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Bush   /bʊʃ/   Listen
Bush

adjective
1.
Not of the highest quality or sophistication.  Synonym: bush-league.



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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... was not very easy to discover at first; for Scoutbush felt so strongly the oddity of taking a pretty young woman into his counsel on a question of sanitary reform, that he felt mightily inclined to laugh, and began beating about the bush, ...
— Two Years Ago, Volume II. • Charles Kingsley

... the summit, and found themselves in the heart of a huge desolation, hedged in by a chaos of peaks and pinnacles, the snows unbroken by twig or bush, untracked by living sign. Here and there the dark face of some white-cowled rock or cliff scowled at them, and although they were drenched with sweat and parched from thirst, nowhere was there the faintest tinkle of running water, while the dry powder under foot scratched their ...
— The Silver Horde • Rex Beach

... he put up, but he finished six feet to the bad and fell across the mark on his face, sobbin' like a child. It's the game ones that cry when they're licked; analyze a smilin' loser and you'll find the yellow streak. I lifted him to his feet, but he was shakin' like a bush in the wind. ...
— Laughing Bill Hyde and Other Stories • Rex Beach

... Moses was felt at the beginning of his knowledge of God. When God revealed himself to him at the bush, it was, so far as we are told, the first time that Moses learnt to know him. The fear of those who say to the mountains, "Fall on us," is felt at the very end of their knowledge of God; for to those who are punished with everlasting destruction from the presence of the ...
— The Christian Life - Its Course, Its Hindrances, And Its Helps • Thomas Arnold

... wretchedness, and particularly a Capt. Danks, who rode to the extreme of his commission in every barbarous proceeding. In the Cumberland insurrection (1776) he was suspected of being 'Jack on both sides of the bush,' left that place in a small jigger bound for Windsor, was taken ill on the passage, thrown down into the hold among the ballast, was taken out at Windsor half dead, and had little better than the burial of a dog. He lived under a ...
— Glimpses of the Past - History of the River St. John, A.D. 1604-1784 • W. O. Raymond

... out through the wood for the road, by which the unsuspecting negro must pass. The heavy clouds which had crept in upon the sky at the set of sun now began to part, and, before the miscreants had emerged from the bush, the deep dark of their path was here and there parted by a shaft of silvery light. Through the tree tops a glimpse of the sky could be occasionally obtained; and although no leaf quivered in this sombre swamp the clouds raced across ...
— The Four Canadian Highwaymen • Joseph Edmund Collins

... Dear Lord, I know it, alas! yet weigh their weakness, And bear with their faults of thy great bounteousness. In a flaming bush, having to them respect, Thou appointed'st me their passage to direct: And through the Red Sea thy right hand did us lead, Where Pharaoh's host the flood overwhelmed indeed. Thou went'st before them in a shining cloud all day, And in the dark night in fire thou ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume I. • R. Dodsley

... to rise at five o'clock on my wedding-morning, so as to make a last gloomy progress round every bird and beast and gooseberry-bush on the premises. I have exacted—binding her by many stringent oaths—a solemn promise from Barbara to make me, if I do not do so of my own accord, at the appointed hour. I am sunk in heavy sleep, and wake only very gradually, to find her, ...
— Nancy - A Novel • Rhoda Broughton

... aged wives to look after the younger ladies. These venerable females have a dread of evil spirits, and consequently will not move from the fire without carrying a fire-stick in their hands; the bush is now dotted about with these little moving points of fire, all making for a common centre, at which are congregated old and young; jest follows jest, one peal of laughter rings close upon the heels of another, the elderly gentleman is loudly applauded ...
— Journals Of Two Expeditions Of Discovery In North-West And Western Australia, Vol. 2 (of 2) • George Grey

... "lum," and thither I went one afternoon with two friends, to try if we could have an opportunity of seeing him. We had scarcely reached the spot when we perceived him lying at the mouth of his "hold," a fine grassy bank at the side of which grew a small bush; and I employed my friends to watch the trout should he escape me. I crossed the brook (my friends remaining on the opposite side), pulled off my coat and waistcoat, and tucked up my shirt ready for action. He was still lying very ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 12, - Issue 331, September 13, 1828 • Various

... Clearly, we had no time to lose if we wished to take our friends the enemy by surprise; availing myself, therefore, to the utmost extent of the cover of the furze bushes, I set off in the direction of the battery, which I presently sighted about half a mile away. Stooping low as I ran from bush to bush, and peering cautiously round each before venturing to start for the next, I soon found myself within about thirty yards of the battery, which I saw to be a crescent-shaped affair, facing eastward and thus in conjunction with the battery on the opposite point, completely commanding ...
— A Middy of the King - A Romance of the Old British Navy • Harry Collingwood

... was so kind, so affectionate." She said that she was quite unworthy of him, while he murmured that he would be very happy "Das Leben mit dir zu zubringen." They parted, and she felt "the happiest of human beings," when Lord M. came in. At first she beat about the bush, and talked of the weather, and indifferent subjects. Somehow or other she felt a little nervous with her old friend. At last, summoning up her courage, she said, "I have got well through this with Albert." "Oh! you have," ...
— Queen Victoria • Lytton Strachey

... from the bush!" he exclaimed; "are you in town to buy imitation coal, or is it to get a derrick and hoist your home affairs away from my property? Why don't you take a tumble, John, and ...
— Back to the Woods • Hugh McHugh

... your designs, Miss Julia. Guy is a great lover of the beautiful, and I am not aware that anywhere in the book of fate is written the decree that he shall not marry again. Take care, you are tearing your lace point on that rose bush; let me disengage it." She stooped to rescue the cobweb wrapping, and, looking about her, Miss ...
— Beulah • Augusta J. Evans

... and rich farmers, said Luther, are not worthy of so many benefits and fruits which the earth doth bear and bring unto them. I give more thanks to our Lord God for one tree or bush than all rich farmers and husbandmen do for their large and fruitful grounds. Yet, said he, we must except some husbandmen, as Adam, Noah, Abraham, and Isaac, who went out to see their grounds, to the end they might remember God's gifts in ...
— Selections from the Table Talk of Martin Luther • Martin Luther

