Free Translator Free Translator
Translators Dictionaries Courses Other
Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Catch   /kætʃ/   Listen
Catch

verb
(past & past part. caught; pres. part. catching; catched is rarely used)
1.
Discover or come upon accidentally, suddenly, or unexpectedly; catch somebody doing something or in a certain state.  "She was caught shoplifting"
2.
Perceive with the senses quickly, suddenly, or momentarily.  Synonym: pick up.  "He caught the allusion in her glance" , "Ears open to catch every sound" , "The dog picked up the scent" , "Catch a glimpse"
3.
Reach with a blow or hit in a particular spot.  Synonym: get.  "The blow got him in the back" , "The punch caught him in the stomach"
4.
Take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of.  Synonyms: grab, take hold of.  "Grab the elevator door!"
5.
Succeed in catching or seizing, especially after a chase.  Synonyms: capture, get.  "Did you catch the thief?"
6.
To hook or entangle.  Synonym: hitch.
7.
Attract and fix.  Synonyms: arrest, get.  "She caught his eye" , "Catch the attention of the waiter"
8.
Capture as if by hunting, snaring, or trapping.  Synonym: capture.
9.
Reach in time.
10.
Get or regain something necessary, usually quickly or briefly.  "Catch one's breath"
11.
Catch up with and possibly overtake.  Synonyms: catch up with, overtake.
12.
Be struck or affected by.  "Catch the mood"
13.
Check oneself during an action.
14.
Hear, usually without the knowledge of the speakers.  Synonyms: overhear, take in.
15.
See or watch.  Synonyms: see, take in, view, watch.  "This program will be seen all over the world" , "View an exhibition" , "Catch a show on Broadway" , "See a movie"
16.
Cause to become accidentally or suddenly caught, ensnared, or entangled.
17.
Detect a blunder or misstep.  Synonym: trip up.
18.
Grasp with the mind or develop an understanding of.  Synonym: get.  "We caught something of his theory in the lecture" , "Don't catch your meaning" , "Did you get it?" , "She didn't get the joke" , "I just don't get him"
19.
Contract.
20.
Start burning.
21.
Perceive by hearing.  Synonym: get.  "She didn't get his name when they met the first time"
22.
Suffer from the receipt of.  Synonym: get.
23.
Attract; cause to be enamored.  Synonyms: becharm, beguile, bewitch, captivate, capture, charm, enamor, enamour, enchant, entrance, fascinate, trance.
24.
Apprehend and reproduce accurately.  Synonym: get.  "She got the mood just right in her photographs"
25.
Take in and retain.
26.
Spread or be communicated.
27.
Be the catcher.
28.
Become aware of.
29.
Delay or hold up; prevent from proceeding on schedule or as planned.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Catch" Quotes from Famous Books



... veil be lifted for a brief moment and the dull ears quickened to catch the pleading accents of the blessed lord? 'Do it unto Me'? none would longer count their flowers and fruit their own, the Royal seal would be seen on each, whether growing wild in copses, or carefully nurtured in hothouse and conservatory, and these treasures ...
— God's Answers - A Record Of Miss Annie Macpherson's Work at the - Home of Industry, Spitalfields, London, and in Canada • Clara M. S. Lowe

... sent by Marguerite had been discovered in his boat, had been taken to the guard-house, and had given such answers as led to the suspicion that he was waiting to aid the flight of some one. The captain of the Guard, thinking so to catch the person for whom the boatman waited, had sent two bodies of men out, one to occupy the spot near which the boy had been found, the other to patrol the river bank in search of questionable persons. I had arrived ...
— An Enemy To The King • Robert Neilson Stephens

... not escaped the weakness. Still, I think some credit is due for the alternative adopted. During the whole voyage, I had kept a reckoning, and paper and pencil were always in my pocket, in readiness to catch a moment to finish a day's work. I wrote as follows on a piece of paper, therefore, as fast as possible, and dropped the billet on the quarter-deck, by enclosing a copper in the scrawl, cents then being in their infancy. I had merely written—"The brig's forecastle is filled with ...
— Afloat And Ashore • James Fenimore Cooper

... fur cap. "If Miss Rawlinson would like to see Mrs. Sandberg, I'll drive her round," he suggested. "We'll catch you up in a league or so. Gregory has a bit of patching to do on his ...
— Hawtrey's Deputy • Harold Bindloss

... he is the scoundrel that was to have charge of the 7 I wrote you about two weeks since; their master was to take or send them there, and he wanted me to send for them. I have since been confirmed it was a trap set to catch one of our colored men and me likewise, but it was no go. I suspected him from the first, but afterwards was fully confirmed in my suspicions. We have found the two Rust boys, John and Elsey Bradley, who the villain of a Bust took out of jail and sold to a trader of the name of Morris, who ...
— The Underground Railroad • William Still

... the Poet in his lasting home, Lamented Surrey!—hero, bard divine, Pride, grace, and glory of brave Norfolk's line. Departed spirit!—Oh! I love to hold Communion sweet with lofty minds of old, To catch a spark of that celestial fire Which glows and kindles in thy rapturous lyre; Though varying themes demand my future lays, Yet thus my soul a willing homage pays To that bright glory which illumes thy name, Though naught can raise the splendour ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 19. No. 575 - 10 Nov 1832 • Various

... friends are early to bed and early to rise; they have, in the morning, trout to catch for breakfast, and we have a good way to ...
— Aylwin • Theodore Watts-Dunton

