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Chock   /tʃɑk/   Listen
Chock

verb
(past & past part. chocked; pres. part. chocking)
1.
Secure with chocks.
2.
Support on chocks.



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"Chock" Quotes from Famous Books



... sometimes that Providence has done picked us out ez speshul favorites. Good fortune is plum' showered on us. We've got a snug holler like this, one uv the finest homes a man could live in, an' round us is a wilderness runnin' thousands uv miles, chock full uv game, waitin' to be hunted by us. Ev'ry time the savages think they've got us, an' it looks too ez ef they wuz right, we slip right out uv thar hands an' the scalps are still growin' full an' free, ...
— The Eyes of the Woods - A story of the Ancient Wilderness • Joseph A. Altsheler

... just to help poor little Sally Nutter out of the vapours, and vowing that no excuse should stand good, and that come she must to tea and cards. 'And, oh! what do you think?' it went on. 'Such a bit a newse, I'm going to tell you, so prepare for a chock;' at this part poor Sally felt quite sick, but went on. 'Doctor Sturk, that droav into town Yesterday, as grand as you Please, in Mrs. Strafford's coach, all smiles and Polightness—whood a bleeved! ...
— The House by the Church-Yard • J. Sheridan Le Fanu

... about corn and lan', "Hoo 's the markets," says he, "are they risen or fa'en? Or is this snawie weather the roads like to chock?" But the gudewife aye spiers for my muckle ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume VI - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... rent, which was heard throughout the ship, the foretopsail, which had been double-reefed, split in two athwartships, just below the reef-band, from earing to earing. Here again it was—down yard, haul out reef-tackles, and lay out upon the yard for reefing. By hauling the reef-tackles chock-a-block we took the strain from the other earings, and passing the close-reef earing, and knotting the points carefully, we succeeded in setting the ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. X (of X) - America - II, Index • Various

... Ma, she thinks I'm at school, but I ain't." He looked up wickedly, bubbling over with the shameless joys of truancy. "Thar's a lot of chinquapin bushes over yonder in Cobblestone's wood an' they're chock full of nuts." ...
— The Miller Of Old Church • Ellen Glasgow

... gardener had a sorry time of it while they stayed. He complained that "a herd of wild buffalo turned loose to rend and destroy" would not have done as much damage to his fruit and flowers as they. "Not as they means to do it, I don't think," he said. "But they're so chock-full of go that they fair runs away with their selves." The gardener's excitement did not long ...
— The Story of Dago • Annie Fellows-Johnston

... says, "to a little boarding-house called.... The house was as comfortable as it could be, the food plain, but eatable, but the common table was always chock full of Plymouth Brethren and tract-giving old maids, and we ...
— The Life of Sir Richard Burton • Thomas Wright

... Jocelyn Thew was sitting quite by himself, as though deep in thought.—We all got up to bed somehow. I sat for some hours at the open window. Pretty soon I got sober, and I began to realise what had happened. And all the time I thought of that safe, chock full of money, and the combination ready set. I heard Katharine moving about in her room, and I knew that she was waiting for me to go and say good night. I wouldn't. I put on a short jacket instead of my dress coat, and I took an electric torch out of my dressing case and I went down-stairs. ...
— The Box with Broken Seals • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... very interesting morning. Got leave to go into the town and see the Cathedral of St Martin. None of the others would budge from the train, so I went alone; town chock-full of French and Belgian troops, and unending streams of columns, also Belgian refugees, cars full of staff officers. The Cathedral is thirteenth century, glorious as usual. There are hundreds of German prisoners in the town in the Cloth Hall. ...
— Diary of a Nursing Sister on the Western Front, 1914-1915 • Anonymous

... 'Chock full o' science,' said the radiant Captain, 'as ever he was! Sol Gills, Sol Gills, what have you been up to, for this many a long ...
— Dombey and Son • Charles Dickens

... chock-full of those vulgar presents had been pushed into the back part of a dark cupboard which stood in the little girl's room. Penelope knew all about that. She opened the cupboard, disappeared into its shadows, and then returned with ...
— Girls of the Forest • L. T. Meade

... saloon and gambling-joint. In one corner was a very ornate bar, and all around the capacious room were gambling devices of every kind. There were crap-tables, wheel of fortune, the Klondike game, Keno, stud poker, roulette and faro outfits. The place was chock-a-block with rough-looking men, either looking on or playing the games. The men who were running the tables wore shades of green over their eyes, and their strident cries of "Come on, boys," ...
— The Trail of '98 - A Northland Romance • Robert W. Service

... whistle to the note of the curlew; across the meadow from the church wandered Crane, the little Church of England missionary, peering from short-sighted pale blue eyes; beyond the coulee, Sarnier and his Indians chock-chock-chocked away at the seams of the long coast-trading bateau. The girl saw nothing, heard nothing. She was dreaming, ...
— Conjuror's House - A Romance of the Free Forest • Stewart Edward White

... there was a matter of half a ream of brown paper stuck upon me, from first to last. As I laid all of a heap in our kitchen, plastered all over, you might have thought I was a large brown-paper parcel, chock full of nothing but groans. Did I groan loud, Wackford, or did I groan soft?' asked Mr ...
— The Life And Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby • Charles Dickens

... 'forwards,' or for'ad as the sailors say; that a large rope was a 'hawser,' and that every other rope was a 'line'; to make anything temporarily secure was to 'belay' it; to make one thing fast to another was to 'bend it on'; and when two things were close together, they were 'chock-a-block.' I learned, also, that the right-hand side of the vessel was the 'starboard' side, while the left-hand side was the 'port' or 'larboard' side; that the lever which moves the rudder that steers ...
— Cast Away in the Cold - An Old Man's Story of a Young Man's Adventures, as Related by Captain John Hardy, Mariner • Isaac I. Hayes