... "The caper-bush grows on the shores of the Mediterranean sea, Grand'ther. Miss Black had it for a theme, out of the Penny Magazine; it ...
— The Morgesons • Elizabeth Stoddard

... with thee run, Their sacred rites had just begun. Unfinished yet those rites remain; But finished if thou turn again. All rooted life and things that move To thee their deep affection prove. To them, when warmed by love, they glow And sue to thee, some favour show, Each lowly bush, each towering tree Would follow too for love of thee. Bound by its root it must remain; But—all it can—its boughs complain, As when the wild wind rushes by It tells its woe in groan and sigh. No more through air the gay birds ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... rose and was fired at, but still pursued its flight untouched, till, at last, the pointer became careless, and often missed his game. As if seemingly willing, however, to give one chance more, he made a dead stop at a fern-bush, with his nose pointed downward, the fore-foot bent, and his tail straight and steady. In this position he remained firm till the sportsman was close to him, with both barrels cocked, then moving ...
— Anecdotes of Dogs • Edward Jesse

... of the mountains Mr. Hunt met with three different kinds of gooseberries. The common purple, on a low and very thorny bush; a yellow kind, of an excellent flavor, growing on a stock free from thorns; and a deep purple, of the size and taste of our winter grape, with a thorny stalk. There were also three kinds of currants, one very large and well tasted, ...
— Astoria - Or, Anecdotes Of An Enterprise Beyond The Rocky Mountains • Washington Irving

... the midst of this garden was a piller of antique worke, all gold set with pearles and stones, and on the top of the piller, which was six square, was a lover, or an arch embowed, crowned with gold; within which stood a bush of roses red and white, all of silk and gold, and a bush of pomegranats of the like stuffe. In this garden walked six knights, and six ladies richlie apparelled, and then they descended and dansed manie goodlie danses, and so ascended out ...
— A Righte Merrie Christmasse - The Story of Christ-Tide • John Ashton

... a bush, he reconnoitred the place, disappearing from sight the moment he entered the chaparral in any direction. Returning at last, with a grave face, he said, "Will Majella let me leave her here for a little time? There is a way, but I can find it ...
— Ramona • Helen Hunt Jackson

... is this righteousness, even according to the degree or clearness of the sight of faith. 7. The bow is of that nature, as to make whatever you shall look upon through it, to be of the same colour of itself, whether that thing be bush, or man, or beast; and the righteousness of Christ is that that makes sinners, when God looks upon them through it, to look beautiful, and acceptable in his sight, for we are made comely through his comeliness, and made accepted in the Beloved (Eze ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... wide and is deep and navigable. the course of this river as far as I could see from the top of Cut bluff, was due North. it passes through a beatifull level and fertile vally about five miles in width. I think I saw about 25 miles up this river, and did not discover one tree or bush of any discription on it's borders. the vally was covered with Elk and buffaloe. saw a great number of gees today as usual, also ...
— The Journals of Lewis and Clark • Meriwether Lewis et al

... that UFO's belonged to the U.S. from the first, but Dr. Vannevar Bush, the world-famous scientist, and Dr. Merle Tuve, inventor of the proximity fuse, added their weight. "Impossible," ...
— The Report on Unidentified Flying Objects • Edward Ruppelt

... n't got no papers of 'is own, 'E 'as n't got no medals nor rewards, So we must certify the skill 'e 's shown In usin' of 'is long two-'anded swords; When 'e 's 'oppin' in an' out among the bush With 'is coffin-headed shield an' shovel-spear, A 'appy day with Fuzzy on the rush Will last a 'ealthy Tommy for ...
— Kipling Stories and Poems Every Child Should Know, Book II • Rudyard Kipling

... and lonesome was that desolate bar between the "bay" and the ocean. Here and there it swelled up into great drifts and mounds of sand, which were almost large enough to be called hills; but nowhere did it show a tree or a bush, or even a patch of grass. Annie Foster found herself getting melancholy as she gazed upon it and thought of how the winds must sometimes sweep across it, laden with sea-spray and rain and hail, or the bitter sleet and blinding snow ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, October 1878, No. 12 • Various

... How senseless of him to go on reiterating the old plea! He ought to have pleaded for himself—to have let the man in him seek her and take his defeat, instead of beating about the flimsy bush of philanthropy. ...
— The Fruit of the Tree • Edith Wharton

... suffer her to say this twice, but, running after the ugly old hat, caught it just before it could disappear in one of the sand pits. She followed me, but unfortunately caught the train of her riding-habit in a bush, which tripped her, and caused her to fall with her beautiful locks of hair amongst the briers. At first she refused all assistance, but in the end she was obliged to let me disentangle her hair—a circumstance which annoyed her much more than the accident ...
— Major Frank • A. L. G. Bosboom-Toussaint

... her, he whispered something in her ear, whereupon a queer little animal about two inches long came out of the grass, and running up her body, disappeared in her mouth. Then Eric pushed her, and she rolled over three times, then sprang to her feet, and with a wild startled cry leaped a high bush and disappeared. Nor could they, when they ran to the other side of the bush, ...
— Werwolves • Elliott O'Donnell

... gentle heart, destroys All pain but pity: thus the lone voice spake: "When from this wreathed tomb shall I awake! When move in a sweet body fit for life, And love, and pleasure, and the ruddy strife 40 Of hearts and lips! Ah, miserable me!" The God, dove-footed, glided silently Round bush and tree, soft-brushing, in his speed, The taller grasses and full-flowering weed, Until he found a palpitating snake, Bright, and cirque-couchant in a ...
— Keats: Poems Published in 1820 • John Keats

... the one Boss trusted most. Seven youngsters in hand and one in the bush—land knows where!—is a bigger job 'n just drivin' a four-footed team. I ain't no call to feel lonesome but just to feel sot up. Funny, ain't it, Lem! You a regular, dyed-in-the-wool old bach to find yourself suddenly playin' daddy to seven strappin' ...
— Dorothy on a Ranch • Evelyn Raymond

... a good look around. Their chief was a fat, bloated feller, with a body like a barrel, and his face pitted with small-pox. He told me that he was boss of all the place around us, and had some big plantations about a mile back in the bush, just abreast of us, and that he would let me have all the food I wanted. In five days or so, he said, we should have fine weather for diving, and he and his crowd would ...
— The Call Of The South - 1908 • Louis Becke

