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Buss   /bəs/   Listen
Buss

verb
(past & past part. bussed; pres. part. bussing)
1.
Touch with the lips or press the lips (against someone's mouth or other body part) as an expression of love, greeting, etc..  Synonyms: kiss, osculate, snog.  "She kissed her grandfather on the forehead when she entered the room"






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Buss" Quotes from Famous Books



... a heavy accusation," said Joceline, the bold recklessness of whose temper could not be long overawed; "Odds pitlikins, is our master's old favourite, Will of Stratford, to answer for every buss that has been snatched since James's time?—a perilous reckoning truly—but I wonder who is sponsible for what lads and lasses did before his day?" "Scoff not," said the soldier, "lest I, being called ...
— Woodstock; or, The Cavalier • Sir Walter Scott

... bare legs were mud to the knees, his kilt and shirt clung sopping to his body, and, having lost his hat, his wet hair was plastered over his eyes. Mrs. Morran said, not unkindly, that he looked "like a wull-cat glowerin' through a whin buss." ...
— Huntingtower • John Buchan

... Whatever they want I give; though it be something else, they shall have it. Drunkard, leper, Tammanyite, small-pox and cholera patient, shoddy and codfish millionnaire, And the beautiful young men, and the beautiful young women, all the same, Crowding, hundreds of thousands, cosmical multitudes, Buss me and hang on my hips and lean up to my shoulders, Everywhere listening to my yawp and glad whenever they hear it; Everywhere saying, say it, Walt, we believe ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... and in doing so pronounced the word also, according to its orthography. "I beg your Lordship's pardon," said Mr. Hawkins, very respectfully; "but if your Lordship will use the common designation for such a vehicle, and call it a 'Buss—" The loud laughter which ensued, and in which his Lordship joined, prevented the conclusion of ...
— The Jest Book - The Choicest Anecdotes and Sayings • Mark Lemon

... Princess Lieven, at her mansion he met and ministered to many of high rank; he also began to hold meetings in the house of Colonel Paschkoff, who had suffered not only persecution but exile for the Lord's sake. While the Scriptures were being read one day in Buss, with seven poor Russians, a policeman summarily broke up the meeting and dispersed the little company. At Lodz in Poland, a letter was received, in behalf of almost the whole population begging him ...
— George Muller of Bristol - His Witness to a Prayer-Hearing God • Arthur T. Pierson

... a "lady" in the picnic symposium of the day before had asked many questions about him and his grandchild, and had seemed pleased to hear they were both so comfortably settled. The "lady" had been accompanied by another "lady," and by two or three young gentlemen. They had arrived in a "buss," which they had hired for the occasion. They had come from Humberston the day after those famous races which annually filled Humberston with strangers—the time of year in which Rugge's grand theatrical exhibition delighted that ancient town. From the ...
— What Will He Do With It, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... his water-casks at one of these islands he again hoisted sail, and steered southwest, in the hope of making Buss Island, which had been discovered by Sir Martin Frobisher, in 1578, as he wished to ascertain if it was correctly laid down on the chart. As he did not succeed in finding it, he continued this course for nearly a month, having much severe weather and a succession of gales, in one of which ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 11 • Various

... kinder heart. Elphi, great-heead, Greatest iver seen, Nea yan i' this deale Awns a breeter een. Elphi, little chap, Thof he war so small, War big wi' deeds o' kindness, Drink tiv him yan an' all. Him at fails to drain dry, Be it mug or glass, Binnot woth a pescod, Nor a buss(3) frae ...
— Yorkshire Dialect Poems • F.W. Moorman

... country lad That fashions strange would see, And he came to a vaulting school, Where tumblers used to be: He liked his sport so well, That from it he'd not part: His doxy to him still did cry, Come, buss ...
— The Sources and Analogues of 'A Midsummer-night's Dream' • Compiled by Frank Sidgwick