... me in an occupation not very canonical; but what of it? As Saint James says: 'The bow can not be always bent.' I am preparing some lime-twigs, which I shall place in the Bois des Ronces as soon as the snow is melted. I am not only a fisher of souls, but I endeavor also to catch birds in my net, not so much for the purpose of varying my diet, as ...
— A Woodland Queen, Complete • Andre Theuriet

... him to leave, he saw with surprise that he could only by running catch his train, and, as the boys had not come back for him, he ...
— Miss Ashton's New Pupil - A School Girl's Story • Mrs. S. S. Robbins

... impressed with new ideas; extremely tenacious of the old; with difficulty warmed; and as slowly cooling again.—How unsuited then to our national character is that species of poetry which rises upon us with unexpected flights! Where we must hastily catch the thought, or it flies from us; and, in short, where the Reader must largely partake of the Poet's enthusiasm, in order to taste his beauties. To carry the parallel a little farther; the Greek Poet wrote ...
— Early Reviews of English Poets • John Louis Haney

... hear what they have to say, for you catch only a scrap or a sentence here and there; but to go up against them. Somehow or other you get their drift that way. Anyhow I am conscious that this helps me to understand what the people need and want. There is such a thing as commercial instinct; and contact with the people ...
— The Young Man and the World • Albert J. Beveridge

... catch poor old Miss White, who reeled, and then tried, as she sank into a chair, to speak: "What? What? Not with you last night? Nannie! She must have been. She told me she was going—" Miss White grew so ghastly that Nannie, in a ...
— The Iron Woman • Margaret Deland

... "I long to catch butterflies to be my messengers to you. I thought of getting my letters posted in Paris, so as to arouse your curiosity and make you believe that I was there. In short a great many quaint notions came to my head and have only just been dispersed ...
— The Love Affairs of Great Musicians, Volume 2 • Rupert Hughes

... after all I must look something like a beetle with a white head. But why should you mind being compared to a flea? A flea works by night and so do you, Macumazahn; a flea is active and so are you; a flea is very hard to catch and kill and so are you; and lastly a flea drinks its fill of that which it desires, the blood of man and beast, and so you have done, do, and will, Macumazahn," and he broke into a great laugh that rolled and echoed ...
— Child of Storm • H. Rider Haggard

... George started with horror. "Black fellow burn beef here and eat him. Black fellow a great thief. Black fellow take all your beef. Now we catch black fellow and shoot him suppose he not tell us ...
— It Is Never Too Late to Mend • Charles Reade

... invited his guest to an end porch shaded by a profusion of vines, notable among them the sweetbrier, that gave out a fragrant incense on the night air. Even here they could catch sounds of the music from the river parties, for the violin and a young ...
— A Little Girl in Old Detroit • Amanda Minnie Douglas

... lined with eyes within, And, being so, the sage unmakes the man. In love he cannot therefore cease his trade; Scarce the first blush has overspread his cheek, He feels it, introverts his learned eye To catch the unconscious heart in the very act. His mother died,—the only friend he had,— Some tears escaped, but his philosophy Couched like a cat, sat watching close behind And throttled all his passion. Is't not like That devil-spider ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... against taking it. Polly and Jack declared that they would starve sooner than eat anything that hadn't been cooked over a camp-fire. Bell and Philip said that they should stand in front of it all the time, for fear somebody would ride through the canyon and catch them camping out with a stove. Imagine such a situation; it made them blush. Margery said she wished people weren't quite so practical, and wouldn't ruin nature by introducing such ugly and unnecessary things. ...
— A Summer in a Canyon: A California Story • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... youth, I blushed to think how superior she was to what I well remember myself to have been at the same age; nay, how far my superior at that very time. I earnestly desired to catch something of the spirit which appeared so lovely in her; for, simple, teachable, meek, humble yet earnest in her demeanour, she bore living ...
— The Annals of the Poor • Legh Richmond

... rink he raced after L.; he wanted to overtake her and it seemed as if it were life which he wanted to overtake, that life which one cannot bring back or overtake or catch, just as one cannot catch ...
— Note-Book of Anton Chekhov • Anton Pavlovich Chekhov

... quite unaware of any change in him. To his physical comfort she gave all due attention, anxious lest he should catch cold in this hideous weather, and doing her best to rule the house as he desired; but his intellectual life was no concern to her. Herein, of course, Harvey did but share the common lot of men married; ...
— The Whirlpool • George Gissing

... Money, my Wife, and my House, I withdrew to this Desart, where you see me. I have since endeavour'd to get my Bread by Fishing; but the Fish, as well as all Mankind, desert me. I scarce catch one in a Day; I am half starv'd; and had it not been for your unexpected Benevolence and Generosity, I had been at the Bottom of ...
— Zadig - Or, The Book of Fate • Voltaire

... observed within the tropics, with respect to other classes of animals which live in society, for instance monkeys and crocodiles. In the Missions of the Orinoco, and on the banks of the river Amazon, the Indians, who catch monkeys to sell them, know very well that they can easily succeed in taming those which inhabit certain islands; while monkeys of the same species, caught on the neighbouring continent, die of terror or rage when they find themselves ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America • Alexander von Humboldt

... a monk of Alcobaca who came to General Wellesley on the night of 16th August 1808, and told him that if he wished to catch the French he must be quick as they meant to retire early in the morning, thus enabling him to win the battle of Rolica, the first fight ...
— Portuguese Architecture • Walter Crum Watson

... that we catch it, and make it carry us somewhere or other," said Halliday. "Its back is long enough to let us all ride on it: you, Boxall, on the top of the hump, as the post of honour; Ben, astern; and Charlie and I ...
— Saved from the Sea - The Loss of the Viper, and her Crew's Saharan Adventures • W.H.G. Kingston