... ever reached that city the same authority does not state." Dante calls him Cain; Chaucer has him put up there as a punishment for theft, and gives him a thorn-bush to carry; Shakespeare also loads him with the thorns, but by way of compensation gives him a dog for a companion. Ordinarily, however, his offence is stated to have been, not stealing, but Sabbath-breaking,—an idea derived from the Old Testament. Like the man mentioned in the Book of Numbers, ...
— Myths and Myth-Makers - Old Tales and Superstitions Interpreted by Comparative Mythology • John Fiske

... of tobacco stems and a soapsuds of whale oil or carbolic soap; mix and apply to the bush with a sprinkler, turning the bush so as to wet the under as well as the upper part of the leaves. Apply, before the sun is ...
— The Ladies Book of Useful Information - Compiled from many sources • Anonymous

... you we hatch the pasty snipe, And all undaunted face Huge fish of unfamiliar type— Bush-pike and bubble-dace; Or, fired by hopes of lyric fame, We deviate from prose, And make it our especial ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Aug 15, 1917 • Various

... am still!' cried Synesius, tears of excitement glittering in his eyes;.... while Raphael gave himself up to the joy, and forgot even Victoria, in the breathless rush over rock and bush, sandhill and watercourse. ...
— Hypatia - or, New Foes with an Old Face • Charles Kingsley

... entered a rough pasture. It was a day of such abounding life one could pity the worm the robin pulled. For on such a day everything seemed to have the right to live and be happy. The crows sauntered across the sky, care free as hoboes. Under foot the meadow turf oozed water, the shad-bush petals fell like confetti before the rough assault of horse and rider. Gething liked this day of wind and sunshine. In the city there had been the smell of oiled streets to show that spring had come, here was the smell of damp ...
— O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1920 • Various

... only a skirmish—a bush-whacking fight for the possession of a swamp. A few companies were deployed as skirmishers, ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No 3, September, 1862 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy. • Various

... 'you are less at loss for a joke than an argument; and that you prefer bush-fighting. For my own part, I love the fair and open ...
— The Adventures of Hugh Trevor • Thomas Holcroft

... the heather yet sturdily bore a few last rosy blossoms, and the ripe blackberries shone like black diamonds on the straggling brambles. Here and there a belated furze-bush ...
— Peter's Mother • Mrs. Henry De La Pasture

... gate, by Mr. Wythan's orders, informed Carinthia that her mistress had opened her eyes: There was a hope of weathering the ominous third time. But the hope was a bird of short flight from bush to bush until the doctor should speak to confirm it. Even the child was under the shadow of the house. Carinthia had him in her arms, trusting to life as she hugged him, and seeing innumerable darts out of all regions ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... or, the Culture of Pyramidal and Bush Fruit Trees, with Instructions for Root Pruning. With 32 Illustrations. ...
— France and the Republic - A Record of Things Seen and Learned in the French Provinces - During the 'Centennial' Year 1889 • William Henry Hurlbert

... seas; the tender witchery of Spring; the blazonry of autumn woods; its purple moors and the wonder of its silent mountains; its cobwebs glittering with a thousand jewels; the pageantry of starry nights. Form, colour, music! The feathered choristers of bush and brake raising their matin and their evensong, the whispering of the leaves, the singing of the waters, the voices of the winds. Beauty and grace in every living thing, but man. The leaping of the hares, the grouping of cattle, the flight of swallows, ...
— All Roads Lead to Calvary • Jerome K. Jerome

... evidently a home-made table. There was nothing, except a rifle, upon the rough log walls, and nothing upon the floor, which was, as usual, rudely laid with split boards, for dressed lumber is costly in the Bush. Looking through the open door into the general living-room, which was also lighted, he could see a red twinkle beneath the register of the stove, beside which a woman was sitting sewing. She was a hard-featured, homely person in coarsely fashioned garments, which did not seem to fit her well, and ...
— The Greater Power • Harold Bindloss

... very well that mysterious circular mirror composed of two hemispheres which reflects as it were the rays emanating from the "burning bush" and the blazing star—the spiritual sun Shining ...
— Five Years Of Theosophy • Various

... middle of the dear Old Briar-patch making faces and laughing at Reddy Fox. Of course that wasn't a nice thing to do, not a bit nice. But Peter had just had a narrow escape, a very narrow escape, for Reddy Fox had sprung out from behind a bush as Peter came down the Lone Little Path, and had so nearly caught Peter that he had actually pulled some fur out of Peter's coat. Now Peter was safe in the dear Old Briar-patch. He was a little out of breath, because he had had to use his long legs as fast as he knew how, but he was safe. You see, ...
— Mother West Wind 'Why' Stories • Thornton W. Burgess

... different from the lotus of the Nile, described in the 2nd book, as well as from the lotus in the East. Lindley records the conjecture that the article referred to by Herodotus was the nabk, the berry of the lote-bush (Zizyphus lotus), which the Arabs of Barbary still eat. (Vegetable Kingdom, ...
— Ceylon; an Account of the Island Physical, Historical, and • James Emerson Tennent

... chewink calls his dear Behind the bush; and very near, Where water flows, where green grass grows, Song-sparrows ...
— Little Rivers - A Book Of Essays In Profitable Idleness • Henry van Dyke

... women gossiping at their toilets; children sprawling in the dirt, chasing each other, shouting; men drinking, playing mora, quarrelling, laughing, singing, twanging mandolines, at the tables under the withered bush of the wine-shop; and two or three more pensive citizens swinging their legs from the parapet of the bridge, and angling for fish that never bit, in the ...
— The Cardinal's Snuff-Box • Henry Harland

... hand and left behind. Nobody can find a lost heroine in the scrub but the aboriginal "tracker," and he will not lend himself to the scheme if it will interfere with the novelist's plot. The scrub stretches miles and miles in all directions, and looks like a level roof of bush-tops without a break or a crack in it —as seamless as a blanket, to all appearance. One might as well walk under water and hope to guess out a route and stick to it, I should think. Yet it is claimed that the aboriginal "tracker" was able to hunt out people lost in the scrub. Also in the ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... Suffolk) if a man cuts himself with a bill-hook or a scythe he always takes care to keep the weapon bright, and oils it to prevent the wound from festering. If he runs a thorn or, as he calls it, a bush into his hand, he oils or greases the extracted thorn. A man came to a doctor with an inflamed hand, having run a thorn into it while he was hedging. On being told that the hand was festering, he remarked: 'That didn't ought to, for I greased ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India—Volume I (of IV) • R.V. Russell