... been at least a couple of run-through rehearsals to make sure he had all the business and stage movements down pat, and Sid and Martin would have been doing their big scenes every backstage minute they could spare with Sid yelling, "Witling! Think'st that's a wifely buss?" and Martin would have been droning his lines last ...
— No Great Magic • Fritz Reuter Leiber

... tak' to coaton! I wad as sune spin the hair frae Sawtan's hurdies. Short fushionless dirt, that canna grow straucht oot o' the halesome yird, like the bonnie lint-bells, but maun stick itsel' upo' a buss!—set it up! Coorse vulgar stuff, 'at naebody wad weir but loup-coonter lads that wad fain luik like gentlemen by means o' the collars and ruffles—an' a' comin' frae the auld loom! They may weel affoord se'enteen hunner linen to set it ...
— Robert Falconer • George MacDonald

... distressed them less than indiscriminate pressing. A prosperous people, they chose out those of their number who could best be spared, supporting the families thus left destitute by common subscription. Buss fishermen, who followed the migratory herring; from fishing-ground to fishing-ground, were in another category. Their contribution, when on the Scottish coast, figured out at a man per buss, but as they were for some inscrutable ...
— The Press-Gang Afloat and Ashore • John R. Hutchinson

... And for defence of this good cheer, and my lady's little pearl necklace, there was the family basket-hilt sword, the great Turkish cimiter, the old blunder-buss, a good bag of bullets, and a ...
— History of English Humour, Vol. 1 (of 2) - With an Introduction upon Ancient Humour • Alfred Guy Kingan L'Estrange

... of years the General held Meetings in the great Circus Busch on the National Buss-tag, Repentance Day; and, as the way in which his name is pronounced by most Germans comes very near one of the two words, it has almost become a Booth Day in the thoughts ...
— The Authoritative Life of General William Booth • George Scott Railton

... and that's everything, you know. No, sir, no,' continued he, slowly and thoughtfully, dropping the silver to half-minute time; 'no, sir, no; if I might make free with a gen'leman o' your helegance,' continued he, after a pause,' I'd say, sell 'im to a post-master or a buss-master, or some sich cattle as those, but I doesn't think I'd put 'im into the 'ands of no gen'leman, that's to say if I were ...
— Mr. Sponge's Sporting Tour • R. S. Surtees

... allay his chagrin by clasping him in her brawny arms, and imprinting on his ruddy cheek a kiss. This only served to heighten their merriment and increase his embarrassment, particularly as his Cher ami swore she had not had a buss like it since the death of her own dear dead and departed Phelim, the last of her four husbands, who died of a whiskey fever, bawling for pratees and buttermilk, and was ...
— Real Life In London, Volumes I. and II. • Pierce Egan

... naught but roast me. And now I am in the seventh heaven. Ho! ho!' he continued, with a comical pirouette of triumph, 'he laughs best who laughs last. But there, you are not afraid of me, pretty? You'll let me buss you?' ...
— The Castle Inn • Stanley John Weyman

... years old, as I've oft'times been told, To doubt it, sure, would not be right, With a pipe in his jaw, he'd buss his old squaw, And get a young saint ev'ry night, my ...
— The Fall of British Tyranny - American Liberty Triumphant • John Leacock

... argued, "what for should ye pay for the breadth of yer back to lie doon on? Jock Gordon wull mak' ye juist as comfortable ablow a heather buss as ever ye war in a bed in ...
— The Lilac Sunbonnet • S.R. Crockett

... the board; for one or two butchers had whispered to the official, "That fellow is a right mad blade, who yet made us much sport to-day. He sold more meat for one penny than we could sell for three; and he gave extra weight to whatsoever lass would buss him." And others said, "He is some prodigal who knows not the value of goods, and may be plucked by ...
— Robin Hood • J. Walker McSpadden