... scene! "Well done, well done, little boy! Brave boy!" I cried, trying to catch and caress him; but he would not be caught. Never before or since have I seen anything like so passionate a revulsion from the depths of despair to exultant, triumphant, uncontrollable joy. He flashed and darted hither and thither as if fairly demented, screaming and shouting, ...
— Stickeen • John Muir

... that we catch a glimpse of Greatheart's weather-beaten and sword-seamed face is when he is taking a stolen look out of the window at Mr. Fearing, who is conducting himself more like a chicken than a man around the Interpreter's door. And from that moment till Mr. Fearing shouted "Grace reigns!" as he ...
— Bunyan Characters (Second Series) • Alexander Whyte

... of his money, with the wallet in his possession, and he sometimes dishonestly purposes appropriating the entire contents to his own use. He pays the ten dollars to the finder of the book, who hurries off, saying that he has just time to catch the train by which he intends leaving the city. Upon examining the wallet, the victim finds that its contents consist of a wad of paper wrapped in a wretched counterfeit note. He has given his ten dollars for a collection of ...
— Lights and Shadows of New York Life - or, the Sights and Sensations of the Great City • James D. McCabe

... "eight" turned sideways, so: [symbol]. It has a cunning little bridge in the narrowest part, across which a whole regiment of dolls could march—and you and I, too, for that matter. It is so small and pretty, that I do believe you and I could catch gold fish out of it. I have looked very hard in it to find a mermaid, which, you know, is a lady with no feet: instead of those, she has a fish's tail. I wonder how one would taste boiled; for she ...
— Little Mittens for The Little Darlings - Being the Second Book of the Series • Frances Elizabeth Barrow

... the rock before him, had held him all morning. He had been trying to catch the look of coming summer, the crisp, salt tang of the water, and the scudding breeze. When he looked at the canvas, a scowl held his forehead, but when he glanced back at the water, it vanished in swift delight. It was color to dream on, to gloat over—to wait ...
— Uncle William - The Man Who Was Shif'less • Jennette Lee

... evidence that Dryden smoked. The snuff-box was his symbol of authority. Budding wits thought themselves highly distinguished if they could obtain the honour of being allowed to take a pinch from it. Of Dr. Aldrich, who was Dean of Christ Church, Oxford, and who wrote a curious "Catch not more difficult to sing than diverting to hear, to be sung by four men smoaking their pipes," an anecdote has often been related, which illustrates his devotion to the weed. A bet was made by one ...
— The Social History of Smoking • G. L. Apperson

... vocative, as in the Southern States of the Union, follows the, word:' Daddy, oh!' 'Mammy, oh!' 'Puss,' or 'tittle,' is a girl, perhaps a pretty girl; 'babboh,' a boy. 'Hear' is to obey or understand; 'look,' to see; 'catch,' to have; 'lib,' to live, to be, to be found, or to enjoy good health: it is applied equally to inanimates. 'Done lib' means die; 'sabby' (Portuguese) is to know; 'chop,' to eat; 'cut the cry,' to end a wake; 'jam head,' or 'go ...
— To the Gold Coast for Gold - A Personal Narrative in Two Volumes.—Vol. I • Richard F. Burton

... he had shown her the finished cartoon for the front elevation and with a catch of her breath she had exclaimed, "Oh, Mr. Brand, it is exquisite! I don't know why it is so beautiful, for it looks simple, but, ...
— The Fate of Felix Brand • Florence Finch Kelly

... and most historic of all English cities, breathes in these sumptuous and aromatic pages. After Lamb and Pater, both of whom loved him well, Browne is the subtlest adept in the recondite mysteries of rhythmic prose who can be enjoyed in our language. Not to catch the cadences of his peculiar music is to confess oneself deaf to the finer ...
— One Hundred Best Books • John Cowper Powys

... raised his head and for a moment sniffed, as though to catch some odor, elusive yet ominous, which he had for some time half sensed yet ...
— Darkness and Dawn • George Allan England

... awakes, how from the lighted heights With the soft waving breeze The morning glory smiles in the fresh green.... Here by the rippling brook and quivering flower, We catch Love's rustle as she gently sweeps Like Spring's ...
— The Development of the Feeling for Nature in the Middle Ages and - Modern Times • Alfred Biese

... communicated. To formulate requires getting outside of it, seeing it as another would see it, considering what points of contact it has with the life of another so that it may be got into such form that he can appreciate its meaning. Except in dealing with commonplaces and catch phrases one has to assimilate, imaginatively, something of another's experience in order to tell him intelligently of one's own experience. All communication is like art. It may fairly be said, therefore, that any social arrangement that ...
— Democracy and Education • John Dewey

... later times, were agitating the Parliamentary Army while the King was in his captivity at Holmby. Pamphlets from London, actively circulated among the regiments, aided the discussion and supplied it with topics and catch- words. Especially popular among the soldiers, and keeping up their excitement more particularly against the House of Lords, were the pamphlets that came from John Lilburne and an associate of his named Richard Overton.—Lilburne, ...
— The Life of John Milton Vol. 3 1643-1649 • David Masson

... The caravan will have reached the nothing it set out from.... Surely the potter will not toss to hell the pots he marred in the making." She started from her reverie, and suddenly grew aware of his very words, "However we may strive to catch a glimpse of to-morrow, we must fall back on to-day as the only solid ground we have to stand on, though it be slipping momentarily from under our feet." She recalled the intonation of his sigh as he spoke of the inscrutable nature of things, and she wondered if he, too, with all his friends ...
— Evelyn Innes • George Moore