... General Linares. The American transports from Tampa began to arrive on 20 June, and the expeditionary force, under General Shafter, was disembarked during the following days some miles east of the city. There was then an advance over mere forest tracks through hilly country covered with dense bush. Cervera landed seamen gunners with machine-guns and light quick-firers to strengthen the defence, and anchored one of his cruisers so that her heavy artillery could enfilade an attack on the ...
— Famous Sea Fights - From Salamis to Tsu-Shima • John Richard Hale

... true; but a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush," answered the sheikh. At least, he made use of an Arab proverb of a similar tenor. "However, I will consider the matter. In the meantime, I will receive you and the other Nazarene as guests in my tent, where you will be pleased to exhibit the ...
— Saved from the Sea - The Loss of the Viper, and her Crew's Saharan Adventures • W.H.G. Kingston

... life free from care by appointing a steward of his estate whose duty it was to see that his money-box, to which he went whenever he wanted anything, always had money in it. This box he never locked, having learned that he need fear no robbery by once leaving his cloak for two days under a bush and then finding it again. "This world," he exclaimed, "is too good: it will not last." Among his pets were a porcupine trained to prick the legs of his guests under the table "so that they drew them in quickly"; a raven that spoke like a human being; an eagle, and many snakes. ...
— A Wanderer in Florence • E. V. Lucas

... mistaking the aim of all this, and Mr. Wade was too British in his habits to beat about the bush much longer. ...
— Roden's Corner • Henry Seton Merriman

... supper-table, to go out and pull up a Phytolacca that was going to seed just over the garden-fence. Fred stopped in amazement at hearing so strange a word; and I confess that it bewildered even me. Then followed the very explanation which father had intended to give. He told us it was a poke-bush. ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 88, February, 1865 • Various

... and, before you could say knife, over we went. I pitched, head first, into DICK's stomach, and SANDY and BILL went howling down like a right and left of rabbits. Lord, I laughed till the tears ran down my face. No bones broken, but the old BUTCHER's face got a shade the worst of it with a thorn-bush on the slope. Cart ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, November 5, 1892 • Various

... action of sun and rain. In another place blackened, worn-out window-sills, with delicate sculptures now scarcely discernible, seem too weak to bear the brown clay pots from which springs the heart's-ease or the rose-bush of some poor working-woman. Farther on are doors studded with enormous nails, where the genius of our forefathers has traced domestic hieroglyphics, of which the meaning is now lost forever. Here a Protestant attested his belief; ...
— Eugenie Grandet • Honore de Balzac

... living products, quite unlike the rest of the world in its egg-laying duck-mole and spiny ant-eater, and in its abundant and varied population of pounched mammals or marsupials, emphasized by the absence (except for two or three peculiar little mice and the late-arrived black-fellow and bush-dog) of the regular type called "placental" mammals which inhabit the rest of the world. The rest of the world except New Zealand! Strange as Australia is, New Zealand is yet stranger. Long as the isolation of Australia has endured, and archaic ...
— More Science From an Easy Chair • Sir E. Ray (Edwin Ray) Lankester

... well—about three miles back; but he's away pretty often in the North, and at a settlement on the edge of the bush country. Don't know what he does there, and they're a curious crowd—Dubokars, Russians ...
— The Intriguers • Harold Bindloss

... softly! the grave is made ready; At head and at foot plant a laurel-bush green; For she was a young and a sweet noble lady, The fairest young bride ...
— Sixteen Poems • William Allingham

... down which she was at that time picking her way, and she made up her mind to climb that peak and see if she might not find him by looking from that point of vantage. So she rode to the foot of the pinnacle, tied her horse to a bush and began ...
— The Flying U's Last Stand • B. M. Bower

... die over, it will be naturally on a pillow, and the dead-bells ringing, and a burying with white candles, and crape on the knocker of the door, and a flagstone put over the grave. What way could we put a stone or so much as a rose-bush over Nuala and she in the inside of a water-worm might be ploughing its way down to the ...
— Three Wonder Plays • Lady I. A. Gregory

... garden Duncan was nearer him. He could see the little figure in a blue jersey marching along the paths with a wheelbarrow, very important because he was helping his father. He had called the big clump of azaleas "the burning bush." ... He had always been a ...
— Penny Plain • Anna Buchan (writing as O. Douglas)

... will take my advice, you will look to some other way of settling this business. You know what a law-suit means in this country, and you'll find yourself in the midst of a strange bush of thorns. ...
— The Impostures of Scapin • Moliere (Poquelin)

... hand in his once more, grasping it firmly, and they moved forward again. They could see the moonlight glimmering on the water ahead, and in another yard or two the low-growing bush to which Hone had moored the boat ...
— The Tidal Wave and Other Stories • Ethel May Dell

... a thin-legged robin hops, Or leaping on a twig, he pertly stops, Speaking a few clear notes, till nigh We draw, when quickly he will fly Into a bush close by. ...
— The Germ - Thoughts towards Nature in Poetry, Literature and Art • Various

... for it, lass; I never guessed about the pain, though I might have thought of it, sweet soul; but I knew she was married to a very rich man. I was poor, so poor as to know what hunger meant, I thought she could do without me. I went up into the bush and stayed there until I had made my fortune. After a time I got accustomed to knowing that every one in England would think me dead. I used to laugh in my sleeve at the surprise I meant to give Daisy when ...
— How It All Came Round • L. T. Meade

... filling it. Oak, beech, and chestnut, rotten and brown alike, mingled themselves in one fibrous mass. Manston descended into the midst of them, placed his sack on the ground, and raking the leaves aside into a large heap, began digging. Anne softly drew nearer, crept into a bush, and turning her head to survey the rest, missed the man who had dropped behind, and whom we have called the first watcher. Concluding that he, too, had hidden himself, she turned her attention to ...
— Desperate Remedies • Thomas Hardy

