...
— Historical Tales - The Romance of Reality - Volume VII • Charles Morris

... sent for his folks? You'd feel better to, I sh'd think, if he's taken; some say he has a mother rollin' in wealth, down ...
— "Some Say" - Neighbours in Cyrus • Laura Elizabeth Howe Richards

... to be a sailor And sail the ocean blue. I'd journey to a distant land And then come back to you. I'd bring you lots of happiness, A big trunk filled with joy; A barrel full of hickory nuts For ...
— Sammie and Susie Littletail • Howard R. Garis

... what was I,—to touch that heart? Only a poet, made to pour Love's silver phrase with subtle art In tides of music at her door. What though she bore a brightened blush, As if the echo linger'd long? Even so she listens to the thrush That thrills the air with ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol III, Issue VI, June, 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... is John Wessel (d. 1489), and perhaps also the most notable; certainly the others looked up to him with a veneration which seems to transcend the natural pre-eminence of seniority. Unfortunately the details of his life have ...
— The Age of Erasmus - Lectures Delivered in the Universities of Oxford and London • P. S. Allen

... (d) Plato, labouring under what, to modern readers, appears to have been a confusion of ideas, assimilates the state to the individual, and fails to distinguish Ethics from Politics. He thinks that to be most of a state which is most like one man, and in which ...
— The Republic • Plato

... it. It's clivver of the nigger to be the first of us to think of that same. Then we'd betther set about it at once— ...
— The Castaways • Captain Mayne Reid

... way you're going to take it, you're lost. Our dear Ronny will snatch her from under your nose, although she isn't a bit in love with him, and is with you, if you'd consent to shake her ...
— The Chauffeur and the Chaperon • C. N. Williamson

... century, formerly belonging to the monastery of Stavelot, in the diocese of Liege,—'a remarkably fine Greek MS.' containing the works ascribed to Dionysius the Areopagite,—and the Homilies of Gregory of Nazianzum, 'with scholia written in the year 6480 (A.D. 972);'—together with nineteen additional volumes of a series of transcripts from the Archives at the Hague, of documents relating to English history, extending from 1588 to 1614 and from 1689 to 1702.—In ...
— How to See the British Museum in Four Visits • W. Blanchard Jerrold

... 2nd, 1883, d'Aunay, the French Secretary, told me that Waddington was coming as Ambassador, and intended to ask for Syria for the French as a compensation for our ...
— The Life of the Rt. Hon. Sir Charles W. Dilke V1 • Stephen Gwynn

... "it's a fine thing to have the chance of getting a bit of the country into good fettle, and putting men into the right way with their farming, and getting a bit of good contriving and solid building done—that those who are living and those who come after will be the better for. I'd sooner have it than a fortune. I hold it the most honorable work that is." Robert Evans, like Caleb Garth, "while faithfully serving his employers enjoyed great popularity among their tenants. He was gentle but of indomitable ...
— George Eliot; A Critical Study of Her Life, Writings & Philosophy • George Willis Cooke

... I was shut up in school, writing three hundred disgusting lines of Virgil, or I'd have got the brutes off ...
— Magnum Bonum • Charlotte M. Yonge

... "Mis' West, you'd be more comf'table in the armchair. I fight shy of it because it's too comf'table. If I set back into the hollow, it's because my work's done for the day. And here's a palm-leaf. You look ...
— Other People's Business - The Romantic Career of the Practical Miss Dale • Harriet L. Smith

... the crumbling relics of a stone, O'er which the pride of masonry has smiled, Here am I wont to ruminate alone. And pause, in Fancy's airy robe beguil'd. ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume 13, No. 354, Saturday, January 31, 1829. • Various

... he had made, Don Rafael had learnt to distinguish all the sounds which indicate the march of a corps d'armee. The cadenced hoof-stroke, the distant rumbling of gun-carriages and caissons, the neighing of horses, and the clanking of steel sabres were all familiar to his ear—and proclaimed to him the movement of troops, as plainly ...
— The Tiger Hunter • Mayne Reid