... established regulations," "afford pastime to large masses of industrious population," "unable from pecuniary circumstances," "the more expensive forms of sport." That all very well, but not quite all. Easy enough to catch the trick of speech; who but JEMMY LOWTHER can add the indefinable personal gifts which invest ...
— Punch, or, the London Charivari, Volume 98, March 8, 1890. • Various

... further of Senor Rey for two days, and did not catch even a second glimpse of Jim Framtree. His hours of darkness and daylight were given over to the old destructive monotony—the dark drifting of his mind, all the constellations of love and labor and life shut off by the black mass of nimbus. His identity became ...
— Fate Knocks at the Door - A Novel • Will Levington Comfort

... Ken," said Patty, for there was a note of earnestness in Kenneth's voice that the girl was quick to catch. They had been friends since childhood, and while Patty did not take her "coming out" very seriously, yet she realised that it meant she was grown up ...
— Patty's Social Season • Carolyn Wells

... loud and spectacular where I wanted to be refined and subtle," you said, "just to catch some rough audience and fill the house, would be insupportable. And yet I know actresses ofttimes must do that very thing, to keep a foothold in ...
— A Woman of the World - Her Counsel to Other People's Sons and Daughters • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... to the West?" said an acquaintance, to whom he was one day making complaint of his slow progress. "That is the country where enterprise meets a just reward. If I were as young a man as you are, you wouldn't catch me long in these parts. I would sell out and buy five or six hundred acres of government land and settle down as a farmer. In a few years you'd see me with property on my hands ...
— Lizzy Glenn - or, The Trials of a Seamstress • T. S. Arthur

... This party was over virtuous on the slavery matter, lending an unofficial ear to Garrison and other agitators, but it had been careful not to take a party stand on the question. It would continue to play with the subject. It would put forward a southern slave owner to catch the southern Whigs, and at the same time use his war record to move the pure-blooded ...
— Children of the Market Place • Edgar Lee Masters

... steeping The hillside and the lawn, But still I lie unsleeping, With curtains backward drawn, To catch the earliest ...
— Robert F. Murray - his poems with a memoir by Andrew Lang • Robert F. Murray

... position gives a brand to it neither healthy nor pleasant. They are seated down the centre aisle; but the place is too demonstrative of their poverty. If half the seats were empty, situated excellently though they may be, you wouldn't catch any respectable weasle asleep on them. If some doctor, or magistrate, or private bib-and-tucker lady had to anchor here, supposing there were any spare place in any other part of the house, there would be a good deal of quizzing and wonderment ...
— Our Churches and Chapels • Atticus

... pubic bone. With the left hand hold the head and shoulders. Lower him very gently into the water. Any sudden movement is most injurious, as a baby must never cry when the band is off, if it can be avoided. He will often put out both hands as if trying to catch hold of something. If he seems frightened at the same time, and cries violently, let the buttocks rest on the bottom of the tub, and with the right hand hold both of his, and ...
— Making Good On Private Duty • Harriet Camp Lounsbery

... once went to live in the family of a minister, and a very excellent man he was, as prayed night and morning, and said grace afore meals. Oh, he was a dreadful clever gentleman, 'cause he always used to kiss me when he catch'd me alone, and chuck me under the chin, and tell me I was handsome. Well, Saturday the minister's wife and family went to pay a visit to some relations in New Jersey, and was to stay for two or three days; but the minister himself didn't go ...
— City Crimes - or Life in New York and Boston • Greenhorn

... the small boat; but it was too late to stay her now, even if the Arabs had wished to, but they did not. When she made the sign of the cross, that decided them, and they let her drop. Some waiting Turks made a feeble attempt to catch the sprawling woman, but not much. Sometimes, before one could rise, another woman—for they were nearly all women—would drop upon her bent back. Sometimes, when the first boat was filled, an Arab would catch ...
— McClure's Magazine December, 1895 • Edited by Ida M. Tarbell

... the harbour was reached, however, directly after, and as soon as the oars were laid in all hands were busy for the next two hours shaking out and landing mackerel ready for basketing and sending across country to catch the early ...
— A Terrible Coward • George Manville Fenn

... one in the hall, and I stepped out through the open door to the porch beyond, and stood looking about me. The house was built in the midst of a grove of beautiful old trees, some distance back from the road, of which I could catch only a glimpse. It was a small house, a story and a half in height, evidently designed ...
— The Gloved Hand • Burton E. Stevenson

... plain was quite open, with no trees or shrubs nearer than the river bed, half a mile distant. The cat finding herself hard pressed, and despairing of reaching the river-bed before the dog would catch her, spied old Dan with Paddy and the post thereupon, and conceived that her only chance of safety lay in mounting too. No sooner thought than done. She doubled, sprang on old Dan's tail and fastened her claws in his hinder parts. Dan not approving of such treatment, set to bucking. First Pat ...
— Five Years in New Zealand - 1859 to 1864 • Robert B. Booth

... how I'm feeling. God's been good to me all my years. He's given me a Daddy who's the best in the world. A Daddy who's taught me by his own example how to be strong and fight the little battles I guess it's meant for us to fight. Oh, I won't say it hasn't hurt," she went on, with a catch in her voice. "You see, I loved Jeff. I love him now, and I'll go right on loving him to the end. And it's because I love him I want to help him now—and always. You won't think me a fool girl, my Daddy, will you, but—but—I ...
— The Forfeit • Ridgwell Cullum