... or two with it before he stopped. "This saw," he said, "needs to be filed up a bit." So he went and hunted up a file to sharpen the saw, but found that before he could use the file he needed to put a proper handle on it, and to make a handle he went to look for a sapling in the bush, but to cut the sapling he found that he needed to sharpen up the axe. To do this, of course, he had to fix the grindstone so as to make it run properly. This involved making wooden legs for the grindstone. To do this decently Juggins decided ...
— Behind the Beyond - and Other Contributions to Human Knowledge • Stephen Leacock

... So, now that this book is finished and Tom Brown, so far as I am concerned, is done with for ever, I must take this, my first and last chance of saying, that he is not I, either as boy or man—in fact, not to beat about the bush, is a much braver, and nobler, and purer fellow than ...
— Tom Brown at Oxford • Thomas Hughes

... to lie under a furze-bush." With two pocket-handkerchiefs he tied his horse's fore-legs close together, and sat down and lit a cigar. The furze-patch was quite hollow underneath and ...
— Mike Fletcher - A Novel • George (George Augustus) Moore

... Neighbour's Pence, and your own Pounds will Take Care of Themselves.' 'Borrow an Umbrella, and put it away for a Rainy Day.' 'Half a Currant Bun is better than No Bread'; 'A Bird in a Pigeon Pie is better than three in the Bush.' Got heaps of copy-books filled with these and similar words of wisdom. HOWARD VINCENT is quite right. If there was more of this in our elementary schools, there would be, if I may say so, more men like me. You remember what Who's-This said, 'Let me write their copy-book ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100, March 21, 1891 • Various

... and nullahs, and in some parts of India the difficulties are greatly increased by bowlders of all kinds being scattered over the ground, and by the frequent occurrence of bushes and shrubs armed with most formidable spines and thorns. Conspicuous among these is the bush known as the "wait-a-bit thorn," which is furnished with two kinds of thorn—the one long, stiff, and penetrating, the other short and curved, with a forked point almost like a fishhook. When this once takes hold it is almost necessary ...
— In Times of Peril • G. A. Henty

... leagues to the Westward of it, al along the shoare, there grow many Palme trees, whereof they make their wine de Palma. These trees may easily be knowen almost two leagues off, for they be very high and white bodied, and streight, and be biggest in the midst: they haue no boughes, but onely a round bush in the top of them: and at the top of the same trees they boare a hoale, and there they hang a bottell, and the iuyce of the tree runneth out of the said hole into the bottle, and that is ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of - The English Nation, Vol. 11 • Richard Hakluyt

... Durrisdeer by one of the tenants' sons—the only survivor, he declared, of all those that had gone singing up the hill. By an unfortunate chance John Paul and Macconochie had that very morning found the guinea piece—which was the root of all the evil—sticking in a holly bush; they had been "up the gait," as the servants say at Durrisdeer, to the change-house; and if they had little left of the guinea, they had less of their wits. What must John Paul do but burst into the hall where the family sat at dinner, and cry the news to them that "Tam Macmorland was but new ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. XII (of 25) - The Master of Ballantrae • Robert Louis Stevenson

... mile; presently he pointed with his umbrella, and I saw a comfortable whitewashed cottage by the roadside. The idea of the playhouse was ringing in my head, and I began to wonder why he did not train a rose-bush against its wall, and a moment after I felt that it was well that he did not—a rose-bush could only seem incongruous facing that waste hill. We passed into the house, and seeing the priest's study lined with books, I said, ...
— The Untilled Field • George Moore

... with a desperate assault, the walls, which, in that direction, were deprived of the defence of the river. The first of these formidable bodies consisted entirely of archers, who dispersed themselves in front of the beleaguered place, and took advantage of every bush and rising ground which could afford them shelter; and then began to bend their bows and shower their arrows on the battlements and loop-holes, suffering, however, a great deal more damage than they were able to inflict, as the garrison returned their shot in comparative safety, and with more ...
— The Betrothed • Sir Walter Scott

... threatened to take off into the sea before the boy's astonished senses returned to him. Ben prevented such a disaster, however, by picking up the roll and placing it in Noll's hand, with, "It's worth savin', lad, fur 'tain't every bush that grows sech ...
— Culm Rock - The Story of a Year: What it Brought and What it Taught • Glance Gaylord

... the Streptopus roseus or twisted stem, a rose-colored flower, bearing red berries in the fall. There are also in this wood, trillium, the May flower, Hepatica, and Symplocarpus, thickets crowned with Rhodoras in full bloom—a bush a few feet high with superb rose-colored flowers—the general appearance of a cluster of bushes is most magnificent. In the same locality, further in the swamp, may be found the Kalmia angustifolia bearing ...
— Picturesque Quebec • James MacPherson Le Moine

... kept still as a log of wood, and so, yielding partly to the stream, I landed him somewhat further down than the place where my own clothes were lying. To them he walked, and very quietly picking up my whinger and my raiment that he gathered under his arm, he concealed himself in a thick bush, albeit it was leafless, where no man could have been aware of him. This amazed me not a little, for modesty did not seem ...
— A Monk of Fife • Andrew Lang

... morning a little after Will had been flunked out of college, he was standing on the lawn whittling. I happened to be looking out of the window. I saw Uncle Jim crawling across the grass under cover of a rhododendron bush to a position just behind Will. He was carrying under one arm an enormous fire-cracker, with the fuse lit. He rolled it out on the grass behind Will, and when it went off, Will went, too. He landed seventeen feet from the hole ...
— Through stained glass • George Agnew Chamberlain

... to fish for them from below, from as far below as possible. Every advantage is taken of cover, and the angler soon acquires the habits of a skirmisher. A tuft of rushes, an inequality in the ground, or an alder bush conceals him; behind this he kneels, and gets his tackle in order. He uses only one fly, not two or three, as people do on the Border. He carefully measures his ground, flicking his cast through the air, ...
— Lost Leaders • Andrew Lang