... it, that was what they did. They divided their turnips into ten courses and they called the first one—"Hors d'oeuvres," and the last one "Ices," with a French name, and Peter Piper kept jumping up from the table and pretending he was a footman and flourishing about in his flapping rags of trousers and announcing ...
— Racketty-Packetty House • Frances H. Burnett

... were swelled and pinched by his boots. He wavered in a condition between sleeping and waking. In his right-hand pocket he had a letter of credit; in his left-hand pocket was his passport; and a few louis d'ors were sewn into a little leather bag which he carried in his breast-pocket. Whenever he dozed, he dreamed that he had lost one or another of these possessions; then he would awake with a start, and the first movements ...
— Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen • Hans Christian Andersen

... welcome us home with open arms," Kielland snarled. "They should shower us with kisses. They should do somersaults for joy that I'm not going to let them sink another half billion into the mud out here. They took a gamble and got cleaned, that's all. They'd be as stupid as your pals here if they kept coming back for more." He pulled on his waders, brushing penitent Mud-pups aside as he started for the door. "Send the natives back to their burrows or whatever ...
— The Native Soil • Alan Edward Nourse

... pesos d'oro!" ejaculated his auditors with one breath. Old Miguel dropped his glass which fell with a crash, scattering its contents and fragments over ...
— When Dreams Come True • Ritter Brown

... commanded the 'Aurora' after Mackintosh landed, was with Worsley as his second in command when one of the German submarines was rammed and sunk, and received the D.S.C. for his share in the fight. He was afterwards given command of a Mystery Ship, and fought several actions ...
— South! • Sir Ernest Shackleton

... rid of one or two if you make haste. But they're ugly things to track a chap out by, you know. Why, I knew a young fellow, much your age and build, borrowed a whole sheaf of 'em and went up north, and made up his mind he'd have a high old time. He did slip through a fiver; but—would you believe it?—the next he tried on, they were down on him like shooting stars, and he's another two years to do on the mill before he can come another trip by the 1:30. They all ...
— Boycotted - And Other Stories • Talbot Baines Reed

... 'tis as well to keep children from pears; The pain they might cause, is oft follow'd by tears; 'Tis certainly well to keep them from plums; But certainly not from sucking their thumbs! If a babe suck his thumb 'Tis an ease to his gum; A comfort; a boon; a calmer of grief; A friend in his need—affording relief; A solace; a good; ...
— Advice to a Mother on the Management of her Children • Pye Henry Chavasse

... whispered in his ear,—they were sitting side by side now in the Bal Tabarin,—"if you are going on like this, Heaven knows where you'll land at the end of it all! I'll look after you as well as I can,—where you go, I'll go—but we can't be together every second of the time. Don't you think you'd be safer if you handed over your ...
— The Illustrious Prince • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... their course they bore, Until they near'd the mainland shore; When frequent on the hollow blast, Wild shouts of merriment were cast." Lord of ...
— The Pilot • J. Fenimore Cooper

... Maii, anno domini millesimo quingentesimo nonagesimo primo. Praetor fuit civitatis Conventriae D. Matthaeus Richardson, tunc consules ...
— Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse • Various

... with odors sweet; O run, prevent them with thy humble ode, And lay it lowly at his blessed feet; Have thou the honor first thy Lord to greet, And join thy voice unto the angel-quire, From out his secret altar touch'd with ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 - Christmas Poems from 'round the World • Various

... d'Anvers, Fandor was passing Rokin College. He heard some one calling him. "Monsieur Fandor! ...
— The Exploits of Juve - Being the Second of the Series of the "Fantmas" Detective Tales • mile Souvestre and Marcel Allain