... hardly ever forgies them, and aye luiks doon upo' them. Doobtless the rascal ran awa and left her to fen for hersel; naebody would help her; and she had to beg the breid for hersel, and the drap milk for the bairnie; sae that at last she lost hert and left it, jist as Hagar left hers aneath the buss i' the wilderness afore God shawed her the bonny ...
— Salted With Fire • George MacDonald

... kiss thy detestable bones; And put my eye-balls in thy vaulty brows; And right these fingers with thy household worms; And stop this gap of breath with fulsome dust; And be a carrion monster like thyself; Come, grin on me, and I will think thou smil'st, And buss thee as thy wife! Misery's ...
— Characteristics of Women - Moral, Poetical, and Historical • Anna Jameson

... it was day, To the house of his fair maid took his way. He found his dear Dolly a making of cheese, Says he, 'You must give me a buss, ...
— Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of England • Robert Bell

... smoke blows away you see the man you fired at, taking aim, it may be, at yourself. You should observe, too, that you were in the dark night, and somewhat dazzled by the lamps, and that the sudden stopping of the mail had jolted you. In such circumstances a man may miss, ay, even with a blunder-buss, and no blame attach to his marksmanship.' ...
— Lay Morals • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Lombardy! Soon we will have the prisons empty, by our own order. Trouble yourself no more about Ammiani. He shall come out to the sound of trumpets. I hear them! Hither, my Rosellina, my plump melon; up with your red lips, and buss ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... In thy feasting-flagon's impurpurate glows! The sopped sun—toper as ever drank hard - Stares foolish, hazed, Rubicund, dazed, Totty with thine October tankard. Tanned maiden! with cheeks like apples russet, And breast a brown agaric faint-flushing at tip, And a mouth too red for the moon to buss it, But her cheek unvow its vestalship; Thy mists enclip Her steel-clear circuit illuminous, Until it crust Rubiginous With the glorious gules of a glowing rust. Far other saw we, other indeed, The crescent moon, in the May-days dead, Fly up with its slender white ...
— Poems • Francis Thompson

... little E-phum! ef you don' come 'long heah, boy, an' rock dis chile, I'll buss you haid open!" screamed the high-pitched voice of a woman, breaking the stillness of the summer evening. She had just come to the door of the little cabin, where she was now standing, anxiously scanning the space ...
— Short Story Classics (American) Vol. 2 • Various

... wears a silk top hat, An sometimes smooks cigars!— An owd clay pipe or sich as that Is gooid enuff for awrs. When th' mistress stirs shoo has to ride I' cabs or else i'th' buss; But aw mun walk or caar inside; Ov coorse that's nowt ...
— Yorkshire Lyrics • John Hartley

... I do, which, in Court affairs, often takes the weather-gage of wisdom,—as in Yarmouth Roads a herring-buss will baffle a frigate. He shall not return to London if I can help it, until all ...
— Peveril of the Peak • Sir Walter Scott

... whirled his bauble round about, "This fellow beats them all," he cried, "the worst Those others wrote was that I hopped from York To Paris with a mortar on my head. This fellow sends me leaping through the clouds To buss the moon! The best is yet to come; Strike up, Sir John! Ha! ha! You know no more?" Kemp leapt upon a table. "Clear the way", He cried, and with a great stamp of his foot And a wild crackling laugh, drew all to hark, "With hey and ho, through thick and thin, The hobby-horse is forgotten, But ...
— Collected Poems - Volume Two (of 2) • Alfred Noyes

... observed Counsel, in a recent Breach of Promise Case, "began in a 'bus." This may have been an error of expression, or a misprint, as "began with a buss" would have ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100, June 27, 1891 • Various

... darky, the son of my father's mammy, saw a piece of newspaper that had blown up on one of the telegraph wires and caught there. Running to my grandmother in a great state of excitement, he cried, "Miss Liza, come quick! Dem wires done buss and done ...
— More Toasts • Marion Dix Mosher