... shining inside the four walls and the high arch of blue sky over this particular piece of Misselthwaite seemed even more brilliant and soft than it was over the moor. The robin flew down from his tree-top and hopped about or flew after her from one bush to another. He chirped a good deal and had a very busy air, as if he were showing her things. Everything was strange and silent and she seemed to be hundreds of miles away from any one, but somehow she did not feel lonely ...
— The Secret Garden • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... be, and heard; and as he heard he forgot all about the Sultan's daughter, and the Princess of Constantinople, and the Fairy of Brocheliaunde, and all the other pretty birds which were still in the bush about the wide world; and thought for many a day of naught but the pretty bird which he held—so conceited was he of his own powers of winning her—there safe in ...
— Hereward, The Last of the English • Charles Kingsley

... commenced, waving his hand towards the panel in face of her. "Be pleased to observe the lady sinking into the bush; an effect which the ingenious painter has stolen from no less a masterpiece than the Buisson Ardent' of ...
— The Westcotes • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... there I left him at night, never expecting to see him again. But in the morning he appeared on a low shrub on the lawn, and about nine o'clock he took courage to launch himself on wing. He flew very low across the street, and dropped into the tall grass at the foot of a lilac bush. Why the parents considered that less safe than the open lawn I could not see, but they evidently did, for one of them perched upon the lilac, and filled the air with anxious "chucks," announcing to all whom it ...
— In Nesting Time • Olive Thorne Miller

... was difficult, for it was not until he was close upon the waggons that he could make them out, and as he went on the big bullocks were only represented to him by what seemed to be so many clumps of bush ...
— Dead Man's Land - Being the Voyage to Zimbambangwe of certain and uncertain • George Manville Fenn

... Ah! one more word. If the rascal takes the cars, send me word. If he beats about the bush until night, be on your guard, especially in lonely places; the desperado is ...
— File No. 113 • Emile Gaboriau

... impresses us with the feeling that real work is done here. We fear not to say that Milton himself owes much of his reputation to the peremptory and business-like vigour of his style. He never beats about the bush—he never employs language which a plain man would not have employed—if he could. The sublimity of "Paradise Lost" is supported throughout by the direct force of its language—language the most elaborate, but also the most to the point, and the least fantastical, that ever fell from ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 349, November, 1844 • Various

... good nature, since in his "Remarks" on Burnet's "History of My Own Time," he says: "after all he was a man of generosity and good nature, and very communicative; but in his last ten years was absolutely party-mad, and fancied he saw Popery under every bush." Lord Dartmouth has left an excellent sketch of Burnet's character in a note to the "History of My Own Time": "Bishop Burnet was a man of the most extensive knowledge I ever met with; had read and seen a great deal, with a prodigious memory, and a very indifferent ...
— The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, Vol. III.: Swift's Writings on Religion and the Church, Vol. I. • Jonathan Swift

... like not, but for certain I love it, as some day the child will love it Who plucks a feather from the door-side bush Whenever she goes in or out of the house. Often she waits there, snipping the tips and shrivelling The shreds at last on to the path, perhaps Thinking, perhaps of nothing, till she sniffs Her fingers and runs off. The bush is ...
— Last Poems • Edward Thomas

... a mile ahead of them in the dip of the valley, a number of wagons huddled together. On either side of the road men were lying, and the spurts of smoke that rose from these, as well as from the wagons, proved that they were still stoutly defending themselves. A light smoke rose from every bush and rock on the hillsides around, showing how numerous were the assailants. Leaving the road, Jack galloped toward the hill. Presently several balls came ...
— The Bravest of the Brave - or, with Peterborough in Spain • G. A. Henty

... eyes sparkle. Suppose she did not wear any bathing suit! What an adventure to relate to her intimate friends when she returned to Mauch Chunk, Pennsylvania! It laid hold of her imaginative mind, and the result was that Mrs. Budlong hung her suit on a bush and went in ...
— The Dude Wrangler • Caroline Lockhart

... to the matter, sir," he replied. "I saw the reporter who wrote the article in question; and, after beating about the bush for some time, he finally confessed that he knew nothing more than had been published, and that he had obtained his information from two intimate friends of the cashier, M. Costeclar and ...
— Other People's Money • Emile Gaboriau

... by limiting the size and scope of government. Under the leadership of Vice President Bush, we have reduced the growth of Federal regulations by more than 25 percent and cut well over 300 million hours of government-required paperwork each year. This will save the public more than $150 billion ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... lepers, and many have their legs swollen as big as a mans waist, so that they can hardly walk. The people here are Malabars, of the race of the Nairs of Calicut, who differ much from the other Malabars. These have their heads very full of hair, bound up with a string, above which is a great bush of hair. The men are tall and strong, and excellent archers, using a long bow and long arrows, which are their best weapons; yet they have some fire-arms among them, ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VII • Robert Kerr

... fearfully, for the silence seemed to watch me; and the greenness and orderliness of the place frightened me. But nothing happened, and everything I saw went to prove that the house was empty. I grew bolder then, and sneaking from bush to bush, reached the door and with a backward glance between courage and ...
— In Kings' Byways • Stanley J. Weyman

... went round their garden with them and was told the whole story of it and shown every bush and tree which had come alive. Colin walked on one side of her and Mary on the other. Each of them kept looking up at her comfortable rosy face, secretly curious about the delightful feeling she gave them—a sort of warm, supported feeling. It seemed as if she understood ...
— The Secret Garden • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... clenched his jaws hard. The girl had fallen into a trap. He turned rapidly, facing the house. Only at one point did the shrubbery approach the wall, but for that point he set out hot foot, passing from bush to bush with Indian cleverness, tense, alert, and cool in despite of his ...
— Fire-Tongue • Sax Rohmer

... Villa Pamfili. "Attendono il finale risorgimento,"[1] says the Pope's Italian version on the monument. It is an ironical phrase in view of the history of the next twenty years. "They did not have long to wait," I said, "a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush." And my guide said, I thought well, of the French that they are a people of great gifts and of most generous mind, but that their rulers have often showed "un po' di ...
— With British Guns in Italy - A Tribute to Italian Achievement • Hugh Dalton

... but half a cask of water aboard, and that a hog wouldn't 'a' drank, only for the name on't. So we pulled ashore after some, and findin' a spring near by, was takin' it out, hand over hand, as fast as we could bale it up, when all of a sudden the mate see a bunch of feathers over a little bush near by, and yelled out to run for our ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 5, March, 1858 • Various