... womanly nature gained a stronger hold upon her. She followed him like his shadow on all his wanderings, and when they sat down together by the wayside, she would sing, in a clear, soft voice, an ancient lay or ballad, and he would catch her words on his paper, and smile at the happy prospect of perpetuating what otherwise would have been lost. Aasa's love, whether conscious or not, was to him an everlasting source of strength, was a revelation of himself to himself, and a clearing and ...
— Tales From Two Hemispheres • Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen

... you?" echoed Steve, when he could catch his breath; "do you mean that you're carrying on some sort of business, then, ...
— At Whispering Pine Lodge • Lawrence J. Leslie

... by listening to the other cases, and some of them, I can assure you, are amusing enough. The walls of that room must be by this time pretty well saturated with perjury, and many of the witnesses catch at once the infection. Perhaps I may tell you some other time a few of the amusing incidents that I have seen there. At last my case is called. It is as clear as daylight, but the rascally pettifogger is there with a long-prepared speech, he holds in ...
— Russia • Donald Mackenzie Wallace

... if you would be so kind as not to grow any older till I catch you up, I shall be so very, very, very much ...
— Love Me Little, Love Me Long • Charles Reade

... of our journey, to descend, having passed over the height of land. We saw several grey grouse here, and in the evening one of our men caught one in a curious manner. They were extremely tame, and allowed us to approach them very closely, so Baptiste determined to catch one for supper. Cutting a long branch from a neighbouring tree, he tied a running noose on one end of it, and going quietly up to the bird, put the noose gently over its head, and pulled it off the tree. This ...
— Hudson Bay • R.M. Ballantyne

... situation of providing that nobody may be a citizen of our great Republic except a white Caucasian and a black African, with considerable ambiguity still as to what the word "white" means. The American Indians are, indeed, admitted under the conditions before mentioned, so that as a catch-word the reader may remember that we are a red, white, and black country, but not a brown or yellow one. All this is, of course, the accident of history; but the accidents of history are its most ...
— Popular Law-making • Frederic Jesup Stimson

... late is shocking bad, In fact, the latest catch we had (We kept the matter shady), But, hauling in our nets,—alack! We found no salmon, but a sack That held your ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... of knowledge, and returned home filled with the desire of instructing his countrymen in the laws and the religion of the Greeks. According to Herodotus he was killed by his brother Saulius while he was performing sacrifice to the goddess Cybele. It was he who compared laws to spiders' webs, which catch small flies and allow bigger ones to escape. His simple and forcible mode of expressing himself gave birth to the proverbial expression "Scythian eloquence,'' but his epigrams are as unauthentic ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... and Christina felt that old sense of happy companionship in his presence. The berries were fairly falling off the branches in ripe luxuriance, and they filled the little pail she had brought in quite too short a time. Behind them the top of Craig-Ellachie stretched up to catch the last light of the setting sun. Her home fields spread out beneath; the dusk laying its velvet cloak softly over them. The air was so still, the sound of the horses being driven to the water trough came up from ...
— In Orchard Glen • Marian Keith

... had to run to catch the train ready to start for Paestum. The landscape was changing on both sides of the way, as now they were crossing over marshy portions of land. On the soft meadows flocks of buffaloes, rude animals that appeared carved ...
— Mare Nostrum (Our Sea) - A Novel • Vicente Blasco Ibanez

... doubted that the next morning we were early risers, and as soon as I could catch the faintest glimpse of anything like daylight I shook my companion by the arm, and told him it was sunrise. Poor Toby lifted up his head, and after a moment's pause said, in a husky voice, 'Then, shipmate, my ...
— Typee - A Romance of the South Sea • Herman Melville

... handy to it," said Bob, with the confidence of one in utter ignorance. "We shall be there to-morrow, and then we can catch heaps of cod-fish, and soles, and mack'rel, and find oysters. It'll be ...
— Quicksilver - The Boy With No Skid To His Wheel • George Manville Fenn

... cross streets, long rows of marble, iron, and brown stone warehouses, stretching away for many blocks on either hand, and affording proof positive of the vastness and success of the business transacted in this locality. To the right we catch a distant view of the squalor and misery of the Five Points. On the right hand side of the street, between Leonard street and Catharine lane, is the imposing edifice of the New York Life Insurance Company, one of the noblest buildings ever erected ...
— Lights and Shadows of New York Life - or, the Sights and Sensations of the Great City • James D. McCabe

... Julia was waiting with eager impatience at the gate, her lovely form occasionally gliding from the shrubbery to catch a glimpse of the passengers on the highway, when Charles appeared riding at a full gallop towards the house; his whole manner announced success, and Julia sprang into the middle of the road to take the letter which he extended ...
— Tales for Fifteen: or, Imagination and Heart • James Fenimore Cooper

... gifts lack this charm, has recaptured much of the careless rapture of her earliest books; and very careless and very rapturous they wore. But I am not quite sure that in real life even Ben, when as second whip to the East Cara hounds she lost her horse, would have found an aeroplane useful to catch up with. In case it should be objected that anything so funny as the tea at Miss Talty's never could happen, even in the Caher Valley district, I want to put it on record here and now that ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, April 23, 1919 • Various

... many hours before Willy saw her go up to two young soldiers who were quarrelling. Seizing them, she knocked their heads together. "There, lads," she exclaimed; "make it up this moment, or the next time I catch you at that work I'll knock them ...
— The Voyages of the Ranger and Crusader - And what befell their Passengers and Crews. • W.H.G. Kingston

... on account of it, representing to us that they are very subject to vengeance, not looking to those who dealt the blow, but the first whom they meet of the nation, or even their friends, they make them bear the penalty, when they can catch any of them unless beforehand peace had been made with them, and one had given them some gifts and presents for the relatives of the deceased; which prevented me for the time from going there, although some of that nation assured us ...
— The Country of the Neutrals - (As Far As Comprised in the County of Elgin), From Champlain to Talbot • James H. Coyne