... Clay Clopton was elected State president in 1896; Mrs. Annie D. Shelby, Mrs. Milton Hume and Mrs. Taylor were made vice-presidents; Mrs. Laura McCullough and Mrs. Amelia Dilliard, recording secretaries; Mrs. Hildreth, corresponding secretary; and Mrs. E. E. Greenleaf, treasurer. Mrs. Clopton represented the ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV • Various

... that we must part—no power could save Thy quiet goodness from an early grave: Those eyes so dull, though kind each glance they cast, Looking a sister's fondness to the last; Thy lips so pale, that gently press'd my cheek; Thy voice—alas! Thou could'st but try to speak;— All told thy doom; I felt it at my heart; The shaft had struck—I knew ...
— Miles Wallingford - Sequel to "Afloat and Ashore" • James Fenimore Cooper

... indulgent to my song, Waves the fair Hierophant, and moves along.— High plumes, that bending shade her amber hair, Nod, as she steps, their silver leaves in air; Bright chains of pearl, with golden buckles brac'd, Clasp her white neck, and zone her slender waist; 210 Thin folds of silk in soft meanders wind Down her fine form, and undulate behind; The purple border, on the pavement roll'd, Swells in the gale, and spreads its fringe ...
— The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society - A Poem, with Philosophical Notes • Erasmus Darwin

... the quantitative nature of this difference. A degree of proficiency in labyrinth B attained by the males after 7.0 trials was equaled by the females after 6.2 trials. In labyrinth C the males acquired a habit as a result of 18.7 trials; the females, as a result of 13.8. And similarly in labyrinth D, 6.1 trials did no more for the males than 5.9 did for ...
— The Dancing Mouse - A Study in Animal Behavior • Robert M. Yerkes

... has a chance to make a new beginning, a chance to become the man his father always thought he would be. Of course I may be a fool to trust you. That only time will show; but you see I had a great respect for old Jasper. And now that you have the address you'd better go; stay, though, you must have a hat; folks might wonder—take this," and I ...
— My Lady Caprice • Jeffrey Farnol

... a nose; but you don't wipe the retina at the back of your eye when you are weeping for love—only the outside, where the puling tears are. In short, you know you have a nose, but you don't know you have a retina. D'ye catch me, my small Stagyrite, my petit Peripatetic, my comical Academician, eh? Take your toddy, and let's have a touch ...
— Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, XXII • various

... sings the nightingale And the throstle cock so bold; Cuckoo in the dewy dale And the turtle in the word. But the robin I love dear, For he singeth through the year. Robin! Robin! Merry Robin! So I'd have my true love be: Not to fly At the nigh Sign of cold adversity. "When the spring brings sweet delights, When aloft the lark doth rise, Lovers woo o' mellow nights, And youths peep in maidens' eyes, That time blooms the eglantine, Daisies pied upon the hill, Cowslips fair and columbine, ...
— The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood • Howard Pyle

... Mr. Colman's Lecture: Daughter Sewall acquaints Madam Winthrop that if she pleas'd to be within at 3 P.M. I would wait on her. She answer'd she would ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. IX (of X) - America - I • Various

... said. "Think what it would mean if all that wonderful imagination were turned loose upon just one fellow! Even if she didn't love you, think how she'd play the game! And if she did love ...
— Molly Make-Believe • Eleanor Hallowell Abbott

... Signor Eugenio Rignano, an engineer keenly interested in all branches of science, and a little later the founder of the international review, Rivista di Scienza (now simply called Scientia), published in French a volume entitled "Sur la transmissibilite des Caracteres acquis—Hypothese d'un Centro- epigenese." Into the details of the author's work we will not enter fully. Suffice it to know that he accepts the Hering-Butler theory, and makes a distinct advance on Hering's rather crude hypothesis of persistent vibrations by suggesting that the remembering centres ...
— Unconscious Memory • Samuel Butler