... assistance of parliament. They prayed, therefore, that, towards enabling them to carry on the said fisheries, they might have liberty to make use of such nets as they should find best adapted to the said fisheries; each buss, nevertheless, carrying to sea the same quantity and depth of netting, which, by the fishery acts, they were then bound to carry: that the bounty of thirty shillings per ton, allowed by the said acts on the vessels employed in the ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.II. - From William and Mary to George II. • Tobias Smollett

... Buffs (two companies under Capt. Jacob) near Halifax Alley—remained in trenches three and a half hours and captured fifteen prisoners and two aerial-dart machines. Lieuts. Harrington and Buss (both killed) greatly ...
— A Short History of the 6th Division - Aug. 1914-March 1919 • Thomas Owen Marden

... body, (for so I heard him name her) while she was gazing still upon the empty place, whence she had seen me vanish; which he perceiving, cried—'My little fool, what is it thou gazest on, turn to thy known old man, and buss him soundly——' When putting him by with a disdain, that half made amends for the injury he had done me by coming, 'Ah, my lord,' cried she, 'even now, just there I saw a lovely vision, I never beheld so excellent a ...
— Love-Letters Between a Nobleman and His Sister • Aphra Behn

... breathing, and never harm a human being; in proof of which, only look at your rascal of a postilion, whom any one of my friends would have sent post-haste to the devil for half the trouble he gave me. Easy as I am, I never choose to be balked in my humors. I must have the fifty and the buss, and then I'm off, as soon as you like; and I may as well have the kiss while the old lady signs the check, and then we shall have the seal as well as the signature. Poh—poh—no nonsense! Many a pretty lass has thought it an honor to be kissed ...
— Rookwood • William Harrison Ainsworth

... convenient tavern, where we were shown into a little room on one side of the passage. Here, scarce allowing himself patient till the drawer brought in the wine called for, he fell directly on board me: when, untucking my handkerchief, and giving me a snatching buss, he laid my breasts bare at once, which he handled with that keenness of gust that abridges a ceremonial evermore tiresome than pleasing on such pressing occasions; and now, hurrying towards the main point, we found no conveniency to our purpose, two or three disabled ...
— Memoirs Of Fanny Hill - A New and Genuine Edition from the Original Text (London, 1749) • John Cleland

... hung in the parlour of Henfield's chief inn—I wonder if it is there still—a rude etching of local origin, rather in the manner of Buss's plates to Pickwick, representing an inn kitchen filled with a jolly company listening uproariously to a fat farmer by the fire, who, with arm raised, told his tale. Underneath was written, "Mr. West describing how he saw ...
— Highways & Byways in Sussex • E.V. Lucas

... crooks his weary back A' day in the pitaty-track, Or mebbe stops a while to crack Wi' Jane the cook, Or at some buss, ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 14 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Toss of me with much Affability. So, after a joyous Rouse (which my young Head could then stand, but I am a sad Skinker at the bottle now), the Landlord standing in, we drank Mr. Pinchin's health and better manners to him; and his Reverence dismissed me with a Buss and ...
— The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 2 of 3 • George Augustus Sala

... of our Lord 1396. the foresaid Godekins and Stertebeker, and other their complices vniustly tooke vpon the sea a certain crayer, called the Buss of Zeland, which one Iohn Ligate marchant, and seruant vnto the forenamed Simon Durham had laden in Prussia, on the behalfe of the said Simon, to saile for England, and spoiled the said craier, and also tooke and caried away with ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, v5 - Central and Southern Europe • Richard Hakluyt

... Who would have thought, that 'nown dear would have come so soon? I was even lying down on my bed, and dreaming of him. Tum a' me, and buss, poor dear; ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Vol. 6 (of 18) - Limberham; Oedipus; Troilus and Cressida; The Spanish Friar • John Dryden