... without charity is not calculated to pay very large dividends in the interesting ultimate; that a man may be full of faith, and pregnant with prophecy, and chock-a-block with knowledge and redolent of religious mystery,—that he may leak sanctification in the musical accents of an angel and still be "nothing"—a pitiful hole in the atmosphere, a chimera circulating in a vacuum and foolishly imagining ...
— Volume 1 of Brann The Iconoclast • William Cowper Brann

... miles, and all of a sudden gave it up at an insignificant barrier, or turned off into a workshop. And then others, like intoxicated men, went a little way very straight, and surprisingly slued round and came back again. And then others were so chock-full of trucks of coal, others were so blocked with trucks of casks, others were so gorged with trucks of ballast, others were so set apart for wheeled objects like immense iron cotton-reels: while others were so bright and clear, and others were so delivered over to ...
— Mugby Junction • Charles Dickens

... right," quivered Flame. "It's just chock-full of dead things! Pressed flowers! And old plush bags! And pressed ...
— Peace on Earth, Good-will to Dogs • Eleanor Hallowell Abbott

... for alluvial, for certain, we should have found heavy, shotty gold, with only a few feet of stripping. But I've done better than that—got on the lead—dead on the gutter. To my belief, that gully is the top dressing of a dried up underground watercourse. It's a pocket chock full of gold. ...
— Lady Bridget in the Never-Never Land • Rosa Praed

... stop this clatter somehow. The stones are hot now. The whole thing'll burn up like tinder if we can't chock ...
— In Exile and Other Stories • Mary Hallock Foote

... than no bread, and the same remark holds good with crumbs. There's a few. Annuity of one hundred pound premium also ready to be made over. If there is a man chock full of science in the world, it's old Sol Gills. If there is a lad of promise—one flowing,' added the Captain, in one of his happy quotations, 'with milk and honey—it's ...
— Dombey and Son • Charles Dickens

... I can see the track straight before and straight behind me to either horizon. Peace of mind I enjoy with extreme serenity; I am doing right; I know no one will think so; and don't care. My body, however, is all to whistles; I don't eat; but, man, I can sleep. The car in front of mine is chock full of Chinese. ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 23 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... "Farquhar," he said, "I'm chock full of a story. It kept me awake half the night. I want to ask your advice about it. ...
— In Connection with the De Willoughby Claim • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... ready, was bolted down to a heavy squared beam of timber on the ship's deck. It was loaded by the insertion of the "gonne-chambre," an iron pan, containing the charge, which fitted into, and closed the breech. This gonne-chambre was wedged in firmly by a chock of elm wood beaten in with a mallet. Another block of wood, fixed in the deck behind it, kept it from flying out with any violence when the shot was fired. Cannon of this sort formed the main armament of ships until after the reign of Henry the Eighth. They fired stone cannon-balls, ...
— On the Spanish Main - Or, Some English forays on the Isthmus of Darien. • John Masefield

... gentlewoman where we stayed last night must be a monstrous fine lady! Marion asked him why he thought so. "Why, sir," replied he, "she not only made me almost burst myself with eating and drinking, and all of the very best, but she has gone and filled my portmanteau too, filled it up chock full, sir! A fine ham of bacon, sir, and a pair of roasted fowls, with two bottles of brandy, and a matter ...
— The Life of General Francis Marion • Mason Locke Weems

... you let nobody get a wink ob sleep? Ebbery time I puts my head down, bang! comes a noise and up pops my head. Now, what's a-ailin' ob you, Bert?" and the colored girl showed by her tone of voice she was not a bit angry, but "chock-full of laugh," ...
— The Bobbsey Twins at the Seashore • Laura Lee Hope

... on one end of one of those narrow forms, and this same coolie sat on the other. He rose up suddenly, reached over for the common salt-pot, and I came off—with the multitude of alfresco diners laughing at this smart retaliation until their chock-full mouths emitted the ...
— Across China on Foot • Edwin Dingle

... turn out to be a whacking sensation, and it may be a great deal more important than we think. You don't want to become involved in the investigation, which may become a national affair. I'd like to have a hand in clearing it up. My head is chock- full of theories ...
— Green Fancy • George Barr McCutcheon

... leftenants, I guess, from the British marchin' regiments in the Colonies, that run over five thousand miles of country in five weeks, on leave of absence, and then return, lookin' as wise as the monkey that had seen the world. When they get back they are so chock full of knowledge of the Yankees, that it runs over of itself, like a Hogshead of molasses rolled about in hot weather—a white froth and scum bubbles out of the bung; wishy-washy trash they call tours, sketches, travels, letters, ...
— The Clockmaker • Thomas Chandler Haliburton

... Sloop. and his Sloop being Leaky we Concluded to heave her down and stop her leaks before we Sent her homeward. after we had Cleaned her and got the Cargoe on Board, found Concealed in the under part of the Boats Chock,[4] a Sett of french Papers Expressing who the Cargoe belonged to. John Paas Imediately retracted what he had formerly Said, Acknowledged that Vessell and Cargoe did belong to the french. Some time afterwards we had Some discourse Concerning ...
— Privateering and Piracy in the Colonial Period - Illustrative Documents • Various



Words linked to "Chock" :   chock-full, fasten, block, hold, hold up, chock up, secure, sprag, support, chock-a-block, fix, sustain



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