... laugh that win," said Ross. "In case of a row, a paving-stone in trouser-pocket is worth a Krupp's Battery in the bush." ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 103, August 20, 1892 • Various

... fire, suns innumerable may burn, whose light can never stir the optic nerve at all; and bringing these reflections face to face with the idea of the Builder and Sustainer of it all showing Himself in a burning bush, exhibiting His hinder parts, or behaving in other familiar ways ascribed to Him in the Jewish Scriptures, the incongruity must appear. Did this credulous prattle of the ancients about miracles stand alone; were it not associated ...
— Fragments of science, V. 1-2 • John Tyndall

... commanded a fine view of the country for several miles. My garden was very pleasant, and in it was a summer house at the end of a moss-grown walk. One plant which gave me great delight was a large bush of rosemary. The smell of it always carried my mind back to peaceful times. It was like the odour of the middle ages, with that elusive suggestion of incense which reminded me of Gothic fanes and picturesque ...
— The Great War As I Saw It • Frederick George Scott

... ludicrous method of beating about the bush, the man would persist till he had fairly exhausted your patience; and all this he would do, partly from cunning, and partly from that apprehension of injustice which he has been taught to feel by hard experience. The effects of the example of their parents is early and most strikingly ...
— Practical Education, Volume I • Maria Edgeworth

... from under the bush beneath which he had slept, broke off a thick bough so as to cover his nakedness, and advanced towards Nausicaa and her maids; these last all ran away, but Nausicaa stood her ground, for Minerva had put courage into her heart, ...
— The Humour of Homer and Other Essays • Samuel Butler

... as a man in the waste, and many of them are scant able to go. These people here be Malabars, and of the race of the Naires of Calicut: and they differ much from the other Malabars. These haue their heads very full of haire, and bound vp with a string: and there doth appeare a bush without the band wherewith it is bound. The men be tall and strong, and good archers with a long bow and a long arrow, which is their best weapon: yet there be some caliuers among them, ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, Volume 10 - Asia, Part III • Richard Hakluyt

... fire, or close-stools here. But with thy fair fates leading thee, go on With thy most white predestination. Nor think these ages that do hoarsely sing The farting tanner and familiar king, The dancing friar, tatter'd in the bush; Those monstrous lies of little Robin Rush, Tom Chipperfeild, and pretty lisping Ned, That doted on a maid of gingerbread; The flying pilchard and the frisking dace, With all the rabble of Tim Trundell's race (Bred from the dunghills and adulterous rhymes), Shall live, and ...
— The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 • Robert Herrick

... were certainly peculiar. His Malay pig with its upper teeth wonderfully curved was said to be in the habit of hanging its head upon a bush while it slept, in order to save the strain upon its porcine neck. This was too much even for our credulity. None the less the impression made upon some of us by the evidence for design in nature has ...
— The Meaning of Evolution • Samuel Christian Schmucker

... characterizes all genuine religiousness; and this consists in the fact that the religious man sees {364} miracles of God in all that turns his attention to God's government,—in the sea of stars, in rock and bush, in sunshine and storm, in flower and worm, just as certainly as in the guidance of his own life and in the facts and processes of the history of salvation and of the kingdom of the Lord. In this idea of miracles, ...
— The Theories of Darwin and Their Relation to Philosophy, Religion, and Morality • Rudolf Schmid

... health was coming back to him, and he drank in long pure draughts of it. It was good, after all, to be alive and young. A sudden throbbing in the air brought him to a halt; it came from a tiny humming-bird poising itself over a bush-tufted rock on his right. As it sang on, careless of his presence, John watched the music bubbling and trembling within its flame-coloured throat. He, too, felt ready to sing for no other reason than pure delight. He understood the ancient gods and their laughter; he smiled ...
— Fort Amity • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... wing beats, till she headed him and with savage blows of pinion and beak drove him back, seeing nothing, guided only by fear and instinct, towards the water. For five minutes more she chevied him hither and yon through the trampled grass, driving him from water to bush and back again, jabbing him at every turn; till a rustle of leaves invited him, and he dashed blindly into thick underbrush, where her broad wings could not follow. Then with marvelous watchfulness ...
— Wood Folk at School • William J. Long

... he prevented from avenging himself with an axe? If he hits his neighbor on the head with the kitchen chopper what do we do? Do we all join hands, like children playing mulberry bush, and say: "We are all responsible for this, but let us hope it will not spread. Let us hope for the happy, happy day when he shall leave off chopping at the man's head, and when nobody shall ever chop anything forever and ever." Do we say: "Let bygones be bygones. Why go ...
— New York Times, Current History, Vol 1, Issue 1 - From the Beginning to March, 1915 With Index • Various

... the sliding ground when a bush caught at his feet and yanked them from under him with a crackling of branches, and the bottom tread of a flight of stairs swung at his head like a gigantic club. Among the sudden splintering of branches and snapping of vines ...
— The Man Who Staked the Stars • Charles Dye

... Bill? Do you see anything unusual away there to wind'ard, to set you staring like an owl in an ivy bush?" ...
— The Cruise of the "Esmeralda" • Harry Collingwood