... bystanders that it was the headquarters of the Yale team, which that afternoon was to play Princeton at the Polo Grounds. The players were about to leave the hotel for the field, and I hurried inside to catch a ...
— Football Days - Memories of the Game and of the Men behind the Ball • William H. Edwards

... refinement of disposition and inborn delicacy of feeling. But they may also, to a great extent, be learned and acquired. "Watch," it has wisely been said, "those of excellent reputation in manners. Catch the temper of the great masters of literature—the nobility of Scott, the sincerity of Thackeray, the heartiness of Dickens, the tenderness of Macdonald, the delicacy of Tennyson, the grace of Longfellow, the repose of Shakespeare." It is well worth while for every young man beginning ...
— Life and Conduct • J. Cameron Lees

... all now, but she gathered that the smaller man was pressing some enterprise upon the other, and that his companion, although inclined to accept, found difficulties. She waited for a little time, and presently she began again to catch ...
— The Governors • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... meteor shines Delightfully, to th' levell'd sun opposed: Lovely refraction ! while the vivid brede In listed colours glows, th' unconscious swain, With vacant eye, gazes on the divine Phenomenon, gleaming o'er the illumined fields, Or runs to catch the treasures ...
— The Natural History of Selborne • Gilbert White

... that he was allowed to talk, drew me on one side in the garden. As I was a heretic (he put it more politely) and had the day to myself, would I do him a favour? He was hard put to it to find enough fish for all these guests; would I catch him some trout in the streams in the forest? I asked for nothing better, but I had no trout-rod with me. He produced a rod, SUCH a trout-rod! A long bamboo with a piece of string tied to it! To fish for ...
— The Days Before Yesterday • Lord Frederick Hamilton

... Stoned," and said one to other, "Verily in this well is a Satan!" Mohsin heard their words and answered them and said, "Y'llah[FN444] Ho you, draw me out hence, for verily I am of mankind and not of Jinn-kind and being blind I fell yesterday into this hole." Cried they, "Catch tight hold of the cord," and when he did so they drew him out and finding him weak from famine they gave him a somewhat of food and he ate and drank. The caravan-folk on like guise drank from the well and watered their beasts; ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... another cry, of sorrow and of horror. Tanit-Zerga's little hand relaxed in mine. I had just time to catch the child in my arms and hear her ...
— Atlantida • Pierre Benoit

... across twelve miles or so to inspect a mixed Division of Australians and New Zealanders at Heliopolis. Godley commanded. Great fun seeing him again. These fellows made a real good show; superb physique: numbers of old friends especially amongst the New Zealanders. Another scurry in the motor to catch the 4.15 for Alexandria. Tiring day if I had it in my mind to be tired, but this 30,000 crowd of Birdwood's would straighten up the back of a pacifist. There is a bravery in their air—a keenness upon their clean cut features—they ...
— Gallipoli Diary, Volume I • Ian Hamilton

... perfect observers and delineators of actual nature, low or high; but precludes them from that speciality of art which is properly called sublime. If ever we try anything in the manner of Michael Angelo or of Dante, we catch a fall, even in literature, as Milton in the battle of the angels, spoiled from Hesiod:[174] while in art, every attempt in this style has hitherto been the sign either of the presumptuous egotism of persons who had never really learned to be workmen, or it has been connected with very tragic forms ...
— Selections From the Works of John Ruskin • John Ruskin

... has been here, and this is the first good look I have had at him," the buzzing whispers ran. "It is said that they were obliged to catch him between shields before they could take him."... "Such hair on a Dane is more rare than a white crow."... "I believe no good of any one with locks of that color."... "Tibby, the weaving-woman, says he is skilful in magic."... ...
— The Ward of King Canute • Ottilie A. Liljencrantz

... know it's an awfully dangerous thing. It's just foolhardy to run any sort of risk with it, and it's wise when you make a fire in the open air like this, to stand on the same side as the wind comes from, even if you haven't any skirts or fluffy hair to catch." ...
— Tattine • Ruth Ogden

... the hatchet that has sunk into the silent stream. I want the other half of the weapon that is buried fathom deep, and for want of which the thick woods darken round me by the Sacred River, and I can catch not a glimpse of ...
— My Novel, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... evergreen thickets inhabited by hundreds of warblers. There will be no dead silence for you in the forest, any longer, but you will hear sweet and delicate voices on every side, voices that you know and love; you will catch the key-note of the silver flute of the woodthrush, and the silver harp of the veery, and the silver bells of the hermit; and something in your heart will answer to them all. In the frosty stillness of October nights you will see the airy tribes flitting across the moon, following the secret call ...
— The Blue Flower, and Others • Henry van Dyke

... wires to the head of his bed, and bells at each ear—think how even he would click and flash those wondrous dispatches of his, and how they would become mere nothing without the activity and honesty which catch up the threads and stitches of the electric needle, and scatter them over ...
— Speeches: Literary and Social • Charles Dickens

... that Scouting is chosen by the girls because it interests them. Use as bait the food the fish likes. If you bait your hook with the kind of food that you yourself like, unless you happen to have a natural affinity for young people, it is probable that you will not catch many. If the Scouting program fails to interest girls, they will ...
— The Girl Scouts Their History and Practice • Anonymous