... nos sorts a l'etendue. La goutte de rosee a l'herbe suspendue Y reflechit un ciel aussi vaste, aussi pur Que l'immense Ocean dans ses plaines d'azur. LAMARTINE. ...
— The Heavenly Father - Lectures on Modern Atheism • Ernest Naville

... things outside of the Treaty which were promised at the Treaty at the Lower Fort, signed the 3rd day of August, A.D. 1871. ...
— The Treaties of Canada with The Indians of Manitoba - and the North-West Territories • Alexander Morris

... the Bohemians in general rather than on the beauty of their capital. With keen perception they draw the deeper meaning from out the stones of Prague; thus in the fifties of the last century writes Viollet-le-Duc, "Prague est une capitale dans laquelle on sent la puissance d'un grand peuple," and Massieu de Clerval is yet more emphatic: "si un pays peut se vanter d'une nationalite indestructible c'est a coup sur la Boheme.—Une nation qui a passe par de pareilles epreuves ne perira, elle ...
— From a Terrace in Prague • Lieut.-Col. B. Granville Baker

... available, on a just basis, for the use of successive generations; (b) End involuntary poverty and insecurity and the exploitation of man by man and of one social group by another social group; (c) Make necessary public services generally available on equal terms, to all mankind; and (d) Guarantee equal opportunity to earth-dwellers based on the greatest good ...
— Civilization and Beyond - Learning From History • Scott Nearing

... nil since my landing in the new world, my assets were gradually diminishing. I had only a few pounds left; as my expenditure for lodging alone was at the rate of over two guineas a week; and Monsieur Parole d'Honneur's loan, which I looked upon only in the light of trading capital, I had determined not to touch on for ...
— She and I, Volume 2 - A Love Story. A Life History. • John Conroy Hutcheson

... if all the words were expressed: as, "The second and the third Epistle of John are each but one short chapter."—"The metaphorical and the literal meaning are improperly mixed."—Murray's Gram., p. 339. "The Doctrine of Words, separately consider'd, and in a Sentence, are Things distinct enough."—Brightland's Gram., Pref., p. iv. Better perhaps: "The doctrine of words separately considered, and that of words in a sentence, are things ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... whither I had strayed on a sultry afternoon in quest of shade and quiet. I had halted opposite the little shop window, and, with my eyes bent dreamily on the row of wigs, was pursuing the above train of thought when I was startled by a deep voice saying softly in my ear: "I'd have the full-bottomed one ...
— The Vanishing Man • R. Austin Freeman

... you was goin' to take a trip across country, and I thought maybe you'd take me along. You and ...
— The Motor Girls • Margaret Penrose

... St. Pulcheria died A.D. 453, four years before her nominal husband; and her festival is celebrated on the 10th of September by the modern Greeks: she bequeathed an immense patrimony to pious, or, at least, to ecclesiastical, uses. See Tillemont, Memoires Eccles. tom. ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 3 • Edward Gibbon

... practising finished too," she urged. "If we can tell Miss Todd that our work's quite squared up, she'll let us stay out longer; but you know her. If there's a single girl who hasn't learnt her literature, or made up her music list, the whole crew of us will have to come trotting back. I'd be sorry for that girl!" Geraldine looked round the room grimly. "I should give her a very unpleasant time myself, and I expect the rest of you would, too. She'd richly deserve all ...
— A harum-scarum schoolgirl • Angela Brazil

... flag-ship, and his fleet stormed the passage, raked with chains and shell. From the 18th to the 25th of April, a battle royal was waged with splendid valour on both sides; but the forts were passed, the boom was broken, the defensive fleet defeated, and Farragut had won New Orleans. Farragut, David D. Porter and other heroes had their full share of war and of glory not only here but later in Mobile Bay, and in 1863 with Grant and Sherman at Vicksburg, and at Port Hudson on the Mississippi, and Porter at Fort ...
— The Battle of Principles - A Study of the Heroism and Eloquence of the Anti-Slavery Conflict • Newell Dwight Hillis



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