Words linked to "Bush" :   kalmia, Croton tiglium, Conradina glabra, kapuka, Lepidothamnus laxifolius, crepe jasmine, German tamarisk, Cyrilla racemiflora, Lepechinia calycina, Dacridium laxifolius, currant, hydrangea, European cranberry bush, Anthyllis barba-jovis, camelia, sugar-bush, furze, leadwort, Himalaya honeysuckle, Desmodium motorium, Batis maritima, banksia, coronilla, cat's-claw, amorpha, Bauhinia monandra, Kochia scoparia, hiccough nut, hamelia, cotton-seed tree, Jerusalem thorn, Diervilla sessilifolia, Comptonia asplenifolia, Codariocalyx motorius, gooseberry, Mahonia aquifolium, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, ephedra, candlewood, Eryngium maritimum, juneberry, kelpwort, groundberry, Ledum groenlandicum, kali, crape myrtle, abelia, casava, Jacquinia armillaris, dog laurel, Jacquinia keyensis, currant bush, Aralia spinosa, Datura suaveolens, frangipani, guinea flower, Euonymus americanus, joewood, cranberry, helianthemum, chaparral broom, male berry, makomako, Ardisia crenata, Brassaia actinophylla, forestiera, Lavatera arborea, coyote bush, fever tree, capsicum pepper plant, crape jasmine, bearberry, Adam's apple, flowering hazel, daisy bush, Adenium multiflorum, cinquefoil, Cytisus ramentaceus, cyrilla, brittle bush, Erythroxylon truxiuense, camellia, Japanese allspice, huckleberry, Chilean firebush, Christmas berry, Hermannia verticillata, frangipanni, chanal, lotus tree, honey bell, indigo plant, Epigaea repens, Lagerstroemia indica, Bassia scoparia, Cajanus cajan, laurel sumac, Apalachicola rosemary, barilla, forsythia, George H.W. Bush, cotton, Brugmansia suaveolens, Indigofera tinctoria, day jessamine, carissa, Acocanthera oppositifolia, Lysiloma sabicu, raspberry bush, bryanthus, alpine azalea, ground-berry, Diervilla lonicera, fuchsia, honeyflower, Ledum palustre, Leycesteria formosa, maleberry, firethorn, allspice, boxthorn, Acocanthera venenata, Canella-alba, cushion flower, Mahonia nervosa, Irish gorse, Acocanthera oblongifolia, five-finger, castor-oil plant, butcher's broom, Hakea laurina, cajan pea, Caesalpinia decapetala, fetterbush, Chilean flameflower, Chrysolepis sempervirens, holly-leaves barberry, barbasco, Lupinus arboreus, bean caper, Adenium obesum, buckthorn, clianthus, devil's walking stick, hollygrape, cotoneaster, dombeya, bitter pea, leatherwood, jujube, box, Aspalathus cedcarbergensis, kidney wort, hediondilla, leatherleaf, chanar, fire-bush, broom, render, butterfly flower, cotton plant, pepper bush, dwarf golden chinkapin, consumption weed, Leucothoe racemosa, Larrea tridentata, fothergilla, mallow, croton, caragana, Fabiana imbricata, Francoa ramosa, Erythroxylon coca, Lyonia ligustrina, lomatia, he-huckleberry, fire thorn, Dovyalis caffra, derris, dhal, lilac, Cestrum nocturnum, hiccup nut, cassava, Brugmansia arborea, Kolkwitzia amabilis, Grewia asiatica, Biscutalla laevigata, bean trefoil, indigo, caper, barberry, coca, Dirca palustris, buddleia, Argyroxiphium sandwicense, kudu lily, Desmodium gyrans, Christmasberry, Hakea leucoptera, flowering shrub, lily-of-the-valley tree, Baccharis halimifolia, Cineraria maritima, Jupiter's beard, flowering quince, catjang pea, guava bush, black bead, bitter-bark, bracelet wood, furnish, Madagascar plum, spice bush, greasewood, dahl, hawthorn, columnea, Cestrum diurnum, Ardisia escallonoides, geebung, Hakea lissosperma, Leucothoe fontanesiana, California redbud, crepe gardenia, Aristotelia serrata, Guevina heterophylla, Heteromeles arbutifolia, California beauty, common flat pea, Loiseleuria procumbens, black greasewood, arrow wood, false azalea, Lepidothamnus fonkii, belvedere, provide, stagger bush, haw, artemisia, andromeda, Euonymus atropurpureus, Lyonia lucida, Aspalathus linearis, coffee rose, gardenia, calliandra, daphne, Embothrium coccineum, horsebean, Canella winterana, heath, governor's plum, African hemp, Aralia stipulata, blolly, coville, Benzoin odoriferum, bridal-wreath, gastrolobium, caricature plant, Combretum bracteosum, Chile nut, kei apple, boxwood, Dalea spinosa, Malosma laurina, Chinese holly, Chinese angelica tree, Japanese angelica tree, castor bean plant, Australian heath, Lyonia mariana, crepe flower, ringworm bush, Flacourtia indica, lady-of-the-night, maikoa, Indian rhododendron, Anadenanthera colubrina, bristly locust, Acocanthera spectabilis, coyote brush, desert rose, desert willow, Ilex cornuta, Hercules'-club, fool's huckleberry, capsicum, impala lily, American angelica tree, Aristotelia racemosa, blue cohosh, woody plant, Cordyline terminalis, honeysuckle, grevillea, Kiggelaria africana, Aralia elata, corkwood tree, governor plum, Baccharis viminea, lavender, cherry laurel, Colutea arborescens, Georgia bark, Datura sanguinea, glandular Labrador tea, Anagyris foetida, climbing hydrangea, Brazilian potato tree, dog hobble, Chiococca alba, blueberry root, black haw, Benjamin bush, Chilopsis linearis, coralberry, chaparral pea, Chinese angelica, hemp, Graptophyllum pictum, Chamaedaphne calyculata, shadbush, Lindera benzoin, Brugmansia sanguinea, fetter bush, Griselinia littoralis, Cycloloma atriplicifolium, Mahernia verticillata, honeybells, crampbark, huckleberry oak, Acalypha virginica, angel's trumpet, guelder rose, Catha edulis, Chilean rimu, blackthorn, Baccharis pilularis, cupflower, George Herbert Walker Bush, Codiaeum variegatum, arbutus, crowberry, Chile hazel, East Indian rosebay, batoko palm, Cytesis proliferus, Geoffroea decorticans, Gaultheria shallon, cranberry tree, crystal tea, leucothoe, lavender cotton, supply, alpine totara, Dalmatian laburnum, flame pea, beauty bush, sweet pepperbush, lentisk, hovea, Labrador tea, Lambertia formosa, Cercis occidentalis, bridal wreath, Leiophyllum buxifolium, Hibiscus farragei, Clethra alnifolia, Halimodendron halodendron, Halimodendron argenteum, crepe myrtle, coca plant, Eriodictyon californicum, Japan allspice, Christ's-thorn, Leucothoe editorum, Chilean nut, Genista raetam, joint fir, juniper, Brunfelsia americana, Guevina avellana, jasmine, ligneous plant



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