... canons, &c.; which power of jurisdiction, saith he,(1115) remaineth one and the same, whole and entire, both in the bishop, and in the presbytery: in him personally; in it collegially. His confession of the presbytery's power and authority, we catch and lay hold on; but whereas he would have this power any way proper and personal to bishops, he is confuted ...
— The Works of Mr. George Gillespie (Vol. 1 of 2) • George Gillespie

... watch for. Does the hunter Think it nought to roam the livelong day, In winter's cold; to risk the desp'rate leap From crag to crag, to climb the slipp'ry face O' th' dizzy steep, glueing his steps in's blood; And all to catch a pitiful chamois? Here is a richer prize afield: the heart Of my sworn enemy, ...
— The Life of Friedrich Schiller - Comprehending an Examination of His Works • Thomas Carlyle

... preconceived ideas in any direction are strangely in the way of real freedom. It is difficult to catch new harmonies with old ones ringing in our ears; still more difficult when we persist in listening at ...
— As a Matter of Course • Annie Payson Call

... procession might pass through the street of the Bardi, which some thought was a sign of penitence, an act of humiliation. The sad train moves on. An old man sitting at a door rises, strains his eyes to catch a last glimpse of Hyppolito, and then covers them in anguish, and sinks down again. This is an old man he had saved from misery and death. Two youths, hand in hand, are gazing with sad faces, and tears run down their cheeks. They are orphans: he had clothed and fed them. Hyppolito ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 433 - Volume 17, New Series, April 17, 1852 • Various

... their caps at him here, I dare say," says Madam Esmond, grimly looking at her dependant, "and try and catch Mr. Esmond Warrington for their own daughters, who are no richer than Miss ...
— The Virginians • William Makepeace Thackeray

... you just mentioned?" asked the man of the island, quickly. He was bending forward eagerly, as if to catch the answer. ...
— The Girl Aviators' Sky Cruise • Margaret Burnham

... length is in a state of uniform fusion; the arrow is then let fly, when it draws a thread out with it. The arrow is preferably allowed to strike a wooden target placed, say, 30 feet away from the bow, and a width of black glazed calico is laid under the line of fire to catch the thread or arrow if it falls short. The general arrangements will ...
— On Laboratory Arts • Richard Threlfall

... ne'er advance a Judgment of their own, But catch the spreading notion of the Town; They reason and conclude by precedent, 410 And own stale nonsense which they ne'er invent. Some judge of author's names, not works, and then Nor praise nor blame the writings, but the men. Of all this servile herd the worst is he That in proud dulness joins with ...
— The Rape of the Lock and Other Poems • Alexander Pope

... think I thought," said Rickie rather nervously. "It is not easy to catch the spirit of a thing at once. I only ...
— The Longest Journey • E. M. Forster

... theer still, His crutches hes to fetch him; But he's seen t'time, when in his prime, 'At nobody theer cud catch him. ...
— Revised Edition of Poems • William Wright

... catch him and try to tame him, but the bill-poster said to wait and see what happened next; and sure enough, two other sparrows came and flew in circles above his head, and chirped to him as if they were talking over what could be done. ...
— Master Sunshine • Mrs. C. F. Fraser

... a moment's lull, and Dr. Lueger begins his speech. Graceful, handsome man, with winning manners and attractive bearing, a bright and easy speaker, and is said to know how to trim his political sails to catch any favouring wind that blows. He manages to say a few words, then the ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... side the gas jet placed, a bar. Each of a different metal, one has far More power than has the other to expand When hot, which makes it bend, you understand, In doing so it acts upon a rod And lever, under whose constraining nod A catch which holds the shutters is set free, And with a spring they close ...
— Home Lyrics • Hannah. S. Battersby

... He gave me his name and said 'Witcher's command.' Hardly were the words out of his mouth before a negro soldier standing near raised his carbine and aimed at the Confederate soldier's breast. I called out and sprang forward, but was too late to catch the gun. The negro fired and the poor soldier fell badly wounded. Instantly the negro was knocked down by our white soldiers, disarmed and tied. I drew my revolver to blow his brains out for his terrible crime, ...
— The Black Phalanx - African American soldiers in the War of Independence, the - War of 1812, and the Civil War • Joseph T. Wilson

... notwithstanding, there must be some rules to the game or you don't get your work of art. When those modern wizards of the halls set themselves to a piece of bizarre juggling, say, with a string of pearls, a dumb-bell and a rose-petal, they do toss and catch—don't merely let everything just drop. Mr. STEPHENS will know what I mean without caring overmuch. There's something in it all the same. Anyway, there really are in The Demi-Gods delicate shy pearls and gleams of the authentic ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, November 18, 1914 • Various

... astonishing results to follow from the vivid fiction of a gouty pamphleteer who wrote to catch the market and was hoisted into immortal fame by the effort: that his book should, like a spark falling on straw, fire the brains of a French shoemaker's apprentice and a Lincolnshire schoolboy, impelling each to a career crowded with adventure, and crowned with memorable achievements. ...
— The Life of Captain Matthew Flinders • Ernest Scott

... little mice; make no noise, for ef she woke it 'ud be all up with us. You three come down to the kitchen, and I'll have something hot for you to drink, and then I'll have the pony harnessed to the light cart, and drive you over to F—- in time to catch the three o'clock mail train. The guard'll be good to you for he's a friend of mine, and I'll have a bit of a note writ, and when you get to London the guard'll put you in a cab, and you'll drive to the address written on the note. The note is to my cousin, Annie West, ...
— The Children's Pilgrimage • L. T. Meade

... the grenadier Fleuriot recognized her in an inn in Strasbourg. She had just managed to escape from captivity. Some peasants told him that the Countess had lived for a whole month in a forest, and how that they had tracked her and tried to catch her without success. ...
— Farewell • Honore de Balzac