... tinctured either cheek with tinct of martial red; * Sagittal shots from eyelids Sagittarius threw: Dowered him Mercury with bright mercurial wit; * Bore off the Bear[FN315] what all man's evil glances grew: Amazed stood Astrophil to sight the marvel birth * When louted low the Moon at full to buss the Earth. ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... an old man's passion Amounts to no more than this smoke that I puff; There, there, now, buss me in good old fashion; A died-down candle will flicker ...
— John Marr and Other Poems • Herman Melville

... service at board, and thou shalt do me service a-bed: now must I, as young married men use to do, kiss my portion out of my young wife. Thou art my sweet rogue, my lamb, my pigsny, my playfellow, my pretty-pretty anything. Come, a buss, prythee, so 'tis my kind heart; and ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. IX • Various

... schoolmistress, was born in London in 1827, the daughter of the painter-etcher R.W. Buss, one of the original illustrators of Pickwick. She was educated at a school in Camden Town, and continued there as a teacher, but soon joined her mother in keeping a school in Kentish Town. In ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 - "Bulgaria" to "Calgary" • Various

... was better than the rest of us. There was that, for ane thing. He'd no be doing the things the rest of us were glad enough to do. It was naught to him to walk along the Quarry Road wi' a lassie, and buss her in a dark spot, maybe. And just because he'd no een for them, the wee lassies were ready to come, would he but lift his finger! Is it no always the way? There'd be a dozen decent, hard working miners who could no get a lassie to look their ...
— Between You and Me • Sir Harry Lauder

... The remains of the Buss family, composed of three people, have already been exhumed. The town is visited daily by hundreds of strangers and none are disappointed, as the apparition is always on duty promptly at 9 o'clock. The strange figure was at once recognized by the inhabitants ...
— The Best Ghost Stories • Various

... up i' Bradyslee, and down i' Bradyslee, And under a buss o' broom; And there he found a good dun deer Feeding in ...
— Ballads of Robin Hood and other Outlaws - Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - Fourth Series • Frank Sidgwick

... my letter! when my friend shall see thee, * Kiss thou the ground and buss his sandal-shoon: Look thou hie softly and thou hasten not, * My life and rest are in those hands ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 4 • Richard F. Burton

... claim, appeared in 1896 (Legends of the Saints in the Scottish Dialect of the Fourteenth Century, 3 vols., Scottish Text Society). See the introductions to these editions; also Skeat and Koppel u.s., and P. Buss, Sind die von Horstmann herausgegebenen schottischen Legenden ein Werk Barberes? (Halle, 1886) (cf. Anglia, ix. 3, 1886). (5) For the Gospel-story evidence see Metcalfe, u.s. I. xxix. (6) On the Alexander Book and its assumed relationships, ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 - "Banks" to "Bassoon" • Various

... of thine (Juventius!) If any suffer me sans stint to buss, I'd kiss of kisses hundred thousands three, Nor ever deem I'd reach satiety, Not albe denser than dried wheat-ears show 5 The kissing harvests our ...
— The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus • Caius Valerius Catullus

... a hug and a hearty buss, as she called that salutation, on each cheek, and pulled me into the hall, and was ...
— Uncle Silas - A Tale of Bartram-Haugh • J.S. Le Fanu

... figures. Messrs. Anderson and Woolmer are the best imitators of Berghem's Landscape and Cattle; and the Interior of a Kitchen, by Maaes, has met with the greatest possible attention from Miss Alabaster, Mr. Bone, Jun., and Messrs. Novice and Buss. The best attempts from the Canaletti are by Miss Dujardin, Mr. F. Watts, and D. Pasmore, Jun. From the copies of Titian's Holy Family, we may prefer Mr. Rochard's, which is the same ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 14, - Issue 401, November 28, 1829 • Various

... little sweetheart! My little bright sun, my little apple of paradise, you," Glycera waxed tender, "give me your lips, then! Give me your little lips to buss, ...
— Yama (The Pit) • Alexandra Kuprin



Words linked to "Buss" :   smack, touching, peck, smooch, deep kiss, soul kiss, French kiss, touch



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