... I like that part of his work which is farthest removed from the manner of the man of Camden. Walt Whitman was a genius; and whilst it is quite possible and at times desirable to imitate his freedom in composition, it is not possible to catch the secret of his power. It would be an ungracious task to quote Mr. Sandburg at his worst; we are all pretty bad at our worst, whether we are poets or not; I prefer to cite one of his poems which proves to me that he is not only an original writer, but that he possesses a perceptive ...
— The Advance of English Poetry in the Twentieth Century • William Lyon Phelps

... the line to try to lift the car onto the road. But even with twenty men at the towing rope it refused to move. The men were obliged to give it up and run on to catch ...
— Kings, Queens And Pawns - An American Woman at the Front • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... fine writing. And let one have any shadow of interest in the great questions he treats, and every page displays a style which is the rarest of literary gifts. The very fact that his writing is untinted by those lesser beauties which catch the eye but to impede its deepest glances, is in itself an excellence all the greater in proportion to the gravity of his topics. Absolutely free from the least obscurity, his diction is a magnetic medium uniting the master's personality, the disciple's understanding, and the ...
— Life of Father Hecker • Walter Elliott

... approached the house Uncle Joshua looked wistfully toward it, trying to catch a glimpse of "Sunshine," whom he had not seen for nearly a year and a half. But only the face of a little negro girl was seen looking from the window, and Uncle Joshua exclaimed, "Now, what's possessed them to fetch that yaller gal! I've got ...
— Tempest and Sunshine • Mary J. Holmes

... and there are but few inhabitants upon it, who support themselves partly by fishing. In this delightful climate their wants are not numerous, and the rich soil produces almost any thing which they desire. The fish about here are not plentiful, and what they catch have to be sought for at a long ...
— Cord and Creese • James de Mille

... primary underlying and continuing cause is lack of clear appreciation of what finance means and stands for and is needed for. And from this there has sprung a veritable host of misconceptions, prejudices, superstitions and catch-phrases. ...
— High Finance • Otto H. Kahn

... and the time that he had spent in the garden had given her the chance to catch up. Six little stone steps led down from the garden to the beach, and Max ran down, pushed the gate wide, and sprang out onto the hard ...
— Princess Polly At Play • Amy Brooks

... no novelty at Nijni; no new shape, pattern, or colour just coming out to catch popular favour; no unknown mechanical contrivance; no discovery likely to affect human progress and brought here for the entertainment of the intelligent, un-commercial visitor. There are only the shop-keeper and his customer, though it is a wholesale ...
— Russia - As Seen and Described by Famous Writers • Various

... sudden the moanin' of the cattle grew louder. I rode up close to them an' saw what the reason was, and it made me catch my breath. A big cow was steppin' slowly out, head low, right into the gale. ...
— The Boy Ranchers on Roaring River - or Diamond X and the Chinese Smugglers • Willard F. Baker

... away," said Dick. "In any case I'm going myself in a few minutes. Yes," he added, turning to Rainham, "I'm very sorry, but I've got to take my wife out to dinner, and I shall have to catch a train in, let ...
— A Comedy of Masks - A Novel • Ernest Dowson and Arthur Moore

... shepherd boy, down in the valley of humiliation. Heart's-ease grew there, and his song was, 'He that is low need fear no fall.' If we have this true, deep-rooted poverty of spirit, we shall be below the tempest, which will go clean over our heads. The oaks catch the lightnings; the grass and the primroses are unscorched. 'The day of the Lord shall be upon all high things, and the loftiness of men shall be ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Ezekiel, Daniel, and the Minor Prophets. St Matthew Chapters I to VIII • Alexander Maclaren

... that this poem is not built broadly on the human heart; there is too much discussion about the difficulty of becoming a Christian, and the subtile genius flits so quickly through the lines that an ordinary butterfly-net does not catch it. That is well for the genius. But we are of opinion that the human heart will always find in this great poem the solemn and glorious things that belong to it, and more and more so as new and clearer thought is born into the world to read it. It is no more difficult ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 79, May, 1864 • Various



Words linked to "Catch" :   indefinite quantity, hook, erupt, hit, unhitch, rope, touching, reception, roll up, check, hoard, catchment, shoestring catch, detent, collect, fixing, bench hook, clutch, prehend, understand, run, trip, play, curb, pick up, hunt down, find out, seize, spread, comprehend, catch up, take, fastening, accumulate, preview, receive, find, batfowl, latch, retake, amass, rebound, drawback, listen, hunt, suffer, get, object, take in, catch phrase, hold in, hurt, visualize, interlock, reproduce, detain, bag, intercept, grownup, hood latch, draw in, combust, fair catch, ignite, adult, delay, pull in, doorstopper, attract, board, draw, hasp, learn, constraint, touch, visualise, propagate, witness, fastener, seizure, dog, snare, catchy, pawl, compile, interlocking, hear, hold up, rat, pull, manner of speaking, physical object, overhear, speech, discover, spectate, lasso, grab, appeal, get on, recapture, gaining control, track down, get a line, trammel, trap, attach, snag, harpoon, nett, baseball, contract, game, net, contain, perceive, click, ache, ensnare, meshing, change, doorstop, get wind, frog, delivery, control, interception, surprise, catch up with, compete, vie, moderate, hold, conflagrate, restraint, acquire, snatch, pile up, contend, get word, take fire, fish, mesh, collar, tripper, entrap, baseball game, work, holdfast



Copyright © 2019 Free-Translator.com